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Патент USA US2127262

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Aug. 16, 1938-
w. J. LA cAssE
ICE CUBER
Filed July 14, 1937
2,127,262
Patented Aug. 16, 179381
1 2,127,262
UNETED STATES. PATENT OFFICE
2,127,262
ICE CUBER
William J. La C‘asse, Duluth, Minn., assignor to
The Coolerator Company, Duluth, Minn, a
corporation of Minnesota
Application July 14, 1937, Serial No. 153,525
9 Claims. (Cl. 62-412)
This invention relates to ice cubers of the type
tion and which will be ef?cient and positive in
adapted to be placed upon a cake of ice to sink operation.
thereinto and thereby de?ne regularly shaped
In the accompanying drawing wherein a pre
knobs or projections in the ice cake which may
be subsequently separated from the ice cake to ierred embodiment of my invention is illustrated,
Fig. 1 is a top perspective View of my novel
afford regularly shaped ice cubes.
Heretofore it has been proposed to equip an cuber;
Fig. 2 is a bottom perspective view;
ice cuber of the above described kind with a
Fig. 3 is a perspective view wherein my cuber
closed tank into which a ?uid heating medium,
such as water and preferably hot water, could be is illustrated in section and the operation of my
introduced to supply heat to a grid or other knob cuber is illustrated; and
Fig. 4 is a transverse sectional detail view
or projection forming arrangement to expedite
taken substantially midway between the ends of
sinking such an arrangement into the ice cake. the
cuber.
‘
15
In order to obtain efficient operation it is essen
tial that there be good heat conductive relation
between the tank and the grid, and heretofore
such heat conductive relation has been estab
lished by ?rmly connecting the grid to the bot
20 tom of the tank. Such construction, however,
entailed a multiplicity of joints which tended to
increase the cost of manufacture of the cuber
and was otherwise somewhat objectionable.
Hence, one of the important objects of this
25 invention is tov provide a. novel ice cuber in which
the grid or other knob forming arrangement will
be associated with the tank in such a way that
the number of joints between the tank and grid
will be reduced to a minimum.
Heat conduction past a joint is not as efficient
30
as heat conduction along an uninterrupted" path
and thus where a portion of the grid or other
knob forming arrangement of an ice cuber is
provided by a part or parts unitary with the
tank and the remaining portion thereof is af
forded by parts joined to the tank, the difference
in heat conductivity of such portions may inter
fere with proper and efficient operation of the
cuber.
40
My novel cuber, as illustrated in the accom
panying drawing, comprises a body 5 preferably 15
formed from a single piece of sheet metal by a
stamping or drawing operation into the form of
a substantially rectangular pan embodying four
upright walls unitary with an interconnecting
wall extending substantially at right angles to
the upright walls. This interconnecting wall,
designated by 6, constitutes the top of my novelv
cuber and preferably the interconnection be
tween this wall 6 and- the upright walls is
rounded, as best illustrated in Fig. 4. A plate 1
is inserted into the pan so provided and is dis
posed in parallel but spaced relation with the
wall 6.
25'
This plate is connected to the upright
walls in a suitable manner as by being soldered
or brazed thereto. The wall 6 and the plate 1 in
cooperation with the portions of the upright wall
therebetween de?ne a closed tank 8.
As best illustrated in Fig. 1, the upper portion
of one corner of the body 5 is preferably arranged
at an inclination with respect to the wall 6 and
the adjacent upright walls of said body to there
by provide an inclined ?attened portion 9. A
Therefore still another important object of my ‘ tapped opening I0 is provided in this. ?attened
invention is to so equalize the heat conductivity
of the various portions of the grid or other knob
forming part of a cuber that e?‘icient and posi
tive operation will result.
Other and further objects of my invention are
to facilitate the introduction of the heating me
dium into the tank or the like provided to receive
the same; to insure against water or air being
entrapped in the grid and thereby prevent the
grid from properly sinking into the ice and to
also prevent the formation of a vacuum in the
grid when the cuber is raised after the knobs or
projections have been formed on the block of
ice; to substantially reduce the number of sepa
rate parts included in a cuber; and to provide a
55 novel cuber of simple and economical construc
portion through which a ?uid heating medium,
such as water and preferably hot water, may be
introduced into the tank 8. After such a heating
medium has been introduced into the tank 8, the
opening H] is closed by having the threaded stem
portion of a cap ll ?tted thereinto, a gasket l2
being disposed below the enlarged head of the 45
cap II to prevent leakage.
The longer of the upright walls of the body 5
constitute the side walls I3 and M of myv cuber
while the shorter of the upright walls constitute
the end walls l5 and i6 and the portions of the
walls l3, l4, l5 and I6 which depend below the
plate ‘I constitute the outer walls of the grid or
knob or projection forming portion of my novel
cuber. In order that a multiplicity of small
regularly shaped knobs or projections may be
2,127,262
2
formed by my cuber, the area enclosed by the
walls I3, I4, I5 and I5 and disposed outwardly
of the plate ‘I is divided into .a plurality of sub
stantially rectangular recesses by a longitudinally
extending partition IT and a plurality of trans
from.
versely extending partitions I8. Slots as l9 ex
tend substantially half way across the partition
I? at regular intervals from one edge thereof.
'Likewise, a slot as 20 extends substantially half
10 way across each partition I8 substantially mid
way between the ends of each partition and from
By aligning the slots 20 with
the respective slots IS the partitions I1 and I8
' one edge thereof.
therefrom. I have found that by providing sub
stantially crescent-shaped openings, as illustrated
in the drawing, the attainment of all of the fore
going advantages is facilitated, which is to say,
the reduction of heat conductivity of the side
walls and the enabling of escape of water and
air from the recesses is enhanced. If water
and/ or air were permitted to accumulate in the 10
recesses it might have the effect of cushioning
the cuber and prevent it from sinking down into
the ice properly. Furthermore, when the cuber
may be inter?tted together so that the opposite
edges of the various partitions lie in parallel
15
planes. After the partitions I1 and I8 have been
so inter?tted they are placed in the area en
closed by the walls; I3, I4, I5 and I5 with the
partition I'I extending between the walls I5 and
IS and the various partitions I8 extending be
tween the walls I3 and I4 at regularly spaced
intervals. The inwardly disposed edges of the
partitions I? and I8 are rested against the un
25..
derside of the plate 1 and are suitably connected
Like
wise, the ends of the partition II respectively
abutting the walls I5 and I6 and the ends of the
respective partitions I8 abutting the walls I3
and I4 are interconnected to said abutted walls
thereto as by being soldered or brazed.
being soldered or brazed.
3.0: as Itbywill
thus be seen that by resort to
the fore
going construction I provide a grid or knob or
projection forming arrangement beneath the
tank provided in my cuber.
It will likewise be
seen that the portionsof this grid are provided
35' by parts unitary with the walls of the tank where;
as other portions are provided by parts joined
to the tank. These parts of the grid which are
unitary with the walls of the tank afford an un
40
interrupted path of heat travel whereas those
parts which are joined to the tank by reason of
the joint do not a?ord an uninterrupted path of
heat travel even though relatively good heat
conductivity may be had through the joints.
I have found that in ,a substantially rectan
'gular cuber of the kind which I illustrate in the
drawing the just described difference in heat
conductivity may tend to impair the operation
is raised after use there might be a tendency to
draw a vacuum in the recesses which would im Pl Cl
pair easy removal of the cuber, but the openings
such as 2| prevent the drawing of such a vacuum.
In order to facilitate handling of the cuber,
grooves as 22 are formed in those portions of the
walls I3 and I4 constituting the side walls of 20
the tank 8, and these grooves are de?ned by the
inturned portions of said walls I3 and I4. These
grooves facilitate gripping of the cuber and ex
pedite installation on and removal of the cuber
from an ice cake.
In use the tank 8 is ?lled with water and pref
erably hot water since this quickens the opera
tion of the cuber. The cuber is then rested on
the top of an ice cake and heat from such ?uid
heating medium in the tank l0 passes through 30
the various parts of the grid to the portions of
the ice cake upon which the edges of the grid
are rested, whereupon meltage of the ice in align
ment with these edges occurs and the cuber there- _
35
fore sinks into the icecake.
The tank 8 is so proportioned that by the time
the plate I rests on the top of the ice cake sub
stantially all of the heat in the ?uid heating
medium will have passed through the grid to the
ice cake and therefore when the cuber has sunk 40
into the ice cake in an amount sufficient to en
of the cuber, for when the cuber is rested on an
ice cake heat may not be conducted through the
50
partition II as rapidly as through the walls l3
and I4 with the result that meltage may not
take; place as rapidly along the partition II as
along the lower edges of the walls I3 and I4.
55 This may result in the cuber rocking on the par
tition II to one side or the other which may re
sult in its sinking unevenly into the ice cake.
Inasmuch as the walls I5 and I6 are relatively
short as are the partitions I8 and in 'view‘ of
60
the number of partitions I8 provided no difficulty
has been experienced with the cuber tilting from
end to end.
'
_
These openings likewise permit any water
that might be entrapped in the recesses to drain
‘
However, to overcome any tendency of the
cuber to rock on a partition, such as the par-‘
tition I1, I reduce the heat conductivity of the
65. side walls I3 and I4 by providing openings as 2|
in said walls.
These openings 2| are so located
in the walls I3 and I4 that they are aligned with
the cubical recesses de?ned by the outer walls of
the grid and the partitions therein, wherefore the
70
gage the plate 'I with the top of the ice no further
meltage will occur. When the cuber has sunk
into the ice cake in this amount it may be lifted
off whereupon the longitudinal grooves as 23 and 45.
the transverse grooves as 24 formed by the var
ious parts of the grids will de?ne a plurality of
knobs or projections 25 on the ice cake. Then
by the use of an ice pick or an ice chipper these
knobs or projections may be readily separated 50'
from the ice cake whereby regularly shaped ice
cubes are afforded.
The partitions I1 and I8 are intimately con
nected to each other and to the walls I3, I4, I5
and I6 and to the plate or partition ‘I so that 55
efficient heat transference will be effected, where- ~
by transference of heat through the walls pro-'
viding the grid will take place instead of the heat
transference being directly from the tank to the
ice. So to do avoids rounding off the corners of
wise objectionable excessive meltage of the ice.
By providing the inclined wall 9 and locating
the ?lling opening in this inclined wall the posi-‘
tioning of the cuber below a faucet or other
65' s
source of hot water is facilitated which expedites
?lling the tank 8 with the fluid heating medium
such as hot water.
_
As will be apparent to one skilled in the art,
the one-piece substantially pan-shaped body af 70
heat conductivity through the walls I3 and I4 to . fords economical manufacture and substantially
reduces the number of parts ‘required to produce
the ends of the partitions I8 is not reduced. Fur
the
cuber, which insures more economical con
thermore, such alignment of the openings 2| with
struction and efficient'and positive operation.
the cubical recesses enables any air that might
7 5, {be entrapped in the recesses to escape there- .
60, .
the ice cubes formed on the ice cake and other
While Ihave illustrated and described a pre- _
2,127,262
ferred embodiment of my invention it is to be
understood that this is capable of variation and
modi?cation and I therefore do not wish to be.
limited to the precise details set forth but desire
to avail myself of such changes and alterations
as fall within the purview of the following claims.
I claim:
1. An ice cuber adapted to form ice cubes on
an ice cake and comprising a tank adapted to
10 contain a ?uid heating medium, the side and end
Walls of said tank depending below the bottom
thereof, and partitions extending between the de
pending portions of said
therewith to provide a c
15 partitions being joined to said bottom to insure
e?icient heat transference therethrough to an ice
cake from the ?uid heating medium when said
grid is rested on the ice cake, selected of the de
pending portions of said walls having openings
20 therein to equalize heat transference through the
depending portions and said partitions.
3
free edges of said partitions are rested, said walls
also serving to transfer heat from said ?uid heat
ing medium to said ice cake when the free edges
of said walls are rested on the ice cake along
with the free edges of said partitions, selected
of said walls having openings therein positioned
to communicate with said recesses to permit the
escape of air and water from said recesses during
the operation of said cuber, said openings also
serving to equalize the heat transference through 10
said walls and said partitions to thereby insure
proper operation of said cuber.
5. An ice cuber adapted to form ice cubes on
an ice cake and comprising a one-piece substan
tially pan-shaped body having
plate in said body spaced from the open end
thereof and cooperating therewith to provide
a tank, said body having a portion thereon at one
corner thereof inclined relative to the adjacent
15
20'
2. An ice cuber adapted to form ice cubes on
an ice cake and comprising a one~piece substan
tially pan-shaped body having an open end, a
25 plate in said body spaced from the open end
thereof and cooperating therewith to provide a
tank, said body having an opening therein
through which a ?uid heating medium may be
introduced into said tank, and partitions extend
30 ing between opposite walls of said body outwardly
of said plate and cooperating with each other
means for closing said opening, and partitions
extending between opposite walls of said body
outwardly of said plate and cooperating with
each other and said walls to provide a cube form~
ing grid, said partitions being intimately con
nected to said plate to insure heat transference 30’.
through said grid to an ice cake from the ?uid
heating medium in the tank when said grid is
rested on the ice cake.
35.
'
6. An ice cuber adapted to form ice cubes on
an ice cake and comprising a one-piece substan 35
tially pan-shaped body having an open end, a
plate in said body spaced from the open end
thereof and cooperating therewith to provide a
40
tank,
45
means for closing said opening, and partitions 45
extending between opposite walls of said body
outwardly of said plate and cooperating with
50
efficient heat transference therethrough from the
the tank to an ice cake on
which the free edges of said partitions are rested,
each other and said walls to provide a cube form
'
partitions being joined to said
e?icient heat transference there 50
through from the heating medium in the tank
to an ice cake when the free edges of said parti
tions are rested on the ice cake, said walls also
55
serving to transfer heat from said ?uid heating
55
60
partitions to thereby insure proper operation of 60
said cuber.
'
'7. An ice Cuber adapted to form ice cubes on
an ice cake and comprising a one-piece substan
65
introduced into said tank, and partitions extend
ing between opposite Walls of said body outwardly
tially pan-shaped body having an open end, a
plate in said body spaced from the open end 65
thereof and cooperating therewith to provide a
tank, said body having a portion thereon at one
70 of said plate and cooperating with each other
and said walls to provide a cube forming grid
70
on said body at one corner
75
thereof, said inclined wall having an opening
therein through which a ?uid heating medium
may be introduced into said tank, removable
means for closing said opening, and partitions 75
'4
2,127,262‘
extending between opposite walls of said body
outwardly of said plate and cooperating with
each other and said walls to provide a cube
forming grid, said partitions being joined to said
i plate and said walls to a?ord efficient heat trans
ference therethrough from the heating medium
in the tank to an ice cake when the free edges of
said partitions are rested on the ice cake, said
walls also serving to transfer heat from said fluid
heating medium to said ice cake when the free
edges of said walls are rested on the'ice cake
along with the free edges of said partitions, se
lected of said walls having openings therein to
equalize the heat transference through said walls
and said partitions to thereby insure proper
151 operation of said cuber, opposite walls of said
body having outwardly opening grooves therein
to facilitate gripping of the cuber and expedite
installation on and removal of the cuber from
20 an ice cake.
8. An ice cuber adapted to form ice cubes on‘
an ice cake and comprising a one-piece substan
tially pan-shaped body having an open end, a
plate in said body spaced from the open end
thereof and cooperating therewith to provide a
25 tank, said body having an opening therein
through which a fluid heating medium may be
introduced into said tank, and partitions extend
ing between opposite walls of said body out
wardly of said plate and cooperating with each
30 other and said walls to provide a cube forming
grid, said partitions being intimately connected
to said plate to insure heat transference through
said grid to an ice cake from the ?uid heating
medium in the tank when said grid is rested on
the ice cake, opposite walls of said body having
outwardly opening grooves therein to facilitate
gripping of the cuber and expedite installation
on and removal of the cuber from an ice cake.
9. An ice cuber adapted to form ice cubes on
an ice cake and comprising a one-piece substan
tially pan-shaped body having an open end, a
plate in said body spaced from the open end 10
thereof and cooperating therewith to provide a
tank, said body having a portion thereon at one
corner thereof inclined relative to the adjacent
walls of said body at said corner to thereby pro
vide an inclined wall on said body at one corner 15
thereof, said inclined Wall having an opening
therein through which a fluid heating medium
may be introduced into said tank, removable
means for closing said opening, and partitions
extending between opposite walls of said‘body 20.
outwardly of said ‘plate and cooperating with
each other and said walls to provide a cube form
ing grid, said partitions being intimately con
nected to said plate to insure heat transference
through said grid to an ice cake from the fluid 25,
heating medium in the tank when said grid is
rested on the ice cake, opposite walls of said body
having outwardly opening grooves therein to
facilitate gripping of the cuber and expedite in
stallation on and removal of the cuber from an
ice cake.
WILLIAM J. LA CASSE.
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