close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Патент USA US2127352

код для вставки
Aug- ‘16, 1938’
w. DUBILIER
2,127,352
CONDENSER
Fig].
’ Original Filed Oct. 12, 1932
3/ 30
95%
m
w
2
'
ha
I
M
m
3
8 2y
m
4‘
m
L Q
M.
Q
-_-
@iéSi
‘I
5
//
I, \g
INVENTOR
ll
gill/0m Dub/'l/elr
6M, ML
ATTORNEYS
6
2,121,352
Patented Aug. 16, 1938
UNITED-STATES PATENT-OFFICE
72,127,352
_ CONDENSER
William‘ Dubilier, New Rochelle, N. Y., assignor to’
Dubilier Condenser Corporation, New York,
N. Y., a corporation of Delaware
Application October 12, 1932, Serial No. 637,415
Renewed July 3, 1937
'
a
13 Claims.
(Cl. 175-41)
sponding to Fig. 1 but slightly spread and en
electrical devices, and containers therefor, and larged for clearness.
This invention relates to condensers and similar
more particularly to such devices when associated
with a liquid, such as an insulating oil.
5
For the purposes of this speci?cation the term
“condenser” includes other electrical devices
which will function when sealed within a con
tainer; and the term “oil” includes other liquid
insulating or impregnating materials.
10
It is important that the condenser be well sup
ported within its container, and the requisites of
the container are vthat it keep the oil in, keep
moisture out, and that it afford mechanical pro
tection and support.
15
2
.
In the several ?gures like reference characters
indicate like parts.
The container for' the condenser shown in Figs. 5
1 and 2 is provided with double walls consisting of
a thin metal can I and an outer enclosure 2 of
heavy metal.
Cushioning material is disposed
between the inner and outer walls preferably at
the top and bottom, as illustrated by spacers 3 10
and 4, of cork, rubber composition ‘or the like.
The can I should be a snug ?t within the en
closure 2 mm little space between their side
walls, but if desired additional cushioning mate
Two types of such containers are in common
rial may be- inserted therebetweenw The spaces 15
use, one of which is formed of thin sheet metal between the walls may be ?lled with melted com
having its seams soldered, as in a sardine can, pound indicated at 3a (Fig. 4), such as wax, in
and is therefore limited to small and light weight _ lieu of spacers 3 and 4 or in combination there
devices. Containers of this ‘type are cheap but with.
afford little mechanical protection-to the device
Since the inner can I is made of thin metal,
enclosed therein and they are easily damaged, such as tin, it is easily formed and soldered,
with consequent leakage. The other type is made thereby providing an oil and moisture tight en
‘ of heavy metal to provide an oil tight container
closure for a condenser 5. The outer can 2 need
with suf?cient- mechanical protection. The cost
25 of such containers is high, whether they are made
with soldered or welded joints, or made seamless
by drawing or casting; a large part of the cost
being due to the necessity of making them tight
to oil and moisture. Additional expense and dif
30 ?culty "are involved in welding or soldering the
not be oil tight, its chief purposes being to pro
vide mechanical protection and ‘support for the
inner. can and the condenser.
For this reason
the enclosure 2 can be made very cheaply by
bending up sheets of heavy metal and spot-weld
cover on such a. container due to the large amount
ing the joints. A closure member or bottom cover
6 can ‘be secured by a riveting or bending opera 30
tion, or both; Preferably this cover consists of a
of heat absorbed by the heavy metal walls and
metal plate having its sides 1 and 8 bent up to
the danger of injuring the condenser therein. In
either type the scams or joints are directly ex
35 posed to mechanical shocks which may break
them and cause leakage.
closure 2 andhaving its end portions secured by
The object of this invention is to make a con
tainer'which is easily sealed to oil and moisture
and which gives greater protection against leak
40 age and mechanical shocks than either type
aforementioned, at less cost than the heavy type
and occupying about the same or less space. A
further object is to support a condenser within
the container in . ?xed, spaced relation to the
45 walls.
The invention will be described in connection
with the accompanying drawing showing one em
bodiment thereof and in which
Fig. 1 is a view partly in section, of a container
50 with a condenser and its support therein, accord
ing to the invention;
Fig. 2 shows the external appearance thereof on
., a smaller scale;
_»
' ‘
Fig. 3 shows a support member; and
Fig. ,4 is a fragmentary sectional view corre
engage the corresponding sides 9 and ll! of en
eyelets H to projecting feet I! and I3 of the en
closure. vFor additional security, the corners M
of cover 6 are bent down to engage the upper
sides of projections l2 and I3. The projecting
feet are thus made doubly thick with triple thick
ness at the corners,,to provide a rigid mounting , 40
base for the device.
‘
Fig. 3 shows details of a portion of a support ‘or -
clamp which holds the condenser 5 and serves to
space the condenser from the walls of can I, at
the same time preventing movement of the con
denser within the container. The support com
prises a U-shaped metal member l6 adapted to
rest on thebottom of the container with its sides
?tting between opposite walls thereof and with
extensions l1 and ID on its bottom portion ?tting
between the other two walls of the container.
The condenser 5, as shown in Fig. 1, usually con
sists of a number of oil ?lled sections l9 stacked 7
one above the other, each section having-‘foils
of opposite polarity exposed Vat/opposite 'ends,
2,127,352
'2
thereof. These condenser sections are stacked in
the member IS with their foil ends projecting in
scribed, the cushioning effect between the two
walls absorbs and distributes mechanical shocks,
thereby preventing injury to the soldered seams
the direction of extensions -l‘I-.and l8 respectively,
and spaced therefrom. The sides of the sections of the inner wall'so that they remain oil tight even though the device be subjected to mechan
may bear directly against the sides of the mem
ical abuse. The double-wall construction also
ber it but insulating liners may be inserted be
prevents accidental puncture of the inner wall
tween the bearing surfaces if desired. The sup
port for the condenser is completed by another . by sharp instruments, a frequent cause, of trou
U-shaped member 20 which bears against the'top ble with “tin can” type containers. The protec
section
of the condenser and is held in place by tion afforded by the outer walls permits the use 10
10
the bent-over ends II and 22 of member 18.
Members l6 and 20 thereby form a clamp for the
condenser sections which are preferably held
under pressure while the ends II and 22 are bent
16 over. Liners 23 provide insulation for the clamp.
. The can I is made sumciently long to provide
spaces between the foil ends and the walls of the
can so that, when the clamped condenser is with
in the can, the projections l1 and II keep the
foil ends in spaced relation to the walls. Lateral
movement of the condenser is prevented by the
of thin metal for the oil tight portion of the con
tainer even though the enclosed electrical device
has considerable size and weight. These advan
tages are obtained with a double-walled contain
er having the same or smaller outside dimen 16
sions than a single walled container of the same
inside dimensions because of-the space required
for upstanding seams and thick welds to make
the latter container'oil tight.
The manufacturing cost of such a double
walled container is less than the cost of the
sides of the member II and its projections l1 and I heavy single-wall type due principally to the sim
ll. The portions oi the \members It and 20 plicity of its parts and the ease with which
they are joined. The condenser can be sealed in
which project above the condenser prevent move
the inner can without excessive heating thereof
ment of the condenser in a vertical'direction.
The condenser sections are electrically con ' because of the small heat capacity of the thin
nected by metallic strips, such as 24, extending metal walls. Joining the parts of the other en
closure presents no difficulty when the joints need
from one section to another in the spaces be
not be oil'tight, and no heat is required to com
tween the foil ends and the walls of the con
tainer, such connections being made before the plete the outer enclosure after the condenser is
condenser is inserted in the can. In Fig. 1 placed therein. As an example, a heavy metal
all of the sections are connected in parallel, but can of a certain size and made oil tight costs
series or series-parallel connections may be used $2.50 plus-the labor required to seal the cover
after the condenser is inserted therein, which op
or the sections may be connected to form sepa
rate groups.
I
The members it and 20 provide and maintain
su?icient space between the top .of the conden
ser and the top of can i for terminals, such as
25 and 2G, and leads, such as 21 and 28, electri
cally connecting the terminals with the con
denser. The terminals 25 and 26 are prefer
ably secured to the top of the inner can I and
insulated therefrom by means of insulating
washers 28; holes 30 in the can being made con
siderably larger than the terminals. The wash
ers 29 are sealed by cement or varnish. The top
of the outer can 2 is provided with‘openings 3i
and is otherwise adapted to accommodate the
washers and terminals. Suitable connecting
50 lugs 32 are secured to the terminals for conven
ience in making electrical connections;
,
The above mentioned spaces between the to
and sides of the condenser 5 and the can I are
made no longer than is necessary to provide
eration is complicated by the large amount of as
heat required and consequent danger to the
condenser. Compared to this cost, a double
walled container of the same size costs only 30
or 31 cents, of which 12 M13 cents is the cost
of the inner can and 18 cents is the cost of the
outer enclosure.
'
The manufacture of a container in accordance
with this invention requires less expensive equip
ment and such equipment is more readily adapt
ed to diiierent sized containers than the equip
ment required for the manufacture of oil tight.
heavy metal containers.
I claim:
_
1. A container for an electrical condenser com
prising an inner liquid-tight. thin sheet-metal
casing, an outer casing of relatively thick sheet
metal and a meltable compound interposed be
tween the casings and ?lling any open spaces be
tween them and substantially adhering to their
55 room for the connecting strips and leads, there- ' opposite faces.
2. An electrical condenser comprising an in
by conserving space and oil. The ?xed spac
ing provided by the condenser clamp permits
ner liquid-tight thin sheet-metal casing holding
small clearances with assurance that accidental
the condenser elements therein, an outer cas
contact of conductive parts with the walls will
ing of relatively thicker sheet metal and slight
ly larger than and surrounding the inner cas
ing, and a wax-like compound partially or wholly
?lling the space between the two casings and
not occur.
a
In assembling the condenser, the can I with
the condenser and its clamptherein and with the
terminals ailixed, is sealed \up except for two
all holes such as II.
The can is then ?lled
‘with hot oil (approximately 160° F.) through one
of these holes, the air escaping through the other
ner liquid-tight, thin sheet-metal casing holding
the
condenser
elements
therein,
an ,outer
are soldered over. . when the oil cools a slight
casing of relatively thicker sheet metal and
slightly larger than and surrounding the inner
casing, and a compound su?iciently liquid to be
vacuum is created thereby permitting subse
quent expansion and contraction of the oil with
ings and becoming solid at normal temperature
out creating excessive pressure in the can and
so as to constitute a unitary means for securely
hole. The can is filled to within about Vath inch
of the top and, while the oil is still hot, the holes
eliminating the necessity for a breather open
as.
75
constituting a unitary filler means.
3. An electrical condenser comprising an in
'
In a double-walled container, as above de
poured into said space between the two cas
70
positioning and protecting the inner thin metal
casing.
'
4. An electrical condenser comprising a con-v 75
3,
aiaassa
denser body, a container for the condenser body
formed of thin readily bendable metal having
edge portions bent into tight-?tting engagement
with adjacent portions of the container to form
seams, sealing means continuously sealing all
seams to provide a liquid-tight casing, said metal
having suf?cient rigidity to provide a self-sup
porting manipulable container unit; and an un
sealed outer protective casing of relativelyrigid
shock-resistant metal enveloping and closely ?t
ting the container.
5. An electrical condenser comprising a con
' denser body, a container for the condenser body
formed of thin readily bendable and solderable
metal having edge portions crimped together to
form seams, solder continuously sealing all seams
of the container to provide a liquid-tight cas
ing, said metal having sufficient rigidity to pro
vide a self-supporting manipulable container
unit; and an unsealed outer protective casing of
relatively rigid shock-resistant metal enveloping
and closely ?tting the container.
6. An electrical condenser comprising an her
meticaliy sealed container formed of thin read
ily bendable metal, a condenser body mounted
in the container and completely supported there
by, said metal having su?icient rigidity to pro
vide, in combination with the condenser body
mounted therein, a self-supporting ma'nipuiable
30 container unit; and an unsealed outer protective
casing of relatively rigid shock-resistant metal
enveloping and closely ?tting the container.
7. An electrical condenser comprising an her
metically sealed container formed of thin read
35 ily bendable metal, a condenser body mounted
in the container and completely supported there
by,‘ said metal having sufficient rigidity to pro
~10
10. An electrical condenser comprising a con
denser body, a container for the condenser body
formed of thin readily bendable metal having 10
edge portions bent into tight-?tting engagement
with adjacent portions of the container to form
seams, sealing means continuously sealing all
seams to provide a liquid-tight casing, said metal
having sumcient rigidity to provide a self-sup
porting manipulable container unit; an unsealed
outer protective casing’ of relatively rigid metal
enveloping and closely ?tting the container, and
cushioning means arranged between the casing
and the container in position to prevent move
ment of the container in the casing, said means
comprising yieldable material in extended con
tact with the walls of the container body to dis
tribute over a substantial area of the container
impacts transmitted through the casing.
11. An electrical condenser comprising a con
denser body, a container completely enclosing the
body, and means for mounting the condenser
body in the container, comprising ?at members
engaging the top, bottom and opposite sides of 30
the condenser body and positioned in ?atwise'
contact with the bottom and two opposite sides
of the container, extending into engagement
with the other opposite sides of the container at
the bottom to maintain the condenser body 35
against movement within the container.
12. An electrical condenser comprising a con
vide, in combination with the condenser body,
a self-supporting manipulable container unit; an
denser body comprised of a plurality of ?attened
unsealed outer protective casing of relatively rigid
shock-resistant metal enveloping and closely
?tting the container, and insulated terminals
connected‘ to the condenser body and accessible
from the exterior of the protective casing.
frame for mounting the condenser body in the 40
container, said frame comprising members of
8. An electrical condenser comprising an her
metically sealed container formed of thin rela
tively ?exible metal, a condenser body mounted
in the container, said metal having sumcient
rigidity to provide, in combination with the con
denser body, a self-supporting manipulable con-‘
tainer unit; and an outer protective casing of
relatively rigid metal enveloping and closely ?t
ting the container, the protective casing being
formed of a plurality of sections joined at spaced
points to provide an unsealed mechanically strong
casing.
'
9. An electrical condenser comprising a con
denser body, a container for the condenser body
formed of thin readily bendable metal having
60
the container, and an end section adapted for
connection to the body portion in position to
cover the exposed end of the inner container
after insertion thereof in the body portion, the
outer casing sections being arranged to provide
a mechanically strong unsealed casing for the
container.
edge portions bent into tight-?tting engagement
with adjacent portions of the container to form
seams, sealing means continuously sealing all
seams to provide a liquid-tight casing, said metal
having su?icient rigidity to provide a self-sup
- porting manipulable container unit; and an outer
protective casing of relatively rigid metal en
veloping and closely ?tting the container, the
protective casing comprising a body portion
shaped to fit closely and substantially contain
70 uously over the sides and one end of the con~
tamer, arranged to permit endwlse insertion of
condenser rolls, a container, and a clamping ‘
?at material extending along the bottom, top
and opposite sides of the condenser body and ?t
ting flatwise against two opposite sides of the
container over a substantial portion of the area
thereof, arranged to provide a reinforcement for
the container, the bottom of the frame being
in extended ?atwise contact with the bottom of
the container and arranged to provide a rein
forcement therefor, said'bottom being provided -
with upturned ends engaging the other sides of
the container and arranged to ' maintain said
sides in spaced relation to the ends of the con
denser rolls.
13. An electrical condenser comprising a, con
denser body, a container, and a clamping frame
for mounting the body in the container, said
frame comprising a U-shaped member of- sheet
material extending along the bottom and oppo
site sides of the condenser body and in substan 60
tially continuous ?atwise engagement with the
juxtaposed sides of the container, 9. bottom mem
ber of sheet material extending across the bot
tom of the U-shaped member and having up
turned ends engaging the other sides of the con 65
tainer in position to maintain the condenser body
in spaced relation thereto, the bottom of the
frame being in substantially continuous ?atwise
engagment' with the bottom of the container.
70
wnmm ppm.
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
565 Кб
Теги
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа