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Патент USA US2127635

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Aug. 23, 1938.
|. WARSHAWSKY
2,127,635
ELECTRIC CLOCK
Filed April 27, 1956
4 Sheets-Sheet 1
I l ".
14522 1'
/ 2 /
RNVENTOR
BY
Maw-4a,? / I
Ra
3 ATTORNEYS
Aug. 23, 1938.
' l. WARSHAWSKY
2,127,635 '
ELECTRIC CLOCK
Filed April ‘27, 1956
'
4 Sheets-Sheet 2
LIjVENTOR
a?!»
W T MEQL;
9
TORNEYJ
k
Aug. 23, 1938.
l; WARSHAWSKY ,
" 2,127,635
ELECTRIC CLOCK
Filed April 27, 1936
4 Sheets-Sheet 3
Aug. 23, 1938.
|. WARSlV-lAWSK-Y
2,127,635
ELECTRIC CLOCK
Filed April 27, 1936
4 SheetsfSheet 4
INVENTOR
Um
i’atented Aug. 23, 1938
entree
Farrier caries
2,.ll27,<835
ELIEE'ERIC omen
Hsador “Warshawiry, Brooklyn, N. ‘221, assignor of
twenty-eight and one-third percent to Siacoh
Warshawsky and twenty-eight and onewthird
percent to Nettie Warshawshy, hoth of Erect;
iyn, N. Y.
Appiication April 27, 1936, @eriai No. “£6,523
3 (Claims.
‘The present invention relates to striking elec
tric clocks and more particularly to a novel and
improved striking electric clock in which the
time train is also used for the direct actuation of
5 the striking mechanism.
Objects and advantages of the invention will
The arbor 95 carries near its front end a pin
ion il meshing with and driving a gear-wheel it
be obvious herefrom, or may be learned by prac
which is driven at 3- R. P. M. in a clockwise
direction. This gear wheel i8 is staked upon an
arbor i9 journaled in the plates of the movement. 10
and combinations pointed out in the appended
Staked upon the arbor ii! a little behind gear
claims.
The invention consists in the novel parts, con
wheel I8, is the hammer-actuating wheel 20,
struction, arrangements, combinations and im
15 provements herein shown and described.
The accompanying drawings, referred to here
in and constituting a part hereof, illustrate one
embodiment of the invention, and together with
the description, serve to explain the principles of
20 the invention.
Of the drawings:
which revolves at the same number of revolu
tions as gear-wheel l8. Arbor I9 also carries
near its extreme rear end a gear-wheel 2 I, mesh 15
ing with and driving an identical gear-wheel 22,
which revolves vin a counter-clockwise direction
at 3 R. P. M., and is rotatably mounted on stud
23 extending forwardly from the rear plate ii of
the movement. Gear-wheel 22 meshes with and 20
drives gear-wheel 24 which is the seconds-wheel,
embodiment of the present invention, with the
hands and dial removed;
at 1 R. P. M. in a clockwise direction. Gear
wheel 24 is staked upon a seconds-arbor 25, near
its rear end. The seconds-arbor 25 extends from
Fig. 2 is a view similar to Fig. 1 but with the
front to rear centrally through the movement,
Fig. 1 is a front elevation of an illustrative
parts in striking, rather than silent, position;
Fig. 3 is a vertical section taken on the line
3—3 of Fig.4;
Fig. 4 is a plan view of the clock;
30
Figs. 5, 6 and '7 are detailed perspective views
of different parts of the mechanism; and
Fig. 8 is a detailed front view of a different
form' of gathering pallet and pallet disc.
The present invention has for its object the
35 provision of a novel and improved electric strik
ing clock. A further object is the provision of
such a clock which is reliable in operation, simple
in construction and economical to manufacture.
Another object is'the provision of an electric
40 striking clock. in which no separate striking
train is employed and the striking mechanism
is directly actuated by the synchronous motor
time train. Still another object is the provision
of a striking clock in which a rack for controning
45 the striking mechanism is returned to its normal
.50
i4 is staked upon an arbor i5, jlournaled in the
plates M and iii of the movement.
be set forth in part hereinafter and in part will
tice with the invention, the same being realized
10 and attained by means of the instrumentalities
25
as the pallet-wheei of a rack-striking means
(later described), which revolves at 30 R. P. M. in
a counter-clockwise direction. This gear wheel
and may carry at its extreme forward end a
seconds pointer 26.
Staked upon the seconds-arbor 25 near its
mid-portion, is a pinion 21 which meshes with
and drives a gear-wheel 28 at 10 R. P. H. in a
counter-clockwise direction. Gear-wheel 28 is
staked upon. an arbor 29 which is journaled in the
plates of the movement. staked upon the arbor
29 near its front end is a pinion 30 meshing with
and driving ‘the minute-wheel 3| 'at l R. P. H.
in a clockwise direction. This minute-wheel 3|
is mounted upon the extreme rear end of a minute
sleeve 32 through which the seconds-arbor 25 ex
tends. The minute-wheel 3| is frictionally cou
pled to the minute-sleeve 32 to drive the latter 40
through a friction washer 34 staked upon the
rear end of the sleeve 32 and against which the
said minute-wheel Eli is pressed for frictional
engagement by a spring washer 33 staked upon
the minute-sleeve 32. At its forward end, ex 45
position by or under control of a constantly ro
tending through the front plate, the minute
tating part of the time-keeping mechanism.
As embodied, the time-keeping mechanism
sleeve 32 carries the minute-hand‘ 35. staked
upon the minute-sleeve 32, somewhat forward of
the minute-sleeve washer 36, is a minute-pinion
31, meshing with and driving a dial-wheel 38 50
carrying a dial-pinion 39 which is mounted to
gether with it upona stud 40 forwardly project
ing from the front plate it of the movement in
the usual manner of clock-dial-work. The dial
P1111911 38 meshes with and drives an hour wheel 55
comprises a synchronous motor HI, secured to the
rear plate il of the movement, which has an
arbor i2, revolving in a vclockwise direction at
180 R. P. M., which projects through an aperture
in the rear plate. At its extreme forward end
arbor i2 carries a driving pinion l3 meshing
with and driving a gear wheel 14, which also acts
2
9,127,685
II staked upon an hour-sleeve 52, sleeved over
and rotating freely upon the minute-sleeve 22,
in front of the minute-pinion 31. At its forward
end, the hour sleeve 42 carries the hour hand 44'.
Staked upon the minute sleeve "directly be
hind the minute pinion 21 is a minute disc 52
larger in diameter than the minute pinion 31.
Projecting rearwardly from the minute disc 52,
is a pin 50, for setting the striking mechanism
10 in motion at the hour.
-
The minute sleeve 32 is held in its proper posi
tion on the seconds arbor 25, by a washer 50
staked upon the minute sleeve 32 just behindthe
front plate and a washer 35 staked upon the
15 minute sleeve 32 just forward of the front plate
I6, allowing the minute sleeve 22 just a little axial
play-
.
Figure 1 shows the striking mechanism at rest,
or when it is not striking the hour. Most of the
parts shown are arranged between the front plate
and the dial and are hidden from view by the dial
55.
Gear wheel I5 acts as the pallet wheel of a
rack-striking train, and carries on its arbor, ex
25 tending through the front plate, a modified
gathering pallet BI.
This modi?ed gathering
pallet 6| rotates freely on its arbor, and im
mediately behind it is a pallet disc 52, staked upon
the arbor. The pallet disc 02 carries a straight
30 light spring 53, attached by means of a screw 54.
This tension spring 53 operatively bears against
the gathering pallet pin 55 on the gathering pal
let BI, and since the pallet disc 52 is constantly
rotating, the tension spring 55 forces the gather
35 ing pallet 5| to rotate with it. A small washer 55
staked upon the arbor in front of the gathering
pallet 6| prevents it from coming oi! the arbor.
The snail 10 is fixed upon the hour sleeve 42
in front of the hour wheel ll, and revolves
40 once in twelve hours.
Rack ‘I5 is oscillatably supported on a stud ‘I5
extending forwardly from the front plate, and is
provided with an extension piece ‘I1, resting upon
the hook ‘I0 of the rack hook ‘I0.
The rack hook ‘I9 is oscillatable on a stud l0
projecting forwardly from the front plate I0, and
by,meansl of the spring 5|, the rack hook 715 is
forced upwards against its stop pin 52 extending
forwardly from the front plate, thus lifting the
50 rack ‘I5 out of engagement with the gathering
pallet pin 55. A pin 85 extending forwardly from
the front plate limits the upward movement of the
rack ‘I5.
At the lower end of rack 15 is provided an extra
55 tooth ‘I5’ which is engaged by the hook ‘I0, but is
short enough not to be engaged by the pin 55 as
are the other and longer teeth.. This short tooth
‘I5’ prevents the hook ‘I8 slipping off the rack be—
fore the last stroke and thereby producing a false
60 number of strokes.
-
Stop pin I00, projecting forwardly from the
front plate of the movement, above leverzarm 95,
limits upper movement of lever arms 95, 50 and 95
attached to arbor 92.
The warning lever IOI, whose purpose it is to
start the striking exactly at the hour, revolves
about the stud I02 extending forwardly from the
front plate. Pivoted on the front side of the warn
ing lever IOI by pin I03 is an extension piece
I05, shaped as shown having a hooked portion 10
I05, against which the upper end of spring I01
presses.
Spring I01 is wound once about a re
cessed portion of the tube I08, attached to the
warning lever IIII, where it is fitted over its stud
I02, and is wound several times about a screw I08, 15
to fasten its end. The extension piece I05 also
has a downwardly projecting stop finger IIO,
bearing against the warning lever IN. The
spring I01 pressing against the hooked portion I05
of the extension piece I05 forces the downwardly 20
projecting finger IIO to bear against the warning
lever IOI to force the lever to its position of rest
against stop pin III, projecting forwardly from
the front plate.
The rear side of the warning lever IOI lies 25
against the minute-sleeve washer 25, and the
front side of the warning lever IOI lies behind the
minute disc 52.
Pin 50 extending rearwardly from the minute
disc 52, runs clear of the warning lever IIII but 30
bears against the extension piece I05, when in
the course of its revolution in a clockwise direc
tion it reaches extension piece I05, thus forcing
the warning lever IN to the left only very
shortly before the hour.
The warning lever IOI has also a projecting
finger I22, the purpose of which is to force the
rack hook ‘I0 downwardly and to the left, shortly
before the hour, as will presently be explained.
The top end of the warning lever IN is formed
as a curved projection piece in which a pin I24
is mounted.
'
All the wheels of the clock are constantly ro
tating, whether the clock is striking or not, as the
single train serves not only as the striking train 45
but also as the time train.
7
The operation of the striking mechanism may
be described as follows:
vAs the hands approach the hour, the pin 50 in
the minute disc 52 forces the extension piece Ill, 50
and thereby the warning lever IN, to the left.
This causes the projecting finger I 22 of the warn
ing lever IN to force the rack hook ‘I0 down
ward, against the action of its torsion spring II,
also causing the rack ‘I5 to drop slowly.
55
At the same time that the warning lever Ill
is forced to the left, its upper projecting pin I24
engages the upper end of lever arm 05, and pre
vents it from dropping with the rack ‘I5.
As the rack ‘I5 slowly drops its lowest full tooth
The hammer arm 90 carrying the hammer head crosses the path of the gathering pallet pin 55,
BI is rigidly attached to the rear prolongation of which after reaching its lowest position on the
an arbor 92, journaled in the plates II and I5 and gathering pallet 5| now begins its rotation up
extending therethrough, and its purpose is ‘to wardly. If thegathering pallet pin 05 engages
65 strike the gong 94 which is suitably mounted.
the tip of the lowest full tooth of the rack, its 66
The lever arm 95 shaped as shown, is rigidly at ' rotation is momentarily stopped, but the ?exible
tached to the front prolongation'of arbor 02 and tension spring 52 on the rotating pallet disc 02,
the extreme upper end of lever arm 85 rests upon bearing against the gathering pallet pin 55 turns
pin 95, extending forwardly from the upper part
70 of rack 15. Lever arm 95 is rigidly attached to
arbor 92, between the plates of the movement,
and engages the teeth of the hammer-actuating
wheel 20. when lever arm 55 rests upon pin 05,
lever arm 90 is raised out of contact with‘liammer
actuating wheel 20.
about it, until it reaches a position to the right of
the gathering pallet pin 55, and forces it to the 70
left, out of contact with the tip of the lowest full
rack tooth allowing the further rotation of the
' gathering pallet 5| .
If the gathering pallet 5| were staked upon its
arbor, and the gathering pallet pin 55 engaged the 75
3
oneness
tip oi the lowest full rack tooth, the clock would
stop running, as the gathering pallet pin 65 would
not be able to travel past the tip of the lowest full
rack tooth.
Usually the gathering pallet pin 65 does not
engage the tip oi‘ the lowest full rack tooth, but
slips past it, no compensating movement of the
tension spring 63 being necessary.
10
I
The possibility or the gathering pallet pin 65
engaging the tips of the other rack teeth is very
remote, since these teeth cross the path of the
gathering pallet pin 65 quickly, but if it should
occur it is taken care of by the compensating
movement of the tension spring 63.
As the rack hook ‘is is forced lower and lower,
its hook ‘it slips from underneath the extension
piece ll of the rack ‘I5 and then from underneath
the lowest lull rack tooth, and the rack it drops
until the rack feeler H30 falls upon one of the steps
of the snail ‘Id.
The constantly rotating gathering pallet pin 65,
on its travel toward the rack teeth, engages one of
the teeth of the rack 15 (depending upon which
step of the snail the rack feeler 536 has fallen);
25 lifting the rack for a distance of one tooth, but on
rest out of engagement with the gathering pallet
pin 65. At the same time, the pin 96 on the upper
part of the rack ‘l5 raises the top part of lever arm
95, so that lever arm W is raised above and out of
contact with the teeth of the hammer-‘actuating
wheel 20, thus preventing further striking of the
gong 94 by the hammer-arm 9t.
It is apparent, therefore, that the gong is struck
once for each full tooth that the rack is
and the strokes are controlled in number
snail ‘Hi. If it is four o'clock the gong is
four times, if it is ten o'clock, the gong is
raised,
by the
struck
struck
ten times, etc.
It has been stated above that for a minute or so
before striking of the hour occurs, the rack 15 is 15
alternately lifted from and dropped upon the
snail ‘ill, for 'a distance of one tooth, by the rotat
ing gathering pallet pin 65. Exactly at the hour,
the rack hook ‘ill moves to the right and engages
the rack teeth. It is apparent that if the rack 20
hook engages the rack teeth when the rack
happens to be raised one tooth above the snail,
the rack hook will engage one tooth less, than if it
engaged‘ the rack teeth when the rack were resting
on the snail. This would cause inaccuracies in 25
its travel away from the rack teeth, the rack feeler striking the hour.
'
are again drops upon the snail ‘it. The rack is ,
To assure correct striking, it is necessary that
not raised upwardly tooth by tooth, because the the rack hook ‘it engage the rack teeth when the
hook ‘it of the rack hook ‘it has been forced a
rack is resting on the snail "it. The rack hook
30 short distance to the left of the rack teeth (and
must therefore engage the rack teeth when the 39)
thus out of contact with them) by the projecting gathering pallet pin til is not engaging the rack
?nger £122 of the warning lever illl. This con
teeth. For this purpose there is provided a lever
tinues for a minute or so (depending on speed of _ ltd shaped as shown in Figs. l and 2, pivoted at
operation or‘ the parts), until exactly at the hour,
35 the pin till in the minute disc at passes the tip of
the extension piece lilil, allowing the warning lever
ill to he suddenly forced back towards its position
of
against stop pin ill, by means oi‘ spring
lot. “this causes the upper pin {12d of warning
lever ill to move out of supporting contact with
the top part of lever arm
allowing the lever arrn
to drop, until lever arni till makes contact with
the teeth of the hammer-actuating wheel 2d.
‘The " clr hook ‘l9, under the iorce of its torsion
stop i622.
,
, is now forced to the right, and the hook
‘it engages the reel: teeth, and the rock. ‘it’; is now
curved nose is reached. and then face M6 of lever
lifted by tooth by tooth, by means of the gathering
pallet pin
and the resilient effort of rack hook
it‘. T‘ach time that the gathering pallet pin 65
ME») is reached. Face 9% is then reached, and
?nally race till, a slight distance to the right of
lace Still, when the warning lever Hill has forced
the rack hook ‘F9 to its extreme left position.
till
The lever Mill is now between the rack hook ‘l9
and the pallet disc 62 as shown in
2. A pin
653 extends forwardly from the pallet disc
and
50 anc
e
hook ‘it? raise the rack one tooth, a
tooth o the hammer actuating wheel Ell passes
‘out
contact with the lever arm
causing this
lever arm to fall towards the next lower tooth oi
the wheel, thus causing the hammerhead ill to
A pin M9, radially mounted
55 strike the going 96.
in stud Q52’ in front of plate it has an inwardly
turned end ?f/lil protecting through a slot 52H in
the plate to limit the movement of hammer arrn
just before the head ill strikes the gong he.
till The elasticity of arm till provides the proper
striking action.
I
7
in order to secure this synchronisni between
rise of the rack of one tooth and striking oi‘ the
gong, on each revolution oi the gathering pallet
pin
tooth oi the hammer-actuating wheel it
passes by the lever arm as. Since the pallet wheel
it makes 3t R. P. M. and the hammer-actuating
Zvhggilil makes 3 R. P.
ee
til
above the pallet disc
A light spring (1 3% serves
to press the lever iélii downwardly against stop
M2. ‘When the striking mechanism is at rest, as 40
shown in Figure l, lever flit bears against its
Shortly before the hour, when the warning
lever {Jill is forced to the left, face MS of lever Mt‘
?nally reaches pin i615 and slides upon it until the
spr
65
Mill, on the front side or the warning lever Hill,
with its stops M32‘ and M3 forwardly projecting 35
from the warning lever HM, and a pin Mil tor
wardly projecting from the front plate, slightly
the latter wheel has ill
.
After the lowest full tooth or the slowly rising
rack ‘i it has been engaged by the hook ‘iii, the hook
slips under the extension piece 'i'i oi the rack ‘l5,
and under the force of its torsion spring ti the
rack hook ‘ill jumps upward until it strikes against
its stop pin 82, lifting the rack 15 to its position of
is located near its rim, some distance behind the
free end of the tension spring 63, in reference to 56
the direction of rotation of the pallet disc @2.
The constantly rotating pallet disc pin its dur
ing a part or its circular path now bears against
‘lace Mil and forces lever Mil slightly upward,
once every revolution.
Exactly at the hour, the warning lever ml
moves to the right, carrying lever Mil with it,
allowing the rack hook ‘it to move toward the
right on its way to engage the rack teeth. Face
lb’! of lever Md slides upon pin, I45 until face IBil 65
strikes pin “5 and cannot move past it, thus
holding the warning lever HM against movement
to the right, and the rack hook ‘E9 in its move»
ment to the right, before it has engaged the rack
teeth. Face i?t cannot move past pin I45, until
the pallet disc pin B53 in the course of its revolu
tion, reaches face Mt of lever I40 and raises the
lever slightly upwardly, so that face I50 slides
above pin M5. Face Md and the curved nose of
lever I40 slide upon and past pin “5 as the
4.
2,127,635
warning lever I0l moves to the right until it
reaches its stop-pin I I I, carrying lever I40 with it;
This allows the rack hook ‘I0 to engage the
rack teeth and the rack is lifted, tooth by tooth,
as already described above.
The operation of lever I40 insures that the rack
hook 10 engages the rack teeth when the rack 15
What I claim is:
1. In an electric clock driven by an electric
motor, a striking mechanism comprising a rack,
a rack hook to restrain the movement of said
rack, a warning lever intermittently actuated by
the driving gearing oi the clock to make said
rack hook inoperative and to allow the rack to
is resting upon the snail 10, because at the mo
fall from its position of rest, and to make said‘
rack hook operative again, a snail cam associated
ment when the pallet disc pin I53 reaches face
10 I40 of lever I40 to release the lever, the gathering
pallet pin 65 is out of engagement with the rack
teeth, and therefore cannot raise the rack 15
above the snail 10.
'
Stop I 43 on warning lever IOI limits the up
15 ward movement of lever I40.
If the hands of the clock are turned counter~
clockwise, as when setting to correct time, the
pin 50 in the minute disc 52 is turned counter»
clockwise. Pin 50 causes the pivoted extension
20 piece I05 to turn against the force of its spring
I01, its downwardly projecting stop ?nger IIO
moving away from the warning lever I0 I, without
moving the warning lever. When the pin 50
passes the tip of the extension piece I05, the ex
25 tension piece iumps back to its normal position on
the warning lever I 0|, under the force of its
spring I01, the downwardly projecting finger IIO
oi the extension piece I05 bearing against the
warning lever IOI.
30
Therefore, when the hands are set backward,
no striking occurs, and the mechanism is not
damaged or subjected to undue strains.
The pallet disc 02 is preferably so ?xed upon
its arbor, in relation to the hammer-actuating
wheel 20, that the lever arm 05 will be ascending
when the rack hook ‘I0 Jumps upward after en
gaging the lowest tooth on the rack, raising the
rack ‘I! to its position of rest, and that a stroke‘
of the gong 04 precedes a rise of the rack of one
tooth, and not vice versa. It a stroke of the
gong follows a rise of the rack of one tooth, the
rack hook ‘I0 after engaging the lowest tooth of
the rack ‘II, would jump upward, raising the rack,
which would prevent the further descent of lever
, arm 00 and thus the final stroke of the gong, and
the striking at the hour would be inaccurate.
In Figure 8 of the drawings is disclosed a form
of gathering pallet and pallet disc in which the
tension spring I00, secured to the pallet disc 02
50 by means 0! a screw I04, is shorter in length and
its relation to the gathering pallet pin 60 is
somewhat difl'erent than that shown in Figures 1
and 2 of the drawings. The manner of operation
of this form of gathering pallet and pallet disc
with the hour hand of the clock to limit the fall 10
of said rack, a constantly rotating gathering
pallet driven from the clock driving gearing to
return the rack to its position of rest, a constantly
rotating hammer actuating wheel driven from the
clock driving gearing, and a hammer shaft having 15
two arms rigidly attached thereto, and rotating
therewith, one arm used for contacting the 11am
mer actuating wheel during striking, the other
arm cooperating with the warning lever and rack
to control the time of engagement of the first 20
mentioned arm with the hammer actuating wheel.
2. In an electric clock driven by an electric
motor, a striking- mechanism comprising a rack,
a rack hook to restrain the movement of said rack,
a warning lever intermittently actuated by the 25
driving gearing of the clock to make said rack
hook inoperative and to allow the rack to fall
from its position of rest, and to make said rack
hook operative again, a snail cam associated with
the hour hand of the clock to limit the fall of said 30
rack, a constantly rotating gathering pallet mem
ber driven from the clock driving gearing to re
turn the rack to its position of rest, a constantly
rotating hammer actuating wheel driven from
the clock driving gearing, a hammer mechanism, 35
and means including a correcting member mov
ably attached to the warning lever and co-oper
ating with the gathering pallet member to en
sure the engagement of the rack hook with the
rack at theend of the warning period when said 40
rack is resting upon the snail.
3. In an electric clock driven by an electric
motor, a striking mechanism comprising a rack,
a rack hook to restrain the movement of said
rack, a warning lever intermittently actuated by
the driving gearing oi the clock to make said
rack hook inoperative and to allow the rack to
fall from its position of rest, and to make said
rack hook operative again, a snail cam associated
with the hour hand of the clock to limit the fall 50
of said, rack,’ a constantly rotating gathering
pallet member driven from the clock driving gear
ing to return the rack to its position of rest, a
constantly rotating hammer actuating wheel
, however, remains exactly the same as for the form
‘ disclosed in Figures 1 and 2 of the drawings.
driven from the clock driving gearing, a hammer
mechanism, said gathering pallet member con
The invention in ‘its broader aspects is not
limited to the speci?c mechanisms shown and
described but departures may be made therefrom
60 within the scope of the accompanying claims
without departing from the principles of the in
vention and without sacri?cing its chief ad
sisting of a member staked on its arbor driving
another member freely rotatable on said arbor by
suitable elastic means, the latter member con
vantages.
,1
taining the gathering pallet pin, said elastic 60
means preventing arrest of rotation of the gather
ing pallet pin by the tips of the rack teeth.
ISADOR WARSHAWSKY.
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