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Патент USA US2127826

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2,127,826
Patented Aug. 23, 1938
UNITED STATES
PATENT‘ OFFICE
2,127,826
COUNTER TRAY
Pierre H. Meyer, Mount Vernon, N. Y.
Application March 14, 1936, Serial No. 68,894
3 Claims. (Cl. 206-472)
In order to fully comprehend certain features
This invention relates to trays for use upon
counters in supporting and displaying merchan
disc, and particularly merchandise contained in
small packages or consisting of relatively small
articles; and the object of the invention is to
provide a tray of the class described which is
molded or cast from a suitable composition. or
compound so as to materially simplify and
cheapen the cost of production of an article of
H) the class under consideration, and at the same
time, provide an article of this kind which may be
readily handled and conveniently cleaned during
the use thereof; a further object being to provide
a tray of the class described, the inner surfaces
a of the side walls of which are tapered and the
lower corner portions of which are rounded to
facilitate the removal of small articles from the
tray as well as to simplify the cleaning of the
tray whenever desired; a further object being to
2 O provide the inner surfaces of opposed walls with
one or more pairs of inwardly projecting partition
supporting members whereby the tray or the com
partment thereof may be divided into two, three,
four or six compartments formed by partition
25 strips detachably mounted with respect to the
tray and with respect to each other; a still
further object being to- provide a tray of the class
described which will be constructed of such di
mensions as to permit the arrangement of a
30 number of the trays upon a counter of standard
size to substantially cover the full depth of the
counter without the loss of counter space and
further to the provision of means for support
ing the trays in a stepped relationship or angular
position on the counter; and with these and other
objects in view, the invention consists in a de
vice of the class and for the purpose speci?ed,
which is simple in construction, ef?cient in use,
and which is constructed as hereinafter de
40 scribed and claimed.
The invention is fully disclosed in. the follow
ing speci?cation, of which the accompanying
drawing forms a part, in which the separate parts
of my improvements are designated by suitable
45 reference characters in each of the views, and in
which:
Fig. 1 is a transverse, sectional view through a
counter showing one. arrangement of the trays
thereon.
Fig. 2 is a view similar to Fig. 1 showing a modi
?ed arrangement of the trays on a counter.
Fig. 3 is a plan view of a tray indicating one
method of partitioning the same; and,
Fig. 4 is a section on the line 4—4- of Fig. 3
with thepartitions detached.
of my invention, it is advisable to point out that
in many kinds and classes of chain stores,
counters of standard size and construction are
employed, particularly, with respect to the depth
of the counter surface. It is one distinctive
feature of my invention to standardize the con
struction of trays of different sizes, which might
be graded as “small,” “medium” and “large” as to
length and width, so that a number of such trays 10
in the respective sizes, when arranged end to end
or side by side, on a counter, will fill or substan
tially fill the counter surface transversely so
that no loss will be experienced in the display
surface of the counter or that part thereof upon 15
which the trays or a group- of trays are ar
ranged to display merchandise of the kind for
which the trays are suitable, namely, articles in
relatively small containers or small in size.
In the accompanying drawing, for the purpose
O
of illustrating one use of my invention, I have
shown a tray 5 consisting of a bottom wall 6
having a downwardly extending peripheral flange
1 which serves to support the bottom 6 above the
surface upon which the tray is mounted. EX
tending upwardly from the bottom 6 are long side
walls 8 and shorter end walls 9 to produce an
oblong, rectangular tray. The inner surfaces of
the walls 8 and 9 are tapered upwardly and out
wardly so as to provide relatively thin upper 30
edges l0 which are preferably rounded on their
inner corners.
The inner surfaces of the side walls 8 are pro
vided with three pairs of inwardly projecting and
vertically arranged ribs ll integrally formed CO
with said walls, said pairs of ribs being arranged
one directly opposite the other on the opposed
walls 8, and the end walls 9 are provided centrally
with a pair of corresponding ribs l2. The central
pair Ha of the ribs II is arranged centrally of 40
the walls 8, whereas the other pairs lib‘ and lie
are arranged at opposite sides of the pairs of ribs
Ha and are equally spaced therefrom.
It will be noted upon a consideration of Fig. 4
of the drawing, that the inner surface of the
walls of the tray, intermediate the pairs of ribs
II and I2, is preferably made straight, as indi
cated at I3 at the‘left of Fig. 4. This. straight
wall joins the bottom wall in a sharp corner i4, 50
whereas, throughout the remainder of the tray,
the lower inner corner I5 is' rounded as indicated
at the right of Fig. 4. The purpose of thereund
ed corner I5 throughout the tray is to facilitate
removal of smallarticles from the tray and at 55
2
1,1
2,127,826
the same time, to simplify cleaning or dusting of
the tray whenever desired.
I also provide means for dividing the compart
ment of the tray into a number of compartments
of different sizes. In Fig. 3 of the drawing, I
have indicated one arrangement of partitions
for dividing the tray into four compartments,
which is accomplished by a transverse partition
I6 arranged and supported in the pairs Ha of
the ribs II and supplemental partitions lBa
which extend from the pairs of ribs 12 to the
partitions l6 abutting or substantially abutting
the latter, and supported against relative move
ment thereon by a cross-shaped spring coupling
or clip II.
It will be seen from a consideration of Fig. 4
of the drawing, that the pairs of rods H—-IZ do
not extend to the upper edges of the tray. How
ever, the partition strips IB, [6a that may be
employed will extend to the upper edges of the
tray. These strips are usually composed of glass
but may be composed of any desired material,
for example, a material consistent with that
‘a lil
used in the construction of the tray. A single
partition such as l6 may be employed to divide
the tray into two compartments, and in like man
ner, a single partition may be used between the
lugs l2-—|2 to divide the tray also into two com
partments, or two of such partition strips may be
30 arranged in the opposed pairs of lugs H2), H0
in the manner indicated by the dot and dash
lines 18, represented in Fig. 3 of the drawing,
to divide the tray into three compartments, or if
used in conjunction with a partition similar to
35 the partition IGa, the tray may be divided into
six compartments. In the latter case, two of the
couplings similar to the couplings I? will be
employed. By providing each of the trays with
the pairs of lugs disclosed, the trays may be used
40 without any partitions, or with any number of
partitions that may be desired to divide the same
into the required number of compartments.
To illustrate two distinct uses of the tray shown
in Figs. 3 and 4 of the drawing, I have indi
cated in Figs. 1 and 2 of the drawing, a cross
section of a counter consisting of a counterboard
l9 having a front, upwardly projecting ?nishing
strip 20, and a rear, upwardly projecting backing
strip 2|. With trays of the kind disclosed in
Figs. 3 and 4 of the drawing, four of these trays
may be arranged in end to end relation directly
upon the counterboard l9 or any suitable facing
material applied thereto or upon a step forming
member 22 as is seen in Fig. 1 of the drawing,
having stepped surfaces 22a, 22b and 220 ar
ranged at different heights so that the second,
third and fourth trays are arranged above the
other in the manner illustrated in Fig. 1 of the
drawing. With this arrangement, the devices
for supporting price tags may be arranged di
rectly upon the front edges of the trays arranged
immediately above the forward tray, and the
price tag supporting means of the last or upper
tray may be arranged upon the counter or upon
the back wall of the tray.
With the construction shown, the combined
length of four of the trays will equal or substan
tially equal the depth of the counter or the dis
tance between the front and rear strips 20, 2|.
On the other hand, the width of the trays is such
that ?ve of these trays may be similarly mounted
on a counter of the same standard depth, either
directly upon the counter or in the stepped
arrangement shown in Fig. 1, or in both arrange
75 ments of the trays, they may be disposed side by
side as shown in Fig. 2, or in an end to end rela
tion on an upwardly inclined support 23 in the
manner indicated in Fig. 2 of the drawing.
Other arrangements of the trays may be pro
vided on the counter or other supports, depend U!
ing entirely upon the type of display which is
desired and the particular kind or class of
merchandise supported in the trays or the sev
eral compartments thereof. In displaying cer
tain kinds of merchandise where it is desirable
to protect or cover the merchandise arranged
on display, short partition strips may be used
in the trays of a height no greater than the ver
tical dimensions of the supporting ribs and a
transparent cover or top panel may be arranged 15
within the tray and supported on said ribs and
on the partition strips if the latter are employed.
In constructing the tray, the same will be
molded or cast from suitable materials or com
pounds and preferably such materials of a non 20
metallic structure in order to economize on the
production of the trays and at the same time,
reduce the weight thereof. Heretofore, it has
been the practice or custom to construct trays
from wood for displaying merchandise in the
manner herein represented or to simply use avail
able sheet metal dishes which were in no Way
standardized, nor were they provided with any
means for constructing compartments within the
trays, varying not only in size but in number.
The construction of wooden trays as well as
30
others, has been expensive and unsatisfactory,
whereas a tray of the kind under consideration,
in the ?rst place, become standardized as to size
in its adaptation for the intended uses, and fur 35
thermore, ful?lls the desired want at the lowest
possible cost, and at the same time, produces an
article which is highly ?nished thereby materially
enhancing and otherwise beautifying the dis
play as a whole. In molding or casting various
types of non-metallic compounds, the same may
be made in various colors or combinations of
colors to suit the fancy and desires of the user,
or to be consistent with the merchandise placed
on display.
Having fully described my invention, what I
claim as new and desire to secure by Letters
Patent, is:
1. A merchandise display tray of the class de
scribed comprising a unitary molded rectangular .
body of rigid material consisting of a bottom
wall and upwardly extending side and end walls
having perpendicularly straight, smooth and un
obstructed outer surfaces, the inner surfaces of
said side walls being tapered from the bottom l
wall upwardly and outwardly to form relatively
thin upper edges on the walls of said tray, the
side and end walls joining the bottom wall by
a ?llet, the inner surfaces of opposed walls of
said tray having pairs of inwardly projecting
vertically arranged bar like lugs so placed apart
as to snugly receive relatively thin partition
members to be inserted therein, said lugs extend
ing from the bottom wall of the tray upwardly
and terminating at a point below the upper edges 65
of said walls, said pairs of said lugs being ar
ranged on the inner surfaces of both the side and
end walls of the tray in directly opposed relation
one with respect to the other, the side walls of
the tray having a plurality of pairs of said lugs,
and the inner surfaces of the walls of said tray
intermediate the pairs of lugs thereon parallel
ing the outer surfaces of the tray.
2. A merchandise display tray of the class de
scribed comprising a unitary molded rectangu- 75
3
2,127,826
lar body of rigid material consisting of a bottom
wall and upwardly extending side and end walls
having perpendicularly straight, smooth and un
obstructed outer surfaces, the inner surfaces of
said ‘side walls being tapered from the bottom
wall upwardly and outwardly to form relatively
thin upper edges on the walls of said tray, the
side and end walls joining the bottom wall by a
?llet, the inner surfaces of opposed walls of said
tray having pairs of inwardly projecting ver
10
tically arranged bar like lugs so spaced apart as
to snugly receive relatively thin partition mem
bers to be inserted therein, said lugs extending
from the bottom wall of the tray upwardly and
terminating at a point below the upper edges of
15
said walls, said pairs of said lugs being arranged
on the inner surfaces of both the side and end
walls of the tray in directly opposed relation one
with respect to the other, the side walls of the
tray having a plurality of pairs of said lugs, the
inner surfaces of the walls of said tray inter
mediate the pairs of lugs thereon paralleling
the outer surfaces of the tray and joining the
bottom wall in sharp corners to permit the lawer
edge of the partition to engage the upper surface
25
of the bottom wall, and the upper edges of the
side and end walls being bevelled.
,
3. A merchandise display tray of the class de
scribed comprising a unitary molded rectangular
body of rigid material consisting of a bottom wall
and upwardly extending side and end walls hav
ing perpendicularly straight, smooth and unob
structed outer surfaces, the inner surfaces of said
side walls being tapered from the bottom wall
upwardly and outwardly to form relatively thin
upper edges on the walls of said tray, the side
and end walls joining the bottom wall by a ?llet,
the inner surfaces of opposed walls of said tray 10
having pairs of inwardly projecting vertically ar
ranged bar like lugs so spaced apart as to snugly
receive relatively thin partition members to be
inserted therein, said lugs extending from the
bottom wall of vthe tray upwardly and termi 15
nating at a point below the upper edges of said
walls, said pairs of said lugs being arranged on
the inner surfaces of both the side and end
walls of the tray in directly opposed relation one
with respect to the other, the side walls of the
tray having a plurality of pairs of said lugs, the
inner surfaces of the walls of said tray interme
diate the pairs of lugs thereon paralleling the
outer surfaces of the tray, and the side and end
walls projecting below the bottom wall to form 25
peripheral supporting ?anges.
PIERRE H. MEYER.
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