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Патент USA US2127944

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2,127,944
Patented Aug. 23, 1938
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,127,944
PROCESS FOR BEPBODUCING IMAGES
Robert It. Tanner, Detroit, Mich” assignor to
Parker-Wolverine Company, Detroit, Mich, a
corporation of Michigan
No Drawing. Application June 13, 1936,
Serial Pie. 85,053
(Cl. 95-5)
This invention relates to a novel and improved present invention and steps of the method out
method of faithfully reproducing images upon lined herein will iind great practical utility in any
3Claima.
solid surfaces. More particularly, it relates to a
process for reproducing a decorative ?nish upon
5. a hard, plane surface, such, for example, as a
sheet metal panel.
Heretofore, the process most satisfactory and
most successful from a commercial standpoint
for reproducing images upon plane surfaces has
10 embodied substantially the features disclosed in
U. 8. Patent No. 1,548,465 to Henry. In accord
ance with the teachings of this patent, which is
primarily directed to the reproduction of wood
grain on sheet metal panels, a suitable section of
15 wood is photographed in the usual manner to
produce a negative photographic plate. Sub
sequently, a photographic positive is produced
from this plate and a printing plate or roll is
reproduced from the positive in accordance with
20 practice well known in the photcgravure art.
Preferably, the printing plate thus reproduced is
formed by means of the well known Rembrandt
screen in order that the resultant product will
have in its surface a plurality of recesses of vary
25 ing magnitude. The plate is coated with a stain
and a doctor blade or wiper is utilized for the
purpose of removing surplus stain from the sur
face of the plate. When a soft roll is passed over
the plate the masses of pigment or stain within
30 the recesses will be picked up on the roll and
will be transferred to the surface upon which it
is desired to reproduce the image photographed.
This process results in the small individual masses
of pigment being merged and all‘lines of union
between the masses obliterated in order that a
more detailed reproduction and a more uniform
process wherein it is desired to reproduce upon
a plane, hard or solid surface an image of any
thing capable of being photographed.
GI
In order that a full and complete understand
ing of the present invention may be obtained, the
speci?c process outlined below is directed to the
reproduction of an imitation wood grain ?nish
on a sheet metal panel.
The process may suc
10
cessfully be practiced in the following manner.
A photographic plate is ?rst exposed to white
light of uniform intensity and ordinary charac
tor for a period of relatively short duration, the
period, however, being sumciently long so that
in the event the plate were developed, the result~
ant product would be relatively dark and of uni
form density throughout its entire surface. The
particular length of this initial exposure depends
upon many variable factors, for example, the par
ticular type of photographic emulsion used on
the plate, the nature and intensity of the source
of white light to which it is exposed, and the
length of such exposure.
By way of illustration, the following initial ex
posure has been found particularly satisfactory
and in the practice of the method of the present
invention when conventional photographic plates
now commercially obtainable are used. The plate
is exposed for approximately two seconds to a .
25-watt Opal tungsten lamp at a distance of
eight feet. This plate is not developed after this
initial exposure, but is subjected to a desensitiz
ing process which materially reduces the “speed”
or light SBHSIUVEHESLL of the emulsion which covers
the plate. While many and various methods may ~
be utilized to obtain the necessary densltization
of the exposed plate, the following process has
vision of a process which obtains greatly improved ‘ been ,found particularly satisfactory for accom
plishing this purpose. The plate is preferably de
40 results and which results in a reproduction more
sensitized by bathing it for three minutes in a
and attractive ?nish will be obtained.
The present invention contemplates the pro
faithful in detail than any heretofore obtainable.
Further, it will be appreciated that the process
of the present invention is considerably simpler
than the Henry process outlined above and that
the unnecessary and undesirable steps forming an
essential part of the Henry process have been
eliminated.
-
While it will be appreciated from the following
detailed description that the process forming the
50 basis of the present invention is primarily di
rected to a method of reproducing a ?nish in imi
tation of natural wood greining upon a sheet
metal panel, the generic inventive concept pre
sented herein is of much broader scope. It will
55
be readily apparent that certain features of the
desensitizing solution which preferably is com- -
posed of:
125 cubic centimeters of pheno-safranie solu
tion of 1 part to 1000 strength.
50 cubic centimeters of potassium bromide,
10% solution, and
45
Sufficient water to make a total of 500 cubic
centimeters.
‘
50
The plate is preferably swabbed with cotton so
that the wetting action of the solution will be
uniformly distributed over the entire surface of
the plate. and while wet the plate is placed in a
55
plate holder of a camera.
2
2,127,944
A section of wood has the surface thereof
?nished ‘and prepared in a manner to bring out
not only the grain of the wood in detail, but the
highlights and other ornamental effects there
of. A particuiariy satisfactory manner of ac
complishing this is to utilize a filler of Chinese
blue or Milori blue which may be worked into the
surface of the wood in order to accentuate the
ornamental appearance thereof.
While the particular manner in which the wood
is photographed may be varied within relatively
20
sequently exposed to light of predominantly
wide limits, depending upon the speci?c type of
equipment used, it has been found particularly
longer wave length, this second exposure tends to
satisfactory to use a camera having a diaphragm
substantially to its original condition prior to
act in a way which serves to restore the emulsion
opening of F22 and provided with a red color
initial exposure.
filter, preferably such as is known as a "Wrattan
‘A’ 25 red" filter. ‘The camera is focused on the
sectin of wood which has been prepared as de
has been pretty de?nitely ascertained that this
bleaching e?‘ect is considerably more pronounced
As a result of experiments it 15
if the di?’erence in wave length between the two
scribed above for a period of approximately forty
exposures is relatively great. Consequently, it
minutes with strong illumination. Manifestly,
may be appreciated that in the event that the 20
wave length of the light used for the initial ex
posure is sufficiently short the subsequent ex
the length of the exposure is directly dependent
upon the illumination and consequently the length
of this exposure may be varied within relatively
wide limits. While various types of cameras may
be satisfactorily used for the purpose, it has been
found particularly satisfactory to use a camera
provided with an eighteen inch process lens and
dispose the slab of prepared wood about thirty-six
inches away.
‘After exposure, the plate is developed in the
usual manner, then ?xed, washed and dried, and
the resulting product provides a positive image of
the section of wood photographed, and it has been
found that the image upon the plate is particu—
35 larly clear, accurate and detailed. Further, it has
been found that the minute features of the grain,
the highlights and other factors which con
tribute to the ornamental appearance of finished
wood, are faithfully reproduced in detail.
an
After completion of the preparation of the
plate in accordance -with the method outlined
above, any suitable process may be utilized for the
purpose of providing a printing roll or plate to be
utilized for transferring the image thus formed
to solid surfaces. While any suitable process
30
such as a half tone may be used for producing
the printing plate or roll from the positive plate,
it has been found preferable as will hereinafter be
more clearly seen to utilize a photogravure proc
ess, such for example as .he following:
A print may be made from the plate on sensi
tized photo carbon tissue such as is ordinarily
employed in the intaglio process of printing.
After exposure in making the print on the carbon
tissue, the latter is again exposed to light. through
a screen of the Rembrandt type in order to break
up the surface of the image into a plurality of
individually isolated elements or bodies. This
image is then etched upon a metallic plate in the
64 conventional manner and the individual bodies
making up the image will be reproduced as
recesses of a magnitude varying in accordance
with the darkness of the original plate for which
the metallic reproduction plate was prepared.
' When paint, stain or pigment is applied to the
metallic reproduction plate, the recesses will be
filled and the surplus pigment may be wiped 0d’.
The pigment disposed in these recesses may be
transferred to the surface upon which it is de
TI v sired to reproduce the image by means of a soft
resilient roll, which serves to merge the individual
masses of pigment and consequently obliterate
all lines of union therebetween. providing. a
faithful reproduction of the image photographed.
75
exposure of a plate to light will give a negative
with certain emulsions, it has been found that
upon further exposure a positive will result.
These regression phenomena are not fully under
stood. What is known as the Herschel effect is 'an L1
even morepronounced regression phenomenon
than the above, and it is this latter effect which
contributes materially to the present invention.
It has been found that if a photographic plate
is initially exposed to a source of light and sub
While it has long been well recognized that
posure may be made with ordinary light, and the
necessary regression phenomena will still be
present.
It will be apparent from the foregoing that
the plate, after its initial exposure. if developed in
the conventional manner, would be uniformly
dark throughout its entire surface. The process
of photographing the desired image through a red
?lter serves to exercise a bleaching effect upon
those particular portions of the plate upon which
the most light is projected, consequently resulting
in the direct production of agpositive Plate as a
result of the photographing
The particular dyes or pigmented materials
utilized for accentuating the grain of the wood
should be of such a color that they will not serve
to re?ect any appreciable amount of light upon
the plate during the photographing process. 40
The reason that Chinese or Milori ‘blues are
chosen for use in the foregoing speci?c illustra
tion of the process is that these two have been
found to be notably lacking in any red compo
nents and are hence extremely satisfactory when 45
a red ?lter is used.
.
It has been found that the image reproduced
by the above donned process is, as has been
pointed out, particularly faithful in detail. When
the speci?c process is utilized for the reproduction 50
of wood graining on metallic surfaces,as has
been described above, the process results in the
clear and faithful reproduction of not only the
grain structure but the high lights of the wood
grain, which features greatly improve the appear 66
ance of the resultantproduct.
It will be appreciated that the process outlined
above may be conveniently utilized for the pur-.
pose of photographically reproducing almost any
type of image upon a plane, solid surface and
that the inventive concept is not limited to the
specific process of reproducing wood graining as‘ ‘
outlined.
Many other and further modifications of the
process outlined herein. falling within the scope 65
of the invention as defined in the subjoined
claims, will be clearly apparentto those skilled
in the art.
I claim as my invention:
1. Themethod of reproducing wood graining
upon a solid surface which comprises preparing
a .wood panel to accentuate the grain thereof.
initially exposing a photographic plate to a source
of white light of uniform intensity, partially de
sensitizing said exposed plate, phoiographlni
3
9, 1 27,944
said prepared wood panel through a color ?lter
on said plate to produce a positive reproduction
oi’ the grain oi’ the wood thereon, said color ?lter
serving to exclude light of short wave length and
subsequently utilizing a photogravure process for
reproducing the image from said plate upon a
solid surface.
2. The process of reproducing wood graining
upon a solid surface which comprises initially
exposing a photographic plate to a source of
white light, subsequently partially desensitizlng
said exposed plate, preparing a wood panel with
blue dye to accentuate the grain thereof, photo
relatively short wave length and subsequently
reproducing the image from said plate upon a
solid surface by a photogravure process.
3. The method of producing wood graining
upon a solid surface‘ which comprises initially
exposing a photographic plate to white light of
uniform intensity for a period sulllciently‘long
to render the plate black it developed, partially
desensitizing said plate, preparing a wood panel
to accentuate the grain thereof, photographing 10
said prepared panel upon said exposed, partially
desensitized plate through a red color ?lter which
serves to exclude the shorter wave lengths of
graphing said prepared wood panel on said ex
‘light, developing said plate, preparing a photo
posed partially desensitized plate through a color gravure plate from said plate, and transferring
filter to produce thereon a positive image of the
food grainlng in said panel, said color ?lter being
of the type which serves to excludes light of
the image from said photogravure plate to a
solid surface by a photogravure process.
ROBERT R. TANN‘ER.
CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION.
Patent No. 2,l2"(>,9l.|ll.
August 25, 1958.
ROBERT R .
TAN'NER .
it is hereby certified that error appears in the printed specification
of the above numbered patent requiring correction as follows: Page 5, first
column, line 17, claim 2, for the word "food" read wood; and line 18, for
"excludes" read ‘exclude; and that the said Letters Patent shouldbe read
with this correction therein that the same may conform to the record of
the case in the Patent Office.
Signed and sealed this 11th day of October, A. D. 1958.
Henry Van Aradale
(Seal)
Acting comrhissioner of Patents.
3
9, 1 27,944
said prepared wood panel through a color ?lter
on said plate to produce a positive reproduction
oi’ the grain oi’ the wood thereon, said color ?lter
serving to exclude light of short wave length and
subsequently utilizing a photogravure process for
reproducing the image from said plate upon a
solid surface.
2. The process of reproducing wood graining
upon a solid surface which comprises initially
exposing a photographic plate to a source of
white light, subsequently partially desensitizlng
said exposed plate, preparing a wood panel with
blue dye to accentuate the grain thereof, photo
relatively short wave length and subsequently
reproducing the image from said plate upon a
solid surface by a photogravure process.
3. The method of producing wood graining
upon a solid surface‘ which comprises initially
exposing a photographic plate to white light of
uniform intensity for a period sulllciently‘long
to render the plate black it developed, partially
desensitizing said plate, preparing a wood panel
to accentuate the grain thereof, photographing 10
said prepared panel upon said exposed, partially
desensitized plate through a red color ?lter which
serves to exclude the shorter wave lengths of
graphing said prepared wood panel on said ex
‘light, developing said plate, preparing a photo
posed partially desensitized plate through a color gravure plate from said plate, and transferring
filter to produce thereon a positive image of the
food grainlng in said panel, said color ?lter being
of the type which serves to excludes light of
the image from said photogravure plate to a
solid surface by a photogravure process.
ROBERT R. TANN‘ER.
CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION.
Patent No. 2,l2"(>,9l.|ll.
August 25, 1958.
ROBERT R .
TAN'NER .
it is hereby certified that error appears in the printed specification
of the above numbered patent requiring correction as follows: Page 5, first
column, line 17, claim 2, for the word "food" read wood; and line 18, for
"excludes" read ‘exclude; and that the said Letters Patent shouldbe read
with this correction therein that the same may conform to the record of
the case in the Patent Office.
Signed and sealed this 11th day of October, A. D. 1958.
Henry Van Aradale
(Seal)
Acting comrhissioner of Patents.
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