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Патент USA US2127956

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Aug. 23, 1938..
R. HELMER
2,127,956
METHOD ‘AND APPARATUS FOR DRYING PRINTING‘ INK
Filed Dec. 26. 1935
3 Sheets-Slieet 1
INVENTOR
w/mas
_'
BM“
ATTORNEY
'
Aug. 23, 1938.
2,127,956
R. HELMER
LZETHOD AND APPARATUS FOR DRYING PRINTING’ INK
Filed Dec. 26. 1935
3 Sheets-Sheet 2
MENTOR
BY
ATTORNEY
‘
Aug. 23, 1938.
2,127,956
" R. HELMER
METHOD ANIS APPARATUS FOR DRYING PRINTING’~ INK
Filed Dec. 26, 1935 '
3 Sheets-Sheet 3
hm.
‘$4
m.
-
INVENTOR
ATTORNE
$49
Patented Aug. 23, 1938
I 2,127,956
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,127,950
METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR DRYING
PRINTING INK
Robert Helmer, Douglaston, N. Y., assignor to ‘
The International Printing Ink Corporation,
New York, N. Y., a corporation of Ohio
Application December 26,1935, Serial No. 56,244
12 Claim. (01. 34-48)
This invention relates to a method and ap
paratus for drying printing ink, and aims to ac
celerate the process of printing.
There are now available so-called “quick dry
5 ing" printing inks whose vehicles consist of a
binder dissolved in a solvent whose vapor pres
sure curve is such that the solvent is. substan
tially non-volatile at ordinary room temperature
(‘about 25° C.) and becomes a highly volatile
1o liquid at temperatures of about 150° C. The cus
tomary method of drying such inks is to apply
printed matter in the form of hot gas or radiant
heat, or most desirably both, and the period of
application of the heat to each part of the“ sur
face of the printed matter is limited by relative
movement between the heat-applying means and 5
the printed matter.
I
‘My invention includes also apparatus by means
of which my method may be carried out em-_
ciently and safely.
,
In the form which I now consider most desira- 1o
ble, the apparatus includes a closed furnace, one
heat to the paper on which the 'ink has been - wall of which is provided by a traveling web of
printed to raise the paper and ink to a tempera
ture of about 150° C. This temperature is will
15 cient to vaporize the solvent in the ink and in
suf?cient to injure the paper. In carrying out
this method, it has been customary to heat the
paper from the back or unprinted side, usually,
by contact with a solid heat-conducting member
so such as a hot metal drum,_or by means of hot air.
In both cases, the temperature of the heating
means (hot drum or hot air) has been limited to a
temperature which cannot injure the paper.
This limitation of the temperature of the heat
gg applying means makes. it necessary to apply the
heat for a substantial period in order to raise the
paper and the ink to the temperature at which
the solvent in the ink is highly volatile and to
volatilize the solvent.
_
I have discovered that, on the application of
intense heat to printed matter consisting of paper
printed with a quick drying ink of the type re
ferred to, the period of time required to raise
the solvent in the ink to the temperature at
35 which it volatilizes rapidly and to volatilize sub
stantially all of the solvent in the ink is ma
terlaliy shorter. than the time required to char
or burn the paper. My method consists in dry
ing printing ink by the'application to the printed
40 matter of a heat so intense‘that it is capable of
raising the temperature of the paper far above
its scorching point, while at the same time limit
ing the period of the application of such heat to
a time which is sufficient to volatilize substan
, 45 tially all of the solvent of the ink and less than
the time which would be required to char or burn
the paper. The heat applied in this method may
be above the ignition point of the vapor of the
ink solventfso that at least somev of the solvent
50 vapor from the ink is ignited and burned, but
neither the paper nor the binder in the ink
which binder may be highly‘ in?ammable is
burned or otherwise injured.
In accordance with my invention, the intense
55 heat is vapplied to the printed surface of the
paper bearing the ink to be dried.
The oppo
site wall of the furnace carries the heat-apply
ing means which direct an intense heat against 15‘ 4
the printed surface oi’ the web. This wall is so
arranged that it may be opened to direct the
heat-applying means away from the web in order
to avoid scorching the web when the web is sta
tionary. The'opening means are most desirably 20
operatively connected with the means for caus
ing the travel of the web across the furnace in
such a way that opening of the furnace occurs
automatically when the movement of the web is
stopped.
_
25
A specific embodiment of the apparatus fea
tures of my invention is illustrated in the ac~
companying drawings, in which
Fig. 1 is a side elevation of the complete ap
paratus, omitting parts of the printing press 30
which are of standard construction and show
ing the furnace in longitudinal section;
Fig. 2 is a diagrammatic view containing an
enlarged side elevation of the furnace taken
from the opposite side from Fig. 1 and an en- 35
larged side view of the means for supplying gas
and air to the furnace, and showing the elec
trical connections;
'
Fig. 3 is an enlarged transverse section of the
furnace taken on the line 3-3 of Fig. 1;
Fig. 4 is a further enlarged section taken on the
line ll-4 of Fig. 3 and showing the details of one
of the burners, and indicating in dotted lines
the position of this burner when turned away
from the web;
.
_
45
Fig. 5 is an enlarged section taken on the
line 5-5 of Fig. 1, showing the air control valve,
and
Fig. 6 is a diagram of the electric control.
The apparatus illustrated includes a printing 50
press. iii of standard construction for printing on
a web P of paper. Ink is applied to the web of
paper P in the press. The web'emerges from
the press over a roller H with its printed side
uppermost, and, after the drying of the ink by 66
2
2,127,9oe
the apparatus to be described, the web P is wound
up on a rewind roller I2 which constitutes a part
of the printing press.
The rewind roller and the
other rollers of the press are driven by a three
When the furnace is closed, the burners 36
direct intense heat toward the printed surface
of the web P, which would char and burn the
web if any portion of the area of the web were
The customary means are pro~
exposed to it for more than a very brief period
of time. It is, therefore, essential that this sup
vided for regulating the speed of the press which
determines the speed of travel of the web P.
ply of intense heat to the web be stopped when
the'movement of the web is stopped. This may
phase electric motor indicated diagrammatically
at l3 in Fig. 2.
In its travel between the guide roller I I of the
10 press and the rewind roller I2 of the press, the
web P passes over guide bars I4 and rollers I5,
l6, II, l6 and I9 mounted on a frame 20.
A furnace 30 is mounted on horizontal bars 2|
of the frame 26 above and adjacent to a portion
of the web traveling between the rollers II and
IS. The furnace is enclosed by side walls 3|,
end walls 32, 32'". a top wall 33, and the portion
of the web P between the end walls 32 which
constitutes the bottom wall of the furnace. The
end walls 32 and 32’ terminate a short distance
above the surface of the web. The top wall 33
contains three doors 34, which carry series of
radiant gas burners 35 which are directed to
wards the web P when the doors 34 are closed.
Each row of burners 35 is mounted on a pipe 36.
Each pipe 36 is attached at one of its ends to a
supply pipe 31 through a stuffing box 36 in such
manner that each pipe 36 may be rotated about
its own axis.
Each pipe 36 thus serves as a
30 pivot about which one row of burners 35 and
one door 34 may be rotated between a position
in which the doors are closed and the burners
are directed towards the web P (shown in full
lines in Figs. 1, 3 and 4 and in dotted lines in
Fig. 2) and a position in which the doors are
open and the burners are directed away from the
web (shown in dotted lines at the top of Fig. 2
and in dotted lines in Fig. 4).
Means are provided for simultaneously open
40 ing and closing the three doors 34 and for swing
ing the three rows of burners 35 away from and
towards the web. Such means include radial
arms 66 fixed on the pipes 36, and connected by
links to a swinging bar ‘I0 provided with a han
45 dle ‘I0’, so that, when the bar ‘I0 is in the posi
tion shown in full lines in Fig. 2, the pipes 36
be accomplished in the form of apparatus illus
trated by rotating the pipes 36 to open the doors 10
34 and direct the burners away from the web.
It is desirable that automatic means should be
provided for opening the furnace when the web
is stationary and closing it when the web is put
in motion.
Such means are illustrated in Fig. 2 15
and Fig. 6.
Fig. 2 shows diagrammatically the main switch
66 of‘ the press I0
motor l3 of the
When ‘the switch
tionary and, when
which serves to connect the
press with supply lines 6|.
60 is open, the web is sta 20
the switch 60 is closed, the
web is put in motion by the motor I3 which
drives the rewind roller I2 and the other rollers
of the press.
The closing of the switch 66 energizes a con 25
trol circuit 62 having two parallel branches one
of which, 63, controls a small motor 66 carrying
a pinion meshing with a gear I3 fixed on the
middle one of the pipes 36. When the circuit
63-is energized by closing the switch 66 with 30
the furnace open, the motor 66 acting through
the gear ‘I3 turns all the pipes 36 to swing the
burners downward towards the web and to close
the doors 34. Thus, the furnace is closed and
the burners directed towards the web when the
web is put in motion by closing the switch 66
and energizing the motor l3. If the web is
stopped by opening the switch 60, or by any
means cutting off the current from the motor
I3, the circuits 62 and 63 are tie-energized. 40
This causes operation of the motor 66 in the
reverse direction to open the furnace and direct
the burners away from the web.
Details of the mechanism which controls the
motor 66, are shown in Fig. 6. The circuit 63 45
contains an electro-magnet 61 and this magnet
are turned so as to close the furnace and direct
and a spring 68 control the position of a re
the burners towards the web P and, when the
bar ‘I0 is swung to the position shown in dotted
lines in Fig. 2, the pipes are turned into a posi
versing switch 69 connected between the motor
66 and a supply line 90. Rotation of the motor
66 in either direction beyond the points at which
tion in which the furnace is open and the burners
are turned directly away ,from the web.
Each of the burners 35 includes a nipple 39,
a de?ector 40, and a parabolic radiator 4| of
it directs the burners towards and away from
55 refractory material which is heated to incan
descence by the gas flame issuing from the nipple
and serves to direct the ?ame and radiant heat
along the axis of the burner and, therefore, di
rc :tly, against the web when the burner is turned
towards the web, as shown in Fig. 4.
A mixture of gas and air is supplied to the
burners through the pipes 36 and supply pipes 3‘I
from a mixing chamber 42. The gas and air
are supplied under pressure to the mixing cham~
65 her and the burners by a centrifugal pump 43,
which draws air from the atmosphere through a
pipe 44 and gas from a gas main 45.
After passing under and across the furnace
30, the web P passes through a suction duct 50
70 formed by an upper wall 5|, a lower wall 52, an
end wall 53, and the end walls 32’ of the fur
nace.
The suction duct 56 is open at one side
of the furnace and at the other side is con
nected to a conduit 54 containing an exhaust
75 fan (not shown).
the web is prevented by the opening of switches
8|] controlled by cams 6| mounted on the middle
pipe 36.
In order to save fuel, it is desirable that the
supply of gas to the burners be reduced when
the furnace is opened. For this purpose, an
automatic electric valve ‘I5 of standard construc
tion is placed in the gas supply pipe and con
nected in a branch 16 of the circuit 62. The 00
valve ‘I5 is opened only‘ when the circuit ‘I6 is
energized. Closing of the valve ‘I6 by de—energiz
ing the circuit ‘I6 also closes a butterfly valve
‘IT in the air pipe 44 which is connected to the
mechanism of the valve ‘I5 by a link 18. To
prevent extinguishment of the burners when the
valves ‘I5 and ‘II are closed, a small by-pass ‘I6
is provided around the valve 15 and a small‘
opening 60 is provided in the butter?y valve ‘II.
This by-pass and this opening insure a sufficient
supply of air and gas to the burners to keep
them ignited and the refractory radiators in
candescent when the web is stationary and the
burners are turned away from the web.
A specific example of the practice of my
2,127,966
method by means of the apparatus as described
is as follows: An ink whose vehicle consists‘ of a
solution of a binder such as nitrocellulose in a
volatilizable solvent such as diethylene glycol
monobutyl ether or diethylene glycol monobutyl
ether acetate is applied to the upper surface of
the web P in the press to. As each successive
part of the web is drawn through the furnace 30,
intense gaseous and radiant heat are directed
10 against the printed surface of the web by the
radiant gas burners 35. The solvent- in the ink
is vaporized and ignited as the web passes through
the furnace. The products of’ combustion are
drawn out of the furnace under-the end wall
15 32' and through the suction duct 50, so that they
do not contaminate the air of the press room.
Any vapor which may come off the web after it
leaves the furnace is also drawn out through
the duct 50. Although combustion, both of fuel
3
2. Apparatus for drying printing ink compris
ing means for causing a traveling movement of
a web to which the ink has been applied, a turn
ably mounted heater located adjacent to the
web, and means operatively connected with the
means for causing. travel of the web for direct
ing said heater towards the web when the web is
in motion and- away from the web when the web
is stationary.
v
3. Apparatus for drying printing ink compris
ing means for causing a traveling movement of lo
a web of paper to which the ink has been ap
plied, an enclosed furnace located adjacent to
the printed side of the web so that the web
forms one wall of the furnace, and an automatic 15
means for opening the opposite wall of the fur
nace when the traveling movement of the web
is stopped.
4. Apparatus for drying printing ink comprise
20 gas and of the solvent vapor, is constantly tak- ‘ ing the combination with means for causing
ing place in the furnace, the paper web is not travel of a web to which the ink has been applied, 20
burned, charred or injured in any way because of a gas burner located adjacent to a point of
the period during which any area of the web is the travel of the web and mounted for rotation
within the furnace is extremely short, amounting about an axis transverse the path of the web‘
25 in practice to about one-third of a second. The so that it may be directed towards or away from
25
paper of the web is, of course, heated to a con
the web.
siderable extent during the passage of the web
5. Apparatus for drying a printing ink com
across the furnace and the tensile strength of prising a combination with means for causing the
the web might be reduced if the web were al
travel of a web to which ink has been applied,
30 lowed to remain hot. The web is, however, cooled of a heater adapted to apply intense heat to the
during its passage over the rollers i6, i1, i8 printed side of the web at a point in its travel, 30
(which are preferably water-cooled rollers) be
said heater being mounted for rotation about an
fore it is wound up on the rewind roller l2. ' When
axis transverse the path of the web so that it may
the travel of the web is stopped for any reason, be directed towards or away from the web.
35 the furnace is immediately opened and the burn
6. In a web printing press, apparatus for dry
ers are directed away from the web so that the ing printing ink comprising means for causing a 35
web is not burned.
traveling movement of the web to which the ink
In the apparatus described, the radiant burn
has been applied, a movable heater, and means
ers 35 apply intense heat to the web both in the operatively connected with the means for caus
40 form of radiant heat and in the form of hot gas. ing travel of the web for moving said heater to
This causes a very rapid volatilization of any an operative position when traveling movement 40
volatilizible solvent contained in the ink. If the is imparted to said web so that intense heat is
solvent is in?ammable, a considerable part of it directed upon the printed surface of the web and
is ignited and burned in the furnace. The prod
to an inoperative position when the movement of
nets of combustion, as well as any part of the said web is stopped.
~
45
solvent vapor which is not burned, are drawn off
7. Apparatus for drying printing ink compris
through the suction duct 50 to a point remote ing the combination with means for causing a
from the web.
traveling movement of the material to which the
It is not essential that both radiant heat and ink has been applied, of a furnace, a heater at
gaseous heat be used. I have found it satisfac
tached to ‘one wall of the furnace and adapted
tory to use gaseous heat only, but in this case to direct intense heat upon the printed surface of 50
burners ejecting large gas ?ames under heavy
pressure are used and substantially all the solvent the material, and automatic means for opening
furnace wall to which said heating element
which is driven from the ink on the web is ignited the
is attached.
and burned.
'
The drying of the ink by this method is ex
tremely rapid and permits use of the method
with rotary presses operating at a speed of 400
feet per minute.
My invention is by no means limited to the
use of the method or the apparatus with the par
ticular ink which has been mentioned for the
sake of illustration; It has proved effective by
drying and accelerating the, drying of many
65 types of inks, including several which cannot be
satisfactorily dried by the hot roll method.
What I claim is:
.
1. Apparatu; for drying printing ink com
prising the combination with means for causing
70 a traveling movement of a web of paper to which
the ink has been applied, 01' an enclosed furnace
located adjacent to the printed side of the web
so that the web forms one side of the furnace,
and means for opening the opposite wall of the
76 furnace.
8. Apparatus for drying printing ink compris 55
ing the combination with means for causing a
traveling movement of a web to which the ink
has been applied, of an enclosed furnace having
a heating compartment and a separate suction
compartment located adjacent to the printed side 60
of the web so that the web forms'one wall of the
furnace.
.
9. The method which comprises printing at
room temperature with an ink containing a com
bustible binder dissolved in a volatilizable and
in?ammable solvent which is substantially non
volatile at room temperature, and then applying
to printed ink through a gaseous medium heat of
sufficient intensity to volatilize the ink solvent in
stantaneously and ignite the solvent vapor, and 70
limiting the time of application of said heat to a
period so short that the heat does not char the
ink binder.
10. The method which comprises printing on a
combustible material with an ink containing a 76
4
2,127,956
combustible binder dissolved in a volatilizable
and in?ammable solvent which is substantially
non-volatile at room temperature, moving the
printed material away from the printing means,
applying through a gaseous medium to the print—
ed surface of the material heat of su?lcient in
tensity to volatilize the solvent and ignite the
solvent vapor, maintaining the material out of
contact with any heated surface between printing
10 and the application of said heat, and limiting the
time of application of said heat to each part of
this surface of the material to a period so short
that the heat does not char the material and the
ink binder deposited thereon.
11. Apparatus for drying printing ink, com
prising means for causing a traveling movement
of a combustible web to which the ink has been
applied, an enclosed furnace located adjacent to
ing the furnace temperature above the combus
tion temperature of the web, and means opera
tively connected. to the means for causing travel
of the web for reducing the furnace temperature
to a temperature below the scorching tempera
ture of the web when the traveling movement of
the web is stopped.
12. Apparatus for drying printing ink, com
prising the combination with means for causing
a traveling movement of the material to which 10
the ink has been applied, of a plurality of rows of
heaters adapted to direct intense heat toward the
printed side of the material, each of said rows
being mounted for rotation about an axis parallel
with the axis of rotation of each other row so that 15
the heaters may be directed toward or away from
the material, said axes all lying in a plane paral
lel to the printed surface of said material.
the traveling web so that its printed side is ex- .
ROBERT HELLER.
20 posed to the furnace heat, means for maintain
20
CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION .
August 25, 1958.
Patent No. 2,127,956.
ROBERT HELPER .
It is hereby certified that the name of the assignee in the above num
bered patent was erroneously described and specified .as " The International
Printing Ink.Corporation" whereas said name should have been described and
specified as Interchemical Corporation,
New York, N. Y., a corporation
of Ohio, as shownby the record of assignments in ‘this office; and that the
said Letters Patent should be read with ‘this correction therein that the
same may conform to the record of the case in the Patent Office.
‘
Signed and sealed this 18th day of April, A. o. 1959.
Henry Van Arsdale
(Seal)
Acting Commissioner of‘ Patents.
DiSCLAiMER
2,127,956.——R0bert Helmer, Douglaston, N. Y. METHOD AND Armazxros FOR
DRYING PRINTING INK. _Patent dated August 23, 1938. Disclaimer ?led
May 14, 1940, by the asslgnec, Interchemical Corporation.
Herebg enters this‘ disclaimer to claims 4, 5, and 12 of said Letters Patent.
I
[ ?cwl Gazette June 4, 1940.]
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