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Патент USA US2128137

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Aug. 23, 1938.
‘
R. G. GODSON
BUILDING STRUCTURE
I
Filed Dec. 8, 1934
2,128,137
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BY Q/TZwLé/MJM
ATTORNE YS.
Aug. 23, 1938.
R. G. GODSON
2,128,137
’
BUILDING STRUCTURE
Filed Dec. 8, 1934'
3 Sheets-Sheet 5
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ATTORNEYS.
Patented Aug.‘ 23, 1938
2,128,13T
UNITED‘ STATES PATENT" OFFICE
2,128,137‘ I.
BUILDING STRUCTURE:
Reginald‘G. Godson, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Application December 8, 1934, Serial‘ No. 758,690
In Canada February 21, 1934
16 Claims.
The present invention relates to new and use
ful improvements in the design and erection of
buildings and other structures, same comprising
a geometric load-distribution system for placing
5' loads economically on supporting beams which
carry the floors in the aforesaid structures.
In modern structures the cost of the ?oor-sys
tem, beams and‘ columns is an important per
‘
(e1. 7241)?
them uniformly, over‘the entire length of the said
beams. This, isaccomplished by placing. a series
of ‘ secondary beams arranged in circumscribed
relation? within the panel, and'a plurality of cone
centric groups of beams of smaller extent within
the secondary beams, as. will ,be explained herein.
' A comparison of the costs of floor slabs and‘
centage of the total cost. The cost varies directly
main supporting beams, designed according to
the, present system, with other ?oor systems. in
10 with the weight of the structure, which in turn
depends on the ?oor loads and the span of the
common. use shows that very'ia'ppreciable sav
ings can be made in the' cost of construction.
_
floor beams; and the span becomes a more impor
tant factor as the spacing of the columns in
creases.
Lastly incidental design features etc.,
15' such as ties, struts and bracing, add to the cost
by providing material that apart from the speci
?ed requirements for rigidity, perform no useful
work supporting the floor loads of the structures.
The usual types of floor construction, in use
today, carry the floor loads directly’on- to the sup
porting beams or ‘marginal girders, Without at
tempting to place these loads on the supporting
beams to- best advantage.
,
In an ideal design, the floor loads should be
2-5 transmitted directly to the columns. Failing this,
the next best arrangement would be to carry-as
much of the floor loads as possible to therends
of the marginal beams or girders, thus reducing
the bending moment and subsequent deflection in
30 the beams; resulting in a comparatively light and
rigid structure. Moreover, the floor loads should
be transmitted to all the floor beams, thus making‘ all parts of the frame do useful work. The
application of the present geometric load-distri
35 bution system to the design of floors in any com
monly used-structures achieves these advanta
geous results, as will be fully explained in the
following pages.
'
-
The present geometric load distribution sys
tem is based on the principle of converting
stresses due to the ?oor loads, largely into shear
and reducing the bending moments in the mar
ginal beams to a minimum; as opposed to the
The actual amount‘ of these savings due to re
duced. depths ofslabs. and beams, in masonry
walls, partiti'onstplastering, piping, wiring, etc.,
is also a substantial item in cost of construction.‘ 15,
The reduced dead loads. and building heights also
effect savings in columns and footings, particu
larly in structures designed to resist‘ wind forces.
I In bridge construction the concentrated wheel
loads usually govern'the design of the floor beams 20v
and stringers, although the slab itself may be re
duced by the application of the present geometric
load-distribution systemand such reduction in
the slab dead‘ loads'results in economy in design
of the main trusses and girders of the main struc- 25-‘
ture. Tests of the present system‘have been‘made
and same have proven that the theory involved
is substantiatedin practice.
'
‘In the accompanying drawings forming part of
the present speci?cation, I have illustrated the 30
structural features embodied in my invention, in
which:
Figure l is a plan view showing the layout'of a
ring ?oor system, for a typical panel of a build
ing or similar structure, in which is shown a 35"
number of boundary or marginal girders, a series
of secondary beams arranged in circumscribed
relation in the panel, and a plurality of concen
tric groups ‘ of beams of smaller extent, each
group having its central'point coincidental with‘ 40
that of one of the secondary beams.v
usual practice where larger. bending moments
Figures 2 and 3 show- plan views'of two‘modi
?cations of‘ a triangular floor systeml-lfo'r'build
ings etc., arranged similarly to the ring floor sys
and shear in the usual methods of design are
tem of Figure 1.
»
45
commonly employed; The present system makes‘
Figure 4 shows a plan layout‘of a rectangular
it possible to reduce the cost of building construc
tion by using lighter and shallower beams and
?oor system‘for buildings etc., having a similar
lighter slabs, and by decreasing the story heights
Figure 5 is a-plan view ofv a modi?cation of
.50‘ of buildings. and other structures. ' It is applica
arrangement to those just described.
‘
'
Figure 4, the. rectangles being formed by'means 50
ble to any type of construction, same' being. a
of joists arranged as illustrated, in the section‘
geometric arrangement of the floor units by
shown in Figure 6.
means of which the floor loads are carried in ever
increasing amounts towards‘the ends of the main
651, or marginalv floor beams, instead of distributing
_
.
.
Figure 6 is a- central vertical transverse sec-,
tion on‘line 6-6 of Figure 5.
.
,Figure 7 shows a plan of a modi?ed form of 55
2
2,128,137
right-angular ?oor system, the loads being car
ried on each joist in turn near the ends thereof,
the ?nal or accumulated reactions being placed
to data obtainable from any structural handbook,
the maximum bending moment in a beam, simply
supported, and loaded with a triangular loading,
on the main beams or marginal girders between
increasing from zero at its center to a maximum
the columns near their points of support.
at the ends, is only two-thirds of that for a
Figure 8 shows a plan of alsplayed floor sys ' similar beam loaded with a uniform load over its
entire length; thus it may be seen that the geo
. tern, in which the end reactions of the floor sup
porting structural units are split up into two or metric load-distribution system makes possible
more reactions; the latter being transmitted to the use of lighter and shallower beams than
would be required to support a ?oor panel of the 10
ll) the marginal girders or beams which extend be
tween the columns at points near their points of same size designed to carry the same dead and
support.
live loads under the same conditions of support,
Figure 9 shows a typical part plan layout of a but where the loads are uniformly distributed,
geometric load-distribution system for a build which, according to present methods of design, is
15 ing.
Figure 10 is a plan view of a rectangular panel
?oor system using the geometric ring load-dis
tribution system.
Figure 11 is a plan layout of a ?oor panel in
20 which the rings or strips of floor are irregularly
spaced with reference to each other.
Figure 12 is a transverse vertical section on line
l2—l2 of Figure 11 for semi-detached and iso
lated rings, illustrating graphically the relative
25 strength of the rings shown in said ?gure.
Figure 13 is a transverse vertical section on
line I3--l3 of Figure 11, showing a similar
graphic illustration of the relative strength of
the rings.
30
‘
'
Figure 14 is a plan of a ?oor panel, showing the
arrangement of reinforcing material, located near
the top of. the slab used for the panel.
Figure 15 is a plan of a floor panel showing the
arrangement of reinforcing material located near
the bottom of the slab used for the panel.
Figure _16 is a vertical transverse half-section
on line l6—l6 of Figure 15.
Figure 17 is a vertical transverse half-section
on line I1—|l of Figure 15.
40
.
Figure 18 is a graphical diagram illustrating a
triangular loading on a supporting beam.
Figures 1 to 8 illustrate several geometric sys
tems, the fundamental basic principles of which
are substantially the same in theory, namely, a
45 geometric arrangement of the ?oor units which
distributes the floor loads on to the supporting
?oor beams or marginal girders, in proportion
to their size. It follows that the larger units being
located farthest from the approximate center of
the supporting beam, the greatest floor loads
will be placed on the supporting beam near its
points of support, thus making it possible to have
lighter and shallower beams in the structure,
as is well understood in the design of beams, in
55
common practice.
7
Assuming each geometric structural ?oor unit
to be of unit width, it may be readily seen that:
(1) The load on each of the rings or circular
strips of ?oor I to 6 inclusive as shown in Fig
ure 1 is proportional to its radius.
(2) The load on each triangular strip of ?oor
l, 8, 9 and In as shown in Figure 2 is proportional
to its length,
(3) The load on each rectangular strip of floor
65 ll, I2, I3 and M as shown in Figure 4 is pro
portional to its length.
Therefore the concentrations on the supporting
floor beams, due to the reactions of these ?oor
units increase from zero at the center to a maxi
mum at the outer strips; in other words the
beams or'marginal girders, l5, l6 and H are load
ed with a continuously increasing load, increas
ing uniformly from zero or a minimum at the
center to a maximum at the outer strips or sec
ondary beams, 6, I0, M respectively. According
one of the'most economical distributions in com—
mon use. This explanation is based onv uni
versally accepted principles.
In the case of a right angular floor system as
shown in Figure 7, the floor units, as illustrated
by l8, I9, 20 and 2|, increase in size from the
center ofthe panel until the boundary or mar
ginal beams are reached. Each unit transmits
its load near the ends of the unit directly sup
porting it, until the ?nal accumulated reactions
are placed on the supporting beams 22, 22 etc., 25
near their points of support. It can be readily
seen that the bending moments involved are
greatly reduced by reason of the floor loads be
ing concentrated near the ends of the supporting
members.
,
30
The splayed beam system illustrated in Fig. 8,
demonstrates in an elementary manner how the
floor loads carried by a’structural unit such as
23 can be split up into two or more reactions
24, 25 and placed on the supporting or marginal 35
beams 26, 26 etc., near their points of support,
thus reducing the bending moment in the sup
porting ?oor beam according to the distance these
loads are placed away from the centers of said
40
beams or girders.
Figure 3 is a modi?cation of Figure 2.
Figure 5 is a modi?ed arrangement of Figure 4
in which the rectangles are formed by means of
continuous units as illustrated in section in Fig
ure 6. The dotted portions of the floor units
illustrated by 21, 28 and 29 do not form part of
the geometric system and do not carry the floor
30 or the ceiling 3|.
Consider a case in which the whole floor is
constructed of a plurality of concentric rings
or strips of suitable material, or of any other geo
metric shape ‘that can be mathematically ana
lyzed and practically used: let Figure l repre
sent a plan of a floor panel made up of a series
of vsuch rings as outlined above, the floor being '4
assumed to be symmetrical about the boundary
beams or marginal girders and only half the rings
being shown for the sake of convenience. As
already explained, any other practical geometric
shape would do. However, the “ring” is selected
for this discussion, as it appears to possess cer
tain advantages over other shapes. Assume each
ring to carry a strip of floor one foot wide, and
the centers of each circular strip to be in exact 65
feet from the center of the beam; that is the
annular center of the ?rst ring or strip to be one
foot from the center of the main or marginal
beams; the annular center of the second ring
to be two feet from the center of the main beams 70
and so on.
It may be easily proven that the reaction of
each ring on the supporting beam is propor
tional to the radius of the ring or strip. In other
words, in the geometric load distribution system, 75
3
2,128,137
of contact with each other preventing any torque
the supporting beam is loaded with a triangular
continuous loading, increasing uniformly from
in the rings themselves.
rings.
‘
'
In actual tests made to demonstrate the pres
ent system of construction, reinforced concrete
construction was selected as being the best adapt
ed to fully demonstrate the principles of the geo
metric load-distribution system, because it was
ll) considered that if a solid slab would distribute
In reinforced concrete construction, therefore,
designed according to the present system, no re
inforcement is introduced to take care of any 15
moment or shear along lines normal to the main
rings would naturally follow. Steel boundary
supporting beams usually placed between the col
beams, and the torque in the rings is assumed to
be distributed throughout the disc comprised of
the series of rings I to B ‘inclusive in Figure 1.
Practical tests demonstrated the ring action 20
umns, simply supported, were decided upon as
best ?tted to illustrate the distribution of loads,
due to the present system. The tests disclosed
20 that for working loads the distribution of loads
to the supporting beams is in substantial con
in the slab and no evidence was found to indi
cate any torsional shear failure in any part of
the slab thus certifying to they correctness of the
formity with the geometric load-distribution
theory described herein.
above assumptions.
It can be seen from Figure 9 that the rings of
the same radius are made standard throughout
‘ '
In the case of any other type of construction 25
consisting of semi-detached or isolated rings care
must be taken not to employ any method or ar
the building for any particular ?oor loading;
their detail is exactly similar whether it takes
the form of slab reinforcement semi-detached
rangement to prevent tilting of the rings and the
accompanying torque, which might constitute a
system having considerable strength and stiff 30
or isolated rings. However it is important to
30 note that in the case of semi-detached or isolated
ness, in a direction normal to the main beams
rings the spacing of the rings depends on eco
nomical requirements of design; the smaller the
rings the greater the space between them accord
and thus prevent ring action and the desired dis
tribution of loads on to the main supporting
beams.
As illustrated in-Figure 9 by rings 44, 45 etc., 35
ing to the requirements of building speci?ca
35 tions and codes.
where the arc of‘ the ring subtends central an
gles less than 180 degrees, the moments and
Figure 10 shows a rectangular typical floor
panel in which the ratio of the length and the
torques in such segments of rings decrease con
siderably as the central angle diminishes, thus
breadth of the panel is in the substantial propor~
It can be seen that under
this system the small beams are fully loaded
and the longer beams are only partially loaded as
the result of these arrangements, and all the
outer rings can be made in tangential contact.
Figure 11 illustrates a typical layout for a
semi-detached and isolated ring ?oor system,
consisting of a series ‘of irregularly spaced rings
32, 38, 39, 40 and 4|, as opposed to a solid floor
slab. It may be seen that if the outer rings 32,
32 etc., are designed to carry all the load on the
50 central floor area 33, this load will be carried
back near the ends of the main supporting beams
at points 34, 35 etc., through the reactions of
these outer rings, thus reducing the bending mo
ment in the main beams or girders 36, 36 etc.,
' located around the panel. This reduction in
bending moments is seen to be greater than in
the case of the slab where each ring is assumed
'
In the case of a solid floor slab, the central
?oor area 33 Figure l is treated as a suspended
span for the purpose of design supported on the
four surrounding discs, each disc composed of
a series of rings I to 6 inclusive as shown in Fig
ure 1, by means of a rectangular grid 42 or equiv
alent means as shown in Figure 15.
‘
their center.
shortest direction to cause rupture in the con
crete, the behaviour of semi-detached or isolated
to carry a portion of the central ?oor area 33.
'
whose strength and stiffness are such as to pro
vide the means for carrying such loads in a di 10
rection normal to the main beams, or towards
the panel floor loads to the supporting beams,
Without su?icient transfer of the load in the
tion of two to one.
-
It is important in the’ discussion We have in
hand that the type of construction be such that
there is no tendency for the panel‘floor loadings
to travel to the main beams or- marginal girders
in the direction normal thereto. Therefore no
members are introduced in the present system
zero at the center to a maximum at the outer
-
In the case of the isolated ring design the cen
tral ?oor area 33 is supported by the four outer
rings 32, 32 etc., Figure 11, on a circular ring
31, or other equivalent means of support.
Figures 12 and 13 represent graphically the
size and stiffness of the rings required for vthe
panel as shown in Figure 11 in which ?gures the
rings 32, 33, 39, M! and El are shown in section.
It will be noted that the tangential rings 32,
32 etc., support each other laterally at points
making additional savings in material possible 40
in the ?oor over those outlined above.
Practical tests show the ratio of the measured
de?ection to the calculated de?ections on the
basis of triangular loading and uniform loading
is 41; '73; 100. In other words the actual de 45
?ection is only 0.562 of the calculated de?ection
for a triangular loading; as proportionally rep
resented in Figure 18 and still further reduction
factors may be found to'be practical.
In the case of a, solid‘slab floor, the rings are 50
assumed to be partially restrained at the sup
ports and laterally supported for their entire
perimeter by the shear in the slab and no al-‘
lowance made for torque. These assumptions
are fully justi?ed by practical performance as 55
proved in actual tests. The maximum negative
moment occurs at the supporting beams on the
line 46, 46 etc., Figure 14, and the maximum pos
itive moment occurs at the center of the half
rings on the line 41, 151 etc., Figure 15. The points 60
of “inflexion” are assumed to be for practical
purposes on a line 48, ll8,'etc., Figures 14 and
15, making an angle of substantially about 45
degrees with the diametral line of the rings,
which lies parallel with the boundary beams.
The floor is designed for the maximum posi- '
tive moments in an intermediate or outer ring
and extra strength provided at the critical points
to resist “excess moments.” ‘It can be seen that
the critical points occur only in the outer rings; 70
whereas the theoretical strength required in the
inner rings is'negligible, and these. small ‘rings
can be constructed by any practical means. It
is readily seen that a saving can be eifected in
the floor itself by making the smaller rings shal 75
4
2,128,137
low, and providing hollow ?llers beneath them,
as at 12, 13 Fig. 12 of any material to keep the
ceiling level.
ures 14 and
moments is
and extends
ticularly in connection with barrel and shell roof
construction, similar to those used for skating
The reinforcement 49, 50 etc., Fig
rinks and other auditoriums. In the latter case
17, required to resist the negative the rings will naturally conform to the pitch
located near the top of the rings. or curvature of the roof being designed. In the
between the points of inflexion 48, extreme case where these rings are almost ver
48 etc., on both sides of the supporting beam
as shown in Figure 14.
The reinforcement 5|,
52 etc., required to resist the positive bending
10 moments in Figure 15, is located near the bot
tom of the rings as is shown in said ?gure. This
reinforcement 5|, 52 etc., is shown continuous at
53, 54 etc., in Figures 15 and 1'7 for the entire
circle, for practical purposes, but need only ex
15 tend between the points of in?exion 48, 48 etc.,
Within any particular panel. Extra compression
reinforcement is provided where necessary at 55,
56, 5'! etc., Figure 17 located at the bottom of
the slab and extending‘between the points of in
20 flexion 48, 48 etc., Figure 15, on both sides of the
supporting beam as shown in said ?gure.
The reinforcement shown in Figure 15 by 58,
59 etc., located at the bottom of the ?oor and nor
mal to the diagonals of the panel is introduced
25 to strengthen these areas of the floor and to’ tie
the discs together.
The reinforcement shown in Figure 14, at 65,
6| etc., located at the top of the floor around
the columns, is introduced to strengthen the
30 corner area of the panels, as initial failure tends
to occur at the top of the slab‘ near the ends of
tical they will act as a series of arches distribut
ing the loads almost vertically on the support
ing beams or Walls, increasing from a minimum
at the center of the system of rings, to a maxi 10
mum at the rings farthest from the center of
the ring system.
From the above description it will be seen that
I have provided a system of construction which
accomplishes all the advantageous features set 15
out in the preamble of this speci?cation.
I claim:
1. An arrangement of floor panel construc
tion, comprising a number of marginal girders
connected to each other to form the outline of
a panel, a. plurality of panel beams each sup
ported on a marginal girder, and arranged to de
liver panel load concentrations thereto, which in
crease from a minimum at a point intermediate
the ends of the girder to a maximum nearer the 25
ends. of the same.
2. An arrangement of floor panel construc
tion, comprising a number of marginal girders
connected to each other to- form the outline of
a panel, a plurality of panel beams each sup
ported on a marginal girder at a plurality of
the beams, and roughly parallel thereto.
points, and arranged to deliver the maximum
Figures 16 and 17 represent graphically the
relative strength and sti?ness of rings 62 to 61
panel load concentrations near the ends of said
35 inclusive for a solid ?oor.
In the case of semi-detached or isolated rings
as shown in Figure 11, the rings are assumed to
3. An arrangement of ?oor panel construc
tion, comprising a number of supporting columns,
be “partially restrained” and designed to resist
bending and torsional moments.
Tests reveal
that the torsion developed is only a small part
of that indicated by “free torsion equations”.
However, judgment must be used based on the
strength and stiffness of the constructional meth
ods employed.
As before mentioned, Figure 11 shows the lay
out for a panel constructed of semi-detached or
isolated rings and Figures 12 and 13 give a graph
ical representation of the relative size and stiff
ness of the rings required.
65
a number of marginal girders carried by said
columns, a series of secondary beams arranged
in circumscribed relation about the‘ panel, each
being partially in said panel and partially in an 40
adjacent panel and carried on one of the marginal
girders, and a plurality of concentric groups of
beams of smaller extent, which extend in both
of said above described panels, each group hav
ing its central point coincidental with that of
one of the secondary beams, such arrangement of 45
panel beams being adapted to deliver load con
centrations on. each of the marginal girders,
which increase from a minimum near the center
In the case of a solid floor, the central area
of each group of panel beams, to a maximum at
42, Figure 15 is designed exactly the same as an
points where the loads from the secondary beams
ordinary two-way slab and reinforcement l4, 14
are delivered to the marginal girders.
etc., is provided located near the bottom of the
slab as shown in Figure 16 or any other suit
55 able means of support may be employed.
In the case of semi-detached or isolated rings,
this area 33 Figure 11, may be supported on a
curved ring 3'! as shown in Figure 11, or by any
other practical method.
60
girder.
In the description of the present system I have
shown the outer rings to be tangential in. order
to best describe the distribution of loads to the
supporting beams, however in some instances it
is advantageous to continue the systems farther
by providing overlapping or interlocking rings 68,
69 etc., as shown in Figure 10.
These rings would be designed to carry a cer
tain percentage of the floor load depending on
the relative stiffness of the rings which overlap
4. An arrangement of floor panel construction,
comprising a number of marginal girders con
nected to each other to form the outline of a
panel, a series of secondary beams arranged in 55
circumscribed relation in the panel, each mount
ed on one of the marginal girders, and a plu
rality of concentric groups of beams of smaller
extent, each having its central point coinciden
tal with that of one of the secondary beams,
such arrangement of interior panel beams be
ing adapted to deliver panel load concentrations
on each of the marginal girders, which increase
from a minimum near the center of each group 65
of panel beams to a maximum at the points
Where the loads from the secondary beams are
delivered to the marginal girders.
5. An arrangement of ?oor panel construc
70 or interlock, etc.,
tion comprising a main girder, a series of sec
While I have described this structure for floors
of buildings, bridges, and other structures, it is
readily seen that the present system of construc
tion and design may be readily applied for use
75 in connection with roofs of any kind and par
ondary beams, each having its central point on
the approximate longitudinal center line of said
girder, and a plurality of concentric groups of
beams of smaller extent, each having its central
point coincidental with that of one of the sec- 75
70
5
2,128,137‘
Jond'ary beams, such arrangement of secondary
beams and beams of smaller extent being adapt
ed to deliver load concentrations on the main
girder, which increase from a minimum near
the center of each groupof beams‘ to- amaXi
mum at points where the loads from the sec
ondary beams are delivered to the marginal
girders.
6. An arrangement of floor panel construc
tion, comprising a number of supporting col
lumns, a number of marginal girders carried by
said columns, a' series of secondary beams ar
ranged in circumscribed relation in the panel,
each mounted on one of the marginal girders,
15 and having its central point intermediate the
ends: of said girder, and a plurality of concen
tric groups of beams of smaller extent, each hav
ing its central point coincidental with that of
one of the secondary beams, such arrangement
of interior panel beams being adapted to de
liver panel load concentrations on each of the
marginal girders, which increase from a mini
mum near the center‘ of each group of panel
beams to a maximum at the points where the
25 loads from the secondary beams are delivered
to the marginal girders.
7. An arrangement of ?oor panel construction
for delivering ?oor panel concentrations to the
boundary beams at points adjacent the ends. of
30 said beams, comprising a number of connected
boundary beams forming apanel therebetween, a
series
of rectangularly arranged ?oor panel
beams ultimately supported by the boundary
beams, each beam of which beginning at the ap
35 proximate center of the vpanel delivers its load
reactions near the ends of its adjacent and suc
cessive panel beams in turn, until the accumu
lated load reactions of all the interior panel
beams are delivered on the boundary beams in
the manner speci?ed.
8. An arrangement of floor panel construction,
comprising a number of supporting columns, a
number of marginal girders carried by said col
umns, a series of arc-shaped secondary beams
arranged in circumscribed relation in the panel,
each mounted on one of the marginal girders,
and with its central point near the approximate
center of said girder, and a plurality of concen
tric groups of arc-shaped beams of smaller ex
tent, each having its central point coincidental
with that of one of the secondary beams, such
arrangement of interior panel beams being
adapted to deliver pan-e1 load concentrations on
each of the marginal girders, which increase from
55 a. minimum near the center of each group of pan
el beams, to a maximum near the ends of said
girders.
9. An arrangement of ?oor panel construction,
comprising a number of supporting columns, a
number of marginal girders carried by said col
umns, a series of angular-shaped secondary beams
arranged in circumscribed relation in the panel,
each mounted on one of the marginal girders
and with its central point near the approximate
65 center of said girder, and a plurality of concen~
tric groups of angular-shaped beams of smaller
extent, each having its central point coincidental
with that of one of the secondary beams, such
arrangement of interior panel beams‘ being adapt
ed to deliver panel load concentrations on each
of the marginal girders, which increase from a
minimum near the center of each group of panel
beams, to a maximum near the ends of said
75
girders.
10. An arrangement of ?oor panel construc
tion, comprising a number of supporting col
umns, a‘.v number of ,marginal girders carried by
said columns,- a series of U-shaped secondary
beams arranged in circumscribed relation in the
panel, each mounted on one of the marginal 5
girders, and with‘ its centrallpoint'near the ap
proximate center of said girder, and a plural
ity of concentric groups of U-shaped beams of
smaller extent, each having its central point coin
cidental with that of one of the secondary beams, 10
such arrangement of interior panel beams being
adapted to deliver panel load concentrations on
each of the marginal girders, which increase from
a minimum‘ near. the center of each group of
panel beams, to a' maximum' near the ends of 15
said girders.
1
11. An arrangement of ?oor panel construc
tion, comprising a number of supporting columns,
a number of marginal girders carried by said
columns, a series of secondary beams arranged 20
in circumscribed relation in the panel, each
mounted on one of the marginal girders‘, and
with its central point near. the approximate cen—
ter of said girder, and a plurality of concentric
groups of beams‘ of smaller extent, each having 25
its central point coincidental with that of one
of the secondary beams‘, reinforcing members in
each of the panel beams near the top surface
thereof, for‘ carrying the negative bending mo
ments of such beams where they cross the mar
ginal girders, andv reinforcing members in each
30
of the panel beams near the bottom thereof for
carrying the positive bending moments in said
beams, such arrangement of interior panel beams
being adapted to deliver panel load concentra 35
tions on each of the marginal girders which in
crease from a minimum near the center of each
group of. panel beams, to a maximum near the
ends of said girders.
'
12. An. arrangement of floor panel construc 40
tion, comprising a number of supporting col
umns, a number of marginal girders carried by
said columns, a series of secondary beams ar
ranged in circumscribed relation in the panel,
each mounted, on one of the marginal girders,
and with its central point near the approxi
mate center of said girder, and a plurality of
concentric groups of beams of smaller extent,
each having its central point coincidental with
that of one secondary beam, reinforcing mem
bers in. each of the panel beams near the top 50
surface thereof for carrying the negative bend
ing moments of such beams where they cross
the marginal girders, said members extending
substantially between the adjacent points of con
tra?exure in adjacent building panels, and re 55
inforcing members in each of the panel beams
near the bottom thereof for carrying the posi
tive bending moments in said beams, such mem
bers extending substantially between the points
of co-ntra?exure within adjacent building panels,
such arrangement of interior panel beams being
adapted to deliver panel load concentrations on
each of the marginal girders, which increase from
a minimum near the center of each group of
panel beams, to a maximum near the ends of
said girders.
‘
13. An arrangement of ?oor panel construc
tion, comprising a number of supporting col
umns, a. number of marginal girders- carried by
said columns, a series of secondary beams ar 70
ranged in circumscribed relation in the panel,
each mounted on one of the marginal girders,
and with its central point near the approxi
mate center of said girder, and a plurality of
concentric groups of beams of smaller extent, 75
6
2,128,137
each having its central point coincidental with
‘that of one of the secondary beams, reinforcing
members in each of the panel beams near the
top surface thereof for carrying the negative
bending moments of such beams, where they
cross the marginal girders, said members ex
tending substantially between the adjacent points
of contra?exure in adjacent building panels, and
reinforcing members in each of the panel beams
near the bottom thereof for carrying the posi
tive bending moments in said beams, some of
such members extending substantially between
the points of contra?exure within adjacent pan
els and others of which extend throughout the
15 full length of the panel beams, such arrangement
of interior panel beams being adapted to de
liver panel load concentrations on each of the
marginal girders, which increase from a mini
mum near the center of each group of panel
beams, to a maximum near the ends of said
girders.
14. In a floor panel construction having a num
ber of marginal girders forming the outline of
the panel, an arrangement for delivering floor
panel load concentrations to the marginal gird~
ers which increase from a minimum at a point
intermediate the length of each girder to a maxi
mum towards the ends of same, comprising means
which are geometric shaped in plan view for
transmitting to said girder loads due to panel
loading in such a manner that the maximum
bending moment created in each of the marginal
girders is less than if the panel load were de
livered to the said girders so as to create a uni
form loading on each girder.
15. An arrangement of floor beam construction
for delivering load concentrations to a girder
which increase from a minimum at a point in
termediate the length of the girder to a maxi
mum towards the ends of same, comprising a
plurality of beams which are geometric shaped 10
in plan view, mounted substantially in an axial
manner and solely on the said girder, so that,
the load concentrations occur on the girder in
the order speci?ed.
16. An arrangement of ?oor panel construction 15
for delivering ?oor panel concentrations to‘ the
boundary beams at points adjacent the ends of
said beams, comprising a number of connected
boundary beams forming a panel therebetween,
a series of rectangula-rly arranged ?oor panel 20
beams, ultimately supported on the boundary
beams, each interior panel beam beginning at
the approximate center of the panel being ar
ranged to receive a plurality of unequal load re
action concentrations from its adjacent panel 25
beams, near the ends thereof, until the accumu
lated load reactions from all the interior panel
beams are delivered to the boundary beams in
the form of concentrations in the manner spec
i?ed.
REGINALD G. GODSON.
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