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Патент USA US2128211

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Aug.23,1938.
TNLJUDGE
2,128,211
RAILWAY SIGNALING SYSTEM
Filed Sept. 25, 1956
2 SheetsfSheet 1
93
SN»
INVENTOR
£7
ATTORNEY
Aug. 23, 1938.
T. J. JUD'GE
2,128,211‘
RAILWAY S IGNALING SYSTEM
Filed Sept. 25, 1956
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
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Patented Aug. 23, 1938
. 2,128,211
UNETED STATES gPATEN'i' OFHQE
2,128,211
RAILWAY SIGNALING SYSTEM
Thomas J. Judge, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, assignor
to General Railway Signal Company, Roches
ter, N. Y.
Application September 25, 1936, Serial No. 102,557
12 Claims. (01. -246—33)
This invention relates in general to railway sig
naling systems, and more particularly to an abso
lute permissive block signaling system employing
coded track circuits for controlling wayside and/ or
5 cab signals.
In general, it is proposed in accordance with the
present invention to provide an absolute permis
sive block signaling system employing coded track
circuits arranged to effect the control of train
10 movements in both directions through a portion
of single track in the usual manner, but without
the use of control line circuits. More speci?cally,
it is proposed to provide in each block a track cir
cuit associated with each direction of movement
15 so arranged that the two track circuits are inde
pendent of each other due to the distinctive char
acter of their energization. It is then proposed to
independently code or modulate the distinctive
energization of each of these track circuits in a
2 0 manner to condition wayside and/or cab signals
for each direction of train movement in accord
ance with forward tra?ic conditions.
Other objects, purposes and characteristic fea
tures of the present invention will be obvious as
25 the description thereof progresses, during which
references will be made to the accompanying
drawings, in which
Fig. 1 and Fig. 2 show in a diagrammatic and
3
conventional manner the apparatus and circuits
of a portion of an absolute permissive block sig
naling system arranged in accordance with the
present invention. These two ?gures show adja
cent portions of the railway track and are intend
ed to be placed end to end with Fig. 2 at the right.
In the accompanying drawings, a single track
portion of a railway has been shown as divided by
insulating joints J into track sections or blocks l,
2 and 3, ‘and it is to be understood that this is a
portion of single track wherein trains normally
40 move in either direction and passing sidings or
portions of double track will be provided at spaced
intervals which have not been shown.
The present system employs the usual absolute
permissive block feature wherein two or more
45 trains are permitted to follow each other through
the portions of single track between these passing
sidings, but a train is prevented from entering any
such single track portion which is occupied by a
train moving in the opposite direction. It is be
lieved that a description of the portion of the
present signaling system associated with the typi
cal intermediate portion of single track compris
ing blocks I, 2 and 3 will be su?‘lcient for an under
standing of the present invention, and inasmuch
as the apparatus associated with each of these
blocks is identical, the same reference characters
have been assigned to the like pieces of apparatus
with an exponent corresponding to the particular
block with which it is associated.
It may be brie?y stated that in the present 5
system each block is provided with two superim
posed alternating current track circuits, these two
circuits being energized with distinctively differ
ent frequencies and reversely arranged with re
spect to the ends of the track rails to which the 0
energy is applied, the track rails of course form
ing common electrical conductors for both cir
cuits. More speci?cally, alternating current en
ergy of one frequency is connected to one end of
the rails of each block and alternating current 15
energy of a distinctively different frequency is
connected to the other end of these same track
rails of each block, or as shown on the drawings,
the left hand end of the rails of each block is
connected through a transformer LTR to a power 20
line LP energized by an alternating current gen
erator LG, while the right hand end of these rails
of each block is connected through similar trans
formers RTR to another power line RP energized
by an alternating current generator RG which
supplies a different frequency of alternating cur
rent than generator LT. It is to be understood
however that in the event it is not desirable to ex
tend the power line wires LP and RP along the
5
trackway, the two distinctive frequencies of alter- 30
nating current can be generated locally at each
block from a battery or the like such as by vibrat
ing reed contacts operating at distinctively differ
ent frequencies and arranged to interrupt the
energization of the primary of transformers LTR 3'5
and RTR respectively, all in accordance with well
recognized principles.
The particular frequency applied to each end of
each block is conducted through the track rails in
series to operate a track relay at the other end, ‘10
which track relay is rendered nonresponsive to the
different frequency applied at the same end.
More speci?cally, the energy applied to the left
hand end of each section through transformers
LTR is conducted through the rails in series to
the primary of a tuning transformer RTA con
nected across the right hand end of the rails, the
secondary of this transformer RTA being con
nected to the primary of a second tuning trans
former R'I'B through a tuning condenser RC, 50
whereby the secondary of the transformer RTB
is only effectively energized by the alternating
current of the frequency supplied by transformer
LTR and is not eifectively energized by the alter
nating current of the frequency supplied by trans- 55
2
2,128,211
former RTR. Similar transformers LTA and
LTB and condenser LC are employed at the left
hand end of each section, but the condenser LC as
indicated is of a capacity different from condenser
RC so that the secondary of transformer LTB is
only effectively energized by the alternating cur
rent of the frequency supplied by transformer
RTR.
The secondary of transformer RTB energizes a
10 direct current track relay RT through a full-wave
recti?er RR and in a similar manner the second
ary of transformer LTB energizes a second direct
current track relay LT through a full-wave rec
ti?er LR. In this manner, the track relay RT is
15 controlled only by the current from the trans
former LTR and track relay LT and is con
trolled only by the current from the transformer
RTR, and inasmuch as the current from both
transformers LTR and RTR flows through the
track rails in series, both of these track relays LT
and RT will be dropped by a train shunting the
associated track section.
In order to communicate the traf?c conditions
from block to block without the use of control
25 line circuits, the alternating current energization
of each of the two track circuits for each of the
blocks is individually modulated or coded in ac
cordance with traffic conditions in a direction
individually associated with each of these- two
30 circuits. In other words, the secondary of trans
former LTR is connected to the track rails
through a back contact of a code repeater relay
LCP which is operated in synchronism with either
contact C75 or CWO of a modulator or coder C,
35 and. in a similar manner, the secondary of trans
former RTR is connected to the track rails
through a back contact of a code repeater relay
RCP likewise operated in synchronism with either
of contacts CV5 or C188 of a similar coder C.
40. '
The contacts C75 and CESB may be operated in
any suitable manner, but for convenience these
contacts have been diagrammatically illustrated
as operated'by the usual form of mechanical cod
ing means wherein a continuously energized mo
tor M mechanically operates contacts C75 at the
rate of '7 5 times per minute and also operates con
tact C | 86 at the rate of- 180 times per minute. The
code repeating relays LCP and RCP are at times
continuously deenergized, and at other times op
50 erated by either contact C15 or contact CIBI] as
selected by traffic conditions as will be later de
scribed.
the secondary of transformers LTD and RTD
respectively through condensers LCE and RCE
respectively, which condensers are of a value se
lected to resonate or to permit an effective alter
hating current voltage in the secondary of trans
formers LTE and RTE only when the frequency
of alternating current from the secondary of
transformers LTD and RTD is provided by the
180 rate of operation of the track relays LT and
RT respectively.
Similar tuning transformers
LT?‘ and RTF are also connected across the sec
ondary of transformers LTD and RTD respec
tively but through different capacity condensers
LCF and RCF whereby an effective alternating
current voltage is permitted in the secondary of
transformers LTF and RTF only when the fre
quency of alternating current from the secondary
of transformers LTD and RTD is produced by
either the 180 code rate or the 75 code rate of
operation of the respective track relays LT and
RT. The alternating current produced in the
secondary of transformers LTE and RTE energize
respective direct current relays LE8!) and RES!)
through respective full-wave recti?ers LRE and
RRE, and likewise the alternating current pro
duced in the secondaries of transformers LTF
and RTE‘1 energize respective direct current relays
Ll?» and Rl'5 through respective full-wave recti
?ers LRF and RRF.
.The track relays LT and RT also control the
energization of respective slow releasing track
repeating relays LT? and RT? whereby these
repeating relays remain picked up either when»
the associated track relay is continuously ener
gized or is operating at the 75 or 180 code rate,
but drop when the associated track relay is con
tinuously deenergized. It will now be clear that
when the track relays are continuously energized,
the associated repeating relays will be picked up
but both the associated 180 and 75 decoding relays 40
will be dropped; and when the track relays are
operated at the 180 code rate, the respective re
peating relays and both the respective 180 and 75
decoding relays will be picked up; but when op
erating at the '75 code rate, the respective '75
decoding relays and the respective repeating re
lays only will pick up; and obviously when the
track relays are continuously deenergized due to
a train shunt for example, all of these'relays will
be dropped.
A direction stick relay LS and RS is also asso
ciated with each block, which stick relays are
It will now be clear that when the code re- > made slow releasing for a purpose later described.
peating relays LCP and RCP are operating to These directional stick relays LS and RS are se
interrupt their associated track circuits at either lectively energized according to the direction of
the '75 or the 180 code rate, the respective track a train movement over the associated portionv of
relays LT and RT are operated in synchronism track, or that is, relay LS is picked up by an east
therewith, and consequently the rate of operation bound train movement and relay RS is picked up
of the armatures of relays LT and RT as affecting by a west bound train movement.
The present wayside equipment may be em GE)
60 certain decoding means determined the respective
forward tra?ic conditions. The decoding means ployed to control either wayside or cab signals or
controlled by both track relays LT and RT is both, and consequently the method of effecting
identical and comprises respective transformers the control of both types of signals has been
LTD and RTD having a center tapped primary shown in the accompanying drawings, although
it is to be understood that train movements are
connected to one side of a direct current source of
adequately protected by either type and conse
energy while the two extreme ends are alternately
connected to the other side of this source of
quently either wayside on cab signals may be em
energy by front and back contacts of the respec
ployed alone and the other omitted from the sys
tive track relay LT or RT. In this manner, al
tem.
The wayside signals have been illustrated as the
70 ternating current is- induced in the secondaries
of transformers LTD and RTD which is propor
three indication multiple unit color light type al
tional in frequency to the rate of operation of though other types may be equally well employed,
and the change in the controlling circuits neces
the respective track relays LT and RT.
sary when using these other types will be obvious
Decoding transformers LTE' and RTE‘ are pro
vided having primary windings connected across to those skilled in the railway signaling art. The 75
2,128,211
wayside signals ES govern tra?ic in east bound
direction through their associated block and are
jointly controlled by the associated decoding re
lays LI8I! and L15, and likewise the wayside sig
nals WS govern tra?c in a west bound direction
and are jointly controlled by the decoding relays
RIBIJ and R15.
A west bound train represented by wheels and
axle 5 has been shown as occupying section 3 of
10 Fig. 2, and a cab signal system which may be
employed in the present system has been shown
diagrammatically as carried by such train, but it
is to be understood that the particular arrange
ment of such car carried equipment is shown
15 merely for an example and that various other well
known types of car carried signal controlling sys
tems can equally well be employed.
In Fig. 2, the car carried equipment is illus-u
trated as comprising receiver coils 6 and 1 car
20 ried on the train above the rails and in front of
the ?rst pair of wheels and axle whereby current
is induced in these receiver coils by the alternat
ing current flowing in the track rails from trans
former LTR3. A means similar to that employed
25 in the wayside equipment may be used to tune the
circuit of the receiver coils to the particular fre
quency of alternating current received from the
rails, or that is, the receiver coils 6 and 1 are con
nected in series to the primary of a tuning trans
former 8, the secondary of transformer 8 being
connected to the primary of a second transformer
9 through a condenser I0 whereby the secondary
of transformer 9 is only effectively energized by
the alternating current of the frequency provided
35 by transformers LTR when the train is traveling
in a west bound direction.
However, when the same train is traveling in an
east bound direction, the alternating current af
fecting the receiver coils will be of a different fre
40 quency supplied by transformers RTR, and con
sequently it is contemplated that a manually op
erable switch II may be provided which in this
case of an east bound direction of movement will
be moved from its west bound position W to its
45 east bound position E to connect a condenser I2
in multiple with condenser I I], and thus tune this
circuit to the frequency of transformer RTR.
However, it may be considered sufficient in some
applications to arrange the tuning of the car car
50 ried receiver circuit su?iciently broad so that the
secondary of transformer 9 will be effectively en
ergized by the frequency of current received from
either transformers LTR or RTR, and in such
case the switch I I and condenser I2 may be omit
55 ted.
The remaining portion of the car carried equip
ment may be constructed in accordance with the
usual practice and has been illustrated diagram
matically as an amplifying means A amplifying
60 the current from the secondary of transformer 9
to a value which can operate a master relay MR.
The master relay MR, then operates in synchro
nism with the operation of the particular code re
peating relays LCP or RCR the same as the track
65 relays LT and RT, and consequently a decoding
means similar to that employed in the wayside
arrangement may be employed. '
This car carried decoding means comprises a
transformer I4 operating the same as transformer
70 RTE in the wayside equipment but from a con
tact of the master relay MR rather than a track
relay RT. The output of transformer I 4 then en
ergizes a decoding relay D I 80 through recti?er I5,
tuning transformer I6 and condenser I6 only
when the 180 code rate is received from the rails,
3.
and the output of transformer I4 likewise ener
gizes a decoding relay D15 through recti?er I9,
transformer 20 and condenser 2| when the 75 or
the 180 code rate is received, all in a manner
which may be understood from the previous de
scription of the wayside decoding equipment.
Having now pointed out the essential elements
of the present system, it is believed that the use
fulness and the various interrelated functions of
the apparatus and circuits of the present embodi
ment will be more readily understood by vfurther
description being given from the standpoint of op
eration.
10
Operation
Considering that the illustrated west bound
train represented by wheels and axle'5 is the only
train traversing the portion of the railway system
under consideration, this train then receives a
clear or green cab signal as well as a green way
side signal. In other words, sections I and 2 being
unoccupied, the code repeating relay LCPZ is con"
nected to contacts CI80 of coder C1 through front
contact 25 of relay RTP1 and front contact 26 of
relay R151, thereby operating contact 21 of relay
LCP2 to impulse the energization of section 2 from
transformer LTR.2 at the rate of 180 times per
minute which picks up the track repeater relay
RTPZ at front contact 32 of relay RT2 and the
decoding relays R152 and RIBIl2 are also energized
by the operation of contact 33 of relay RT2. The
green signal lamp G of signal WS2 is then ener—'
gized through front contact 28 of relay R152 and
front contact 29 of relay RI8U2. In a like man
ner the green light G at signal WS1 is energized
through front contacts 48 and 49 of relays R151
and RI 351 respectively, and at all west bound sig
15
20,
25,.
at;
nals as far as the next passing track at the left
of the illustrated portion of single track, a green
signal will likewise be displayed.
The present train while occupying section 3
40.
also receives a green cab signal due to the fact ‘
that code repeater relay LCP3 is connected to
contact CISQ of coder C2 through front contact
Si! of relay RTF2 and front contact ill of relay
R152, thereby operating contact 60 to impulse the
energization of section 3 from transformer LTR3
at the 180 code rate. The reception of these 180
code impulses by receivers 6 and 'I then operates
contact I3 of the master relay ME to effect the
energization of relays D15 and DI Bil as previously
described, and the green cab signal G is then en
ergized through front contacts 34 and 35 of re
lays D15 and DISI] respectively. The east bound
signal ESZ, however, properly displays a red or
danger indication due to the continuous deener
gization of track relay LT3 caused by the occu
pancy of section 3, thus dropping relay LTP3 at
open front contact 38, and dropping relays LI8IJ3
and L153 due to the inaction of contact 31, and
the red signal lamp R of signal ES3 is then en
ergized through back contact 38 of relay L153.
The LTP3 and L153 relays and the east bound
stick relay LS3 being deenergized, obviously pre
vents energization of the code repeater relay‘
RCP2 thus continuously supplying the right hand
end of section 2 with alternating current from
transformer RTR2 through back contact 39
whereby track relay LT2 is continuously ener
gized to drop the decoding relays LIBil2 and L152
by the inaction of contact bill, and the red lamp R
of the east bound signal E62 is then energized
through back contact M of relay‘L152'. Likewise
the deenergization' of the decoding relay L1552 and
the east bound stick relay LS2 prevents the en
69
2,128,211
ergization of the code repeating relay RCP1 thus‘
supplying continuous energy to the right hand
end of section i from transformer RTE1 through
its back contact ill, and it will be clearthat the
. right hand end of each section in advance of the
west bound train will be supplied with continuous
or uninterrupted alternating current so that a
red east bound signal indication will be displayed
at each block of the single track to prevent any
10 east bound train from entering the portion of
single track during the present west bound train
movement.
'
Considering now that the present train in Fig.‘
2 passes the insulating joints J and enters sec
15 ‘tion 2, it will be clear that track relay RT2 will
now be continuously deenergized to drop the de
coding relays Rl'52 and BMW and energizes the
red signal lamp R at signal WS2 through back
contact 23 of relay BT52. The car-carried re
20 'iceivers S and 7 however, DOW receive current llTl
pulses of the 180 coderate from transformer
LTR2 which obviously maintains the green cab
signal G energized the same as while occupying
block 3.
When the present train is passing the insu~v
lating joints J separating blocks 2 and 3, it will be
clear that the track repeating relays RTP2 and
LTP3 will both be deenergized by contacts 32 and
35 respectively, and although these track repeat~
36"iier relays are necessarily somewhat slow releasing
the decoding relays are necessarily still slower to‘
release due to the shunt across their windings
provided by the associated full-wave recti?ers.
Consequently the track repeater relay RTP2 will
iidrop before the decoding relay EH32 drops, and a
circuit is then momentarily completed to pick up
the west bound stick relay RS2, which circuit
may be track from (+), back contact 42 of relay
RTPZ, back contact 43 of relay LTP3, front con
40 tact M of relay RS552, through the windings of re
lay RS2, to (—). “Then the stick relay RS2 has
picked up, it will be clear that relay R152 subse
quently drops, and a stick circuit is then com
pleted through front contact 45 of relay RS2 and
back contact 413 of relay R7752 to hold relay RS2 in
45
its picked up condition, the stick relay RS2 being
suf?ciently slow releasing to retain its armature
in its attracted position during the momentary
interruption of .its energization caused by the
movement of contact 44.
50
The entrance of the present train into block it
obviously disconnects the code repeating relay
LCP3 from the contact ClSii of the coder C2 at
front contacts 30 and 3d of relays RTP2 and R752
55 respectively, but when the west bound stick relay
Rszgpicks up, the code repeating relay LCP3 is
connected to contact C15 of the coder C2 through
front contact 66 of the relay RS2. In this man
ner the entrance of the present train into section
60 '2 changes the energization of _ section
from
transformer L'TR,3 from the 180 code rate to the
'75 code rate.
Now considering that the present train trav
erses section 2 and enters section I of Fig. 1, it
will be clear that track relay RTI will drop and
the decoding relays R351 and R5861 will be de
energized due to the inaction of contact iii, thus
changing the indication at signal WS1 from a
green to a danger or red indication by energizing
70 the red lamp B through back contact 48 of relay
R151. Likewise when the present train passes the
insulating joints J separating sections l and 2,
the dropping of the track repeater relay RJPl be
fore the dropping of the decoding relay R151
75 establishes a pick up circuit for the west bound
stick relay RS1, which circuit may be traced from
(-|-) , back contact 50 of relay RTPl, back contact
5! of relay LTP2, front contact 52 of relay R151
through the windings of relay RS1, to (—). A
similar stick circuit is completed upon the subse
quent dropping of relay R151 to hold up relay
RS1 through its stick contact 53, and the drop
ping of relays RTP1 and R151 disconnected the
code repeating relay LCP2 from the Cl80 code
contact at open front contacts 25 and 26 respec
tively, and the picking up of the stick relay RS1‘
connects the LCP2 relay to the contact C15 of the
coder C1 through its front contact 55.
The coder repeating relay LCP2 now inter
rupts the energization of section 2 from trans
former LTR.2 at the 75 code rate by its contact
2?, which in an obvious manner picks up relay
R752 in Fig. 2 but allows relay RIBEIZ to remain
deenergized. A caution signal indication is then
displayed at signal WS2 by energizing the yel 20;
low signal lamp Y through front contact 28 of
relay R7552 and back contact 29 of relay REBUZ.
The picking up of the decoding relay R152 ob—
viously releases the west bound stick relay RS2»
at contact M inasmuch as the repeating relays 25,
RTP2 and LTP3 are now both picked up, and
the code repeating relay LCP3 is disconnected
from coder contact C75 at open front contact 46
of relay RS2 and is again connected to coder con—
tact C980 through front contacts 30 and M of o
relays RTP2 and R752 respectively. The ener
gization of section 3 from transformer LTRF' is
now interrupted at the 180 code rate by contact
6!} of relay LCP3, which in an obvious manner
provides a clear west bound signal at the en
trance to section 3, which signal hasrnot been
shown in the accompanying drawings.
In this manner, it will be seen that a train
traversing a portion of single track picks up the
stick relays associated with its particular direc—
tion of travel to allow a second train traveling
in the same direction to follow at a safe distance
in the rear of this first train. However, it may
be seen that the stick relays associated with the
opposite direction of travel do not pick up, or 45
that is, considering the present west bound train
movement, it is evident that the entrance of the
present train into section 3 before section 2 causes
the relay L753 to be deenergized before the pick
up circuit for stick relay LS3 is closed at back 507'.
contacts 132 and 1343 of relays RTP2 and LTP3 re
spectively.
'
>
It will of course be clear that the three differ
ent cab signal indications are displayed on the
train in the same manner as at the wayside sig
nals, or that is, a green cab signal G is ener
gized as previously described by the reception
of the 180 code rate of impulses by the receivers
6 and ‘i, while the reception of the '75 code rate
of impulses drops relay Ditii and completes an 60
energizing circuit for the yellow cab signal Y
through front contact 34 and back contact 35
of relays D15 and Dita respectively, and the
reception of either uninterrupted alternating cur—
rent or the reception of no current by the re
ceivers B and l obviously deenergizes both re
lays D'l5 and D589] to energize the red signal
lamp R‘ through'back contacts 34 and 55 of re
lays D'l5 and D! 89 respectively.
The operation of the apparatus of the present 70
system associated with an east bound train move
ment is similar in every respect to the opera
tion just described of the apparatus associated
with a west bound movement, and consequently
it is believed unnecessary to describe such op
5
2,128,211
eration in detail.
The stick relays LS are of
course picked up by an east bound train move
ment to allow east bound trains to follow in the
same manner that relays RS were picked up
by a west bound movement, and the west bound
wayside signals WS then all display a stop in
quency to the other end of each section, a track
relay at said one end of each section responsive
only to the alternating current of the second
frequency, a track relay at said other end of each
section responsive only to the alternating current
dication in a similar manner during ‘such an east
of the ?rst frequency, means for distinctively
coding the alternating current of the ?rst fre
bound movement. Likewise during an east bound
movement of the illustrated train, the switch ii
is moved to position E as previously described
whereby to tune the receiver circuit to the fre
quency of alternating current supplied by trans~
former RTR, and otherwise the car carried
quency in accordance with traflic conditions in
one direction, means for distinctively coding the
alternating current of the second frequency in 10
accordance with tra?ic conditions in the other di
rection, and decoding means individually con
trolled by each track relay and distinctively re
equipment functions the same as during a west
15 bound movement.
sponsive to the coding of the associated frequency
An absolute permissive block signaling system
has thus been provided wherein three-indica
2. In a single track railway signaling system,
tion wayside and/or cab signals are controlled
without the use of control line circuits to per
20 mit following train movements through portions
of single track but to prevent a train from enter
ing a portion of single track which is occupied by
a train moving in the opposite direction. The
feature of the present invention permitting such
25 double direction operation without control line
,
15
a plurality of insulated track sections, means for
applying alternating current of a first frequency
to a ?rst end of each section, means for applying
alternating current of a second frequency to the 20
second end of each section, a track relay at said
?rst end of each section responsive only to the
alternating current of said second frequency, a
track relay at said second end of each section
responsive only to the alternating current of said 25
circuits in, the arrangement ‘of superimposed al
ternating current track circuits. These track
circuits, although each having the track rails as
?rst frequency, means for distinctively coding
the alternating current of said ?rst frequency in
common conductors are in effect two separate
tion, means for distinctively coding the alter
30 and distinct circuits‘, each circuit being indi
vidually coded and associated with one particu
lar direction of travel. These circuits are also
reversely arranged with respect to the ends of
the track rails to- which energy is applied so
35 that each direction of train movement progresses
toward the source of energy in the circuit asso
ciated with that direction of movement, thereby
permitting cab signal equipment to be properly
controlled during each direction of movement
and enabling tra?ic conditions at each block to
be transmitted to the rear blocks in each di
rection by the respective circuit.
Another important feature of the present sys
tem is the method of effecting a stop indica
45 tion at all signals governing traffic in a direction
opposite to- an established train movement. This
method consists in supplying uninterrupted al
ternating current to the track circuit of each
block associated with such opposite direction of
50 traf?c, which uninterrupted alternating current
effects a stop indication at all signals controlled
thereby. A particular advantage of this feature
is that the track circuits are still able to detect
between the occupied and the unoccupied condi
55 tion of their associated blocks, and consequently
other apparatus such as highway crossing signals
may be conditioned directly by the track relays
or the track repeater relays of these blocks in
the usual manner.
60
of alternating current.
The above rather speci?c description of one
form of the present invention has been given
solely by way of example, and is not intended in
accordance with tra?ic conditions in one direc
nating current of said second frequency in ac
cordance with traf?c conditions in thevother die
rection, decoding means individually controlled
by each track relay and distinctively responsive
to the coding of the associated frequency of alter
nating current, and wayside signals controlled by 35
the decoding means.
3. In a railway signaling system, a portion of
single track divided into insulated track sections,
means for simultaneously applying differently
characterized energy to opposite ends of each
section, a track relay at each end of each sec
tion responsive only to the energy applied to the
opposite end, means for individually impulsing
the energy applied to each end of each section
to form codes according to tra?ic conditions, and
decoding means operated by each track relay
for distinctively responding to said codes.
4. In a railway signaling system, a portion of
single track divided into insulated track sections,
means for simultaneously applying differently 50
characterized energy to opposite ends of each sec
tion, a track relay at each end of each section re
sponsive only to the energy applied to the op
posite end, means for impulsing the energy ap
plied to one end or to the other end of
tion in accordance with the direction
ment of a train through the portion
track, and signal controlling means at
each sec
of move
55
of single
each sec
tion distinctively conditioned by the impulsing
of the energy applied to the associated section.
60
5. In a railway signaling system, a portion of
single track divided into insulated track sections,
any manner whatsoever in a limiting sense. It
means for applying interrupted alternating cur
is to be understood that various modi?cations, rent of one frequency to the exit end of each
65 adaptations and alterations may be applied to
section for each direction of train movement 65
meet the requirements of practice, without in ‘
thereover, means for simultaneously therewith
any manner departing from the spirit or scope
applying uninterrupted alternating current of a
of the invention, except as limited by the ap
different frequency to the entrance end of each
pended claims.
section for each direction of train movement
What I claim is:
70
thereover, and signaling means controlled by said
1. In a single track railway signaling system, interrupted
alternating current to display a clear
a plurality of insulated track sections, means indication and controlled by said uninterrupted
for applying alternating current of a ?rst alternating current to display a stop indication.
frequency to one end of each section, means for
6. In a railway signaling system, a portion of
single track divided into a plurality of track sec 75
75 applying alternating current of a second fre
6
In
2,128,211
tions, means for simultaneously applying alter
nating current energy of distinctively different
frequencies to opposite ends of each section,
means for coding the energy applied at each end
of each section in accordance with traffic condi
tions in the two sections respectively adjacent
thereto, and signal controlling means governed
by the coding of the energization of each section.
'7. In a railway signaling system, a portion of
single track divided into track sections, means
10 for simultaneously applying alternating current
energy of different frequencies to opposite ends
of each section, means for coding the energy
applied to each end of each section in accordance
with tra?ic conditions throughout the sections
15 respectively
adjacent to each end, wayside signals
responsive to the coded energy, continuous in
current at the west end of the section, a track
relay at the west end of each section responsive
only to the frequency of alternating current at
the east end of the section, means operable to
intermittently connect the east source of alter- ,
nating current to the east end of each section
to form codes distinctive of west bound traffic
conditions, means operable to intermittently con
nect the west source of alternating current to
the west end of each section to form codes dis 10
tinctive of east bound tra?'ic conditions, code
responsive means controlled by the track relay at
the east end of each section for governing the
west bound signals, and code responsive means
controlled by the track relay at the west end of .'
each section for governing the east bound signals.
10. In combination, a stretch of railway track
ductive cab signaling means, and selective means ' divided into track sections, an east source of a1
for rendering the cab signaling means responsive
to one frequency or to the other frequency of the
alternating current energy applied to the sections
in accordance with the direction of travel.
8. In combination, a stretch of railway track
divided into sections, a ?rst source of alternating
25 current, a second source of alternating current
of a different frequency than the ?rst source, a
code following track relay at one end of each
section responsive to the ?rst source of alternat
ing current only, a code following track relay
30 at the other end of each section responsive to
the second source of alternating current only,
means for supplying impulses of alternating cur
rent to each section from one of said sources
of alternating current in accordance with the
direction of a train movement through the
stretch of track, means for supplying continuous
alternating current tov each section from the
other source of alternating current, signals at
each end of each section governing traf?c in
40 opposite directions, and signal controlling means
controlled by each track relay for effecting a
most restrictive indication when the associated
track relay is energized by continuous alternat
ing current and for effecting lesser restrictive
, indications when energized by impulses of alter
nating current.
9. In combination, a stretch of railway track
divided into track sections, each bound and west
bound signals at the ends of each section, an
east source of alternating current energy of one
' frequency at the east end of each section, a west
source of alternating current energy of a dif
ferent frequency at the west end of each section,
a track relay at the east end of each section
~ I responsive only to the frequency of alternating
ternating current energy of one frequency ap
plied at the east end of each section and simul 20
taneously a west source of alternating current
energy of a different frequency at the west end
of each section, means operable to intermittently
connect the east source of alternating current
to the east end of each section to form codes dis
tinctive of east bound traf?c conditions contem
poraneously therewith and means operable to
intermittently connect the west source of alter
nating current to the west end of each section
to form codes distinctive of west bound traffic ‘
conditions.
11. In combination, a stretch of railway track
divided into track sections, means for applying
alternating current of different frequencies to
opposite ends of each section, a track relay at ‘
each end of each section responsive only to the
alternating current of the frequency applied to
the opposite end, means controlled by the track
relay at one end of each section for governing
tra?ic in one direction, and means controlled by
the track relay at the other end of each section
for governing traf?c in the other direction.
12. In a railway signaling system, a portion of
single track divided into a plurality of track sec
tions, means for simultaneously applying alter
nating current energy of distinctively different
frequencies to opposite ends of each section,
means for coding the energy applied at each end
of each section in accordance with traflic condié
tions in the two sections respectively adjacent ‘
thereto, and cab-carried signal controlling means
governed by the coding of the current energiz
ing each section.
THOMAS J. JUDGE.
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