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Патент USA US2128264

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Aug. 30, 1938.
F, w, OFELDT
2,128,264
BURNER
Filed July 18, 1936.
y
M
'NTOR.
WW“,
'
ATTORNEY.
Patented Aug. 30, 1938
2,128,264
UNlTED STATES PATENT OFFlCE
2,128,264
BURNER
7
Frank W. Ofeldt, McKeesport, Pa, assignor to
Homestead Valve Manufacturing Company,
Coraopolis, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania
Application July 18, 1936, Serial No. 91,405
10 Claims.
This invention relates to burners generally and
more particularly to burners which are provided
with means for preheating or volatilizing ?uid
fuel and the method of operating the same.
This invention may be conveniently applied
to heaters that require uniform distribution of
the burning gases and accurate timing of com
bustion within the combustion chamber. Heaters
that may advantageously employ these features
10 are found in the coil heater art for Water heaters,
spray or atomized heaters and the like, some of
which are disclosed in my Letters Patent No.
1,925,643, No. 1,970,971, and applications for Let
ters Patent Serial No. 36,290, ?led August 15, 1935
15 and Serial No. 88,106, ?led June 30, 1936, and
others referred to therein.
In coil heaters the form of the coils and the
manner in which they are placed within the com
bustion chamber determine the ba?iing charac
20 teristics for distributing and guiding the ?ame.
To vary the control of the ?ame hitherto it has
been necessary to reform or rearrange the coils
or parts which are being heated. As a practical
consideration it is usually necessary to construct
25 a new heater for this purpose, which adds ex
pense.
The principal object of this invention is the
provision of a new and improved de?ector for
controlling the distribution and timing the com
30 bustion of the ?ame.
Another object is the provision of improved
means for preheating or vaporizing a ?uid fuel
prior to discharging it‘ against the de?ector,
thereby permitting accurate control thereof.
35
This invention also contemplates a novel jet
(Cl. 158-—53)
nuts 8. 9 represents spacer members around the
bolts 'l‘between the base‘! and the arms 5 for
maintaining spaced relation between these parts
to reduce heat conductivity therebetween.
The ring casting is provided with aligned slots‘ 5
ll! in the same plane as the outwardly extending
arms 5. These slots are arranged to receive the
outer ends of the de?ector member supporting
arms H. Where the arms 5 are joined to the
ring I5 I provide the bosses 12. These bosses are‘ 10
drilled to receive the bolts l3 which pass through
the outer ends of the de?ector supporting arms
I l for securing the same to the ring casting 4 as
by the nuts IA.
The arms 5 may be strengthened by means of 515
the webs l5 which extend between the bosses l2
and the arms 5. These strengthening webs also
aid in providing radiating surfaces for cooling the
ring casting. To this end the ring casting 4 may
be provided with the radially disposed radiatingl 20
?ns, as indicated in dotted lines in Fig. 1 at IS.
The de?ector supporting arms ll extend ra
dially from the ?ame de?ecting member I‘! and
are provided with the V-shaped depending ?anges
i8 which strengthen said arms and prevent tur-‘ 25
bulence of the ?ame as it passes therearound.
The de?ecting member I‘! is preferably hollow.
The lower portion IQ of the de?ector is preferably
spherical and the upper portion 20 cylindrical.
Thus combustible gases impinged on the under’ 30.
surface thereof will be spread uniformly there
around. The spherical surface also dispenses
with the necessity of accurately adjusting the
center of the impinging gases to strike the center
of the de?ector. Thus slight misalignment of the 35
burner nozzle caused by assembly or by relative
expansion of the parts due to different materials
and priming device for initially starting combus
tion.
Other objects appear hereafter.
In the accompanying drawing wherein I have . or due to different temperatures will not impair
the proper function of the de?ector. I am thus
40 illustrated a practical embodiment of the prin
enabled to avoid the dif?culties arising from the 40
ciples of my invention:
I
Fig. l is a plan view of the burner assembly use of conical or pointed de?ectors.
One arm l l is provided with a boss 2! which is
comprising my invention.
Fig. 2 is a side elevation of the burner shown
45 in Fig, 1.
Referring to the drawing, l represents the base
of a combustion chamber or outer casing having
an aperture 2 through which the burner assembly
3 is arranged to extend into the combustion
chamber. The burner assembly comprises the
?ame guiding ring casting 4 having oppositely
disposed outwardly extending arms 5. Adjacent
their outer ends the arms 5 are provided with
the holes 6 for receiving the bolts 1, arranged to
55 secure the burner assembly to the base I by the
drilled to receive and hold one end of the tube
forming the fuel preheating coil 22. The fuel 45
being fed to the heating coil is arranged to pass
from the fuel supply up through the vertical por
tion 23 of the coil. Near to the top of the vertical
portion 23 the ?rst coil turn 24 is formed. The
uppermost position of the coil 22 occurs at sub~v
stantially the ?rst half of the coil turn 24 as in
dicated at 25.
The coil then descends and is
wound around the cylindrical portion 20 of the
de?ector ll. The last turn 26 of the coil is di
rected toward the boss 2!. The tube is then, 55
"2'v
'
‘
'
2,128,264.
' formed to pass down through the boss as shown
at 21.
The tubing extends below the ring casting 4
as shown at 28 and is arranged to extend radially
inwardly toward the center of the de?ector I1.
29 represents a nozzle secured to the end of the
tube and provided with the port 30 arranged to
direct the fuel against the center of the spherical
surface [9 of the de?ector [1.
The de?ector I‘! is provided with the radially
10
projecting lugs 31 , 32 and 33 arranged to support
the lower side of the coil 22 as it winds down
around the de?ector.
'
It will be noted from Fig. 1 that the coil turn
15 24 extends out in the direct path of the burning
gases and is subjected to considerable heat. As,
suming that oil under pressure is used for fuel,
it will ?ow from the source of supply up through
the tube 23 through the ?ame guiding ring 4 to
20 the coil turn 24 and therearound to the highest
point 25. During this time it will have been heat
ed sufficiently to volatilize. The volatilized fuel
then passes around the balance of the turn 24
and through the coil, the tube 28 to the nozzle 29,
from whence it is expelled out the opening 39 of
the jet. The volatilized fuel becomes superheated
as it passes through the coil 22. This promotes
quick and efficient combustion.
‘
The highly heated fuel impinging against the
1.130 spherical surface and being de?ected therearound
has been found not to support combustion until
it reaches the de?ector arms I! and the lugs 3i
and 33, as the ?ame propagation is not as fast as
the velocity of the gas over the spherical surface.
i235 By placing the lugs or ears 34 on the spherical
surface of the de?ector I am enabled to control
the timing of the initial ?ame combustion. These
small lugs on the spherical surface create a vor
tex in the ?ow of the fuel forming a turbulent
1540 action therein which causes ignition of the fuel
at the tips of the lugs. Thus the position of the
i 50
lugs on-the spherical surface I9 determines the
time at which combustion of the fuel is started.
As the fuel strikes the spherical surface it is
distributed uniformly therearound and is guided
up through the ring 4 past the fuel heating coil
22. As the fuel supply continues to ?ow through
the coil 22 it becomes heated, vaporizes and is
discharged from the nozzle. The de?ector I‘! and
the coil 22 become quite hot, which aid in main
taining the heating cycle.
35 represents a priming pan which may be con
veniently supported from the burner structure by
means of the arm 3'6 secured at its free end un
L55 der- the nut M on the bolt l3 which holds the de
?ector to the ring casting 4. The priming pan may
be provided with fuel and a wicking, such as waste,
which when ignited heats the nozzle and the lower
portion of the fuel pipe and the fuel therein. This
160 continues until the burner ?ame heats the fuel
in the coil 22 sufficiently to permit continuous op
eration thereof.
A notch 3'!‘ is formed in the bottom edge of the
depending ?ange [8 adjacent the de?ector l1.
165 This notch provides a break in the lower edge of
each ?ange and permits ‘that portion of the com
bustible gases and the ?ame that is adjacent the
de?ector IT to pass up along both sides of the
depending ?anges i8 and the arms II. If the
lower edges of these ?anges were permitted to ex
tend horizontally to the de?ector a portion of the
gases and the ?ame would roll therealong toward
the ?ame guiding ring 4 and be de?ected down
wardly, creating a rotary turbulence that would
have a detrimental effect on the burning fuel.
Thus by abruptly changing the contour of the
?anges l8 adjacent the de?ector I‘! so that it
extends upwardly toward the de?ector, that por
tion of the fuel and ?ame passing therearound is
carried by its own velocity to a point above the
lower edge of the ?ange and therefore travels
undisturbed to the combustion zone.
1. In an oil burner, the combination of a ?ame
guiding ring, a de?ector positioned concentrically 10
within said ring and having an under arcuate
surface, means for supporting said de?ector from
said ring and for positioning the lowermost por
tion of the arcuate surface of the de?ector slight
ly below the lower perimetral edge of said ring, a 15
preheating fuel coil mounted on said de?ector in
spaced relation with the inner wall of said ring,
a burner positioned in spaced relation beneath
said de?ector and connected to said coil, and
means on the under arcuate surface of the de?ec
20
tor disposed above the lower perimetral edge of
said ring for timing the initial ?ame combustion
of the fuel issuing from the burner.
2. In an oil burner assembly, the combination
of a burner, a baf?e having a convex under sur 52 5
face disposed above the burner for distributing the '
combustible gases issuing therefrom, a fuel sup
ply coil wound in a helix about the baffle and hav
ing its lower end connected to the burner, lugs on
the perimetral surface of the baffle under support- 7‘.
ing the coil, and means below said lugs for reduc
ing the velocity of a portion of the combustible
gases to maintain initial ?ame combustion thereof
“between said lugs and said means.
3. In an oil burner assembly, the combination
of a ?ame guiding ring, a de?ector positioned ax
ially of the ring and supported therefrom for dis
tributing the combustible gases within said ring,
a burner disposed beneath the de?ector, a fuel
supply coil disposed about and supported by the
de?ector and having its lower end connected to
the burner, and means on said de?ector below said
coil for reducing the velocity of a portion of the
combustible fuel to maintain initial ?ame com
bustion thereof between said coil and said means.;;45
4. In an oil burner assembly, a unitary struc
ture comprising a de?ector arranged to distribute
combustible gases, a preheating fuel coil sur
rounding the de?ector and supported thereby,
a burner positioned beneath the de?ector and;
supported by the lower end of the coil, and means
on said de?ector below said coil for reducing the
velocity of a portion of ‘the combustible fuel to
maintain initial ?ame combustion thereof be
tween said coil and said means.
5. A de?ector for use with a burner which com- a
prises a body portion having an under arcuate
portion arranged to be positioned in the path of
the'combustible gases issuing from the burner to
distribute the same, an arm‘ for supporting said
body portion, the under side of said arm extend
ing upwardly adjacent the said body portion to
prevent the ?ame from extending along said arm.
6. A de?ector arranged to be positioned over
a burner which comprises a cylindrical body por-» 65
tion having an under arcuate surface for distribu
ting the combustible gases issuing from the bur
ner, an arm having a depending ?ange of down
wardly converging cross section for supporting
the de?ector, the lower edge of said ?ange ex
tending upwardly to said body portion to prevent
the ?ame from extending along the bottom of
said ?ange.
‘
7. In an oil burner, the combination of a fuel
jet, a de?ector against the surface of which the~.'
70
2,128,264
combustible gases of the fuel impinge, the said
3
surface being substantially semispherical, and
impinge, and a plurality of spaced projections ar
ranged about the perimetral surface of the de
means disposed on said surface to control the
?ector member above the apex thereof for re
combustion timing of a portion of the ?ame of
burning fuel by reducing the velocity of a part
of the combustible gases to a point wheretheprop
agation is maintained immediately above said
ducing the velocity of a portion of the combustible
gases to maintain initial ?ame combustion of the
fuel at a point in the immediate region above said
means.
8. A de?ector member to be disposed above an
10 oil burner and having a convex lower surface
against which the combustible gases of the fuel
impinge, and means on said de?ector disposed
above the apex thereof for reducing the velocity
projections.
10. A de?ector member to be disposed above an
oil burner and having a convex lower surface
against which the combustible gases of the fuel
impinge, and a plurality of spaced projections on 10
the convex surface of the de?ector member above
the apex thereof for reducing the velocity of a
part of the combustible gases to maintain initial
flame combustion of the fuel at a point in the
of a part of the combustible gases to maintain
15 initial ?ame combustion of the fuel at a point in
the immediate region above said means.
immediate region above said projections, said 15
9. A de?ector member to be disposed above an projections being at all times below the zone ‘of
oil burner and having a convex lower surface combustion.
‘
against which the combustible gases of the fuel .
FRANK W. OFELDT.
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