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Патент USA US2128318

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Aug. 30, 1938.’
A. |_. PORTER
2,128,318
MACHINE FOR OPERATING UPON SOLES
Filed Jan. 25, 1936
4 Sheets-Sheet l
/7_
ea
36
J7
59
75 54/46/20
7/
1' g. Z.
50
Aug. 30, 1938.
v
v A. 1.. PORTER
2,128,318
MACHINE FOR’OPERATING UPON SOLES
Filed Jan. 25, 1956
4 Sheets-Sheet 2
Aug. 30, 1938.
v
A_ |__ PORTER
2,128,318
MACHINE FOR OPERATING UPON'SOLES
Filed Jan. 25, 1956
4 Sheets-Sheet 3
Aug. 30, 1938.
A. |_.v PORTER
‘
2,128,318
MACHINE FOR OPERATING UPON SOLES
Filed Jan.‘ ,25, 1956
4 Sheéts-Sheet 4
him/717R:
ME‘ 9%
NM)
2,1283%
Patented Aug. 30, 1938
UETED STATES PATENT OFFEEE
2,128,318
MACHINE FOR OPERATING UPON SOLES
Albert L. Porter, Salem, Mass, assignor to
United Shoe Machinery Corporation, Pater
son, N. J., a corporation of New Jersey
Application January 25, 1936, Serial No. 60,828
35 Claims.
This invention relates to machines for operat
ing upon soles and is illustrated herein as em
bodied in a machine of the type disclosed in'Let
ters Patent of the United States No. 1,939,750 and
(01. 12-412)
with reference to another system of grading.
As herein illustrated, the last-mentioned means,
in accordance with another feature of the inven
tion, is adapted to be operated independently of
No. 2,020,344, granted December 19, 1933, and No
vember 12, 1935, respectively, uponapplications
the ?rst-mentioned means and is calibrated with 01
of E. E. Winkley.
In machines of the type mentioned above, the
positioning of soles consistently in the desired lo
same or substantially the same length.
cation with respect to shaping instrumentalities
gaging, than that between the ball line and the 10
heel part, and hence it is preferable to position
soles longitudinally in machines of the type in
question by engagement with the toe end of the
sole. In order to obviate any interference by
gaging means which is thus adapted to engage
the toe end of the sole to the relative approach
of members between which the forepart of the
for imparting the desired longitudinal or trans
verse curvatures, or both, to a sole is facilitated by
the use of mechanism including gaging members
adapted to position the sole by engagement with
15 its edge at one end and at spaced points at one
side of the sole. Such gaging mechanism is so
constructed and arranged that by the successive
positioning of a single control member in dif
ferent locations the gaging members are simul
taneously set to position properly a series of sol-es
within a certain range of lengths the width
grading of which is uniform.
However, soles may be so graded in other in
stances, such for example as between the A and
multiple A widths or between the E and multiple
25 E widths of soles of the same nominal length, that
the actual lengths of the soles may not vary at all,
or at last not in the same proportion relatively to
changes in width as in the case of soles of the
same nominal length but of those widths between
A and E. Moreover, lasts of di?erent nominal
widths may have the same actual width across the
bottom of the forepart, the difference between
them, owing to the width grading, occurring in
_ their girth. Accordingly, it is apparent that dif
ferent sections of a complete run of soles to be
used in connection with such lasts may be graded
by different systems.
In view of the foregoing, an object of the inven
tion is to provide an improved gaging mecha
4 0. nism, adapted for use in a machine for operating
upon soles graded by different systems, which
will permit the setting of the gages with reference
to one system of grading without disturbing the
setting of the gages with regard to another sys
45 tem of grading.
To this end, the invention contemplates the
provision of means for positioning a sole with
respect to a form about which the sole is to be
shaped which includes a gage adjustable laterally
of the form and adapted to engage the edge of the
sole at one side thereof, said gage being mov
able obliquely with respect to the longitudinal
aXis of the sole at an angle determined with refer
ence to the proportion between the differences in
length and width of soles graded by one system
(such as that employed in grading soles of the
same nominal widths but of different lengths),
and plural means for adjusting the gage laterally
60 of the form, one of which means is calibrated
reference to the width grading of soles of the
The relation between the ball line and the fore
part of a sole is more critical, for purposes of
sole is clamped, one or both of the members may
be recessed to provide clearance for the gaging
means.
Such recessing of these members re
20
sults in the removal of what otherwise would be
their sole-shaping surfaces and hence the im
pairment of their sole-shaping function to that
extent to which their surfaces have thus been
cut away. With this problem in view, another 25
object of the invention is to provide improved
means for gaging or positioning a. sole between
clamping members adapted to operate over the
entire area of the forepart of the sole, which
means wil1 not prevent the members from being
moved into their operative relation.
In accordance with this object, the invention
provides, in combination with a form mounted
for movement between a sole-receiving position
and a treating position and a clamping member
mounted for movement toward the form, an end
gage mounted and arranged normally to be yield
ingly held in operative relation to the form and
means constructed and arranged to operate in
response to movement of said form toward its
treating position to move the end gage away
from the form out of the path of the clamping
member.
It has been found that sol-es of a relatively
wide range of sizes may successfully have their
shank portions formed by being pressed about a
certain form in a machine of the type in which
the invention is illustrated as embodied, essential
requirements being that the soles be positioned
properly with regard to the portion of the form
0
which is to form the “break” of the soles between
their forepart and shank portions and that the
soles be thus held throughout the shaping opera
tion. However, it may be di?icult, without apply
ing excessive clamping pressure to the fore and 55
heel parts of soles having relatively wide shanks,
securely to hold the fore and heel parts against
the stresses set up in the margins of the shank
when the latter are displaced to give the shank its
required transverse shape. This dif?culty is most
Z
2,128,318
pronounced when operating upon soles for men’s
shoes as there is considerable material in the
shanks or" such soles; but it also may arise when
operating upon soles for women’s shoes the size
or the style of which requires a relatively broad
shank. Moreover, when soles of relatively small
sizes are operated upon, the amount of their fore ' '
and heel parts which are presented to the form
ing and grip-ping surfaces of fore and heel part
10 clamping members may be too small at times to
insure adequate frictional resistance against
slipping when the shank is operated upon. In
view of the foregoing, another object of the in
vention is to make provision for insuring against
15 slipping of soles with respect to a form about
which their shanks are shaped.
In accordance with this object, invention is
to be recognized in the provision, in a machine
for operating upon soles, of pressing members
20 mounted for movement toward and away from
each other and a yielding member disposed be
tween the pressing members, the pressing sur
face of one pressing member having a plurality
of separated elevated areas which cause portions
25 of the sole opposite thereto to be pressed into
the yielding member in response to pressure be
tween the pressing members. In the illustrated
machine, the forepart of the form about which
the shank of a sole is formed is employed as one
30 pressing member and, in accordance with an
other feature of the invention, is provided with
a plurality of blunt projections extending from
its sole-engaging surface to form the elevated
35
areas referred to above.
It is not uncommon as a decorative feature
to ?nish different portions of shoe bottoms in
contrast to each other.
Such a ?nish may be
accomplished by painting or staining one char
acteristic portion of a shoe bottom and ?nishing
40 the remainder of the bottom in its natural color,
as results for example from the use of Wax only.
In other cases, it may be desirable to paint or to
stain the entire bottom of the shoe but yet to
?nish different characteristic portions of it by
45 the use of different colored stains or paints or
by staining one portion and painting others. _As
bottom ?nishing of this type is carried out by
hand, its effectiveness, which depends to a con
siderable extent. upon the operator’s judgment
50 in determining the boundary between the por
tions of the shoe bottom which are to be ?nished
in different ways, may vary materially.
In view of the foregoing, it is another object
of the invention to facilitate the ?nishing of
55 shoe bottoms in the manner described above by
enabling the operator to apply ?nishing medium
to shoe bottoms in less time and with greater
accuracy and uniformity than has been possible
heretofore. To this end, the invention contem
plates, in accordance with another feature
thereof, the combination of a sole support about
which a sole is to be formed into the shape it is
to have in the ?nished shoe and means shaped
and arranged to press a, sole against said support
65 and simultaneously to make a demarcationon
the sole between characteristic portions thereof.
This demarcation on the sole indicates a definite
boundary between such portions of the sole as
are to be ?nished in different ways and is used
70 as a giude by the operator in applying ?nishing
medium to the sole. He is thus relieved of the
duty of determining the location and shape of
the portions of the sole to be differently ?nished,
with the result that he may carry out the finish
75 ing operation rapidly, accurately and uniformly.
Depending upon how the shoe bottom is to be
decorated, this demarcation may be made either
between the forepart and shank or between a
characteristic portion of the shank and the re
mainder of the sole.
These and other features of the invention will
appear more fully from the following description
when read in connection with the drawings and
will be pointed out in the appended claims.
Inthe drawings,
10
Fig. 1 is a front elevation of a part of a machine
in which the invention is illustrated as embodied;
Hg. 2 is a plan view illustrating the lower
so1e~treating members in their operative posi
tions and the gaging instrumentalities for p0si— 15
tioning' soles with respect thereto;
Fig. 3 is a view in elevation of the forepart
sole-gaging instrumentalities as viewed from
the rear of the machine;
Fig. 4 is a plan view of the mechanism illus 20
trated in Fig. 3, certain parts of which have been
removed;
Fig. 5 is a sectional view in end elevation of
the mechanism illustrated in Fig. 3, the location
of the section line being indicated by the line 25
V—V in Fig. 4;
.
Fig. 6 is a side elevation of the forepart gagin
means as viewed from right to left in Fig. 2, the
drawing in full lines indicating the position of
the sole on a form in the sole-receiving position 30
and the drawing in dotted lines indicating the
inoperative positions of the gaging means and
the treating of a sole;
Fig. '7 is a sectional elevation, the position of
the section line being indicated by the line 35
VII-VII in Fig. 4, illustrating the gaging of a
sole longitudinally of the form when in its sole
receiving position;
Fig. 8 is a fragmentary plan View illustrating a
stage in the retractive movement of the gaging
means illustrated in Fig. 4;
Fig. 9 is a view in end elevation of the mech
anism illustrated in Fig. 8;
Fig. 10 is a fragmentary plan view of the con
trol knob for setting the gaging means;
45
Fig. 11 is a diagrammatic view in elevation il
lustrating the calibration of one of the gaging
means;
Fig. 12 is a view in perspective of the sole
engaging surface of an improved conforming tool
50
embodying means for making a demarcation; and
Fig. 13 is a view in perspective illustrating a
conformed sole having demarcations between its
characteristic portions made by the use of the
tool illustrated in Fig. 12.
55
In the illustrated machine, which has a right
hand set of operating instrumentalities similar
to the left-hand set shown in Fig. 1, the sole
treating members which assist in imparting the
longitudinal and transverse curvatures to a sole 60
comprise a form Ill (Fig. 2) mounted on a table
l2 and a heel part support 14 mounted on a table
IS.
‘The invention is exempli?ed herein with
reference to the shaping of a sole for a woman’s
shoe having a relatively high heel and the illus 65
trated form H] has an integral shank portion I?
having substantially the longitudinal and trans
verse curvatures which it is desired to impart to a
?nished sole. A sole having been positioned, by
mechanism to be described later and forming an 70
important part of this invention, on the form l0
and heel part support Hi When in their sole-re
ceiving position, indicated by the full-line show
ing of the form II] in Fig. 6, the tables l2 and I6
are then swung to carry the form l0 and the heel 75
3
'2,128,3 18
part support Hi to an upright sole-treating posi
tion, indicated by the dotted outline of the form
ID in Fig. 6. The fore and heel parts of the sole
are clamped against the form If! and the sup
port I4 when in the last-mentioned position by
fore and heel part clamps l8 and 20 (Fig. ‘1) , re
spectively, which are moved downwardly to cause
a sheet 22 of relatively thin rubber, the ends of
which are attached to the opposite ends of the
10 clamps l8 and 20, to exert a yielding pressure
against the fore and heel parts of the sole.
The heel part clamp 20 and the support l4 may
then be bodily dropped relatively to the form In
to an extent depending upon the relative heights
15 of the heel part of the sole with respect to the
forepart to produce the desired angular relation
between the shank and the forepart. As fully de
scribed in the above-mentioned Letters Patent
No. 1,939,750, this treatment of the sole may be
effected either with or without stretching the
shank portion of the sole bodily, depending upon
the adjustment of a link 24 (Fig. 1) which holds
the fore and heel part clamps l8 and 22, respec
tively, a predetermined distance apart. The link
24 is ilustrated herein as being positioned so as
to cause no over-all stretching of the sole as its
heel part is dropped, this result being accom
plished by the link’s causing the forepart clamp
i8 to move toward the right (Fig. 1) as the heel
part of the sole is dropped. To permit similar
movement of the table 12, it is mounted at its for
ward end to slide longitudinally of the machine on
a rod 26 which is ?xed to a support 28 and is op
erated by a lever 29 to swing the table i2 in
the manner described above. Two gage position
ing levers 30, one of which is mounted in the sup
port 28, are positioned by V-shaped guides 32
when the form l0 and support 14 are swung into
sole-receiving position to set the gaging mecha
40
45
50
55
60
nism, as will be described later.
The sole is next shaped about the form It by
the downward movement of a conforming tool 34
(Figs. 1 and 12) the operative surface of which
is substantially complementary to the shank por
tion I‘! of the form and the part of the forepart
portion of the form contiguous to the shank por—
tion. Reference may be made to the above—men
tioned Letters Patent for a more.complete de
scription of the mounting of and the mechanism
for operating the sole-clamping members and the
sole-shaping or conforming tool.
The forepart engaging surface of the form It
is of suf?cient size to accommodate the largest
soles which the machine will be called upon to
shape and is convexly curved both longitudinally
and laterally in order to produce a cupped effect
in the forepart of the sole to facilitate the ?tting
of the sole closely to the shoe bottom. As indi
cated in Fig. 6, the forepart clamp i8 is concave
1y curved with reference to the shape of the form
l0 and also is provided with a pressing surface co
extensive with the forepart of the form In except
for a small area contiguous to the ball line which
is operated upon by the conforming tool 34 so as to
65 afford a shaping and clamping action which ex
tends substantially completely over the forepart
of the sole. This construction of the forepart
clamp I8 and the form if] is permitted by causing
the gaging mechanism, which in its operative po
70 sition overlies the pattern, to be completely re
moved from between the clamp l8 and the form EU
as they are moved into clamping relation, as will
be described later.
In order to insure against slipping of the sole
75 with respect to the form 10 when the sole is con
formed, the sole-engaging surface of its forepart
has been bored at a plurality of spaced areas to
receive anti-slipping inserts 36 having blunt ends
which project slightly from its sole-engaging sur
face. Similarly, the heel sup-port It is provided
with a plurality of inserts 38.
The ends of these
inserts are rounded so as to merge into the surface
from which they extend and may conveniently be
made of ?brous material such as wood, for ex
ample, the end grain of which is presented to the 10
sole. Since the rubber sheet 22 is interposed be
tween the sole being operated upon and the
clamps I8 and 20, the formation of condensed
areas in the sole is avoided as the sole at points
opposite to the ends of the inserts is pressed to a 15
slight extent into the yielding sheet 22, as illus
trated in Fig. 6. Thus, slipping of the fore and
heel part portions of the sole is resisted, not only
by the friction between the sole and the form ill
and heel support M, but also by the wedging eifect 120
produced by the tendency of the sole to be moved
across the rounded ends of the inserts 3B, 38.
Although the use of the anti-slipping inserts 36,
38 has been illustrated herein with reference to a
form adapted for shaping the soles for women’s 25
shoes, it is to be understood that it is not to be
limited to such use alone. For example, the in
vention comprehends the use of such inserts in
a form adapted for shaping soles for men’s shoes,
which forms may have integral forepart, shank 30
and heel portions lying substantially in the same
plane.
‘
The conforming tool 34 is so shaped that its
sole-engaging surface is substantially comple
mentary to that of the portions of the forepart 35
it and shank ll of the form with which it is to
cooperate to impart the desired transverse curva
ture to the sole and the desired angular relation
between the forepart and the shank, as indicated
by the sole illustrated in Fig. 13 for example.
The illustrated conforming tool 34 has mounted
thereon means for making a demarcation on the
sole, such as a groove 35, (the prominence of
which is exaggerated in Fig. 13 for purposes of
illustration), when the sole is shaped in conform 45
ity to the form. This means, as herein illustrated,
comprises a Y-shaped wire 31 (Fig. 12) the ends
of which are bent and arranged to extend inward
ly into the conforming tool 34 in order to hold the
wire in the desired position. One branch a of the
wire 31 is arranged to extend longitudinally of the
conforming tool so as to indent a groove extend
ing substantially along the median line of the
shank of the sole. The other branches to and c
of the wire 31 which are joined to each other and 55
to the branch (1 are so positioned with respect to
the conforming tool 34 as to form a groove ex
tending continuously along the ball line or
“break” in the sole at the location where the
shank of the sole begins to incline away from the .60
plane of the forepart.
It is apparent that, if
desired, any two of the sections of the wire 31 may
be used together without the other in order to
make a demarcation either between the forepart
and the shank or between either of two portions of 65
the shank and the forepart; that is, the wire 3?
might consist of only the branches b‘ and c, the
effect of which would be to indent a demarcation
between the forepart X of the sole and the shank
portion.
The sections a and b, if used together 70
without the section 0 would produce a demarca
tion on the sole between the portion Y of the shank
and the remainder of the sole. Similarly, if sec
tions a and c of the wire 31 are used without the
section b, a demarcation would be made between 75
2,128,318
the portion of the shank Z and the remainder
of the sole. Although the invention is illustrated
engaging the guides 32 (Fig. 1) which are posi
tioned by a control handle 65, the proper posi
with reference to the use of a wire in connection
tion of which for any sole within a range of sizes
with the tool 34 for making a Y-shaped demar
cation, it is to be understood that the invention
comprehends the use of any rigid means for mak
ing a demarcation of any desired shape on the
sole. It will now be apparent that in ?nishing the
between which the grading is uniform being in
dicated by scales 55 and 5'!" (Fig. 10) associated
bottom of a shoe the sole of which has been
treated in the manner described above, the paint
ing or staining of one characteristic portion of the
sole which is to be ?nished in contrast to another
is carried up to the demarcation between the por
tions of the sole which are thus to be ?nished in
15 different ways, and, by thus using the demarca
tion on the sole as a guide, the operator is enabled
to perform this operation with great rapidity and
accuracy and with insurance that uniformity in
appearance of all soles treated in this way will be
20 maintained.
The positioning of a sole on the form I0 is
effected by gaging means adapted to engage the
edge of the sole at the toe end and at spaced
points at one side of the sole. This gaging means
25 comprises a toe gage 50 (Fig. 2) adapted to posi
tion the sole longitudinally of the form, a fore
part side gage 42 and a heel part side gage 54
with the control handle 65. It is to be under
stood that the heel part side gage 54 (Fig. 2) has
a movement similar to and simultaneously with
that of the gage 42 referred to above, the gage 44
being mounted upon a slide 55 which is moved .f
along an angularly adjustable slideway 68 bya
rod 69 on one of the levers 35.
Components of the movement of the slide 56
extending longitudinally of the sole are trans
mitted to the rod 52 on which the toe gage 40 is
mounted by a lug 15 (Figs. 2 and 3) which is ?xed
on the slide 55 and the opposite sides of which
are embraced by the arm 45 and the member 50.
The toe gage 55 may thus be swung from a posi
tion in juxtaposition to the form ill away there
from into its position indicated in dotted lines
in Fig. 6 and still be under the control of the
lug ‘Ill. The toe gage MI is normally urged toward
its dotted line position in Fig. 6 and away from
the form Ill by a torsion spring 72 the ends of 25
which abut the lug ‘i0 and the member 55. The
toe gage 40 is held in juxtaposition to the form Ill
arranged to position the sole laterally of the
when the latter is in its sole-receiving position by
form.
a cam lever ‘M rotatably mounted on the rod
52 and connected thereto by a spring 76 so as
The toe gage 45 is mounted for adjust
30 ment longitudinally of the form ID on an arm 45
(Fig. 5) and is clamped thereon by a screw 48.
The arm 46 is ?xedly mounted on a member 55
carried by a rod 52 which is movable axially, as
will be described below, to effect an adjustment
35 of the gage 40 longitudinally of the form I!) and
also for rotation to permit the gage 40 to be
swung into and out of juxtaposition to the form
It]. The rod 52 is thus mounted in a standard
54 ?xedly mounted on the support 28.
40
The toe gage 40 and the forepart side gage 42
are mounted and arranged to partake of the
movement of a slide 56 which is adapted to be
moved along a slideway 58 on the support 28 by
a transverse square rod 60, Figs. 3 and 7, received
45 within a complemental recess in the slide 55 and
carried at the end of one of the levers 30. The
slide 55 is held in assembled relation with the
slideway 58 by a T-headed bolt 6| the head of
which is received in a T-slot in the slideway. A
50 spring 63 surrounding the bolt 5! and abutting
the bottom of a recess in the slide 56 yieldingly
holds the latter against the slideway 58 to pre
vent any lost motion between them. Parallelism
of all positions of the slide 56 is insured by the
55 rod 50 which prevents turning of the slide 55
about the bolt 5!. The slideway 58 is mounted
for angular adjustment with respect to the sup
port 28 about a screw 59 (Fig. 3) and is held in
any desired position of adjustment by a clamp
60 controlled by a screw 62.
The proper position of
the slideway 58, when the machine is used to
operate upon a given run of soles of the same
style, is such that its tangent is equal to the
ratio of the increase in width to the increase in
65 length between soles of successive sizes within
that range of soles which are graded uniformly
such as soles of the same width size but of dif
ferent lengths. Accordingly, by one adjustment
of the slide 56 along the slideway 58, the toe gage
70 ?ll and the side gage 42 are moved simultaneously
to accommodate any sole of a series having the
same nominal width but different lengths. The
slide 56 is thus operated when the form I0 and
heel support M are moved into their sole-receiv
75 ing position, the levers 30 during this movement
yieldingly to hold the toe gage 56 against the
form Ill when the cam plate M is swung into
engagement with a plate Ts’ (Figs. 6 and 11)
which overhangs the edge of a ?xed cover 18 at
the front of the machine. It will now belap- '
parent, with reference to Fig. 6 in which the toe
gage M is illustrated as being yieldingly held
against the form it, that as soon as the form is
moved toward the sole-treating position the cam
lever 14, in moving away from the plate ‘ill, will 40
swing under the influence of the spring 72 to
permit the toe gage 45 also to swing upwardly
away from the form it into its dotted line posi
tion, determined by the engagement of the cam
lever 14 with a guard 19 attached to the support I
28, thereby obviating any possibility of interfer
ence by the toe gage with the relative approach
of the clamping member 98 and the form In.
Accordingly, as pointed out above, it is possible
in the illustrated construction to employ a clamp
l8 and form iii, the surfaces of which are coex
tensive with the iorepart of the sole to be treated
and,hence, may cause it to be completely shaped,
as by cupping, to make its edges ?t closely to the
shoe bottom.
_
The edge gage 42 (Fig. 4) and a sole-supporting
?nger 80 are mounted to swing relatively to each
other for a. purpose to be described hereafter
about the axis of a stud 82 ?xed in one end of a
carrier in the form of an arm 84 which, at its
other end, is pivotally mounted by means of a stud
86 on the slide 56. The ends of a torsion spring
88 (Fig. 4) surrounding a screw 95 ?xed to the
carrier or arm 84 are arranged to abut against
shoulders on the slide
and arm 84 so as nor
65
mally to urge the arm 84 toward the slide 56.
Movement of the arm 35 relatively to the slide 56
is controlled, for a purpose which will be described
later, by a screw 92 threaded in the slide 55 and
arranged to abut the arm 85 near the stud 85. 70
The screw 92 has a head 94 which is calibrated
and marked with width sizes, as will be described
later, which indicate corresponding positions of
the arm 84 on which the width gage ‘i2 is mount
ed. In order to permit the edge gage 42 to engage
2,128,318
soles of all sizes at the same point relatively to
the ball line‘, it is adjustably mounted, by means
of a screw 96, Figs. 3 and 4, on a plate 98, this
plate also being pivotally mounted on the stud
82 and normally being urged by a spring 909 to
hold the edge gage 42 in its operative position.
This operative position of the gage 42 is deter
mined not only by adjustment of the screw 92
but also by the position of a rod I92 (Fig. 4), one
10 end of which is adapted to abut a lug E64 extend
ing upwardly from the plate 98. The rod H32 is
mounted to slide in the arm 84 so as adjustably to
limit the swinging of the gage 42 away from the
arm, and is adjusted by a control knob N6 the
15 bottom part of which has formed thereon a gear
E08 arranged to mesh with a rack l H) carried by
the rod 542. The knob I46 is rotatably mounted
on a stud l l2 ?xed on the arm 84 and is yieldingly
urged downwardly by a spring H4 (Fig. 5) into
20 engagement with a plate I 16 mounted on the bot
tom of the rack lid in order to set up sufficient
'riction to hold the rod 282 in any position of ad
justment. A pointer H8 (Fig. 4) fixed to the
rack H8 is adapted to indicate the position of
25 the rod 942 with reference to a graduated index
l2!) carried by the slide 56.
The sole is .gaged with respect to the pattern
it in sole-receiving position, illustrated in Fig. 6,
by being placed with the end of its forepart in
30 engagement with the toe gage 40, the side of the
forepart engaging the side gage 42 and resting on
the sole support 39 and the heel part of the sol-e
resting in a notch formed in the end of the heel
part side gage 44. When the clamp i8 is moved
35 toward the form til the support 813 is ?rst swung
from beneath the sole in a direction having com
ponents directed toward the toe gage 44 and side
gage 42 so as frictionally to urge the sole into
contact with these members. Later the toe gage
40 44} is swung away from the form as described
above and, before the clamp I8 is caused to exert
pressure on the sole, the edge gage 42 as well as
the sole support 88 will have been swung out of
the ?eld of action of the clamp IS. The move
45 ment of the sole support 85! relatively to the edge
gage 42 and also the movement of'the latter away
from the sole is derived from the downward move
ment of a cam plate i22 (Figs. 1 and 6) associ
ated with the clamp l8 and adapted to engage a
50 lever 524 to cause it to swing about a stud l2?
fixed in the upper end of the standard 54. The
lever 424 has an arm 828 the lower edge of which
extends substantially parallel to the axis of the
slideway 558 and is adapted to engage a pin l3?)
55 which extends upwardly from the sole support
til. The sole support 88 is normally urged to that
position relatively to the side gage 42 illustrated
in Fig. 4 by a spring I32 one end of which abuts
the pin I343 and the other end a pin I34 ?xed to
the plate 98. This position of the sole support
Bil is determined by a pin !36 ?xed to the plate
98 and adapted to be engaged by a shoulder of a
recess 133 (Fig. 8) formed in the member 8%.
5
for the heel part side gage 44, the latter is mount
ed for adjustment laterally of the sole on the hub
of a control knob E44 (Fig. 2) which is calibrated ‘
with reference to a system of width grading, as
will be described later, and is .mounted eccen~
trically with respect to its hub on a stud I42
carried by a block H44 which is mounted for ad
justment laterally of the sole on the slide 66.
Adjustment of the block 444 is effected by a knob
H46 rotatably mounted on the slide 64 and having 10
a gear 548 meshing with a rack ltltl carried by the
block I44. In order to position the notched por
tion of the gage 44 so as to hold the heel part of
the sole substantially in the plane of the support
54, a tongue r52 extending forwardly from the 15
hub of the gage 44 is normally urged into en
gagement with a pin i554 ?xed to the block I44
by a spring i154 which is coiled about the hub of
the heel part gage 44. The yielding mounting of
the side gage 44 allows it ‘to swing downwardly, 20
thereby avoiding any damage which otherwise
might be caused it the conforming tool 34 were to
carry the portion of the sole supported by the
gage 44 below its normal position heightwise of
the support l4.
To summarize brie?y the operation of the gag
ing means without considering for the present
their adjustment or calibration, upon movement
of the tables l2 and lBinto sole-receiving posi
tion, illustrated in Fig. 6, the slides 56 and 66 are 30
positioned with respect to their slideways 58 and
68 by the operation of the levers 30 which are
controlled by ‘the guides 32 which previously
will have been positioned by movement of the
control knob 64 to the proper position with ref 35
erence to the size of the sole to be gaged. A sole
to be operated upon is next placed over the form
I0 and heel support M with its toe end in engage
ment with the gage 40, the bottom of its forepart
resting upon the sole support 80, the edge of its 40
forepart abutting the side gage 42, and the mar
gin vof its heel part resting within the notched
end of the heel part gage 44. When the machine
is treadled, the tables l2 and I6 are swung, as
fully described in United States Letters Patent 45
No. 1,939,750, to the sole-treating position indi
cated by the dotted showing of the parts in Fig.
6. During this movement the toe gage 40 is
swung upwardly away from the form l0 under the
influence of the spring '52. Later, as the clamps 50
i8 and 20 are lowered to cause the fore and heel
parts of the sole to be gripped, the cam plate
I22 operates the lever I24, thereby causing the
sole support 89 to move out from underneath the
sole, thereby 'frictionally urging the forepart
against the side gage 42.‘ The latter part of the
movement of the sole support 80 is communicated
to the side gage 42 whereby both of these mem
bers are simultaneously moved away from the
sole completely out of the ?eld of action of the 60
clamp I8, thereby obviating the possibility of
damage to the support 8!] and gage 42. The heel
part of the sole is then displaced heightwise with
Until the other shoulder of the recess 13% is moved respect to the forepart in order to give the shank _'
65 into engagement with the pin 4%, as illustrated ' the desired angular relation with respect to the 65
forepart and the conforming tool 34 is next
in Fig.
in response to pressure of the lever arm
P123 against the pin 534, the sole support 23b swings moved downwardly to shape the shank of the sole
from underneath the sole with respect to the edge and a portion of the forepart contiguous to the
gage 42. However, further movement of the pin shank about the corresponding portions of the
form [0. It is to be understood that, while the 70
H38 under the influence of the lever arm 528
heel part gage 44 is not moved laterally of the
causes the side gage 42 to be swung with the sole
support 89 away from the sole edge until the gage sole to prevent interference with the operation
and sole support are completely removed from the of the conforming tool 34, the pivotal mounting
of the gage 44 with respect to the block I44 per
?eld of action of the clamp l8 and the form it.
Continuing to the description of the mounting mits the gage to yield downwardly if it extends 75
75
6
2,128,318,
into the path of movement of the conforming
tool 34. These operations then occur in a reverse
order and the conformed sole is carried by the
form it] back to its sole-receiving position. As
this position is approached, the cam lever 14,
which during the treatment of the sole engages
the guard ‘E9, is moved into engagement with
the plate Tl which causes the toe gage 40 to be
swung into juxtaposition to the form l0 and
10 yieldingly held thereagainst owing. to the pro
vision of the spring 76 which connects the cam
lever ‘54 and the rod 52.
The setting and calibration of the gage mech
anism will now be described with reference to the
15 treatment in the illustrated machine of an ex
emplary series of soles which are graded by dif
ferent systems. Soles of the same width size
but of different length sizes within a certain
range commonly are strictly geometrically simi
lar.
This range of soles may include all lengths
of a certain class, such as men’s or women’s for
example, and of any given width (1. e. 4-B, 5—-B,
6—-B, etc.) and hence it is possible in the use
of the illustrated machine to gage such soles ac
25 curately by one movement of the fore and heel
part gages 40, 42 and 44 along the slideways
53 and 58, respectively, if the slideways are so
angularly adjusted as to cause the movement of
the side gages 42 and 44 laterally of the form It),
30' and the movement of the toe gage 40 longitudi
nally thereof to occur in the same ratio as that
of the increase in Width to the increase in length
of these geometrically similar soles. Such ad
justment of the slideways 58 having been made,
~ thepositioning of the gages for a series of soles
of the same width but of different lengths may
be accomplished merely by moving the knob 64
so that the width graduation on the scale 65 (Fig.
10) corresponding to the width of the sole being
40 operated upon is opposite to the length gradua
tion on the scale 67 corresponding to the length
size of the sole being operated upon.
'
It is to be understood that the above opera
tion of the gages may be carried out after a pre
liminary setting of not only the slides 58 and 68
but also the scale 61, as will now be explained.
To this end, a sole is placed on the form ID in
longitudinal and lateral alinement therewith.
The gages 4e, 42 and 44 are then moved into en
50. gagement with the sole edge with the help of the
variousv adjustments referred to above; that is,
adjustment of the toe gage 40 may be e?ected
relatively to the arm 46 and the gage may then be
clamped in adjusted position by the screw 48.
55 The side gage 42 may be adjusted laterally of the
sole by operating the knob I06. Similarly, the
heel part side gage 44 may be adjusted laterally
of the sole by movement of the control knob I46.
When the above adjustments have been made,
60 the scale El is adjusted on the cover 18 to bring
the graduations on the scales 6'! and 65 corre
sponding to the size and width of the sole to be
operated upon into registration.
If the above
operations are carried out with a reference to a
65
sole, for example, soles of any length but
having a 13 width will be gaged properly with
regard to the pattern H) by moving the knob 64
to bring the B width graduation on the scale 65
opposite to that length graduation on the scale
70 6.4‘ corresponding to the length size of the sole
to be operated upon.
However, soles of the same length size but of
different widths are commonly so graded that
as the widths are increased the actual lengths
75. also are increased somewhat, but the increase in
width in such cases is greater in proportion to
the increase in length than in the case of soles
of the same width sizes. but of diiferent lengths.
‘Therefore, if, as in the illustrated machine, the
positioning of the sole longitudinally of the form
once the gages have been set is e?ected exclusive
ly by the control knob 64, provision must be made
for making an adjustment of the side gages 42
and 44 independently of and in addition to that
effected by their movement laterally of the pat 10'
tern along the inclined slideways 58 and 48 to
compensate for the difference in grading between
soles of the same lengths but of di?erent widths
and soles of the same widths but di?erent
lengths. In the illustrated machine, the scale 65 15
is so calibrated that by moving the knob 64 to
bring any of the width size graduations indicated
in Fig. 10 opposite to any length graduation the
sole of that size corresponding to the graduations
which are in alinement will be properly posi 20
tioned longitudinally of the pattern It]. How
ever, the extra lateral adjustment of the gages 42
and 44, necessitated for the reasons described
above, is made in the forepart gaging means by
the calibrated knob 94 and in the heel part gag 25
ing means by the calibrated knob E40. If, for ex
ample, it is desired to operate on a 6-—C sole after
a 6—-B sole has been operated upon, the knob 64
is moved to the left (Fig. 10) to bring the C width
graduation on the scale 55 opposite to the length 30
6 graduation on the scale El. As mentioned
above, this movement causes the 6——C sole to be
gaged properly longitudinally of the pattern, but
the movement of the gages 42 and 44 widthwise
of the pattern caused by this movement of the 35
knob 64 is insu?icient properly to position the
sole laterally of the pattern since, owing to the
above-mentioned peculiarity in Width grading for _
soles of the same length, their variations in
Width are greater in proportion to the length 40
than the similar variations in the width of soles
of different lengths, in accordance with which
type of soles the angular adjustment of the slide
ways 58 and 68 is made. Adjustment of the gage
42 laterally of the form it, which compensates
for this difference between width and length
grading, is made in respect to the forepart gage
42 by turning the control knob 94 to permit the
arm 84 to move relatively to the slide 56 toward
or away from the longitudinal axis of the pat 50
tern, the knob 94 being calibrated and marked
with width size graduations any one of which is
indexed by turning the knob until that gradua
tion in question is in its uppermost position.
Accordingly, in operating the gaging mechanism 55
to locate size 6 soles of widths within the range
of A to EEE, for example, the knob 94 is turned
to bring the width graduation corresponding to
the width of the sole to be operated upon into
its uppermost position, and the knob 64 is moved 60
to bring the similar width graduation on the
scale 65 opposite to the length graduation 6 on
the scale 61. Soles of the same length size but
of di?erent widths within the range from A
:through the multiple E widths, commonly have
a slight proportional increase in length but usual
ly as between soles in the range from multiple
A widths to the A width there is no actual in
crease in their length. Accordingly, it is neces
sary, in the illustrated machine, to gage all soles 70
of the same length within the range of width
sizes between A and multiple A with the control
knob 64 so positioned that the A graduation on
the scale 65 is opposite to the desired length
graduation on the scale 61. Hence, in gaging 75
2,128,818
soles within this range, the differences in their
widths are compensated for entirely by the ad
justment of the knob 94, and therefore it is ap
parent that the knob {ill will have to be rotated a
Ch greater distance between successive sizes from A
to AAAA than was the case when movement of
ll)
the slide 56 contributed to the adjustment of the
gage 42 widthwise of the pattern. This feature
of the calibration of the knob 94 is clearly illus
trated in Fig. 11 in which the angle between suc
cessive graduations within the range from A to
EEE is substantially smaller than that between
successive graduations within the range extend
ing from A to AAAA.
The knob Hit for controlling lateral adjust
ment of the heel part gage M is calibrated simi
larly to the knob 94, due regard being had, of
course, to the fact that the gage M is mounted
eccentrically on the knob Mt.
Having thus described my invention, what I
20
claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Pat
ent of the United States is:
1. In a machine for operating upon soles, a
form, means for positioning a sole with respect
25 to the form comprising a gage mounted for ad—
justment laterally of the form and adapted to
position a sole laterally thereof by engagement
with the edge of the sole at one side thereof, said
gage being movable obliquely with respect to the
30 longitudinal axis of the form at an angle deter
mined with reference to the differences in length
and width of soles graded by one system, and
plural means for adjusting said gage laterally
of the form one of which means is calibrated
35 with reference to another system of grading.
2. In a machine for operating upon soles, a
form, means for positioning a sole with respect
to the form comprising a gage mounted for move
ment in a direction oblique with respect to the
40 longitudinal axis of the form, and plural means
operable independently of each other for adjust
ing said gage laterally of said form, one of said
means being calibrated with reference to the
grading of soles of the same length but of di?er
45 ent widths.
3. In a machine for operating upon soles, a
form, means for positioning a sole with respect
to the form comprising a gage adapted to engage
the edge of the sole at one side thereof, a carrier
50 on which said gage is mounted for adjustment
longitudinally of the form in order to permit said
gage to engage the edges of soles of different sizes
at the same point with respect to the ball line,
means for adjusting said gage with respect to said
55 carrier laterally of the form, and adjusting means
operable independently of said last-mentioned
means for positioning the carrier laterally of the
form, said adjusting means being calibrated with
reference to the grading of soles of the same
60 length but of different widths.
4. In a machine for operating upon soles, a
form, means for positioning a sole with respect to
the form comprising a gage adapted to engage
the edge of the sole at one side thereof, a carrier
65 on which said gage is mounted for adjustment
longitudinally of the form in order to permit said
gage to engage the edges of soles of different sizes
at the same point with respect to the ball line,
means mounted on said carrier for adjusting said
70 gage laterally of the form with respect to the car
rier, said carrier being mounted to swing toward
and away from the form, means for yieldingly
urging said carrier away from the form, and an
adjusting screw calibrated with reference to the
75 grading of soles of the same length but of differ
7
ent widths for limiting the movement of the car
rier away from the form.
5. In a machine for operating upon soles, a
form, means for positioning a sole on the form
laterally and . longitudinally thereof comprising
end and side gages adapted to engage the edge of
the sole at the toe and one side thereof, a carrier
for said side gage, means for adjusting said side
gage relatively to the carrier laterally of the form,
a slide on which said carrier is mounted, said slide 10
being mounted for movement at an angle to the
longitudinal axis of the form the tangent of which
is equal to the ratio of the increase in width to
the increase in length of soles graded by one sys
tem, and means for adjusting said carrier later 15
ally of the form in accordance with another sys
tem of grading.
6. In a machine for operating upon soles, a
form, means for positioning a sole with respect to
said form comprising end and side gages adapted 20
to engage the sole at the toe and one side thereof,
a carrier for said side gage, a slide on which said
carrier is mounted for movement toward and
away from said form, yielding means connecting
said slide and carrier for urging the latter toward 25
said form, said slide being connected with said
end gage and mounted for movement in such a
direction extending obliquely with respect to the
longitudinal axis of the form that soles of the
same nominal width but of different lengths are 30
positioned laterally and longitudinally of the form
by one movement of said slide, and means cali
brated with reference to the grading of soles of
the same nominal length but of different widths
for limiting the movement of said carrier with re— 35
spect to the slide toward said form.
'7. In a machine for operating upon soles, a
form, means for positioning a sole with respect
to said form comprising end and side gages adapt
ed to engage the edge of the sole at the toe and 40
one side thereof, said side gage being mounted for
movement in a direction oblique with respect to
the longitudinal axis of the form and to swing lat
erally'of the form about different axes, means for
swinging said side gage about one of said axes to 45
position it laterally of the form, yielding means
for causing said side gage to be urged about an
other of said axes, and means calibrated with ref- -
erence to the grading of soles of the same length
but of different widths for adjustably limiting the 50
movement of said side gage with respect to the
form;
8. In a machine for operating upon soles, a
form, an end gage and a side gage for positioning
a sole longitudinally and laterally of the form 55
respectively, said side gage being connected with
said end gage and mounted for movement in a
direction oblique with respect to the longitudinal
axis of the form, a carrier on which said side
gage is mounted for movement laterally of the
form, means on said carrier for adjusting the po
sition of said side gage laterally of the form, and
means for adjusting the position of said carrier
laterally of the form.
9. In a machine for operating upon soles, a
form, an end gage and a side gage for positioning
a sole longitudinally and laterally of the form
respectively, said side gage being connected with
said end gage and mounted for movement in such
a direction with respect to the longitudinal axis
of the form that soles of the same. nominal width
but of different lengths are positioned laterally
and longitudinally of the form by one movement
of said side gage, and plural means operable inde
pendently of each other for positioning said side 75
8
2,128,318
.
gage laterally of the form, onev of ‘which means is
calibrated with reference to the grading of soles
of the same nominal length but of different
widths.
10. In a machine for operating upon soles, a
form, means for positioning a sole on the form
laterally and longitudinally thereof comprising
gages adapted to engage the edge of the sole at
an end and one side thereof, means for sup
10 porting said end gage for sliding movement in the
direction of the longitudinal axis of the form, a
carrier for the side gage, a slide on which said
carrier is pivotally mounted, said slide being
mounted for movement obliquely with respect to
15 the longitudinal axis of said form, means for im
parting to said end gage the components of the
movement of said slide extending in the direction
of the longitudinal axis of the form, means for
positioning said side gage with respect to said
20' carrier laterally of the form, and means for posi
tioning said carrier with respect to said slide
laterally of the form.
'
'11. In a machine for operating upon soles, a
form, an end gage and a side gage for positioning
25 a sole longitudinally and laterally of the form re
spectively, said end and side gages ‘being mounted
for movement longitudinally of the form in dif
ferent directions, and means constructed and ar
ranged to utilize the components of movement of
30' said side gage extending in the direction of
movement of said end gage to position said end
15. In a machine for operating upon soles, sole
shaping means. comprising a clamp and a form,
said form being mounted for movement from be
neath the clamp to a sole-receiving position,
means for positioning a sole with respect to said
form comprising a gage adapted to engage the
edge of the sole at the toe end thereof and
mounted normally to swing away from said form,
and means operated by movement of said form
toward its sole-receiving position for moving said 10
toe gage into juxtaposition to said form.
16. In a machine for operating upon soles, sole
shaping means comprising a clamp and a form
mounted and arranged to swing from beneath
said clamp to a sole-receiving position, means
mounted for movement with said form for posi
tioning a sole with respect thereto comprising a
gage adapted to engage the edge of the sole, said
gage being mounted for movement into and out
of juxtaposition to said form, means for urging
said gage away from said form, and means op
erated by movement of said form toward its sole
receiving position for moving said toe gage into
juxtaposition to said form.
17. In a machine for operating upon soles, sole
shaping means comprising a clamp and a form
mounted to swing from beneath said clamp to a
sole-receiving position, a gage for positioning a
sole on said form mounted normally to swing
away therefrom, and means constructed and ar
ranged to move with said form toward its sole
gage.
receiving position for yieldingly holding said gage
12.‘In a machine for operating upon soles, a
form, means for positioning a sole longitudinally
in engagement with said form when it is in its
35 and laterally of the form comprising gages adapted
for engagement with the edge of the sole at the
18. In a machine for operating upon soles, sole
shaping means comprising a form, a clamp
mounted for movement toward and away from
toe end and at one side thereof, said gages being
mounted for movement in different directions
longitudinally of the form, means for adjusting
40 said side gage, and connections between said side
and end gages constructed and arranged to pre
vent displacement relatively to each other longi
tudinally of the form but to permit their rela
tive displacement laterally of the form whereby
45 only those components of movement of the side
gage extending in the direction of the longitu
dinal axis of the form are utilized to position said
end gage.
13. In a machine for operating upon soles, a
50 form, means for positioning a sole with respect
to said form comprising end and side gages
adapted for engagement with the edge of the sole
at an end and at one side thereof, said end gage
being mounted for movement in the direction of
55 the longitudinal axis of the form, said side gage
being mounted for movement obliquely with re—
spect to the longitudinal axis of the form, and
connections between said gages for utilizing the
components of the movement of the side gage
60 longitudinally of the form to position said end
gage.
14. In a machine for operating upon soles, a
form, end and side gages adapted for engage~
ment with the edge of the sole at the toe and one
65 side thereof respectively thereby to position the
sole longitudinally and laterally of the form, said
end and side gages being mounted for movement
in di?erent directions longitudinally of the form,
means for adjusting said side gage to position it
70 laterally of the form, and connections between
said gages comprising members arranged to slide
relatively to each other laterally of the form
whereby only the components of movement of.
said side gage longitudinally of the form are uti
75 lized to position said end gage.
3O
sole-receiving position.
said form, said form being movable from beneath
the clamp to a sole-receiving position, means for
positioning a sole with respect to said form com 40
prising a gage mounted normally to swing away
from said form, and means operated by move
ment of said form toward its sole-receiving posi
tion to move said gage outside of the path of said
clamp into juxtaposition to said form.
45
19. In a machine for operating upon soles, sole
shaping means comprising a clamp and a
form mounted for movement from beneath the
clamp into sole-receiving position, a gage as
sociated with said form adapted to position a
sole thereon by engagement with the sole edge, 50
means for operating said gage toward and away
from the form comprising an abutment, a lever
associated with said form mounted for move
ment therewith into engagement with said abut
ment, and connections between said lever and
gage for moving the gage into and out of juxta
position to said form as the latter is moved into
and out of its. sole-receiving position respec
tively.
~
60
20. In a machine for operating upon soles,
sole-shaping means comprising a. clamp and a
form mounted for movement from beneath the
clamp into sole-receiving position, a gage for
positioning a sole with respect to said form and
65
mounted for movement therewith, an abutment,
means for operating said gage comprising a lever
adapted to be moved into engagement with said
abutment when said form is moved toward its
sole-receiving position, and yielding connections
between said lever and gage constructed and ar 70
ranged to cause said gage to be yieldingly held
against said form when it is in its sole-receiving
position.
‘
21. In a machine for operating upon soles,
means for shaping a sole comprising a form, a
2,128,318
clamp mounted for movement toward and away
from said form, said form being movable from
beneath the clamp to a sole-receiving position,
means for positioning a sole relatively to the
9
cooperating with said form and support to grip
the fore and heel parts of the sole, means co
operating with said form to shape the portion of
form comprising gages adapted for engagement
the sole between said clamps, said form and sup
port having a plurality of blunt projections ex
with the edge of the sole at the toe and one side
tending from their sole-engaging surfaces.
thereof, means operated by movement of said
form toward its sole-receiving position to move
said toe gage into juxtaposition to the form,
10 said means being constructed and arranged to
move the toe gage away from the form when the
latter is moved away from the sole-receiving
position, and means operated by said clamp in
moving toward said form to move said side gage
15 out of engagement with the sole.
22. In a machine for operating upon soles, co
operating pressing members mounted for move
ment toward each other to clamp and shape a
sole disposed therebetween, and a yielding mem
20 ber arranged to impart the pressure of one of said
pressing members to the sole, the sole-engaging
surface of the other of said pressing members
having a plurality of separated elevated areas
thereby to cause portions of the sole opposite to
25 said elevated areas to be pressed into said yield
ing member in response to pressure between said
pressing means.
23. In a machine for operating upon soles,
sole-shaping means comprising a form having a
30 plurality of blunt projections extending from its
sole-engaging surface, and means mounted for
movement toward said form for pressing a sole
into conformity to the form, said means includ
ing a resilient sheet adapted and arranged to en
gage the sole and to yield at areas opposite to
said projections.
24. In a machine for operating upon soles, a
form provided with anti-slipping inserts the ex
posed surfaces of which extend beyond the sole
engaging surface of said form, and means for
pressing a sole into conformity to the shape of
said form, said means having a yielding sole-en
29. In a machine for operating upon soles, a
form, a pressing member having a work-engaging
surface shaped and arranged to extend contin
uously over contiguous portions of the forepart
and shank portions of a sole on the form, and
means mounted on said member for making an
indented demarcation on said sole between, a
characteristic portion of the shank and the re
15
mainder of the sole.
30. In a machine for operating upon soles, a
form having contiguous forepart and shank por
tions having the angular relation that the cor
responding portions of a sole are to have in ashoe,
means for pressing a sole on said form into 20
conformity to the shape thereof, and a member
extending from the sole-engaging surface of said
pressing means constructed and arranged to make
an indented demarcation in the surface of the
sole between a characteristic portion of the shank 25
and the remainder of the sole.
31. In a machine for operating upon soles, a
form, and a pressing member having a continuous
work-engaging surface shaped and arranged to
impart to contiguous portions of the forepart
and shank of a sole on said form the angular
relation they are to have in a ?nished shoe, said
pressing member having means for making a
demarcation on the sole between the forepart and
shank of the sole.
32. In a machine for operating upon soles, a
form, and a pressing member cooperating with
said form to impart to contiguous portions of the
forepart and shank of a sole adjacent to the ball
line the angular relation they are to have in a 40
finished shoe, said member being ridged thereby
to indent the sole at the ball line.
33. In a machine for operating upon shoes, a
gaging surface.
25. In a machine for operating upon soles, a
— form having a plurality of blunt projections ex
tending from its sole-engaging surface, and means
mounted for movement toward said form to
press a sole into conformity to the shape of said
form, said means comprising a plurality of press
ing members and a yielding cover between the sole
and said members.
26. In a machine for operating upon soles, sole
shaping means comprising a form and means
mounted and arranged yieldingly to press a sole
55 into conformity to the shape of said form, said
form having wooden inserts mounted therein so
as to present the end grain to the sole.
27. In a machine for operating upon soles, plu
ral means for gripping the fore and heel parts
60 of a sole, each of said means comprising a sole
support and a clamping member, yielding means
for imparting the pressure of said clamping mem
form having contiguous forepart and shank por
tions disposed at an angle to each other, and a 45
member for pressing a sole against said form into
conformity to the shape thereof, said member
having a ridge arranged to form a groove in the
sole de?ning a boundary between the shank or a
portion thereof and the forepart.
34. In a machine for operating upon soles, a
form, means- adapted for engagement with the
edge of a sol-e on said form for positioning the
sole longitudinally and laterally of the form, a
pressing member cooperating with said form to 55
press the sole into conformity with the shape
thereof, and means carried by said pressing mem
ber constructed and arranged to‘ make a demarca
tion on the sole between characteristic‘ portions
60
thereof.
35. In a machine for operating upon soles, a
form, means for gaging a sole on said form lat
bers to a sole on said supports, and means for
erally and longitudinally thereof, and a pressing
operating upon the shank portion of the sole, the
member cooperating with said form to press a
65 sole engaging surfaces of said supports having a
plurality of separated elevated areas shaped and
arranged to press portions of the sole opposite
thereto into said yielding means.
'
28. In a machine for operating upon soles, a
70 form arranged to support the forepart of a sole,
a support for the heel part of the sole, clamps
sole therebetween into conformity to the shape 65
of the form, said pressing member having a ridge
extending from the sole-engaging surface ar
ranged to form an indented demarcation in the
sole between characteristic portions thereof.
70
ALBERT L. PORTER.
CERTIFICATE
Patent No, 2,128,518.
OF
CORRECTION‘,
ALBERT L.
,_
.
_
August 50, 1958‘,
PORTER.
~
It is hereby certified that error appears in the printed specification
of the above numbered patent requiring correction as follows: Page L|,, first
column, line 6, for the word "rigid“ read ridged; and that the‘ said Letters
Patent shouldbe read with this correction therein that the same may con
form to the record of the case in the Patent Office.
Signed and sealed this 27th day of December, An DR: 1958‘,
Henry Van Arsdale
(Seal)
Acting Commissioner of Patents,
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