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Патент USA US2128469

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Aug. 30, 1938.
E, NlBBs
2,128,469
'EVAPORATOR
Original Filed Aug. 8, 1934
5 Sheets-Sheet 1 _
47
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54/2651" #62655 I
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Aug. 30, 1938.
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E. NIBBS
2,128,469
EVAPORATOR
Original Filed Aug. 8, 1934
s Sheets-Sheet 2
*W I
Aug. 30, 1938.
E. NIBBS
27,128,469
EVAPORATOR'v
Original Filed Aug.. 8, 19:4
3 Sheets-Sheet 3
2,128,469
Patented Aug. 30, 1938
PATENT OFFlCE‘
UNITED STATES
2,128,469
EVAPORATOR
'
_ Ernest Nibbs, New London, Conn,- assignor to
Electric Boat Company, Groton, Conn, a cor
poration of New Jersey
Original application August 8, 1934, Serial No.
738,922. ‘ Divided
and
this
application No
vember 27, 1935, Serial No. 51,771
10 Claims.
This invention relates to evaporators for sub
marine boats, and has to do with means for evap~
crating sea water or water of ?otation so as to
produce steam useful within the hull for various
5 purposes, including the obtaining of drinking
water for the personnel of the boat.
It is known, in submarine boats, to evaporate
sea water and condense the resulting steam and
fresh water vapor so as to obtain water suitable
for drinking purposes. This may be accom
plished by electrical heating means deriving
energy from the boat storage battery, by inde
pendent boilers within the hull, or by boilers
heated by the exhaust gases from the main
15 and/or auxiliary internal combustion engines
within the hull. In all of these cases, accord
ing to present practice, the boiler or evaporator
is installed within the hull, which is objection
able as taking up valuable space. A further ob
20 jection to having the boiler within the hull is
that it radiates considerable heat resulting in
greatdiscomfort to the crew, even when the evap
orator is insulated, and providing thick and ei
?cient insulation upon the evaporator with a
25 view to avoiding radiation of heat therefrom fur
ther increases the bulk of the evaporator, so that
it occupies additional space within the hull.
It is an object of my invention to provide a
boiler or evaporator of simple and efficient con;
struction disposed exterior of the hull and capa
ble of being operated from the interior thereof,
thereby conserving valuable space within the hull
’ while avoiding the above noted objections to hav
ing the boiler or evaporator in the interior of the
boat. It is also an object to provide a boiler of
the character stated of light weight, which can
be readily disassembled for cleaning and repairs,
and which has associated therewith means for
quick ?ooding of the various spaces of the boiler
.40 or evaporator and associated parts. A further
object is to provide a boiler of this character
adapted to be heated from a source of heat with
in the hull, conveniently the main and/or aux
iliary internal combustion engines, this boiler be
ing suitable for disposition between the deck of
the superstructure and the top of the hull while
avoiding objectionable heating of the superstrucé
ture deck. Further objects and advantages of my
invention will appear from the detail description
In the drawings:-'
50
Figure 1 is a central longitudinal sectional view
through an evaporator embodying my invention,
certain parts being shown in elevation, this view
being taken substantially in the plane of line
55 |--l of Figure 2;
(Cl. 114—16)
Figure~2 is a sectional View taken substantially ‘
in the plane of line 2-2 of Figure 1;
Figure 3 is an end view of the boiler, looking at
the inlet end thereof for the exhaust gases from
the internal combustion engine within the hull
of the submarine boat;
Figure 4 is a side view of a boiler embodying
my invention as applied to a submarine boat,
the latter being shown fragmentarily and in sec
tion, parts being broken away and shown in sec 10
tion with certain parts shown in elevation, this
view being semi-diagrammatic.
In my co-pending application for evaporator
for submarines, Serial No. 738,922, ?led August
8, 1934, which matured into Patent No. 2,025,524 15
I have disclosed an evaporator as applied to a
submarine boat. The evaporator of my present
invention is similar to that disclosed in my co
pending application and the instant application,
which is a continuation in part of said co-pend
ing application, has to do more particularly with
the evaporator per se.
The boiler or evaporator includes an inner muf
?er unit M and an outer water jacket unit W,
the latter, though preferred, not being essential 25
in all cases, as will hereinafter appear.
The muf?er unit comprises a mu?ler tube 5
conveniently of rectangular cross-section and
open at both ends. This tube is welded or other
wise suitably secured, at its outer end, to an outer
closure plate or head 6. The inner end of tube
5 is welded to a relatively thick ?ange l bolted
or otherwise suitably secured to an inner closure
plate or head 8, the latter being detachable from
flange 1. The plates 6 and 8 are of circular shape
and the latter plate is welded or otherwise suit
ably secured in the inner end of a cylindrical
shell 9 which extends about tube 5 and de?nes
therewith a water space and a steam space
thereabove. The outer end of shell 9 is welded
or otherwise suitably secured to a relatively thick
annular ?ange 8a bolted to plate 6. Circular
swash plates 10 are secured upon tube 5 and fit
snugly within shell 9. These plates H] are pro
vided with suitable openings for flow of the water
therethrough and serve to prevent objectionable
surge of the water within shell 9, incident to
sudden or abrupt movements of the evaporator
caused by pitching and rolling of the submarine
boat, with which the evaporator is associated,
when traveling on the surface in rough weather.
The normal water level within shell 9 is indi
cated by the line a:,—:z: in Figures 1 and 2. Tube
5 is provided with a plurality of thimble-shaped
hollow projections or tubes ll extending there
2
2,128,469
into from opposite sides thereof and disposed in
staggered relation, these tubes or projections ll
constituting baffles for the hot exhaust gases
discharged into tube 5. It will be noted that
the thimble-shaped tubes I! are closed at their
inner ends and open at their outer ends into shell
9 below the normal water level therein, that is,
39 to which is welded a frusto-conical element 40
into the water space within this shell.
de?ning an outlet opening for the exhaust gases
from muf?er tube 5. Plate 39 is spaced away
from plate 8 of shell 9 and de?nes with the latter
a gas receiving space All. The other end of cyl
inder 36 is welded to a relatively thick annular
?ange 42 the inside diameter of which is slightly
Prefer
greater than the outside diameter of cylinder‘ 35.
ably, vertical ba?le plates I? are suitably sup
ported between the swash plates It a short dis
Flange 52 is bolted to a head or plate 43 spaced
tance from the outer ends of the thimble tubes
outlet opening 44% which registers with the outlet
opening of element 439. Plate 43 is shaped, about
opening lid, to provide a seat which snugly re
ceives the outer portion of element 49, the latter
being Welded to plate 93. Adjacent the lower 15
ll, these ba?ies l2 promoting circulation and
quick heating of the water within shell 9.
A steam take-off pipe I5 is disposed within
15 shell 9 adjacent the top thereof, in steam space
16 above the normal water level. The pipe 55 is
closed at its inner end, extends through plate 6,
and has its outer end welded in a ?tting ll
bolted to the outer face of plate 6, this ?tting
providing means for connecting a steam con
ducting pipe to the steam take-off pipe. Pipe
I5 is slotted at its upper portion for reception of
steam and exclusion of water, in a known man
ner. Preferably, the steam take-01f pipe is dis
25 posed within a housing I8 extending from plate
6, the inner end of this housing being closed and
the upper wall of shell 9 constituting the top of
the housing. Housing l8 has its upper portion
slotted as shown for admission of steam and is
30 provided, at its lower portion, with suitable open
ings for drainage therefrom of water into the
shell 9. As clearly shown in Figure 1, the slots
of housing I8 are staggered relative to the slots
of pipe l5, better to prevent entry of water into
35 the latter. Conveniently, pipe l5 seats in curved
supports l9 of angle cross-section suitably se
cured in housing l8, though any other suitable
means may be provided for supporting the steam
take-01f pipe. The swash plates H] are, of course,
40 suitably notched out at their upper portions to
accommodate the housing III, as shown in Fig
ure 2. Each of these plates is also preferably
provided, at its lower portion, with a notch 20
to facilitate blowing of sediment out of the shell
45 9, as will hereinafter appear.
Plate 6 is provided with an opening 2! into
shell 9 at the bottom of the latter. A ?tting 22
is bolted to the outer face of plate 6 and provides
means for connecting a blow-off pipe 23 to open
ing 2|. A ?tting 24 is bolted to the outer face
of plate 6 adjacent one side thereof and below the
water level within shell 9, this ?tting 24 pro
viding means for connecting a water supply pipe
25 to the interior of shell 9. Two additional fit
55 tings 26 and 2‘! are bolted to the outer face of
plate 6 below and above the water level in shell
9, respectively, and provide means for connect~
ing tubes 28 and 29, respectively, to the interior
of shell 9. Preferably, plate 6 is suitably bored
and threaded for reception of a plurality of zinc
plugs 39 which project beyond the inner face
of this plate into the interior of shell 9. These
plugs, being susceptible to corrosion, localize the
corrosive effect of the sea water within the shell
65 9, which reduces corrosion of the latter.
The water jacket comprises two concentric
cylinders 35 and 36 spaced apart and de?ning
therebetween a water space 37. The cylinder 35
is welded at one end to a flange 35a, which seats
70 against the inner fact of flange 8a, and the adja
cent end of cylinder 36 is welded to a. relatively
outwardly from plate 39 and provided with an 10
portion of element 99, an inwardly projecting de
?ecting element 615 is welded to plate 39 and is
disposed to direct a. portion of the gases flowing
from tube 5 downward into space M and thence
into gas circulating space 45 between shell 9
and cylinder 35, the latter being spaced from the
former, as shown, to permit of flow of a portion
of the exhaust gases about shell 9 in contact
therewith. An outlet nipple M is secured
through plates 39 and 43, conveniently by weld
ing to these plates, and opens into
the top thereof. An arcuate baffle
from the inner face of plate 39 and
low and to either side of nipple 47.
space 4| at
48 projects
extends be
This ba?le
serves to direct the gases from the upper por
30
tion of space 46 into nipple 41, and thence to
atmosphere. This promotes circulation of the
gases about shell 9. A drainage nipple 49 is
suitably secured through plates 43 and 39, con
veniently by welding to these plates, and opens
into the cylinder 35 adjacent the bottom thereof
for draining water from this cylinder, as will
hereinafter appear.
A. ?anged water inlet ?tting 59 opens into
water space 31 between cylinders 35 and 36 for 4-0
normally supplying water to this space, this
tting being welded to the latter cylinder. Fit
ting 50 is provided with a ?anged neck 5! in
tended for connection to supplementary water
supply means for assuring ?ooding of the water
jacket when the boat dives or is submerged.
Cylinder 39 is further provided, at the top there
of, with a ?anged outlet ?tting 52 welded to cyl
inder 36 about a suitable opening through the
latter.
The boiler or evaporator so far described com
prises the water jacket unit and the mu?‘ler unit
previously referred to. The muffler unit is car
ried by plate 6 and may be inserted into and
withdrawn from the water jacket unit by re
moval of the bolts which secure ring 38 to plate
6. The inner end of the mu?ler unit is spaced
from plate 39 of the water jacket unit, as above,
it also being noted that plate 8 is spaced from
baflies 45 and 48, as shown in Figure 1. This 60
accommodates independent expansion and con
traction of the two units lengthwise thereof and
relieves the structure, as a whole, of objection
able stresses from this cause. Preferably, suit
able blocks 53 are welded or otherwise suitably 65
secured to the inner face of cylinder 35 and pro
vide means for supporting and centering shell
9 therein. Preferably, the ends of the blocks to
ward plate 6 are beveled at 54, as shown, to
facilitate insertion of the muf?er unit. I also 70
prefer to provide suitably spaced blocks 55 welded
thick ring 38, the latter seating against the inner
or otherwise suitably secured in cylinder 36 and
face of plate 9 and being bolted or otherwise re
aligned with blocks 53, to assist in supporting
the muffler unit within the water jacket unit.
The mu?ier unit and the water jacket unit 75
movably secured thereto. The inner cylinder 35
75 is provided, at its otherend, with a closure plate
3
2,128,469
may be assembled and disassembled in the man
ner above stated. Access may be had to the in
terior of the mu?ler unit, for cleaning, repairs,
or other purposes, by removing the‘ bolts se
curing plate 8 to ?ange 1, after which the bolts
securing ?ange 8a to plate 6 may be removed,
and the muffler tube, together with swash plates
l0 and the steam take-oil‘ pipe I5, may be with
drawn as a unit from shell 9. This gives ready
access to all parts of the mu?ier unit structure.
Access may be had to the interior of the water
jacket, after removal of the mu?ier unit, as above,
by removing the bolts securing head or plate 43
to ?ange 4-2 of cylinder 36, the latter being then
moved endwise away from plate 43 and from
about cylinder 35. It will be understood that,
in the structure of the boiler or evaporator, suit
able gaskets and packings may be provided
where desired or necessary. These have been
omitted, for clearness of illustration, and as be
ing obvious.
.
'
In Figure 4 I have illustrated an evaporator
in accordance with my invention applied to a
submarine boat B comprising a hull a and a
superstructure b having a deck 0 above the top
of the pressure hull a. The boat itself is of
known construction and need not be illustrated
nor described in detail.
One or more internal combustion engines are
suitably disposed within hull a and each of these
engines is provided with a cylinder water jacket,
in a known manner. Cooling water, commonly
water of ?otation, is supplied under pressure to
the cylinder jacket of the engine in a suitable
35 manner, as by means of a pump driven by the
engine and having its intake connected to a sea
valve opening to the sea through the hull, the dis
charge of the pump being connected to the water
jacket of the engine. An axhaust pipe 69 is con
40 nected to the exhaust manifold of the engine for
conducting the hot exhaust gases therefrom.
This pipe is provided with a water jacket 6! which
‘communicates with the water ‘jacket of the en
gine in a known manner for receiving water there
45 from.
The engine and the means for supplying
cooling water thereto and to the water jacket
of the exhaust .pipe are of known construction
and need not be illustrated nor further described
here. The general arrangement is disclosed more
upper end, with a ?anged outlet neck 68 to which
is bolted one end of an exhaust horn 69. This
horn is of rectangular cross-section and ?ares
toward plate 6 of the evaporator, to which the
other end of the horn is bolted about the rectan
gular opening through this plate corresponding
to the adjacent end of exhaust tube 5.
Water jacket 6| of exhaust pipe 60 is connected
to water jacket ‘63 of ?tting 62 in a suitable man
ner, as by means of short passages 19 and ‘ll '10
formed in pipe 60 and neck 62a of ?tting 62, re
spectively, and disposed in register one with the
other, it being understood that any suitable num
ber of these passages may be provided. Valve 66
has associated therewith a water jacket 12. This 115
water jacket 72 and water jacket 63 of ?tting 62
are connected by pipes 13 and '14, respectively, to
a Y member ‘F5 from thestem of which extends
a pipe 1'6 provided with valves TI and 18 disposed
inboard of the hull. A branch pipe 19, provided
with a valve Bil disposed outboard of the hull, but
operated from within the latter, connects pipe 16
to water jacket 65 of ?tting 64. It will be noted
that valve 6? has associated therewith a water
jacket 8! in direct communication with water 25
jacket 65 of ?tting 64. Pipe 16 is further pro
vided with a valve 82 exterior of the hull, but op
erable from within the latter, and a branch pipe
83, connected to pipe T6 at opposite sides of valve
82, provides a shunt around the latter. Branch 30
pipe 83 is provided with a valve 84 exterior of,
but operable from within, the hull. Pipe 16 is
connected, by means of pipe 25 and ?tting 24,
to the interior of the boiler or evaporator for sup
plying water thereto. Water jacket 65 of ?tting 35
G4 is connected, by a tube 86, to an elbow 81 se
cured to the lower end of ?tting 50. Tube 86
serves normally to supply water to the water
jacket.
In the normal use of the evaporator, when the
boat is on the surface, valves 66 and ‘6'! are open,
as shown, and valves ll, 18, Bl] and 84 are opened,
valve 82 being closed. By adjusting valve 80, to
restrict more or less the pipe 19, the desired pres
sure within pipe 16, for delivering water into the 45
evaporator, may be obtained. The valve 80 is
normally open to a su?‘icient extent to permit ?ow
of water through pipe “#9 into water jacket 65
while also assuring ?ow of waterthrough pipe TB.
Fitting ‘62 accommodates an inboard valve 66 for
By adjusting valve 84, the rate of feed of water 50
to the evaporator may be regulated as desired.
Opening valve 82 permits free flow of water into
the evaporator, which may be desirable for wash
ing out the latter or for other purposes. While
water is being thus delivered into the evaporator, 55
water is also being delivered to the water jacket,
by means of tube 86, and is discharged from the
opening and closing the passage from exhaust pipe
60 into this ?tting. Valve 66 is of known type
water jacket through ?tting 52 and a discharge
conduit 99 attached to this ?tting and disposed to
and is operated, in a known manner, by means
discharge the water overboard. The hot exhaust 60
gases are delivered into the muffler tube and ?ow
therethroughinto space 4!, a portion of these
gases being de?ected into space 46 so as to cir
culate about the shell 9, as above described, and
the remainder of the gases being discharged 65
through a conduit 9! bolted to the outer face of
50 fully in my above identi?ed copending application.
Exhaust pipe ‘60 is connected, at its upper end,
to a valve ?tting 62 disposed at the inner face of
the top of the hull, this ?tting being provided with
a water jacket 63. Fitting 62 is aligned with a
?tting 64 disposed at the outer face of the top of
the hull and provided with a water jacket 65.
(not shown) disposed within the hull. An out
board valve 61, of known type, is mounted in
?tting 64for controlling the passage therethrough,
and is operated, by known means (not shown),
from within the hull, in a known manner. The
, ?ttings 6?! and 64 are disposed in register with
an opening through the hull and are suitably se
cured, by means of bolts passing through ?anges
at the adjacent ends of these ?ttings and through
70 the hull, suitable gaskets being provided between
the ?tting ?anges and the hull so as to provide
watertight and pressure resistant closures at these
points. The upper end of pipe '60 is ?anged and
may be bolted to the lower end of ?tting 52, in
75 a known manner. Fitting 64 is provided, at its
plate 43, this conduit being open to the atmos
phere. The heat from the hot exhaust gases is,
to a large extent, absorbed by the water within
the evaporator, by means of tube 5 and the baffle 70
elements l I thereof, so that this water is quickly
heated to boiling temperature and generates steam
and water vapor which collects within space l'6
above the normal water level.
.
A steam conducting pipe 92 is connected, at
4
2,128,469
its upper end, by means of a T 93, and ?ttingr
II, to the outer end of steam take-off pipe I5.
The lower end of pipe 92 is connected to a cruci
form pipe ?tting 90, to the lower end of which
is connected a steam conducting tube 95 which
extends into hull a and is there provided with
two valves 96 and 91. The other end of tube
95 is connected to the inlet of a condenser 98 of
known type disposed within the hull, from which
10 the condensate is withdrawn through a take-off
pipe 99. This condenser 98 is cooled in a suitable
manner, conveniently by the water of ?otation,
for which purpose the condenser may be pro
vided with water inlet and outlet pipes I00 and
15 IOI, respectively. Conveniently, the cooling wa
ter may be supplied to the condenser from the
pump which supplies water to the water jacket
of the engine, or in any other suitable manner.
The steam generated within the evaporator is
20 led to the condenser where it is condensed to
provide pure water suitable for drinking pur
poses and other uses by the personnel of the boat.
During normal use of the evaporator, the valves
96 and 9‘! are, of course, open.
A safety or pressure relief valve I02, of known
25
type, is mounted at the upper end of T 93.
Neck 5| of ?tting 50 is connected, by a pipe
I03, to one side of ?tting 94. A valve 88, oper
able from within the hull, is interposed in pipe
An in
tation ?ows through pipe I03, neck EI and ?tting
50 into the interior of the water jacket and wa
ter may also enter the water jacket through ?tting
52 and the associated conduit 90. In this man
ner, all of the spaces of the evaporator, includ
ing the evaporator unit and the water jacket
unit, are quickly ?ooded so as to be completely
?lled with the water of ?otation, when the boat
dives or submerges.
This renders it unnecessary
to construct the evaporator sufficiently strongly
to withstand submergence pressure and, accord
ingly, the evaporator, including the water jacket,
may be of relatively light weight, which is an im
portant consideration. Since the tube 86 com
municates with the interior of the water jacket,
through the ?tting 50, the pressure within. water
jacket 65 of ?tting 64, and within the pipes and
tubes exterior. of the pressure hull a, and the
pressure exterior of these parts, when the boat is
submerged, are equalized. Accordingly, none of 20
these parts need be of exceptionally heavy con
struction, which is advantageous as rendering the
structure, as a whole, of relatively light weight.
If desired, known means may be provided for
venting air from the Water jacket when submerg
ing.
This means may be of any suitable or pre
ferred type. It is also contemplated to provide
the water jacket with suitable areas of zinc to
localize the corrosive action of the salt water
30 I03, this valve normally being closed.
?owing therethrough.
of known type, is connected to the other side of
?tting 94. This latter valve is to assure quick
?ooding of the water jacket, when diving or sub
merging, as will be explained presently. Blow
35
out pipe 23 is provided with a valve I05 oper
able from within the hull, which valve is nor
mally closed. If desired, however, valve I05 may
be kept slightly open for drainage from shell 9
of salt and other sediment which may collect at
the lower portion thereof, it being understood
that in this case valve 89 is kept open sui?ciently
to supply water to the evaporator at a rate suf
?cient to compensate for the continual slight dis
charge of water through pipe 23. Tubes 28 and
45 29 pass into the hull and are connected, through
valves I06 and I07 and I08 and I09, respectively,
to tubes 28a and 29*‘, respectively, the latter tubes
drains from spaces 4| and 46 through the con- -
wardly opening pressure responsive valve I04,
When the boat emerges after diving, water
duit M and nipple 49, ?tting 64, above the closed
valve Bl, horn 69 and muffler tube 5 draining
into space II.
The boiler or evaporator drains
through the blow-out pipe 23 until the desired
normal water level is reached, at which time valve
I05 is closed. Valves 66 and 61 may then be
opened, as may valves TI, ‘I8, 96, 91, I09, I01, I08
and I09, valve 88 being ?rst closed. The engine
may then be set into operation and the evap
orator again used in the manner previously de
scribed. It will be noted that the lower portion
of ?tting 92 is of bowl-shape and is provided
with a screw plug I I I. This provides convenient
means for draining from ?tting 62 any slight
amount of water which may collect therein, such
as water which may ?ow into this ?tting from
being connected to a water level indicator or
the upper portion thereof when valve 6‘! is opened
gauge ill] of known type disposed within the
after the boat emerges at the surface from a
dive.
What I claim is:—
hull.
This provides convenient means for ob
serving the water level within the evaporator.
Preparatory to submerging or diving, the en
gine is stopped and the exhaust stack valves I56
and 61 are closed, it being understood that pipe
60 may lead from the exhaust manifold of a
single engine or may be connected to the exhaust
manifolds of a plurality of engines. Shortly
thereafter, as soon as the engine water supply
stops, valves ‘II and ‘I8 are closed and valves I05,
60 I01, I08 and I09 are also closed, either at this
time or earlier, valve 88 is opened, and valve I95
is fully opened. During submergence of the boat,
water of ?otation ?ows freely through pipe 23
into the evaporator so as to ?ll completely shell
65 9, the space at the upper portion of this shell
being vented through pipe 92 and tube 95 into
the condenser 98.
As soon as the evaporator has
thus been completely ?lled with water, the valves
99 and 91 areclosed. Water also enters freely
vI70 through the exhaust conduit 9| and nipples 4?
and 49 into spaces M and 56, tube 5, horn 99 and
the upper portion of ?tting 64 above valve 61,
in the closed position of the latter; Also, valve
I04 opens under the influence of the water pres
sure, when submerged, so that the water of ?o
1. In an evaporator for use with submarine
boats, a horizontal muf?er tube open at its ends
for reception and outlet of hot exhaust gases
from an internal combustion engine, a. horizon- "
tal shell enclosing said muffler tube and de?n
ing therewith a water space and a steam space
thereabove, a steam take-off pipe communicat
ing with said steam space, a cooling water jacket
enclosing said shell in spaced relation. thereto
and de?ning therewith a gas receiving space‘,
and means establishing communication between
the outlet end of said tube and said space.
2. In an evaporator for use with submarine
boats, a horizontal muffler tube open at one end
for reception of hot exhaust gases from an in
ternal combustion engine and open at its other
end for escape of said gases, 2. horizontal shell
enclosing said muf?er tube and de?ning therewith 70
a water space and a steam space thereabove, a
steam take-off pipe communicating with said
steam space, and a water jacket enclosing said
shell, the latter and said tube being spaced at
said other end of said tube from the adjacent
5
2,128,469
end of said water jacket and free therefrom for
connected to said inlet member, a valve con
expansion and contraction independently of said
water jacket.
trolled ?ood pipe connecting said water inlet
3. In an evaporator for submarine boats, a
mu?ler unit comprising a mu?ier tube and a shell
surrounding said tube and provided with end
closure plates attached to said tube and hav
ing openings aligned with the ends thereof, and
a water jacket enclosing said unit and having
10 one end attached thereto and its other end free
from and spaced outwardly beyond said unit to
accommodate independent expansion and con
traction of the latter, said other end of said wa
ter jacket having an exhaust gas outlet open
15
8. In» an evaporator for use with submarine
boats, a mu?ler tube, a shell enclosing said tube
and de?ning therewith a water space and a steam
space thereabove, a valve controlled water sup
ply pipe communicating With said shell, a valve 10
controlled steam take-01f pipe communicating
with said steam space, a valve controlled blow
ing.
off pipe communicating with said shell, a water
jacket enclosing said shell and spaced therefrom
with its end adjacent the inner end of said shell 15
4. In an evaporator for submarine boats, a
muiller unit comprising a mu?ler tube: and a
haust gas‘ outlet opening, said water jacket and
shell surrounding said tube and provided with
end closure plates attached to said tube and
20 having openings‘ aligned with the ends thereof,
and a water jacket enclosing said unit and hav
ing one end secured to one end of said unit and
its other end free from and spaced outwardly
beyond the other end of said unit to accommo
25 date independent expansion and contraction of
the latter, said other end of said water jacket
having an exhaust gas outlet opening, said one
end of said water jacket being detachably- se
cured to the closure plate at said one end of
30 said unit.
5. In an evaporator for submarine boats, a
muffler unit comprising a muffler tube and a shell
surrounding said tube and provided with end
closure plates attached to said tube and having
openings aligned with the ends thereof, and a
water jacket enclosing said unit in spaced rela
tion thereto and having one end secured to said
unit and its other end adjacent and spaced from
the other end of said unit, said other end of
said water jacket having an exhaust gas outlet
opening, said one end of said water jacket be
ing detachably secured to the closure plate at
said one end of said unit.
6. In an evaporator for use with submarine
45 boats, a muffler tube, a shell extending about
said tube in spaced relation thereto, swash plates
mounted on said tube and ?tting within said
shell, a closure plate for one end of said shell
removably secured to one end of said tube and
50 having an opening into the latter, a water jacket
enclosing said shell and having one end spaced
from said closure plate and provided with an
opening communicating with the opening of said
plate, and a closure plate secured to the other
end
of said tube and shell, said second closure
55
plate being removably secured to the other end
of said water jacket and provided with an open
ing to the other end of said tube.
7. In an evaporator for use with submarine
boats, a muffler tube, a shell enclosing said tube
and de?ning therewith a water space and a steam
space thereabove, a valve controlled water sup
ply pipe communicating with said shell, a valve
controlled steam take-off pipe communicating
with said steam space, a valve controlled blow
o-? pipe communicating with said shell, a water
70
member and said steam take-off pipe, and an in
wardly opening pressure responsive valve con
trolling said ?ood pipe.
jacket enclosing said shell and having an ex
haust gas outlet opening communicating with
the outlet of said tube, said jacket being pro
vided with a water outlet open to the atmosphere
and a Water inlet member, a water supply tube
spaced from the latter and provided with an ex
said shell de?ning a gas circulating passage ex
tending about said shell and opening freely into
the space between the inner end of the latter 20
and the adjacent end of said jacket, the latter
being provided with a water outlet open to the
atmosphere and a water inlet member, a water
supply tube connected to said inlet member, a
valve controlled ?ood pipe connecting said wa 25
ter inlet member and said steam take-off pipe,
and an inwardly opening pressure responsive
valve controlling said ?ood pipe.
9. In an evaporator for use with submarine
boats, a muffler tube, a shell extending about 30
said tube in spaced relation thereto, a closure
plate for one end of said shell removably se
cured to one end of said tube and having an
opening into the latter, a Water jacket enclosing
said shell and having one end spaced from said 35
closure plate and provided with an opening‘ com
municating with the opening of said plate, and
a closure plate secured to the other end of said
tube and said shell, said second closure plate
being removably secured to the other end of said 40
water jacket and provided with an opening to
said other end of said tube.
10. In an an evaporator for use with submarine
boats, a muffler tube, a cylindrical shell extend
ing about said tube in spaced eccentric relation 45
thereto, two concentric cylinders extending about
said shell concentrically therewith, said cylin
ders being spaced apart and de?ning a water
jacket extending at one end beyond one end of
said shell, inner and outer closure plates secured 50
in said inner and outer cylinders at said end of
said jacket, said plates being secured together
in spaced relation and de?ning an outlet open
ing into said inner cylinder, said outer closure
plate being removably secured to said outer cyl 55
inder and the adjacent end thereof de?ning an
opening of a size to accommodate said inner
cylinder, said inner plate being spaced from
one end of said shell, a closure plate for said
one end of said shell removably secured to the 60
adjacent end of said tube and having an open
ing thereinto, and a closure plate for the other
end of said shell secured to the other end of said
tube and having an opening thereinto, the last
mentioned closure plate being removably secured 65
to said other end of said shell and to the other
end of said outer cylinder, the other end of said
inner cylinder being free from said last men
tioned closure plate.
ERNEST NIBBS.
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