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Патент USA US2129385

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Sept. 6, 1938.
2,129,385
O. SAUER
KNITTING
Filed'July 8, 1935
-
ITNESSES:
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8 Sheets-Sheet l
‘
1N VEN TOR:
v BY
_
?sirazf Samar,
TORNEYS.
Sept. s, 1938.
O. SAUER
v 2,129,385
KNITTING
Filed July 8, 1935
8 Sheets-Sheet 2
INVENTOR:
WITNESSEgig
I I
Oskar Samar,
'
W'QMM
BY
W
ATTORNEYS.
Sept. 6,1938.
0, SAUER
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2,129,385
IIIIII NG
ed July 8, 1935
WI TNESSES -
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.
8 Sheets-Sheet 3
I N VEN TOR:
-
-
TTORNEYS.
WWW
Sept. 6, 1938.
‘
'-
Q SAUER’
2,129,385
KNITTING
Filed July 8. 1935
WITNESSES‘
'
?-
8 Sheets-Sheet 4
INVENTOR:
@
askar San/0r,
BY
Sept. 6, 1938.
2,129,385
O. SAUER
KNITTING
Filed July 8, ~1935
8 Sheets-Sheet 5_
“
INVENTOR;
?skar 50mm”,
" H BY
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AT
W
NE YS.
Sept.'6,1938.
'
QSAUER
‘
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2,129,385
KNITTIN G
Filed July 8, 1955
.s Sheets-Sheet 6 '
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WITNESSES.
51c
v
v INVENTOR:
\
‘Uskarj Samar
B
Wham?
’(
TTORNEYS.
Sept; 6, 1938.
Q SAUER ‘
'
2,129,385
KNITTING
Filed July 8, *1935
WITNESSES:
'WQZUMZW'
IN VEN TOR:
WWW
(AHTTORNEYS.
‘Sept. 6, 1938.
I
Q_ SAUER
I 2,129,385
KNITTING
7
Filed July 8, 1935
8 Sheets-Sheet 8
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WITNESSES:
IN VEN TOR:
'
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5km" Sana;
BY
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TORNVDLS:
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Patented Sept. 6, 1.938
[UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE-'- 4
a
'
,
73mg
'
I 15 Claims. _(01. 66-169)
fabricsmay be more easily understood,‘ certain
This invention relates to knitting. More spaci?qally, it has reference to plain-and ribbed
' fabrics knit ‘from
courses have in each instance been distinguished, .
one from another, by conventional surface
?ne count silk,'rayon, etc.; as
shading._
well-as to methods of producing such‘ fabrics
'
5
commercially.
‘ The aim ofmy invention
'
a
_
l
_
‘
Referring to Fig. I, successive courses of the
is to make ‘possible’ fabric A there shownv are designated by the nu
"
-
merals IA. The needle wale loops of ‘the courses
the production from a single thread of fine count,
a plain knit sheer-fabric for stockings and the
like which is of- closer texture than possible of
'10 ‘attainment heretofore, and which moreover is
"ringless” i. e. devoid of horizontal streaks. '
The foregoing advantages I realize in practice,
as hereinafter more fully disclosed, through‘ a
1, 2, 3, and 4 areindicated» at ll, l2, l3 and Id
.and the sinker wale loops of said courses at 2|, 22‘,
23 and 24. The- characterizing features of the‘ 10
fabric A in 'Fig. I are that the sinker wale vloops
‘ of ' each "course of the
knitting are transposed to .
adjacent courses; 'andthat said sinker wale loops
form inverse loop wales between the, needle wale
new method of knitting as a result of which the
loops at one side of the'fabric... Thus the sinker 15
sinker wale loops connecting neighboring needle
wale loops 2| of thecourse _l are interknitted
wale loops of one course of the fabric are .con- ,
with the needle wale loops l2 of the course 2, the
sis'tently transposed‘ to other courses more or less
sinker "wale loops 22 of the course [with the ‘
‘remote from" the courses in which said sinker , needle wale loops is of the course‘ 3, and so on
wale loops originated," and forming distinct wales throughout the fabric, the needle and sinker wale 20
20 of interlooped sinker loops between the needle
loops being however montinubus in the needle
wales. As a consequence of such consistent
transposal of the sinker, wale. loops, the in
equalities inherent in the yarn used in the knit
and sinker Iwales as in ordinary knitted fabrics.
The fabric A of Fig.‘ I may be'produced on a .
flat knitting machine of the “Cotton” type ‘provided, as shown in. Figs. IV-VII, with two-sets 25
ting are effectively distributed throughout the
fabric ‘with avoidance of streaks ‘or rings. Fur
ther advantages resulting from‘my new?method,
are that the fabric produced is of a gauge twice
. as fine as fabric'produced in the ordinary way
on commercial knitting machines, and character-.
30 ized by having the loops in alternate wales in
of needles 50 and 5|, a press edge 52 for closing
the beards of the needles'i?,‘ and a ?xed supple- I
mental presser bar 53 for the-needles 51, the
usual sinkers and ‘knock-overs being shown] re
' spectively at 54 and '55. In Fig. IV, the needle‘ 50' 80
is about to descend to draw the loop II for .the
verted in respect to the loops of the other wales.
Other objects and attendant advantages will I
appear from the detailed description which fole
‘ lows of the attached drawings, wherein Fig. I
35 is. a diagrammatic view showing the texture of
‘one form of my improved fabric.
;
»
Figs. II and III are. views similar to Fig. I show
ing alternative forms of the fabric.
>
,
causal of the fabric, holding on its shank .be
neath the sinker 54 the previously-formed loop
l2 of the course '2. The needle 5| ' 'on the other
hand is. ascending through the loop 12 vof the .85
course 2_ and the loop l3 of the course 3 previous’ ,
- ly cast from the needle
50. The relative posi
'
_'
,
tions of the loops _l I, I2 and I3 at this stage of
the knitting cycleis shown in plan in Fig. VIII.
Figs. IV, V, VI and VII are fragmentary per
‘ 'In Fig._ V the needle 50' is in its lowered position,
40 spective views showing how the fabric of Fig. I and the needle Si in its raised position.- During
may be produced on a modified ?at___knitting ma
chine of the “Cotton” type.‘
'
~
'Figs. VIII, IX and ,X are plan views; corre
sponding to Figs. IV, V and VI.
Figs. VIIIa, .IXa and Xa‘ are views like Figs.
45
VIII, IX and X.
'
' >
'
r ‘
descent of the needle 50 in Fig. V the loop ll of
the course I is engaged within the beard of said
needle; while the loop l2 of the course 2v is cast ,
from said needle overthe loop H, by aid of the
knockover 55 and falls back upon the raised
needle 5L.
Incidentally-it will be noted from ’ V‘
Figs. XI, X11 and XIH are views like Figs. Fig. IX that as the loops l2 are cast as just
IV-VII showing how the fabric of Fig. III may » ‘explained they are intertwisted with the loops H‘
be produced commercially.
,
_
'
'
on the corresponding needles 5') with attendant v60
50 - . Fig. IHV shows still another alternative form formation of the completed invert sinker loops
of‘fabric generally like‘ the fabric of Fig. III; and 22. In Fig. VI, the needle‘ 50 is ascending, and
Figs. XV, XVI-and XVII are views similar to the needle 5| descending. Incident to its descent
Figs. XII-XIII showing how the fabric of Fig. XIV' in Fig. VI, the needle 5| engages the loop l2 of
may be produced commercially. ,
_.the course 2 within its book and draws the same,
In order that the construction of the different
2
2,129,385
through the loop II of the course I, after which
the beard of said needle is depressed by contact
with the supplemental presser bar 53. In Fig.
VII, the needle 50 is raised to its highest posi~
tion, and the needle 5| depressed to its lowest
position. In moving from the position of Fig. VI
to that of Fig. VII,,the loop I2 is drawn through
the loop I3 of the course 3 of the fabric and said
loop I3 is cast from the needle 5| immediately
10 after the closing of the beard of said needle and
the descent of the same below the knockover 55,
which, by suitable means not illustrated, is po
sitioned below the supplemental presser bar ‘53
inorder to sustain the loop I3 and thereby assist
15 casting thereof.
As a consequence of the last
described step, the loops I2 are completed in
course 2 as shown in Fig. X. In Fig. VII, the
needle 50_ is ready to receive new yarn Y for the
knitting of another course of the fabric, and
20 the needle 5| ready to ascend after the m'anner
described in connection with Fig. IV to repeat
the loop forming cycle. From the foregoing it
will be seen that a loop is first, formed by the
needle 50 and thereupon cast from the latter and
25 caught by the needle 5I, this operation contin
uing throughout the knitting of the fabric with
the resultthat the sinker wale loops of the re
spective courses assume transposed positions in
line with the loops of adjacent courses. Any
.30 suitable means ‘may be provided for actuating
the needles 5!) and 5| and the knock-over bits
55 in the manner described. If the machine ex
empli?ed be say of thirty-‘six gauge, (24 needles
loops 32b connecting the needle wale loops I 2b
and the corresponding sinker wale loops 22b lie
in the intervening course 3b; and so on through
out the fabric. Here again, the alternate wales
of the fabric are formed of interlooped sinker
loops which are inverted in respect to the loops
of the other wales at the same side of the fabric
as in Fig. I; with the addition however of lines of >
half loops between the wales.
A knitting machine arranged as shown in Figs. 10
IV-VII, but with an additional set of needles,
that is to say, three sets of needles in- all, oper
ated in succession will produce the fabric of Fig.
II in the manner similar to that explained in
connection with the fabric A featured in Fig. I. 15
The fabric C illustrated in Fig. III resembles
the fabric described and claimed in U. S. Patent
No. 1,981,471 in that thepcorresponding needle
wale loops “0, I 30, I 50, etc. of alternate courses
I0, 30 and 5c engage each other after the manner 20
of plain knitting; and in that the bends or bights
of such loops overlie the shanks or sides of cor
responding wale loops of alternate intermediate
courses I2c, I40, I60, etc. likewise interengaged ‘
after the manner of plain knitting, with the 25
sides or shank of all the needle wale loops ap
pearing on one face .of the fabric, and the bends
or bights of all the loops appearing on the other
face of the fabric. The fabric C however differs
from the patented fabric in thatthe. sinker wale 30
loops 2|C—-25C, by virtue of being transposed to
courses remote from the courses containing ‘the
corresponding needle wale loops I Ic-—I5c, form
distinct wales between the needle loop wales.
gauge double that of the needles, namely, forty The sinker wales of alternate courses, it will be
observed, are also engaged with each other after
eight gauge. The fabric is furthermore charac
terized by having, at one side thereof, alternate the mannef'of plain knitting with the bends or
wales (the-sinker wales) wherein the loops are in- - bights of said loops overlying the shanks or
verted in respect to the other (needle) wales. sides of the corresponding sinker wale loops of
alternate intermediate courses, and with vthe 40
.The method of starting this knitting of the fab
‘ shanks or sides of said sinker wale loops all ap
to the inch) it will be seen from the above pro
cedure that the resultant fabric will be of a
ric is as follows: A starting course, say a course
3 is ?rst formed on the needles 50 as shown in
Fig. VHIa and the'sinker wales 23 of such course
engaged with the hooks H of a hook
bar B as in
4
.
‘ 5 the starting of any knitting on a ?at knitting
machine. A second course 2 is then formed as in
Fig. IXa and the needle loops I2 drawn through
the needle loops I3 of the previous course 3, said
50 loops I3 falling back upon the needles 5I. A
third course I is next formed on the needles 50 as
in Fig. Xa with casting of the needle loops I3 of
the course 3 from the needles and release of the
needle loops I2 of the course 2 to-fall back onto
55 the needles 5|. This cycle is continuously re
peated as described in connection with Figs.‘
VIII-X, the fabric being maintained under con
stant tension with the result that the needle and
sinker wale loops of the successive courses take
positions as'shown.
’
-
lathe fabric B of Fig. II, the sinker wale
loops 2Ib corresponding to the needle wale loops
Nb of the course Ib are disposed between the
needle wale loops I3b of the course 3b; the sink
65 .. er wale loops 22b corresponding to the needle
vwale loops I2b of the course 2b between the
needle wale loops I 4b of the course 4b; and so on
- throughout the fabric. The fabric B of Fig. II
is further characterized by vertical rows of in
70 terengaging half loops 3lb, 32bv and 33b‘ interme
diate the needle'and sinker wale loops IIb, I2b,
I3b and ~2Ib, 22b, 23b. The half loops 3Ib con
‘ necting the needle wale loops I Ib and the cor
responding sinker wale loops 2Ib, it will be ob
75 served, lie in the intervening course 2b; the half
pearing on one face of the fabric, and the bights
or bends of said loops all appearing at the other
face of the fabric. Inthe fabric C, the sinker
wale loops are transposed from the correspond 45
ing needle wale loops to other courses further
remote than in the fabric of Fig. IL, Thus, for
example, the sinker waleloops 2| 0 corresponding
to the needle wale loops No of the course Ic lie
between the needle wale loops I5c of the course
50; the sinker wale loops 220 corresponding to
the needle wale loops I 20 of the course 20, be
tween the needle wale loops I60 of the course 60:
and so on throughout the fabric.
The fabric of Fig-III may beproduced upon a 55
?at knitting machine arranged as shown in Figs.
XI-XIII, the machine having two sets of needles
50c and 5Ic; the usual presser edge 520 for the
needles 50c; sinkers 54c; knockovers 550 to coact
with the needles 500. The machine is further
provided with toothed loop detaining wheels 56
and 51 in the plane of the needles 50c and 5Ic,
said wheels being mounted on shafts 58 and 59
adapted for intermittent '_ rotation by ‘quarter
turns in the direction of the arrows; a supple
mental knock-over bar ' 530;
a‘ supplemental
65
presser edge 60 forrthe needles5lc; and supple
mental knock-overs BI to coact with the needles
5Ic. In Fig. XI, the needle 500 is about to de
scend and in so doing takes a loop IIc for the 70
course Ic of the fabric C just kinked by the
sinker 540. In continuing its descent, the needle
carries the loop IIc downv through two previously
formed intertwisted loops I20 and I30 temporar
ily held in superimposed relation by the wheel 56,
3
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‘
7
_
'
2,129,385
loop I3d falling back against the newly drawn
and is in turn inter-twisted with the loop I20. in
loop lld and the loop l5d. dropping onto the
shank of the hook 5| d, which, in the meantime,
'nection with the ?rst embodiment of my inven
has been advanced through the intertwisted
- tion. When the'needle 500 has reached the posi- . loops l5d, Md and the- loop Hd'inreadiness to
tion shown in Fig. XII, the wheel 56 is turned engage the loop l3d. ‘With the foregoing accon'ié
and releases the-loop l3c.which fallsb'ackupon plished, the needle 50d moves leftward from the
the needle 5lc, which,‘ in the‘ meantime has been position of Fig. XVI beneath, the wheel 56d and
a manner identical with that described ‘in con
.raisedfrom the position of ‘Fig. XI to that of . then upward-between said wheel and the presser
Fig. XII and passed‘ upward through two pre- ‘_ edge 52d and lifts the loop I id to the level of the 10
viously formed andintertwisted loops I40, I50 knockover 5511 which advances from theposition
temporaril held in superposed relation by the
-
of Fig. XVI to the position of Fig. XVII to hold
wheel 51. n continuing from the position of Fig.. ’
said loop. At the same time, the .hook 5ld isv
XII the needle 50c moves leftward beneath the moved rightward beneath the 'wheel 51d to draw
wheel 56 and then upward between said wheel the loop 13d in the opposite direction to which 1B
and the presser edge 52c to: the position 'shown the loop lld was drawn by ‘the needle. 50d
is
' - in Fig. XIII. ,Concurrently, the needle 5lc moves
through the loops Md and l5dl, and then ‘upward,
downward from the position of Fig. XII to-draw ' through the ‘full line position; to the dotted line
. the loop l3c through the temporarily previously position in Fig.- XVII incident to which said loopv
intertwi‘sted detained loops l4 and IE0 and inter
l3_d is'released and caught by .the vacant hori
twist it with the loop I40, then leftward beneath‘ zontal tooth 511/ of the wheel 51d. The loop
the wheel 51, and then upward between said forming cycle is completed by return of the
wheel and thesupplemental press edge 60 to the
needle 50d and the hook 5ld to the positions of - ‘
. position of Fig. XIII when the wheel 51 is actu-'
Fig. XV. On its return movement, the needle
ated to release the loop 150. In the meanwhile ’1 50d ?rst descends, then moves rightward be
the knock-overs 55c and 6| have been moved neath the wheel 56d, and ?nally upward between
forward beneath the loops H0 and 130 as shown
in Fig. XIII. ' The needles 50c and Mo next move said wheel and ‘the knockover bar 53d. In mov
downward from the position of Fig. XVII as
downward from the positions shown in Fig. XIII ing
Just
the beard of the need '
with incidental closing .'of- their beards by the closedexplained,
‘by contact with the. presser edge 52d for
pressed edges 52c and 60 and vcasting- of the loops _
H01 and I3c whichare caught by the vacant
passage through the loop H d as the. needle con
tinuesin its descent. Immediately upon being
released by the needle 50d, the loop I Id by virtue
of the tension thereon is drawn laterally from
‘ teeth 56a:' and 51a! of the‘ wheels 56 and 51.
Finally, the needles 50c and 510 move back to the
positions shown inFig. XI to complete the loop ,the knockover 55d and caught by the vacant ’
forming cycle, which is continuously repeated.
The fabric'of Fig. 111 is thus produced under the I ‘tooth 56y of the wheel 56d. Any suitable means
.principle explained in connection with Figs“ may be utilized'to actuate the hooks 5ld and the
5611 and‘51d in the manner described.
VIII-X, except for the ?nal casting of the indi-/ wheels
As a ‘consequence of the tran'sposal of said
vidual needle loops by the detaining wheels sinker
wale loops in all four ‘of the illustrated
which results in the disposal of the sinker wale fabrics, the. irregularities inherent in yarns of
loops in courses more remote from the courses ?ne count are effectively distributed, and'objec
of origin, and in the interloopment of said sinker
“rings” or horizontal streaks thereby
wale loops with the sinker wale loops of. all the tionable
precluded in the fabrics. _- The 'transposal ‘of the '
intermediate courses.
v
\j
'
'
loops in accordance with my invention re
The texture of fabric D shownlin Fig. XIV is sinker
sults as a consequence of impartation to the sink
like the fabric. shown in Fig. III except in; that ers of an abnormal movement considerably great- -
40'
.
.
the sides or shanks of the needle wale loops lld, - . er than in a conventional straight. knitting ma
etc. and the bights or bends of the sinkeriwale
loops 2|d, etc. appear on one face thereof, while
the side or shanks of said sinker wale loops and
the‘bights or bends of the needle wale loops
appear .on the opposite side thereof with conse
quent presentation of a ribbed effect;-
,
.'
.
To produce the fabric of Fig. my, _a knitting
machine organized in accordance ‘with Figs.
XV-XVII may be used, the same having, in ad
chine, as clearly shown in Figs. V, VI, XI and XV.
The illustrated fabrics are tobe regarded ‘as typi 50
cal of other possible forms within, the'scope
the ‘broader of the appended claims:
. - -
.
_Having thus described my invention, I claim:
1. ‘A. knitted fabric characterized by having
.plain sinker wale loops of each component course
thereof ‘transposed between neighboring‘ plain
needle wale loops of a previously knit course. " ’
dition to the ius'ual needles 56d,,sinkers 54d and‘
'2. Asinker
knitted
wale
fabric
loopscharacterized
connecting neighboring:
byhaving
knockovers 55d, hooks/51d corresponding innum vplain
ber to the- needles/750d, a supplemental knockover plain needle wale loops of each component, course
bar 53dgand- toothed wheels 56d and 51:! disposed thereof transposed between corresponding neigh
between neighboring sinkers 54d.
shown,
the wheels 56d and 51d are respectively mounted boring needle wale loops of a previously knit
on shafts 58d and 59d, and adapted to be inter
3. A knitted fabric characterized by having.
mittently rotated ‘by quarter turns in opposite plain
sinker wale loops of each component‘ course
the
directions
needle as56d
indicated
is aboutbytoarrows.
descend,In"and,
Fig.in so thereof transposed between plain neighboring
doing, engages the loop lld just kinked in the needle wale loops Of_"‘& remote previously knit
' course.
yarn Y by the sinker. 54d within its hook. In
continuing its descent, the needle 50d draws the
70
loop lld downward through the two previously
_formed intertwisted loops [2d and [3d temporar
ily held by the wheel 56d. As the needle 50d
.
course, and said sinker wale loops 'interknit with
the needle wale loops; of' all the intermediate
courses.
_
-
g
' 4. A knitted, fabric. characterized by having
plain sinker wale’ loops connecting neighboring
plain needle wale loops of each component course
56d and 5111 are rotated through a quadrant with .thereof transposed between corresponding nee
' reaches the position of Fig. XVI, the two wheels
attendant release of the loops Kid and l5d,_ the
dle wale loops of a remote previouslyikniifcourse,
70
' 4
2,129,885
and said sinker wale loops interknit with corre
sponding needle wale loops of all the intervening
courses.
’
a
-
"
5. A knitted fabric characterized by having the
needle wale loops of alternate courses engaged
with each other after the manner of plain knit
ting and said loops interknitted with the-needle
wale loops of alternate intermediate courses like
wise interengaged after the manner of plain knit;
10 ting; and further characterized by having the
sinker wale loops, of each component course
transposed between neighboring needle wale loops
of- another course.
6. A knitted fabric characterized by having
15 corresponding needle wale loops of alternate
‘courses engaged with each other after the man
ner of plain ‘knitting, and said loops interknitted
with corresponding needle wale loops of alternate
intermediate courses likewise engaged with each
other after the manner of plain knitting; and
further characterized by having the sinker wale
loops of each component course transposed be
tween neighboring needle wale loops of another
course.’
,
7. A knitted fabric characterized by having the
intermediate courses likewise engaged with each
other after the manner of plain knitting, the '
sides or shanks of all the loops appearing at one
side of the fabric and the bends or bights of all
the loops appearing at the other side of the 5
fabric; and further characterized by having the
sinker wale loops of each component course
transposed between neighboring needle wale loops
of another course.
-
a
‘11. A knitted fabric characterized by having 10
the needle wale loops of alternate courses en
gaged with each other after the manner of plain
knitting, and the bends or bights of such loops
overlying the shanks of the sides of the needle
wale loops of alternate intermediate courses 15
likewise interengaged after the'manner of plain
knitting, the sides or shanks of all the ‘loops ap
pearing at one side of the fabric, and the bends: ,
or bights of all of the loops appearing at the
other side of the fabric; and‘further character-‘ 20
ized by having the sinker wale loops of each com
ponent course transposedv between neighboring
needle wale loops of another course.
12. A knitted fabric characterized. by having
corresponding needle wale loops of alternate
needle wale loops of alternate courses engaged
with each other after the manner of plain knit
ting, and the bends or bights of such loops over
lying the shanks or the sides of 'the needle wale
courses engaged with each other after the ‘man
ner of plain knitting, and the bends or bights of
‘such loops overlying the shanks or sides of cor
loops of alternate intermediate courses likewise
interengaged after the manner of plain knitting;
mediate courses likewise engaged after the man
and ifurther characterized by having the sinker
wale loops of each component course transposed
between neighboring needle wale loops of another
course.
7
8. A knitted fabric characterized by having
25
responding needle wale loops of valternate inter
ner of plain knitting, thesides or shanks of all
the loops appearing at the front of the fabric,
and the bends or bights of all the loops appearing
at the'back of the fabric; and further character
ized by having the sinker wale loops of each com 35
ponent course transposed between neighboring
corresponding needle wale loops of alternate needle wale loops of another course.
courses engaged with each other after the man-_
13. The method of knitting by repetitions of a
ner of plain knitting, and the bends or bights of cycle which comprises drawing a new course of
such loops overlying the shanks or sides of cor-' ‘loops through loops of one of a number of previ
40
responding needle wale loops of alternate inter
' ' mediate courses likewise engaged after the man
ner of plain knitting; and further characterized
‘by having the sinker‘wale loops of each compo
45 nent course transposed between neighboring nee
dle wale loops of another course.
'
'
9. A knitted fabric‘characterized byThaving the
ously formed held courses; and drawing the‘loops
of one of the held “courses through loops of an
other held course with incidental castingof the
latter course.
,
_.
'14. The method of knitting by repetitions of a
‘cycle which comprises drawing loops of a. new 45
course through‘ corresponding loops of a previ
ously-formed held course; drawing the loops of
needle wale loops of alternate courses engaged
with each other after the manner of plain knit ' the held course through the corresponding loops
ting and said loops interknitted with the needle of a ‘previously-formed second held course; and
wale loops of alternate intermediate courses like
then drawing the. loops of the‘second held’cou'rse 50
wise interengaged after the manner of plain knit
through corresponding loops of a third previously
ting, the sides or shanks of all the loops appear
formed held course with incidental casting of the
ing at one side of the fabric and the bends or latter‘ course.
I
“ bights of all the loops appearing at the opposite
15. The method of knitting by repetitions of a
side of the fabric; and further characterized by cycle which comprises drawing a new courserof as
' having the sinker wale loops of each component loops through a pair of previously-formed held
course ’transposed between neighboring needle‘ courses while casting one of. said held courses;
wale loops of another course.
,
‘and drawing the cast held course through another
10. A knitted fabric characterized by having pair of previously-formed held courses while cast
corresponding needle wale ,loops of alternate ing one of the last mentioned pair of held to
courses engaged with each other, after the man
courses.
ner of plain knitting, and said loops interknitted
with corresponding needle wale loops of alternate
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OSKAR ISAUER.‘
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