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Патент USA US2129427

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\ sePt- 6, 1938.
R. c. JEPERTINGER
21,129,427
AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEM
Filed Aug. 26, 1935
2 Sheets-Sheet l
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Sept. 6, 1938.
R. c. J‘EPERTINGERY
2,129,427
AIR CONDITIONING- SYSTEM
Filed Aug. 26, 1955
2 Sheets-Sheet 2v
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Patented Sept. 6, 1938
‘ I,
_
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,129,427
AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEM
Richard O. Jepertinger, Milwaukee, Wis.“ as
signor, by mesne assignments, to Modine
Manufacturing Company, Racine, Wis., a. cor—
poration of Wisconsin
'
Application August 26, 1935, Serial No. 37,923
12 Claims.
(01. 257-3)
This invention relates to air conditioning systems for homes and buildings.
' It is an object of this invention to provide an
air conditioning system which needs no distribut5 ing ducts and in which the conditioning of the
air for each room is effected directly'in or near
the room as distinguished from past systems in
which all of the conditioning was done at a
central remote point.
'
10
Another object of this invention is to provide
an air conditioning system in which either a cool—
ing or a heating medium- is pumped under pressure from a central source to a number of re-
motely located conditioning units to effect both
15 a temperature modi?cation and an air circulation
and to be returned from such units back to the
source at atmospheric pressure.
Another object of this invention is to provide
an air conditioning system in which the tempera-
20 ture modifying medium is utilized to provide increased humidi?cation when necessary, and in
' which the pressure of the temperature modifying
25
Referring now more particularly to the accom
panying drawingsin which like numerals indi
cate like parts throughout the several views,‘ the
numeral 5 designates a building having a base
ment 6 and rooms "I to be supplied with condi-~ 5
tioned air.
Each room has one or more condi-
‘
tioning units, indicated generally by the numeral
8. These units may be of the built-in type shown
in Figures 1, 2 and 3, or of the exposed type
shown in Figure 4. The built-in construction is m
preferable, and ‘is therefore shown as the pre
ferred embodiment of the invention.
'
The built-in conditioning unit comprises an
elongated upright stack or air chamber 9 con- 1
cealed in the wall of the room it is to supply, and 15
provided with an inlet opening it at its lower
end and an outlet opening it in its upper end.
The unit is so mounted. in the wall 'of the room
that its inlet opening is near the base board and
4 ,
its outlet opening is near the ceiling. Both open- 20
ings are covered by a suitable grill' i2 and the in-'
let' opening also has a ?lter element l3 preferably
medium controls the functioning of the .humidifying means.
arranged behind its grill.
Through the inlet opening it, the air is taken
A further object of this invention is to provide
an air conditioning system particularly applicable
for installation in buildings and homes already in
use.
With the above and other objects in view which
off the floor of the room and drawn'into the 25
chamber 9 for recirculation. Fresh air may also
be conducted to the chamber 9 through an aux
iliary inlet l4 located in the side 01' the air cham
30 will appear as the description proceeds, this in-
'vention resi es in the novel construction, com-
her 9 adjacent the inlet I0 .and also equipped with
a ?lter element 15.
v
v 80
The fresh air inlet I4 may be c?l'lnected 111
bination and arrangement of parts substantially
rectly with the outside atmosphere through the
as hereinafter described and more particularly
side of the building or to some suitable source of
defined by the appended claims, it being under-
fresh air ‘by means of a duct i6.
-
-
'
35 stood that such changes in the precise embodiment of the hereindisclosed ‘invention may be
made as come within the scope of the claims.
The accompanying ' drawings illustrate two
Any suitablemeans may be provided for con- 35
trolling the ratio of the air entering the cham
her 9 through its recirculation inlet l0 and its
fresh air inlet I4, and for purposes of illustration,
- complete examples of the physical embodiment
40 of the invention constructed according to the
a damper I‘! has been shown in the duct l6 to
effect this function.v
.
40
best modes so far devised for the practical application of the prlnciplesthereof. and in which:
Figure 1 is a cross section through two-rooms
v and part of the basement of a building illustrat-
45 ing one embodiment of this'invention;
Figure 2 is a view partly in front elevation and
partly broken away and in section through one
of the conditioning units of the system; '
‘Figure 3 is a side view of the conditioning unit
50 with a portion broken away and in section; and
Figure 4 is a view of a modi?ed unit‘ partly in "
side elevation and partly broken away and in sec-_
tion through a conditioning unit of the exposed
‘type suitable for buildings and homes already in
65 use.
~
Mounted in the air chamber 9 between the in
let and outlet openings Ill and I4 is a heat ex
changer I8. This heat exchanger extends trans
versely'across the stack or air chamber so that all
air ?owing from the inlet to the outlet must 45
pass through the same. It consists of spaced
headers l9 and 20 connected by a series of tubes
It on which fins 22 are mounted. An inlet pipe 23
connects with theheader l9 and an outlet or ex
haust pipe 24 connects with the header 20.
50
Beneath the heat exchanger is an air circulat- ‘
ing means in the form of an air blower 25. This
blower 25 is mounted within a casing provided by
a sheet metal wall 26 bent to substantially U
shape with the upper- ends thereof extending u
2
2,129,427
across the space between the front and back walls
of the stack or air chamber and attached to the
headers i9 and 20, and the medial portion 26
' thereof shaped to provide a spiral housing for
the blower to direct the air ?ow induced thereby
upwardly through the heat exchanger.
As best shown in Figure 3, the lower portion of
The controls for the valves 40 and 4| function
at the dictation of a central control unit 52
located in one of the rooms of the building. The
construction of this control unit forms no part
of this invention and is therefore not shown
in detail. It is su?lcient to note that this unit
the wall 26 does not extend across the full depth.
embodies a thermostat and a humidistat. The
thermostat is connected to \the controls 42 and 43
of the stack or air chamber.
by means of wires 53 and 54, respectively.
One edge thereof
is spaced from the adjacent wall of the stack so
that air entering the same through the inlet ill
The thermostat of the unit 52 is so arranged
that for winter heating, the need for an in
or M has unrestricted access to the center of the
crease in temperature closes a circuit for the
blower.
control unit 42 which responds to open the‘ valve
-
‘
-
The blower is driven by means of a ?uid pres
15 sure motor 21 suitably mounted in the stack or
air chamber and attached to the shaft of the
blower. To drive the ?uid pressure motor the ex
20
25
30
~35
40
40, and in summer the thermostat of the control
unit 52 acts whenever the temperature exceeds
a predetermined maximum to cause the control
43 to function and open the valve 4|.
haust from the heat exchanger is utilized and
Humidi?cation is provided by sprays of water
to thisend the exhaust or outlet pipe 24 leading in the individual units. For this purpose, a spray
from the heat exchanger is connected by piping nozzle 55 is mounted in each unit beneath the 20
28 to the inlet of the ?uid pressure motor.
heat exchanger so that when in operation it di
The outlet of the ?uid pressure motor has a rects a spray of water up against the heat ex
pipe 29 connected thereto which leads down into - changer. The condensate ?ows down onto the‘
the return line 30 attached to the bottom wall . bottom wall of the unit where it is collected to
3| of the stack or- air chamber 9. The bottom drain down into the pipe 30.
25
wall 3| is pitched toward its connection with the
The spray nomle 55 is supplied with water
return line 30 so as'to drain all condensate ac
from the feed line 35 through a pipe connection
cumulating within the. unit down into the return ' 56 provided with a pressure responsive valve II.‘
line.
_
The valve 5'! is adjusted so as to open when the
As hereinbefore noted, each room of the home pressure on the feed line 35 exceeds that main 30
or building in which the system is installed has tained by the pressure reducing valve 31. To
one or more of the conditioning units 8 arranged illustrate, assuming that the pressure reducing
to supply conditioned air thereto, and it is to be valve 31 is set to open at ?fty pounds per square
observed that except for- the short ducts which inch, the valve 51 in each of the several units
supply fresh air to the units when it is found will be adjusted so as to remain closed until the as
desirable or necessary, the system is substantially pressure in the feed line 35 reaches at least ?fty
ductless, and if the fresh air inlets open directly two or?fty-three pounds per square inch. Hence,
through the outside walls of the building, it is unless the pressure of the feed line is increased,
completely ductless.
the valves 51 of all of the units will remain
The temperature modifying‘medium circulate closed and the humidi?er sprays 55 will be inop 40
ing through the heat exchangers of the differ
ent units is preferably water, although any other
‘suitable liquid may be employed.
-
.
To this end, the inlets 23 of the heat exchangers
erative.
‘
To increase the pressure. of the feed line 35
and effect humidi?cation, a second pressure re
duclng valve 53 and a humidity control valve I!
45 of all of the units are connected with a, feed line ~ connected in series are connected in shunt with
35. The feed line is connected to the outlet of a
force pump 36 through a pressure reducing valve
31. The pump 38, which is driven by an electric
'motor 38, is arranged to recirculate the water in
50 the system or may be supplied with fresh water
from the regular fresh water source of the build
ing. The direct supply to the pump is provided
by a pipe line 39.
g
.
The pipe line 39 has two valves 43 and 4| con
the pressure reducing valve 31., The control valve
53 is normally closed and is controlled by mecha
nism 60 electrically responsive and controlled by
the humidistat located within the control unit '
52 with which it is connected vby a conductor II. 50'
In the event an increase in humidity is re
quired; the response of the humidistat in the
control unit 52 to this condition causes the con;
trol mechanism ill, to function and open the valve
55 nected with it in parallel; Both valves are auto- . SI. With the valve 53 open, the pressure reduc
55
matlc and controlled electrically by suitable con? ing valve ‘I which is set to open at a higher pres
trol mechanism 42 and 43, respectively. The sure than the valve 31, which for purpous of
valve 40 is the hot water control valve, and the illustration may be ?fty-?ve pounds per square
valve 4| is the cold water control valve.
‘inch, will open, the pump 38 maintaining a pres--\
. Through the valves 40 and 4| the pipe line 30 sure su?lcie'ntly high to insure the opening of the 60
is connected respectively with a hot water boiler valve II. The pressure on the feed line 35 is
44 and/or a cold water tank 45., The hot water thus stepped up from ?fty to ?fty-?ve pounds“
boiler 44 is of any suitable design and the cold per square inch, and sea consequence, all of
,water supply-tank 45 may be in the form of an ' the valves 51 controlling the supply of water
ordinary tank provided with a cooling coil 43 to the humidi?er sprays automatically open.
65
supplied‘with refrigerant from a refrigerating
Upon increase in humidity as a result of the
unit 41. Both the hot water boiler and the .cold operation of the humidi?er sprays, the control‘
water supply tank have a common inlet pipe 43 unit causes the mechanism 30 to function to close '
which connects with the fresh water supply of the the valve 33 thus bringing the pressure on the
70 building through a Pipe 43 equipped with a hand feed line 3| back to ?fty pounds, which pressure 70
control valve 50, and also with the return line is insumcient tov maintain theI valves ll open.
It to which all of the return pipes 30 of the sev-v The sprays I! are thus shut off.‘ I
eral conditioning units connect. Obviously. only
It is to be observed that a ma ually controlled
one of the two valves 40 and ‘4i is open at any valve ‘I is“ connected with the inlet pipe 23 of
given time.
'
q~ ‘
>
'
each conditioning unit so that the flow of the 76
2,129,427
temperature modifying medium through the heat '
exchanger and also the ,speed of the blower in
each individual unit may be separately controlled.
I The exposed type of conditioning unit illus
trated in Figure 4, which is particularly suitable
for installations in homes and buildings already
in use, comprises an upright casing or compart
‘ ment 10 of neat external appearance provided
with a recirculation air inlet 1| at its extreme
bottom so as to take air directly off of the ?oor,
and a fresh air inlet 12 connectible with a source
of fresh air. A sliding valve structure ‘I3 is pro
vided to simultaneously control the degree of
opening of both air inlets. This valve mechanism
v10
15 is so arranged that when one air inlet is open
' the other is closed, and vice versa.
Above the air inlets and extending across the
entire horizontal crosssection of the casing or
compartment ‘I0 is an airy ?lter element 14
'
\
3v
2. In an air conditioning system, a heat ex
changer, a blower to induce a ?ow of alr'past the-v
heat exchanger, a ?uid pressure motor to drive
‘ the blower, a humidi?er spray, piping for con
ducting a liquid temperature modifying medium
under pressure to the heat exchanger, the ?uid
pressure motor and the humidi?er spray, whereby
a common medium renders the heat exchanger
effective and provides motive power for the ?uid
pressure motor and supplies kliquid for the hu
midi?er spray, and a pressure responsive valve
10
in said piping ahead of the humidi?er spray to
prevent the ?ow of liquid to the spray except
when the pressure in the piping exceeds that for
15
which the pressure responsive valve is set.
3. In an air conditioning system, conditioning
junits arranged to discharge conditioned air di
rectly into different rooms to be supplied, each
conditioning unit including a heat exchanger and
through which the air entering either or both a humidi?er spray, a common feed line leading 20
inlets must pass to reach the blower 15. The from a remote central point to the heat ex
blower ‘I5 is mounted within a blower casing 11 . changers and the humidi?er sprays of all of the.
open at both sides to permit the ?ow of air into units to ‘conduct a liquid temperature modifying
the center of the blower and having itsoutlet ‘I8 medium under pressure thereto, pressure respon
arranged to dischage' the air up through a grilled sive valves interposed between the humidi?er 25
sprays and the feed line adapted to open and con
_outlet 19 at the top of the unit.
The grill 80 for the outlet has inclined vanes, as nect the humidi?er sprays with the feed line
shown, and is hingedly mounted to permit‘ the when the pressure on the feed line reaches a pre
same to be swung upwardly to provide different determined value, and means controlled by a
80
80 angles of de?ection for the .air discharged from humidistat withinone of the rooms to be supplied
for
controlling
the
pressure
on
the
feed
line.
the unit.
'
,
The blower ‘I5 is actuated by a ?uid pressure
motor ‘8|, which like the motor 21, is driven from
the exhaust of the heat exchanger 82 mounted
in the outlet 78 of the blower casing, the exhaust
of the heat exchanger being connected with the
motor 81 by ‘piping 83.
,
'
The intake of the heat exchanger has a feed
line 84' connected thereto and the exhaust from
40 the motor BI and also a drip chamber 85 are con
nected with a return line 86.‘ Aspray nozzle 81
is also provided which is connected to the feed
line 84 through a pressure control valve 88.
:For purposes of clarity, the various pipe con
4. In an air conditioning system for supplying
tempered ‘and conditioned air to a room, means
for inducing a ?ow of air into said room, a heat
exchanger arranged to give the air ?owing into 35
the room a predetermined temperature, a hu
midi?er spray for increasing the, relative hu
,midity of the air ?owing into the room, a common
feed line to supply a liquid temperature modify
ing medium under pressure to the heat exchanger 40
and the humidi?er spray, a pressure responsive
valve controlling the connection of the humidi?er
spray with the feed line and arranged to open
when the pressure on the feed line reaches a pre
determined value, means for normally maintain 45
entirely outside the unit, but as will be readily _ ing a predetermined pressure on the feed line, and '
means operable to effect an increase inpressure
apparent, these may be so, disposed as to be en
'
tirely within the casing or compartment with the on the feed line.
5. In an air conditioning system for supplying
feed and return lines 84 and 88 entering the same
conditioned air to the living quarters of a home, 50
’
i
50 through the bottom.
the combination of a conditioning unit located _in
.From the foregoing description taken inv con
nection with the accompanying drawings, it will juxtaposition to one of the living quarters of the
be readily apparent to those skilled in the art, home and arranged to discharge conditioned air
into said living quarters, said unit including a
that this invention provides a ductless air condi
heat exchanger, a humidi?er and ?uid pressure 55
tioning
system
and
that
by’reason
of
the
fact
that
55
operated means for, circulating air, a source of
no ducts are necessary a materially simpli?ed de
sign and construction having many advantages liquid temperature modifying medium located in
over past and existing air conditioning systems a non-living quarter section of the home, a force
pump having its inlet connected with said source,
is obtained.
‘
piping leading from the outlet of the pump to 60
WhatI claim as my invention is: ' .
60
said unit for simultaneously supplying the liquid
1. In an air conditioning system, a heat ex
changer, a blower to induce a ?ow of air past the temperature modifying medium to the heat ex
heat exchanger, a ?uid pressure motor to drive changer,’ the humidi?er and the ?uid pressure
operated air circulating means for giving effect
the blower, a humidi?er spray, piping for con
nections of the unit _have been shown located
65
ductinga liquid temperature modifying medium
to all of said elements, a common drain for carry
ing of! all of the spent liquid temperature modi
pressure motor and the humidi?er spray, where- _’ fying medium at atmospheric pressure and any
by _a common medium renders the heat exchanger condensate which forms in ‘the unit, and auto
effective and provides motive power for the ?uid matic valve means for turning on and shutting off
the ?ow of the liquid temperature modifying
70 pressure motor ' and supplies liquid for the medium to the ‘humidi?er in accordance with
humidi?er spray, and an automatic valve in the
humidity requirements without in anywise a?’ect
piping to controlv the functioning of the hu
under pressure to the heat exchanger, the ?uid
midi?er spray without affecting the supply of the _ . ing the supply of the liquid temperature modify
liquid temperature modifying medium to the heat
75
exchanger and the ?uid pressure motor.
I
ing medium to the heat exchanger and the ?uid
pressure operated air circulating means.
65
4 1
2,129,427
6. In an air conditioning system, the combina
of the heat ‘exchanger, means for conducting the
tion of a heat exchanger having an inlet and an
outlet, a blower for inducing a ?ow 01' air through
water from the outlet of the heat exchanger to
the ?uid pressure motor so that the motor is
the heat exchanger, 9. ?uid pressure motor for
driven-from the exhaust of the heat exchanger,
driving the blower, means for conducting a tem- 3 the exhaust fromrthe ?uid pressure motor dis
charging into the atmosphere, and drain means
perature modifying, medium under pressure to
for collecting and draining off the humidi?cation
the \inlet of the heat exchanger, means for con
ducting the ?uid temperature modifying medium
water'whlch is not absorbed by the air stream
and the exhaust from the blower motor.
10. An air conditioning unit comprising, a heat
motor is operated from the exhaust of the exchanger having an inlet and outlet for the ad
mission- and discharge of water under pressure,
heat exchanger, the exhaust from the motor dis
charging into- the atmosphere, and a common a blower for inducing a‘ ?ow of air through the
drain for draining oil the ?uid temperature modi- ' unit, a water turbine for driving the blower, means
for conducting water from the outlet of the heat
-15 fying means exhausted from. the ?uid pressure
motor and for draining o? condensate which exchanger to the inlet of the turbine so that the
turbine is driven from the exhaust of the heat
drips from the exterior voilthe heat exchanger.
exchanger,- means for injecting water for humidi
7. In an air conditioning system, the combina
tion of a heat exchanger having an inlet and. an ?cation into the' air stream induced by the blower,
-20 outlet, a chamber located beneath the heat ex- _ the excess of which drips down to the bottom of
changer" for. collecting condensate which drips the unit, and means at the bottom of the unit for
collecting and draining of! all excess and spent
> from the heat-exchanger, a'?uid pressure Del‘
water used in the operation of the unit.
ated means mounted inside said chamber fffr-in
11. In an air conditioning system for dwellings,
ducing a ?ow of air through the heat exchanger,
£25 means for feeding a ?uid temperature modifying the combination of a conditioning unit located
mediumunderpressure to the inlet of the heat in juxtaposition to one of the living quarters of
the dwelling and arranged to discharge condi
4 exchanger, means for conducting the ?uid tem
perature modifying -medium from the outlet of tioned air into said living quarters, said unit in-‘
the heat exchanger to said ?uid pressure operated cluding a heat exchanger, a humidifier and ?uid
means so that the ?uid pressure operated means pressure operated means for circulating air, a
' is driven by the exhaust from the heat exchanger, ‘source of liquid temperature modifying medium
thejexhaust. from they ?uid pressure operated located in ‘a non-living quarter section of the
means discharging to the bottom of said chamber, dwelling, a force pump having its inlet connected
and means for draining off all spent ?uid and with said source, piping leading from'the outlet
of the pump to said unit for supplying the liquid
fcondensate from said .chamber.
,
temperature modifying medium under pressure to
8. In an air conditioning system, the combina
the heat exchanger, the humidi?er, and ?uid
tion of a heatexchangerahaving an inlet and an
outlet, a blower for‘ inducing a ?ow of 'air through pressure operated air circulating means for giv
the heat exchanger, a ?uid-pressure motor for ing effect to all of said elements, and a common
driving the blower, means for injecting moisture drain for returning all of the spent liquid tem
perature modifying medium at atmospheric pres
into the air stream induced by the blower to pro
vide humidi?cation, means for feeding a ?uid sure and any condensate which forms in the unit
,
'
,
temperature modifying medium to'the inlet of back to said source.
the heat exchanger, means for conducting the
12. In an air conditioning system, a condition
ing unit including a heat exchanger adapted to
45 ?uid temperature modifying medium from the
"outlet of the heat exchanger. to said ?uid pres
have a liquid temperature modifying medium cir
from the outlet of the heat exchanger to the
10 inlet of the ?uid pressure motor so that said
sure motor so that the motor is driven from the
10
15
20
80
-_
40
45
culated - therethrough, a turbine motor, an air
exhaust of the heat exchanger,;the spent ?uid impeller driven thereby and'arrange'd to move
temperature modifying medium from the motor air through the heat exchanger, the discharge
discharging into the atmosphere, and a drain for.
said spent/ ?uid temperature modifying medium
of the turbine motor being to the atmosphere, a‘ 50
sourceof liquid temperature modifying medium
having means for collecting and draining oi! the -' under pressure, means for conducting the liquid
temperature modifying medium under-pressure to' '
excess moisture injected into the, air stream.
9. In an air conditioning system, the combina-i the inlet of the heat exchanger, means-for con
‘ tion of a heat exchanger having an inlet and an‘
ducting the liquid temperature modifying medium
outlet, a blower for inducing a flow of air through a from the outlet of the heat exchanger to the inlet '
the -_ heat exchanger, a ?uid pressure motor for of the turbine motor, and means for returning the
driving the blower; means for introducing water spent ‘liquid temperature’ modifying medium at
for humidi?cation into the airy stream induced by atmospheric pressure back to its source.‘
‘the blower,_ means for feeding water of a prede
60
RICHARD c. mun-Iguana. V
termined temperature under pressure to the inlet
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