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Патент USA US2129477

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Sept, 6, 1Q3&
‘
‘
P. B. PARKS
2,129,447
ADJUSTABLE METALLIC THERMOSTAT
Filed Sept. 20, 1937
2 Sheets-Sheet-l
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Sept. 6, 1938. '
.
P. B. PARKS
I
2,129,477
ADJUSTABFE METALLIC THERMOSTAT
Filed Sept. 20, 1937
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
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\“PatentedSept. e, 1938
- 2,129,477
' UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE v v
2,129,477
_
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ADJ?STABLE rm'mmc THEBMOSTAT
vPaul B. Parks, Oak Park, 111., as’signor to Vapor
Oar Heating Company, Inc., OhicagoJILacor-‘Y
poration of New York
Application September 20,1931, ‘Serial Nb. 164,179
12 Claims. (crane-1:21 ‘_
for localizing as far
possible the application
This invention relates to certain new and use
ful improvements in thermostats or~simllar con
'of auxiliary heat for adjusting the temperature ' _
trolling‘ instruments, especially thermostats of
at which the thermostats will function.
the bi-metallic type having a portion movable in
Other objects and ‘advantages of this inven
response to atmospheric temperature changes‘ to
tion will be more apparent from the following
detailed description of one approved form of
I which the bi-metallic member is exposed so as to
operate some controlling mechanism, usually by
,making'or breaking electric circuits.
According‘ to the present invention, means is
10 provided for conveniently adjusting the opera
tion of the control instrument, for example select
ing the temperature or temperatures I at which
the instrument will function. A localized portion
of the thermostatic member, or more convenient
15 ly a second thermostatic member ?xed at one end
and adiustably connected at the other end with
the relatively ?xed portion of the main vthermo
stat, is con?ned within a casing along with any ~_
auxiliary heater so‘ that the heat output of this
thermostat constructed and operating according
to the principles of this invention.
In the accompanying drawingsr
, Fig. 1 is a side elevation of the instrument, 10
the base and the outer covering shield being
shown in vertical section.
I
'
v
Fig. 2 is a plan view ‘with the outer cover re
moved and the insulating casing for the auxiliary
thermostat and heater being shown in section
substantially on the line 2‘—-2 of Fig. 1.
.Fig. 3 is a vertical section taken substantially
on the lineI-Iof Fig. 2.
Fig. _4 is a wiring diagram.
v
The thermostat comprises the hollow metallic 20
mostat only, and this second thermostat will not w base member I, open at the back, in which the
‘ be in?uenced by air currents to which the main base plate 0! insulating material 2 is secured by
20 heater will be locally applied to the second ther- I
thermostat responds. By adjusting the auxiliary.
heat applied to the second thermostat (or the‘
25 isolated portion of the main thermostat) the
v. main thermostatic ‘member which is exposed to
the air and responds to atmospheric temperature
changes will be bodily adjusted so as to deter
screws 3. The operating parts are mounted on
the irontface of plate 2, and the electrical con- nections are made in the usual manner at the 25
back of plate I. The operating mechanism is en‘
closed by a‘ dished metallic cover or shield 4
will function. More speci?cally an electric heat
provided with a ?ange or rim}; which ?ts over
a portion oi.’ base I' and may be removably secured
thereto inany desired manner. Cover 4 is pro
vided with slots or openings 8 and ‘I in its upper
ing coil is positioned around the second thermo- '
and lower ends, and also preferably with open
mine the temperaturesor other predetermined
30 atmospheric conditions at which the instrument
static bar (or some other type of electric heating ings I in the sides so that a free circulation of‘
element is intimately associated'therewith) and air is permitted through the cover or casing so
that the main thermostatic member may respond
35 both the bar and electric heater are enclosed
'
.
in an insulating casing which is entirely closed quickly to room temperatures. .
vThe vmain thermostatic member? 9 is in the .
except-for a passage for the movable member by
which adjustable connection is made with the form of a bi-metallic bar having one end III '
anchored or relatively ?xed portion0 of the main ?xed at H on an anchoring member I! pivotally
mounted on a pin l3 extending outwardly from
40 thermostat. In this manner the auxiliary heat
is localized and applied only to the auxiliary or base plate 2. The bar 9 is bent or looped so as
adjusting thermostatic member which is shielded to extend practically around- the inner insulating
from air currents, whereas the main exposed ~' casing l4 (hereinafter described in detail) and
thermostatic member is shielded as far as possible the upper free end i! or the bar carries a pair of
45 from the auxiliary heat so as to respond only to
electrical contacts l6 and I1 adapted to engage
.
respectively with the relatively ?xed contacts I.
The principal object of this invention is to pro
and i9. While the contacts II and I! ‘arenormal
vide. an improved controlling instrument such -ly ?xed they are preferably mounted‘ on the '
as brie?y described hereinabove and disclosed inner ends of screws IIv and 2| ‘respectively 1
50 more in detail in the specifications which follow.
mounted in the ?xed members 22 and ‘I!’ so that 50
atmospheric temperature changes.
Another object is to provide'an improved ad?
iustable metallic thermostat.
Another object is .to- provide an improved ad
justing means for a controlling instrument. .
56
Another object is to provide improved means
the positions of the so-called “?xed" contacts
may be adjusted. It will be understood‘ that as
the temperature of the air to which bar Iv is ex
posed rises» or falls, this bar will ?ex or bend in
one direction or the other. For example, it the '
.
2.
2,120,477
temperature rises to a predetermined tempera
ture the bar may ?ex so as to bring movable con- _
tact ll into engagement with ?xed contact i8,
and conversely if the temperature falls su?icient
ly contact II will be brought into engagement
bar I and thence to the movable contacts it and
I1. Assuming that the thermostatic bar 9 is so
constructed as to swing to the right at its upper
end when heated, at a certain predetermined
maximum temperature the contacts ‘18 and It
cuit wires (hereinafter referred to) connect with
will be engaged to complete a circuit between
wires SI and Ill and we may assume that through
suitable binding posts on the back oi base 2, these
certain appropriate control mechanism this cir
wires leading from the ?xed contacts I8, I! and
from the relatively ?xed end’ portion of bar 9
cuit will cause a cooling system to be thrown into
operation or a heating system to be thrown out
with contact it. It will be understood that cir
respectively.
'
The end portion ll of ,the thermostatic bar I
may be considered as ?xed as far as the move
ments of this bar in respect to atmospheric tem
15 perature changes is concerned, but for the pur
pose of adjusting the‘temperatures at which the
thermostat will function the bar I is swung bod
ily in one direction or the other by moving the
pivoted anchorage I! to which the relatively
of operation. Conversely, when the temperature
at thermostat l is lowered so that contacts i1 and
I9 engage a circuit will be completed through
wires 3! and ll to cut oil the cooling mecha
nism or start the heating mechanism. Alter
natively, the circuit connection to one 0! the con
tacts (for example contact I!) might be omitted
and only the contacts I. and ll be used to make
or break the circuit between wires 18 and M thus
stopping or starting the controlled mechanism.
The heating circuit for energizing the auxiliary
The improved adjusting means comprises a
second thermostatic bar 23 having its lower end » heater Ill comprises the wire ll leading from one
?xed at 24 to a block 2| projecting from the base terminal of the source of current 42, the movable
plate, and the upper free end portion 28 or this contact 43 of the rheostat or variable‘ resistance
thermostatic bar is connected with an adjusting 44, wire II leading from resistance 44 to one ter
20 ?xed .end of bar I is secured.
screw 21 threaded through a block 28 connected - minal oi.’ heater ll, and wire 46 leading back to
with anchoring member It. It will be apparent the source of current 42. It will ncw'be seen
that as the auxiliary thermostatic bar 23 ?exes that as rheostat contact 43 is adjusted, the
in one direction. or the other it will, through screw strength voi the current ?owing through coil III
it, move the anchorage‘ l2 and thereby bodily
adjust the position 0! the main thermostat I.
‘the head II of screw 21 is conveniently posi
will be varied and thereby the heat output ad
justed to determine the extent to which thermo
tioned so that a permanent or factory adjust
or the other th'ereby moving the pivoted anchor
age I! to bodily adjust the position of main ther
mostat 9 for any given atmospheric temperature.
ment may be made by turning the screw 11. As
tar as the automatic operation is concerned the
tree end ii of auxiliary thermostat 23 may be
‘considered as ?xedly secured with the relatively
?xed end ll of main thermostat I, and as a mat
ter of fact“ these two thermostats'may be con
sidered as parts oi’ the same thermostatic means,
or might be parts of the same thermostatic bar.
An electric heating element is intimately asso
ciated with the thermostat 28. this heating ele
ment being worth!’ in the form 0! a coil ll
wrapped around the thermostatic bar and having
its terminals connected respectively to the screws
II and 8! which extend throughbase plate I so
thattheconnectionsiortheenergizingcircuit
may be conveniently made at the back or the
8
stat II will be ?exed or bowed in one direction
In this manner the temperatures at which con
tact will be established between either of the
pairs of contacts ll-il or l‘l-il may be ad—
justed at any time by simply adjusting the
strength of the energizing current for auxiliary 40
heater Ill.
.
The insulating case it tends to con?ne the
heat output of this auxiliary heater II to the
secondary thermostat 23 while at the same time
shielding this adjusting thermostat from the 45
varying air currents [which ?ow through the outer
casing 4. In this manner the main thermostat
i is made, as far as possible, responsive only to
changes in temperature in the atmosphere or the
room or other space in which the thermostat is
The thermostat 28 and heater SI are con?ned
withinthechambertttormedininsulatingcas
ing llhereinabovereierredtor'ihiscasingll
maybemetallimbutispreierably formed of some
%E i Ea
‘as tar as possible the transmission of
and localise the elect or
hsater8ltothothermostat?,whileatthesame
timeprotectingthisthermostati'romtheaircur‘
rentstowhichthemainthermostatlisrespon
located,- whereas auxiliary adjusting thermostat
it is responsive only to the auxiliary, hea?’iurg
nished by electric heater ll. Preierahly,I
netic detents in the form oi’ adjustably posi
tioned permanent magnets 41 and It are pod-e 55.
tioned adjacent opposite sides of the movable end
portion 0! thermostaticv bar vI. For example.
magnet 41 is so positioned thatwhen contacts
I! and “are engaged the thermostatic bar is
brought closely-enough to the poles of magnet
casing II is preferably secured to the
l‘ltobestrongiyattracte'dtherebysothatthe
withaslottlin'onesideadaptedtd
contacts II and II. will be held in engagement
until a temperature change-applied to bar 0 ex
erts su?icient tome-on this bar in'an opposite
lbymeansoiscrews?andlland
overthescrewl‘l or block ".amem
.beri‘lpmjectingiorwardlyiromhaseplatet
direction to break the magnetic attraction and
closingtheinnerportimoithisslotsothatthe snap apart the contacts‘ II and II. This prevents
E pamageoropeningthroughthecas
ilisonlym?icienttopermitthenecessary
5 oi’the?exibleconnectionbetweenthe
70 inner thermostat it andthe anchoring mem
ll.
>
-
Referringnowtothewiringdiagramshownin
Hg. 4,
twirss "and" areshown leading
to th ?xed contacts II and II respectively,
whereas a third wire 40 leads to the thermostatic
chattering at the contacts and excessive making
and breaking oi’ the control circuits.
This same type 0! adjusting mechanism could
beapplied inasimilarmannertoothertypesoi 70
?antroiling instruments, ‘for example a humido
As has already been noted. the connecting
means here shown by way of example‘ between the
two thermostatic members 23 “and I. said con 75.
2,129,477
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necting means comprising screw 21, block 28, and‘ " tively ?xed portion of the control member, a heat
anchoring member l2, may take a variety of localizing casing enclosing the thermostat, anv
-forms and is principally for the purpose of pro-v electric heating element intimately associated
viding means for a permanent adjustment be
with the thermostat, an energizing circuit for the
tween these) two members (usually an adjustment heating element, and means for adjustably con
made at the factory). All of‘ this might be‘ trolling the current in the energizing circuit.
omitted and the two thermostatic members ?xedly
6. A thermostat comprising a bi-metallic bar
connected or formed as a unit, as far as the ‘having an operating portion movable with re
. broader principles of the invention are concerned. spect to a relatively ?xed portion in response to
10
I claim:
temperature changes of the atmosphere to which
~
1. A controlling instrument comprising a con-‘
trol member having an operating portion mov
able in relation to a relatively ?xed portion in re-'
the bar is exposed, a movable anchorage for the
relatively ?xed portion of the bar, a second bi.
metallic bar ?xed at one end and secured at the
sponse to predetermined changes in atmospheric other movable end to the movable anchorage, an
conditions, a bi-metallic thermostat having a por- ‘ electric heating‘ element intimately associated
tion movable in response to temperature changes, with the second bi-metallic bar, an ,energizing
‘ ‘means connectingjzhe movable portion of the
thermostat/with‘the relatively ?xed portion of
the control member, a heat localizing casing en
20 closing the thermostat, a heater within the eas
ing and intimately associated with the thermo
stat, and means foreadjustablycontrolling the
heat output of the heater.
2. A controlling instrument comprising a con- ~
circuit for the heating element, means for adjust- ,
ing the current in this circuit, and an insulating
casing con?ning the, second bi-metallic bar and
the heating element to restrict the effect of the 20
heating element to the second bar and protect the
second bar from air currents.
7. A thermostat comprising a bi-‘metallic bar
having an operating portion movable with respect
to a relatively ?xed portion in response to tem 25
perature changes of the atmosphere to which the
bar is exposed, a movable anchorage tor the rela
to predeterminedchanges in atmospheric condi
tlons, a bi-metallic thermostat having a portion tively ?xed portion of the bar, a second bi-metallic
movable in response‘ to temperature changes, bar ?xed at one end and adjustably secured at
30 means adjustably connecting the movable por
the other movable end to the movable anchorage, 30
tion of the thermostat with the relatively ?xed an electric heating element intimately associated
portion of the control member, a heat localizing with the second bi-metallic bar, an energizing
casing enclosing the thermostat, a heater within circuit for the heating element, means for ad-A
the casing and intimately associated with the justing the current in this circuit, and an in
thermostat, and means for adjustably controlling sulating casing con?ning the second bi-metallic 35
bar and the heating element to restrict the effect
the heat output of the heater.
_
3. A controlling instrument comprising a con ,_ of the heating element to the second bar and
' trol member having an operating portion movable protect the second bar from air currents.
8_. A thermostat comprising a bi-metalic bar
in relation to a relatively ?xed portion in re
40 sponse to predetermined changes in atmospheric
having an operating portion movable with respect 40
to a relatively ?xed portion in response to tem
conditions, a thermostat having a portion mov
trol member having an operating portion movable
in relation to a relatively ?xed portion in response ,
perature changes of the atmosphere to which the
able in response to temperature changes, a mov
able anchorage for the relatively ?xed portion 01' [bar is exposed, a pivoted anchoring member on
the control member, means adiustably connecting which the relatively ?xed portion of the bar is
' _ the movable portion 01' the thermostat with the
anchorage to move the same and thereby adjust
the operation of the control member,‘ a heat
localizing casing enclosing the thermostat,v a
heater within the casing and intimately‘, associ-.
ated with the thermostat, and means for‘ adjust
ably controlling the heat output of the heater.
4. A controlling instrument comprising a con
trol member having an operating portion mov
able in relation to a relatively ?xed portion in
response to predetermined changes in atmos
pheric conditions, a thermostat having a portion
movable in response to temperature changes, a
movable anchorage for the relatively ?xed por
tion of the control member, means adjustably
60 connecting the movable portion of the thermostat
with the anchorage to move the same andthere
1 by adjust the operation of the control member,
a heat localizing casing enclosing the thermostat,
an electric heating element intimately associated
mounted, a second bi-metallic bar ?xed at one 45
end, an adjusting member connecting the mov
able end of the second bar with the pivoted
anchoring member, an electric heating element
intimately assOciatedJWith the second bar, an
energizing. circuit for the heating element, means 50
for adjusting the current, in this circuit, and an
insulating casing con?ning the second bar and
heating element to restrict the effect of the heat
ing element to the second bar.
9. A thermostat comprising a bi-metallic bar, 55
a movable anchoring member to which one end
of the bar is secured, ‘a pair of electric contacts
one oi.‘ which is relatively ?xed and the other car
ried by the movable end of the bar so that a cir
cuit through the contacts will be made and broken 60
in response to atmospheric temperature changes
to whichthe bar is exposed, a second thermostatic
bar ?xed at one end, anadjustable connection
between the movable end of this bar and the
65 with the ‘thermostat, an energizing circuit for the - anchoring means, a casing enclosing the second 65
heating element, and means for adjustably con
trolling the current in the energizing,
,
5. A controlling i 'trument comprising a con
trol member having a \ operating portion movable
70 in relation to a relatively ?xed portion in re
sponse to predetermined changes in atmospheric
conditions, a bi-metallic thermostat having a
portion- movable in response to temperature
changes, means adjustably connecting the mov
75 able portion of the thermostat with the rela
bar, a heater within the casing and intimately
associated with the second thermostat to locally
apply heat theretokand means for adjusting the _
heat output of the heater.
10. A thermostat comprising a bi-metallic bar, 70
a pivoted anchoring member to which one end of
the bar is secured, a pair of electric contacts one
of which is relatively ?xed and the other carried
by the movable end of the bar so that a circuit
through the contacts will be made and broken 13/75;
4
2,129,477
’ response to atmospheric temperature changes to
which the bar is exposed, a second thermostatic
bar ?xed at one end, an adjustable connection be
tween the movable end oi‘ this, bar and the
anchoring means, a’ casing.‘ enclosing the second
bar, a heater within the-casing and intimately
associated with‘ the second thermostat to locally
apply heat thereto, and means for adjusting the
heat output of the heater.
-
-
ii. A thermostat comprising a bi-metaliic bar.
a movable anchoring member to which one end
of the bar is secured, a pair of electric contacts
one oi’ which is relatively ?xed and the other car
ried by the movable end of the bar so that a
circuit through the contacts will .be made and
broken in response to atmospheric temperature
changes_.to which the bar is exposed, a second
» thermostatic bar ?xed at one end, an adjustable
connection between the movable end of this bar
20 and the anchoring means, a casing enclosing the
second bat, an electric heating element intimate
1y associated with the second bar, an energizing
circuitfor this heater, and means for adjusting
the energizing circuit.
12. A thermostat comprising a bi-metaiiic bar,
a movable anchoring member to which one end
oi! the bar is secured, a‘pair of electric contacts
one of which is relatively fixed and the other car
ried by_ the movable end of the bar so that a cir
cuit through the contacts will be made and broken
in response to atmospherictemperature changes
to which the barn exposed, a magnetic detent
positioned to attract the bar and yieldingly hold
the contacts in engagement, a second thermo
static bar ?xed at one end, an adjustable con
nection between the movable ‘end of this bar and
the anchoring means, a casing enclosing the sec
ond bar, a heater within the casing and intimately
associated with" the second thermostat to locally
apply heat thereto, and means for adjusting the
heat output of the heater.
'
PAUL B. PARKS.
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