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Патент USA US2129622

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'
Sept. ‘6-, 1938.
I
F. H. MANCHESTER
'
FLOORING MATERIAL AND METHOD FOR MAKING SAME
Filed Jan. 22, 1935
2,129,622‘
‘Patented Sept. 6, 1938
2,129,622
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,129,622
FLOORING MATERIAL AND Marnon iron
I
MAKING
SAME
,
Frank H. Manchester, Akron, Ohio, assignor to
Wingfoot Corporation, Wilmington, Del., a cor
poration of Delaware
Application January 22, 1935, Serial No. 2,854
' 12 Claims.
(01. 154-2)
are substantially uniformly
This invention relatescto rubber flooring mate
rial and the method of producing the same.
The
?ooring material comprises blocks of rubber
?ooring which are backed upuwith a resilient
5 matrix composed of rubber and a cushioning ma
terial such as ground cork.
In making inlaid rubber ?ooring it has been
found that if the various rubber blocks which
comprise the surface are not of exactly the same
10 thickness one of two serious defects” results.
(1) If the composition of the unvulcanized rub
- her is quite rigid, as is usually the case, the heavy
gauge blocks take all the pressure and the light
gauge blocks never meet the polished curing sur
' I5 face.
This results in a rough, undervulcanized,
defective surface on the light gauge blocks.
, (2) If the composition of the unvulcanized rub
ber is plastic the pressure during cure results in
making the heavy gauge blocks ?ow or spread
20 over in the low gauge areas resulting in uneven
dispersed.
When ~
this is placed in the press and pressure is applied
the compressible material under the heavy gauge
blocks is compressed to a greater extent than
the compressible material under the light gauge 5
blocks so that the entire upper surface is brought
into pressure contact withthe upper plate of the
press during the curing’operation. This is in
dicated in Fig. 2. The matrix may be backed up
with any suitable material such as a rubber base 10
4. It will often be advantageous to use fabric 5
between ‘the matrix and the rubber base.
The structure shown in Figs. 1 and 2 is illus
trative of the invention and it is not to be under
stood that the invention is limited to the struc- 15
ture shown. A modi?ed flooring is shown in
Fig. 3. It comprises fabric 5 interposed between
the pieces of inlay and the matrix. Any suitable
means
of backing up the matrix may be
20
' employed.
lines between the blocks.
According to this invention the various inlaid
pieces are backed up with a cushioned matrix
and pressure is applied to the surface of the in
It has been found that ?ne particles of cork
are ordinarily .denser and less compressible than
coarser particles. Cork dust of 100 mesh has a
individual pieces of inlay. The matrix is formed
of rubber in which ?nely divided particles of re
30 silient material such as cork, etc. are dispersed.
which about 50% or more of the cork is not ?ner
gravity in rubber of about 1 and is not very com
25 laid pieces during cure to produce a perfectly v pressible. Ground cork between 14-20 mesh has 25
a gravity of about 0.30 in rubber and is quite
even surface and the intended design is not de
formed by any unintentional lateral ?ow of the compressible. It is not necessary to use cork of
The defects mentioned above are thus avoided
because when the ?ooring is subjected to pres
sure for curing, the cork or other resilient mate
‘ rial under the heavy gauge blocks is compressed
35 and the low gauge blocks are brought into con
tact with the heated platen, plate or pan of the
press and there is no a$preciablelateral distor
tion of the heavy gauge pieces. The light gauge
blocks are vulcanized in pressure contact with
40 the smooth platen of the press and each block
has a perfectly smooth surface. The rubber of
the matrix is .cured with the cork under com
any particular particle size. A ground cork in
than 20 mesh will in general be found satisfactory. 30
Instead of cork other volumetrically compressible
materials such as ground sponge (sponge rub
ber), rubber scrap, ground or shredded Balsa
wood, corn stalk pith and like porous materials
may be used.
35
The invention is particularly valuable in pre
paring ?ooring from blocks of different colors
which are prepared at diil'erent times vand are
therefore commonly of somewhat different thick
ness.
The matrix may be made from any suit- 40
able rubber composition compatible in rate of
vulcanization with the inlaid blocks and which
pression so that when the pressure is released the will adhere to these blocks or to any intermediate
inlaid blocks form‘ a smooth surface.
layer of material such as the fabric shown in
The invention will be further illustrated in' Fig. 3. The following formula for the rubber in 45
45
connection with the accompanying drawing in a matrix comprising ground cork has been found
which Fig. 1 shows rubber blocks of different to give satisfactory results:
thickness placed on a’ rubber matrix before vul
Parts
canization.
Fig. 2 shows the same pieces of ma
50 terial after vulcanization.
Fig. 3 shows a modi
?ed product.
In making the ?ooring the individual pieces of
inlay l are ?tted together on the matrix 2. In
the preferred form of the invention this matrix is
55 composed of rubber in which particles of cork 3
Rubber _____ __
100
Mercaptobenzothiazyl disul?de ___________ __
1 50
Sulfur ___
3
'
Sublimed litharge _______________________ __
5
Ground cork (14-20 mesh) ______________ __ 100
' I claim:
1, Flooringmaterial with a smooth upper‘ sur- ‘5
2
2,129,622
face composed of rubber blocks of different thick
ness on a matrix composed of vulcanized rubber
and a subdivided cushioning material, the cush
ioning material under thick blocks being com
pressed to a greater extent than cushioning ma
terial under thinner blocks.
cushioning material, by bringing the exposed sur
faces of the blocks into pressure contact with a
flat surface thereby compressing to different ex
ground cork, characterized by the upper surface
.tents the cushioning material under blocks of
different thickness, and vulcanizing the rubber of
the matrix while thus holding the cushioning'ma
terial under compression.
9. The method of making ?ooring which com 10
of the flooring material having a smooth surface
prises pressing unvulcanized rubber blocks of dif
produced by vulcanization in pressure contact
ferent thickness onto a matrix of unvulcanized
rubber and ground cork to bring the upper sur
face of each block into the same plane and into
pressure contact with the smooth surface of the 15
press used for vulcanization, and vulcanizing the
upper surface of said blocks in pressure contact
2. Flooring material composed of adjoining
rubber blocks of di?erent thickness backed up
with a matrix composed of vulcanized rubber and
10
matrix of.’ substantially uniform thickness com
posed of unvulcanized rubber and a subdivided
with a smooth surface while the blocks are backed
up by said matrix and further characterized by
15 the fact that cork under the thicker blocks is
compressed to a greater extent than cork under
the thinner blocks.
3. Rubber ?ooring which comprises rubber
blocks of different thickness on a matrix composed
20 of vulcanized rubber and a subdivided cushioning
with said surface while vulcanizing the rubber of
the matrix.
10. The method of making rubber ?ooring
material, characterized by (1) said rubber ?ooring which comprises placing blocks of unvulcanized
having a perfectly smooth upper surface produced rubber of different thickness onto a matrix of
by vulcanization in pressure contact with a ' uniform thickness composed of vulcanized rubber
smooth surface and (2) cushioning material and subdivided cushioning material, bringing the
exposed surfaces of the blocks into pressure con
25 under/blocks of different thickness being com
pressed to a different extent.
tact with a ?at plate of a vulcanization press,
4. Rubber ?ooring comprising rubber flooring thereby compressing portions of the cushioning
blocks of different thickness backed up with a material under the thicker blocks to a greater
matrix composed of vulcanized rubber and sub
extent than the portions under the thinner blocks
and vulcanizing both the rubber blocks and the 30
30 divided cushioning material, the cushioning ma
terial under blocks of different thickness being matrix while maintaining the cushioning material
compressed different amounts to compensate for under pressure.
the difference in thickness in said blocks and be
, 11. The method of making rubber flooring
ing held in said compressedcondition by the sur
which comprises placing blocks of rubber of dif
35 rounding rubber in the matrix, said ?ooring being ferent thickness onto a matrix of rubber and a
characterized by absence of lateral flow of the subdivided cushioning material, the upper sur
material composing the individual rubber blocks. faces of said blocks being in different planes, sub.
5. Rubber ?ooring material comprising rubber jecting this assembly to sufficient vertical pressure
flooring blocks of different thickness backed up to bring the surface of each rubber block into
with a matrix composed of vulcanized rubber and pressure contact with a ?at plate of a vulcaniza
a sub-divided cushioning material, the cushioning tion press without causing substantial lateral flow
material under blocks of different thickness being of any rubber block thereby compressing portions
compressed to a different extent and being held of the cushioning material to a greater extent
in this state by the surrounding vulcanized rubber, than other portions and vulcanizing the exposed
said flooring being characterized by the absence surface of the rubber blocks while in such pres 45
45
of lateral flow of the material composing the in
sure contact.
_
I
dividual blocks and by a smooth upper surface
12. In the method of making rubber ?ooring
produced by vulcanization in pressure contact from (1) blocks of rubber of different thicknesses,
with a smooth surface.
each block having a smooth upper surface and
6. Rubber ?ooring which comprises adjoining (2) a matrix composed of unvulcanized rubber 50
50
rubber blocks of different thickness vulcanized to and subdivided cushioning material, which blocks
a matrix composed of rubber and ground cork, the arranged on the matrix do not present a smooth
upper surface of the ?ooring being a smooth sur
?ooring surface, the steps which comprise sub
face, the matrix under blocks of different thick— , jecting this assembly to suilicient vertical pressure
in a vulcanization press to bring the surface of 55
55 ness being compressed to a different extent.
'7. Rubber ?ooring which comprises blocks of each rubber block into pressure contact with a
rubber of di?erent thickness backed up by a ?at plate of the vulcanization press thereby sub
matrix composed of rubber and ground cork, said
rubber ?ooring having a smooth upper surface
jecting cushioning material under blocks of differ
ent thicknesses to di?erent degrees of compres
60 produced by vulcanization in pressure contact , sion whereby the surface of each rubber block is 60
with a smooth surface and being characterized by
absence of lateral fiow of the rubber blocks and
by the cork under blocks of different thickness
being compressed to a different extent.
8. The method of making ?ooring having a
65
smooth upper surface which comprises forcing
blocks of inlay of different thickness against a
brought into pressure contact with said flat plate
of the vulcanization press without causing sub
stantial lateral ?ow of any block, and vulcanizing
the blocks and matrix while in such pressure
contact.
FRANK H. MANCHESTER.
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