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Патент USA US2129846

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Sept. 13, 1938.
I
G. KNocHENHAux-:R
2,129,846
COOLING SYSTEM FOR INTERNAL‘COMBUSTION ENGINES
Filed April 5, 1935
v2 Sheets-sheet 1
Sept. 13, 1938.
2,129,846
G, KNOCHENHAUER
COOLING SYSTEM FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES
Filed April 5, 1935
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
'
W EN
/
Patented Sept. .13, 1938
l2,129,346 »
UNITED STATES PATENT `'ori-‘ICE
2,129,846
COOLING SYSTEM FOR INTERNAL COMBUS
TION ENGINES
Günther Knochenhauer, Lidingo, Sweden, as
signor- to Aktiebolaget Spontan, Stockholm,
Sweden, a. corporation of Sweden
Application April 5, 1935, Serial No. 14,731
In Germany April 9, 1934
15 Claims. (Cl. 12S-_174)
The present invention relates to cooling sys
radiator to an extent suillcient to permit circu
tems for internal combustion engines and has lation throughout the entire system to be estab
particular reference to systems of this character
utilizing for the cooling medium a liquid the
A continuously open by-pass of this character
5 viscosity of which increases with decrease in is, however, subject to the disadvantage that v5
temperature and vice versa.
it involves continuous loss of power in the cool
Still more particularly the invention relates ing system due to flow of the cooling ñuid through
lished.
to cooling systems of the above character em
`
1
the by-pass whether such flow is required or not,
ploying lubricating oil as the cooling medium. ' and this loss of power cannot bereduced to the
10 The advantages of using lubricating oil as a cool
ing medium have already been recognized, but
in order to successfully employ this liquid, or a
liquid of like characteristics, it is necessary to
utilize a cooling system having structural char
15 acteristics different from those suitable for a wa
ter cooling system. One of the principal reasons
for this is that the specific heat of oil is much
less than that of- water.
In order to make use
of the viscosity characteristics of oil while at
20 the same time avoiding the disadvantage of low
specific heat, it has been proposed in the past
to circulate the oil in a closed system under pres
sure in comparatively thin layers and at com
desired extent by reducing to a very small area 10
the cross-section of the by-pass, for the reason
that with such small iiow area the by-pass is
not effective for the purpose desired.
In order to eliminate the difficulties encoun
tered with systems as heretofore suggested, it is
proposed, in accordance with the present inven
tion, to provide a novel arrangement of radiator,
pumping means and engine jacket spaces, with
respect to ñow of cooling fluid, which will enable
both the radiator and the jacket spaces to be
exposed to both the full pressure of the delivery
from the circulating pumping means, and the
full suction eiîect produced by such means. With
paratively high speeds around the engine parts» such an arrangement, the force tending to pro
25 requiring cooling. Such circulation of the oil duce circulation of oil through the jacket spaces
has been proposed in conjunction with the use of the engine is independent of the viscosity con
of an air-cooled radiator through which the oil dition of the oil in the radiator, and suitable cir
is circulated in series with the cooling jackets of culation of oil through the jacket spaces can be
the engine so as to dissipate the heat transmitted absolutely depended upon regardless of condi
30 to the oil from the engine. In an arrangement
tions of outside temperature.
j
30
of this sort, the viscosity characteristics of the
The invention may be carried into effect with
cooling oil are utilized advantageously since the different specific arrangements, of which the
rate of cooling is automatically altered to com
simplest consists of a single circulating pump
pensate for Iluctuating temperatures. When the which forces oil to the radiator and jacket spaces
35 temperature of the system is high the rate of
and which withdraws oil from them through
ilow of the oil and the cooling eiîected by it are circulating circuits arranged in parallel with re
accelerated because of low oil viscosity, and in spect to ñow of oil toL and from the pumping
case of low temperatures the increased viscosity means.
and resistance to iiow of the oil result in a lower
With an arrangement such as this, it is possible
40 rate of cooling. However, some difñculty may be
to obtain the desired automatic adjustment of the
encountered with arrangements as heretofore cooling effect under diiîerent temperature condi
proposed because of the fact that the outside air tions. The reason for this is that the radiator
temperature may become so cold as to congeal
the oil in the radiator, and in eiîect “freeze” it.
With the usual arrangement of the parts of the
cooling system, this “freezing” of the radiator
tends to stop oil circulation throughout the en
tire system. This has previously been recognized,
and the difficulty has heretofore been overcome
to a certain extent by providing a continuously
open by-pass for the radiator so that when the
latter is ñlled with congealed oil it may be short
circuited until the heat carried to the radiator
by the oil which flows through the engine cyl
inder jackets has an opportunity to “thaw” the
and jacket spaces of the engine are continuouslyv -
subjected to like pump pressures and for this
reason the speed of circulation of the oil through
them is inversely proportional to the viscosity of
the oil. 'I'his is not true of the old form of cool
ing system arrangements in which the radiator
and jacket spaces are arranged in series with
respect to ñow of the cooling medium.
50
Further, with the engine jacket circuit and the
radiator circuit arranged in parallel only about
half of the pump delivery pressure is required
to effect the desired circulation as compared with
what would be required if a series arrangement of 55
2,129,946
2
the parts were employed. This is of substantial
importance, since in systems of the kind under
discussion a small and, comparatively slow speed
centrifugal pump is the simplest and most de
sirable form of pumping element, and with this
type of pump it is difllcult to get sumcient delivery
pressure to effect the desired circulation of rela
tively viscous oil when it must be circulated in
series through the jacket spaces and the radiator
against a pressure representing the combined
flow resistance of the two parts of the system.
For a better understanding of the detailed na
ture of the invention and the manner and ad
vantages of its use, reference may best be had
and an outlet chamber 36. Chamber 24 is con
nected by connection 26 to the outlet 24 of pump
I6, and is also in communication at the outlet
of the pump with connection 20 leading to the
jacket spaces. Chamber 36 is connected by means
of connection 26 to the inlet of the pump and is
also in communication with the connectionl I8
leading from the engine jacket spaces. Cham
bers 34 and 26 are connected by a plurality of
bent tubular cooling elements or tubes 26. The 10
pump I6 and the fan 40 for forcing cooling air
over Athe radiator tubes are advantageously
15 to the ensuing description of suitable embodi
ments of apparatus for carrying the invention
into effect illustrated in the accompanying draw
ings forming a part of this specification.
In the drawings:
20
,
Fig, 1 is a more or less diagrammatic side ele
vation partly in section of an engine having a
cooling system embodying the invention;
Fig. 2 is a central section on an enlarged scale
vshowing another form of apparatus for carrying
the invention into effect;
mounted on a common shaft 42, which may be
driven in the conventional manner by means of
a belt drive 44 from the engine shaft 46.
15
Advantageously the general form of construc
tion of the radiator may be in accordance with
the disclosure in U. S. Patent No. 1,980,811 granted
November 13, 1934, to Fredrik Ljungstrom.
The lines and arrows shown in the figure indi
cate the path of ilow from the pump through
the radiator and back to the pump, and from
the drawings it will be evident that the radiator,
the connections 26 and 28 and the pump together
form a second circuit for circulatory ilow of the 25
Fig. 3 is an end elevation of an engine adapted ' cooling fluid, which circuit is in parallel with
to have attached thereto apparatus of the kind
shown in Fig. 2;
.
Fig. 4 is a more or less diagrammatic illus
tration of an engine having another form of
cooling system embodying the invention; and
Fig. 5 is a view similar to Fig. 4 showing an
engine with still another form of cooling system
embodying the invention.
Referring now to Fig. l, reference character
I0 designates an internal combustion engine
having an oil cooling system which provides for
forced circulation of the oil around the cylinder
barrels and over the cylinder heads, around the
valve seats and exhaust passages. 'I‘he specific
details of construction of the jacket spaces form
ing the path of circulation of the oil are not
essential to the present invention, and for pur
poses of illustration I have indicated the path
45 of flow of the cooling oil through the Jacket
spaces by the dotted lines I2 and I4 and branches
I2a, the branch lines designated I2a indicating
the path of flow around the individual cylinders.
Advantageously the oil is circulated in jacket
spaces providing for flow of oil in thin films at
relatively high velocity, and the construction
may be in accordance with the disclosure in ap
55
plication Serial No. 513,335 filed February 4, 1931,
by Fredrik Ljungstrom, (matured into Patent
No. 2,078,499, granted April 27, 1937).
At one end of the cylinder block there is mount
ed the circulating pump I6 for circulation of the
cooling oil. This pump is advantageously in the
form of a centrifugal pump of the type generally
employed for producing circulation in cooling sys
tems of this character, and is advantageously
rigidly connected to the engine by means of the
connections I8 and 20, which are connected re
spectively to the inlet 22 and the outlet 24 of
65
the pump.
>
From the drawings it will be evident that the
passages represented by lines I2, I2a and I4 in
the cylinder block, the connections I6 and 2l,
and the pump itself, form a closed circuit for
70 circulation of cooling iluid through the pump
and the jacket spaces of the engine.
Connections 26 and 26 provide support for a
radiator indicated as a whole by reference num
ber 30, which is advantageously in the form of
75 a central casing 32 providing an inlet chamber 34
the circuit which includes the jacket spaces of the
engine. It will further be observed that both
of these circuits and the system constituted by
the two of them are closed, so that the system
may be maintained at a pressure above atmos
pheric if desired.
In the embodiment illustrated, lubricating oil
of the same kind as is used for lubricating the
moving parts of the engine is employed as the
cooling fluid, and the cooling system is advan
tageously maintained in filled condition by means
of lubricating oil taken from the engine sump
48 by the lubricating oil pump 50 which dis
charges into the passage 52. Passage 52 is in com 40
munication with the engine bearings and a
branch 54 leads to the engine jacket spaces by
way of a check valve 56. A pressure relief valve
5I is advantageously provided in order to pre
vent the possibility of excess pressure in the cool
ing system. and the pressure of the oil as de
livered from the pump 5I) is advantageously
limited by means of a spring-loaded pressure re
lief device 60.
'I'he structural details of structure suitable for
the supply of oil to the cooling system and the
circulation of oil through the jacket spaces are
disclosed in application Serial No. 661,250 filed
March 17, 1933 by Fredrik Ljungstrom, (matured
into Patent No. 2,085,810, granted July 6, 1937).
The operation of the cooling system will be
largely obvious from the drawings, since it is evi
dent that the cooling oil discharged from pump
I6 will have two possible paths of flow, one
through the engine jacket circuit and the other
through the radiator circuit. It will further be
evident that both circuits are continuously sub
jected to the full pressure and suction eil’ects
of the pump, and accordingly the relative rates
of ilow through the two circuits will depend upon
the relative viscosities of the cooling Aoil in the
two circuits. If, for example, the engine isstarted
when very cold, the relatively viscous oil in the
radiator, producing high resistance to flow in the
radiator circuit, will not interfere with the rapid
establishment of circulation of cooling iluid in
the jacket circuit. In the jacket circuit the rela
tively slow circulation when the engine is started
permits the engine to rapidly warm up, thus
minimizing condensation losses and other unde
2,199,946
sirable factors of operation of a cold engine. As
soon as the engine warms up the viscosity of the
ñuid in the jacket circuit is automatically lowered
and the rate of circulation in this circuit increases
with decreasing viscosity of the ñuid. Then grad
ually the heat generated by the engine serves to
reduce the viscosity of the oil in the radiator cir
cuit, and this circuit commences to function as
required under normal engine operating condi
tions.
Due to the fact that the viscosity of the cool
‘ ing fluid varies with variations in temperature,
it will be evident that during normal engine oper
ation a. substantially automatic balance is ob
tained which results in the provision of cooling
at a rate in accordance with the momentary re
quirements. If, for example, the outside air is
very cold, the tendency will be for the oil to con
geal at a relatively rapid rate in the radiator
tubes, thus increasing the resistance to ilow and
cutting down the rate of ñow of oil in the radiator
circuit. This in turn results in maintaining the
temperature of the cooling oil in the jacket cir
cuit at the desired value, and operation of the
engine at an undesirably low temperature is
avoided. With increase in the value of the outside
air temperature, the viscosity of the oil in the
radiator circuit is reduced, and the desired
rapidity of cooling flow through this circuit is
maintained.
'I'hese desirable features of opera
tion flow substantially from the fact that both
circuits are continuously subjected to substan
tially constant pump pressure and suction, each
circuit being substantially »unaffected with re
spect to pressures by variations in the resistance
to ilow through the other of the circuits.
Turning now to Figs. 2 and 3, another embodi
ment of apparatus is illustrated in which the
radiator casing 32a is connected to the inlet open
ing 62 and outlet opening 64 of the jacket space
66 of the engine Illa. In this embodiment the cir
culating pump is mounted within the radiator
casing 32a and comprises a rotor Ilia mounted on
shaft 42a and discharging through dii’fusor pas
sages 68 to the chamber 18, which serves as the
discharge chamber for the pump and the inlet
chamber for the radiator tubes 38a. Casing 32a
also provides a chamber 12 which serves as the
outlet chamber for the tubes 38a and as the inlet
chamber for the pump. Chamber 18 is connected
with the engine inlet 62 by means of the connec
tion 14, and outlet I64 from the engine is con
nected by means of connection 18 to the inlet of
the pump.
As will be noted from the drawings an annular
web 18 in casing 32a separates the passage pro
vided by the connection 16 from the chamber 'l2
substantially up to the point of entrance of ñuid
into the inlet end of the pump rotor Ilia.
3
jacket spaces and the connection 16 back to the
inlet of the pump, inside of the web 18 forming
the second closed circuit constituting the jacket
space circuit. By means of the construction pro
vided at the inlet of the pump rotor and at the
outlet from the rotor it will be evident that the
fluid in the two circuits is at all times subjected
4to substantially the same pressure and suction
eifects from the pump, which suction and pres
sure effects are substantially equal to the full
pressure and the full suction developed by the
pump. With this arrangement it will be evident
that the same characteristics of automatic dis
tribution of flow through the two cooling circuits
will obtain, for the reasons previously described
in connection with Fig. l.
Turning now to Fig. «i I have shown in some
what diagrammatic form another embodiment of
apparatus in which the circulating pumping
means comprises two separate circulating pumps
84 and 88. The outlet of the pump 88 is in
communication by means of the connection 88
with the inlet of the jacket space of the engine,
and the outlet of the jacket space is connected by
means of connection 98 to the inlet of pump 88. 25
The outlet of pump 8B is connected by means of
connection 92 to the inlet of the radiator 38h,
and the outlet of the radiator is connected by
means of connection 94 to the inlet of the pump
8l. Connections 88 and 92 are placed in com 30
munication by the connection 96 in which is
located valve 98, which is advantageously in the
form of an ordinary butterñy valve. Valve 98
may be operated manually or may be opened and
closed under the inñuence ~of„a thermostatic 35
engine control which has been indicated as com
prising a thermostat |88 located in the jacket
space of the engine and operating, by means of
the bellows |82 to which it is connected, to move
valve 98 toward closed position as the engine tem 40
perature increases and to move the valve toward
open position as the engine temperature de
creases.
'I‘he direction of the flow of cooling oil in this
embodiment of the system has been indicated by 45
means of lines and arrows, and from the char
acter of the iiow as indicated by the arrows it
will be evident thatas in the previously described
embodiments the jacket space circuit and the
radiator circuit are each continuously subjected 50
to the full discharge pressure of the pumping
means and also the full suction effect thereof. If
the valve 98 is open and the radiator 38h is cold,
so that there is high _resistance to ñow of oil
therethrough, it will be evident that there is a 55
jacket circuit comprising the engine jacket spaces,
vthe connections 90, 96 and 88 and the pump 86
through which oil may circulate until the ra
diator is sufñciently warmed up to permit circu
'I'he pump rotor Ilia and the fan 49a are oper
lation through the radiator circuit, which may
ated in this embodiment by means of a gear drive be said to comprise the radiator, pump 84, and
consisting of a gear 80 on shaft 42a, which gear connections 96, 92 and 94. As the engine tem
is advantageously driven from the engine cam perature increases from a cold start, the valve
shaft gear 82.
98 may be closed and with the valve closed it
The path of flow of the cooling oil in this em
will be evident that the system will operate as 65
bodiment of the apparatus has been indicated by a single circuitl system with the radiator and
lines and arrows which it will be observed dei-lne the jacket spaces connected in- series with re
two separate circuits arranged in parallel with spect to iiow of cooling fluid. It may thus be
respect to ilow of cooling medium, as in the em
said that this embodiment provides an arrange
bodiment previously described. Oil discharged ment including connections for selectively pro
70
from the pump to the chamber 'I8 may flow viding circuits arranged in parallel or in series
through tubes 38a to the chamber 72 and from with respect to flow of the cooling medium. In
this chamber to the inlet of' the pump in a closed this connection it is to be observed, however, that
radiator circuit. Oil from the chamber 18 may regardless of whether valve 98 is open or closed,
also flow through the connection 14, the engine or, in other words, regardless of whether the 75
9,129,846
4 .
system'~¿.is operating with a single series circuit
or two parallelly arranged circuits, the inlet to
the radiator and the inlet to the jacket space
of the engine are both subjected to full pump
pressure and the outlets from the radiator and
from the engine jacket space are continuously
subjected to the full suction effect of the pump
ing means.
y
allel with respect to now of the cooling duid,
whereby cooling fluid may flow through said sec
ond circuit without ilowing through said first
circuit.
3. In a closed cooling system for internal com
bustion engines, pumping means, means provid
ing jacket space for circulation of cooling fluid
through the engine, said jacket space having an
Fig. 5 illustrates a slightly different arrange
ment of the general type of system illustrated in
inlet and an outlet, a radiator having an inlet
and an outlet, and connections providing for cir 10
Fig. 4. In this embodiment the arrangement of
pumps, radiator, jacket spaces and connections
is substantially like that previously described,
ing means, said radiator and said jacket space
but differs therefrom in that instead of the con
nections 88 and 92 being connected by the con
nection 96, as in Fig. 4, the connections 90 and
94 are connected by the connection |04. In con
nection |04 there is located a valve 98a controlled
by the thermostat means |00, |02 in the manner
20 previously described. As in Fig. 4, the direction
cf flow of the oil is indicated by lines and arrows,
and it will be evident that in this arrangement
also there is provided the possibility of either two
parallel circuits or a single series circuit for flow
25 of the cooling oil. In both of the embodiments
of Figs. 4 and 5, it is preferable that pumps 84
and 86 be alike with respect to operating char
acteristics and pressures produced, and under
normal operating conditionsV substantially no
flow of oil will take place through the cross con
nections 96 or |04, since with arrangements of
this sort the flow areas should be so proportioned
that the resistance to flow through the two cir
cuits are substantially the same. With substan
tial variations of temperature there will be flow
through these cross connections which may be in
either one of two directions as indicated by the
arrows, depending upon whether the temperature
of the cooling air is increasing and the resist
ance to flow through the radiator decreasing, or
the opposite. The balancing action produced by
such iiow through the cross connections is in
herent in the system, and in this connection it
is to be pointed out that the valve control for
these cross flow passages is not essential to the
45 functioning of the apparatus, but is preferably
employed to facilitate the securing of the best
results from the operation of the system.
From the foregoing it will be evident that ar
rangements other than those shown by way of
illustration may be employed for carrying the in
vention into effect, and the invention is accord
ingly to be understood as embracing all such
forms of apparatus as may fall within the scope
of the appended claims.
What I claim is:
l. In a closed circuit cooling system for inter
nal combustion engines, >pumping means for cir
‘ culating cooling fluid through the system, means
providing jacket space for circulation of the cool
ing fluid to cool the engine, a radiator, and con
nections for continuously subjecting both the
jacket space and the radiator to both the direct
pressure and direct suction effects of said pump
ing means.
2. In a closed cooling system for internal com
bustion engines, pumping means for circulating
cooling ñuid through the system, means provid
ing jacket space for circulation of the cooling
70 fluid through the engine, a radiator, and connec
tions between said pump, said jacket space and
said radiator providing a ñrst circuit including
the pump and the radiator only, and a second
closed circuit including the pump and the jacket
75 space only said circuits being arranged in par
culatory flow of cooling fluid between said pump
including connections establishing direct commu
nication between the discharge and suction sides
of said pumping means and said inlets and said 15
outlets respectively.
4. In a closed cooling system for internal com
bustion engines, a pump, means providing jacket
space for circulation of cooling fluid through the
engine, said jacket space having an inlet and an 20
outlet, a radiator having an inlet and an outlet,
a connection providing direct communication be
tween the outlet of said pump and the inlet of
said jacket space, a connection providing direct
communication between the outlet of said pump 25
and the inlet of said radiator, a connection pro
viding direct communication between the out
let of said jacket space and the inlet of said pump,
and a connection providing direct communica
tion between the outlet of said radiator and the
inlet of said pump.
5. In a closed cooling system for internal com
bustion engines, a pump having an inlet and an
outlet, means providing jacket space for circula
tion of cooling fluid through the engine, said
jacket space having an inlet and an outlet, a ra
diator having an inlet and an outlet, a connec
tion providing direct communication between the
outlet of said pump and the inlet of said jacket
space, a connection providing direct communica
tion between the outlet of said pump and the in
let of said radiator, a connection providing direct
communication between the outlet of said jacket
space and the inlet of said pump, and a connec
tion providing direct communication between the
outlet of said radiator and the inlet of said pump,
the two last mentioned connections having sepa
rate outlets located closely adjacent to the inlet
of the pumping element of the pump.
6. In a closed cooling system for internal com
bustion engines of the type in which oil is adapt
ed to be circulated under pressure, a centrifugal
Dump, a radiator having an inlet and an outlet,
means providing jacket space for the engine, said
jacket space having an inlet and an outlet, con
nections for delivering oil from the, pump directly
to both of said inlets, and connections for draw
ing oil directly from both of said outlets to the
inlet of the pump.
7. In a closed cooling system for internal com
bustion engines, pumping means, a radiator,
means providing jacket space for the engine, and
connections providing communication between
said pump, said radiator and said jacket space
whereby forced circulation of the cooling fluid A
due to pump pressure may be effected in the
system in two separate circuits ilowing in parallel
with respect to each other or in a single circuit
including said radiator and said jacket space in
series.
8. In a closed cooling system for internal com
bustion engines, a first pump, a second pump, a
radiator having an inlet and an outlet, means
providing jacket space for the engine, said jacket
space having an inlet and an outlet, a connec
5
2,129,846
tion providing direct communication between vthe
inlet of said ñrst pump and the outlet of said
a connection providing direct communication be
tween the outlet of said second pump and the in
jacket space, a connection providing direct com
munication between the inlet of said second pump
and the outlet of said radiator, a connection pro
let of said jacket space, and a balancing connec
tion providing direct communication between the
outlet of said radiator and the outlet of said
viding direct communication between the outlet
jacket space.
of said ñrst pump and the inlet ofA said radiator,
12. In a closed cooling system for internal com
a connection providing direct communication be
bustion engines. a iirst pump, a second pump, a
tween the outlet oi’ said second pump and the ` radiator having an inlet and an outlet, means
10 inlet of said jacket space, and a balancing con
providing jacket space for the engine,„said jacket 10
nection providing a direct communication be
space having an inlet and an outlet/a connection
tween the inlet of said jacket space and the inlet providing direct communication between the inlet
of said radiator.
of said ñrst pump and the outlet of said jacket
9. In a closed cooling system for internal com
space,a connection providing direct communica
15 bustion engines, a ñrst pump, a second pump, a
tion between the inlet of said second pump and
radiator having an inlet and an outlet, means the outlet of said radiator, a connection provid I15
providing jacket space for the engine, said jacket
space having an inlet and an outlet, a connec
tion providing direct communication between the
20 inlet of said ñrst pump and the outlet of said
jacket space, a connection providing direct com
munication between the inlet of said second pump
and the outlet of said radiator, a connection pro
viding direct communication between the outlet
25 of said ñrst pump and the inlet of said radiator,
a connection providing direct communication be
tween the outlet of said second pump and the in
let of said jacket space, a balancing connection
providing a direct communication between the in
30 let of said jacket space and the inlet of said radi
ator. and a control valve for controlling iiow
through said balancing connection.
10. In a closed cooling system for internal com
bustion engines, a ñrst pump, a second pump, a
35 radiator having an inlet and an outlet, means
providing jacket space for the engine, said jacket
space having an inlet and an outlet, a connec
tion providing direct communication between the
inlet of said ñrst pump and the outlet oi' said
40 jacket space, a connection providing direct com
munication between the inlet of said second pump
and the outlet of said radiator, a connection
ing direct communication between the outlet of
said iirst pump and the inlet of said radiator, a
connection providing direct communication be
tween the outlet of said second pump and the in 20
let oi said jacket space, a balancing connection
providing direct communication between the out
let of said radiator and the outlet of said jacket
space, and a control valve for controlling flow
through said balancing connection.
13. In a closed cooling system for internal com
radiator having an inlet and an outlet, means
providing jacket space for the engine, said jacket
space having an inlet and an outlet, a connec
tion providing direct communication between the
inlet of said iirst pump and the outlet of said
jacket space, a connection providing direct com
munication between the inlet of said second pump
and the outlet of said radiator, a connection pro
viding direct communication between the outlet
of said iirst pump and the inlet of said radiator,
a connection providing direct communication be
tween the outlet oi’ said second pump and the
inlet of said jacket space, a balancing connec
tion providing direct communication between the 40
providing direct communication between the out
let of said ñrst pump and the inlet of said radi
outlet of said radiator and the outlet of said
jacket space, a control valve for controlling ñow
through said balancing connection, and means re
45 ator, a connection providing direct communica
sponsive to the temperature of the heated cooling
iiuid in the system for regulating the position of
50
55
tion between the outlet of said second» pump and
the inlet of said jacket space, a balancing con
nection providing direct communication between
the inlet of said jacket space and the inlet of
said radiator, a control valve for controlling flow
through said balancing connection, and means
responsive to the temperature of the heatedA cool
ing iluid in the system for regulating the position
of said controlling means.
11. In a closed cooling system for internal com
space having an inlet and an outlet, a connec
65
said controlling means.
.
'
14. That improvement in the art of cooling
internal combustion engines which consists in si
multaneously circulating a portion of the cooling
iiuid in a first closed circuit including the jacket 50
space of the engine and subjecting another por
tion of the cooling ñuid to a positive pressure
tending to produce forced circulation in a second
closed circuit including a cooling radiator.
bustion engines, a first pump, a second pump, a
15. That improvement in the art of cooling 55
radiator having an inlet and an outlet, means4 internalv combustion engines with the aid of a
providing jacket space for the engine, said jacket
60
26
bustion engines, a first pump, a second pump, a
tion providing direct communication between the
inlet‘ ofr said Iirst pump and the outlet of said
jacket space, a connection providing direct com
munication between the inlet of said second pump
and the outlet oi' said radiator, a connection pro
circulating pump which consists in continuously
subjecting the jacket space of the engine to be
cooled to the direct pressure and suction effect
of the `circulating pump and continuously sub
jecting the radiator for cooling the cooling fluid
to the direct pressure and suction effect of the
circulating pump.
viding direct communication between the outlet
, of said flrst pump and the inlet of said radiator,
GÜNTHER KNOCHENHAUER.
55
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