close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Патент USA US2130174

код для вставки
Sept.> 13, 1938.
2,130,174
G. D. BEAUCHAMP
STRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENT
Filed Jan. 14, 1936
J
\
FTW@ßww
y„W
Om
2 Shee‘tS-Sheei- l
W
_L
„„
, a@ /
f
\
»UQ„
„m
ro
„a
.„d
m
,
wy
i*
Sept. 13, 1938.
G. D. BEAUCHAMP
2,130,174
STRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENT
Filed Jan. 14, 19256
„.ir-:.5l .É\Y,
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
2,130,174
Patented Sept. 13, 1938
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
l 2.130.114
s'ramcsn Musical. ms'raum'r
George D. Beauchamp, Los Angeles, Calif., assign
or to Electrol String lnstrument Comration,
Los Angeles. Calif., a corporation of California
Application January 14, 1988, Serial No. 59.032
'iClalma (Cl. 84-1)
This invention relates to musical instruments
and relates more particularly to electrical musical
instruments ot the violin type. A general object
oi’ this invention is to provide a practical, com
6 pact and eilective electrical stringed musical in
strument.
Stringed musical instruments of various char
acters have been introduced having electrical
pick-up units or electro-magnetic pick-up units
10 for converting the vibrations produced by the
strings into modulations in an electrical circuit
to be ampliiled and reproduced as music. Ithas
been the usual practice to include a pick-up of
this character in the instrument in addition to
15 its usual or original sounding board or resonant
body; The sounding board or resonant body of a
violin or a similar instrument is rather large and
cumbersome and renders the instrument diiiicult
to handle and play. The embodiment of an elec
trical pick-up unit in the instrument in addition
to its usual sound board or resonant body of
course increases the weight and bulk of the in
strument.
Another object of this invention is to provide
25 an electrical stringed instrument of the violin
type that is extremely light in weight and well
balanced, and, therefore very easy to handle and
play.
Another object oi' this invention is to provide
mentioned that is very simple in construction and
light in weight, comprising a one piece casting or
body forming the neck, the key box portion or peg
box portion, and the shoulder engaging portion of
the instrument.
Another object of this invention is to provide
a stringed instrument oi.' the violin type that em
bodies a novel, Vsimpli?ed and improved electro
magnetic pick-up unit of the general character
i'ully described and claimed in my co-pending 10
application Serial No. 728,717, illed June 2, 1934,
which has matured into Patent No. 2,089,171",
granted August 10, 1937, for converting the vi
brations of the several strings into pulsations or
modulations in an amplifying sound reproducing
circuit.
Another object of this invention is to provide a
stringed musical instrument of the violin type
that embodies an electro-magnetic pick-up unit
embodying permanent magnets and a coil be 20
tween the polar parts of the magnets, the mag
nets and coil being positioned so that the strings
pass between the coil and the proper polar parts
of the magnets whereby the vibrations of the
strings vary the density of the magnetic flux or 25
disturb the magnetic neld and thus produce an
induced current in the coil, the arms of the mag
net being dampened to prevent sound producing
vibrations of the magnets.
Another object of this invention is to provide 30
30 an electrical stringed instrument of the violin n an electrical musical instrument of the charac
type that has its center of gravity and its great
est mass immediately adjacent its inner end to be
supported on the shoulder oi' the player and has
a simple, very light stub neck devoid of keys and
35 all other parts, which imposes little or no weight
on the fingering hand oi’ the player, making the
instrument very easy to play.
Another object of this invention is to provide
an electrical stringed instrument o! the violin
40 type in which the key box portion or peg box
portion is at the inner end of the neck to be ar
ranged against the shoulder of the player, as dis
tinguished from the usual form of violin in which
the peg box is at the outer end of the neck and
must be supported by the ñngering hand of the
player.
_
Another object of this invention is to provide
an electrical stringed instrument oi' the violin
class that is of novel construction, whereby the
shoulder engaging portion or the shoulder pad on
such portion comfortably rests on the shoulder of
the player and the iinger board of the neck is
elevated in the proper position for playing.
Another object oi this invention is to provide
55
an electrical stringed instrument ci' the character
ter mentioned that embodiesv an electro-magnetic
pick-up unit in which the magnets are shaped
and the core magnets of the coil are propor
tioned and located to have the proper substan
35
tially uniform spaced relationship to the strings
which are arranged in a segmental or arcuate
series.
Another object of this invention is to provide
a stringed musical instrument of the character 40
mentioned in which the pick-up unit is very com
pact and light in weight and is arranged so that
it does not interi'ere with the playing oi' the
instrument.
The various objects and features of my inven 45
tion will be fully understood from the following
detailed description of a typical preferred form
and application oi' my invention, throughout
which description reference is made to the ac
50
companying drawings, in which:
Fig. 1 is a top or plan view o! the instrument
provided by the present invention. Fig. 2 is a
side elevation of the instrument. Fig. 3 is an en
larged transverse detailed sectional view taken as
indicated by line 3_4 on Fig. 1. Fig. 4 is an en
2
2,180,174
larged transverse detailed sectional view illus
trating one of the string tuning units being a
view taken as indicated by line 4_4 on Fig. 2.
Fig. 5 is an enlarged transverse detailed sectional
view taken as indicated by line 5_5 on Fig. l.
Fig. 6 is a fragmentary longitudinal detailed sec«
tional view taken as indicated by line 8-8 on Fig.
5. Fig. 7 is a fragmentary elevation view lof the
under side of the key box portion of the instru
ment showing a part thereof in cross section, be
ing a view taken `as indicated by line 1-1 on Fig.
2 and Fig. 8 is a diagrammatic wiring diagram of
the circuits involved in the invention.
The improved electrical stringed musical in
15 strument of the present invention includes, gen
erally, a unitary body A having a neck III, a key
box portion or peg box portion II and a portion
I2 for engaging the shoulder of the player, ten
sioned strings B extending over the fingerboard
20 of the neck I 0 and an electro-magnetic pick-up
unit C on the neck I0 for converting vibrations
_ oi' the strings B into pulsations or »modulations in
.an amplifying circuit.
The construction and shape of the body A
25 and the relation between the several parts of the
body A are important features of the invention.
The body A is preferably formed of metal, or
other material that may be cast in the form
of a single, integral part or casting. In practice
30 I have found it desirable to form the body A of
a synthetic organic substance resulting from the
chemical condensation of phenol and formalde
v hyde which is relatively light, strong and capable
of being attractively finished. In' accordance
35 with the invention the body A is an integral one
piece member and provides or forms all of the
principal frame parts and supporting parts of the
instrument.
The neck I0 over which the strings B are strung
40 is an elongate part comprising the forward or
outer portion of the instrument. The neck Ill is
shaped to be readily and properly engaged and
held by the player’s fingering hand. The neck III
is preferably tapered both horizontally and ver
45 tically toward its outer end to be of less cross
sectional dimension adjacent its outer end than
at its inner end where it joins the portion Il.
~ 'I'he lower or under side of the neck I0 is rounded
or provided with a convex surface Il. In the
50 preferred construction the neck I0 is tubular or
hollow to be light in weight and easy to handle.
A longitudinal groove I 5 is provided in the neck
I0 and has the same general contour as the
external surface of the neck. The fingerboard
55 I 8 of the neck I 0 closes the upper end of the
groove I5. 'I'he ñngerboard I6 may be cemented
or otherwise fixed in place. The upper side or
surface I'I of the finger board i6 is transversely
convex throughout the major portion of its length
60 and is shaped and finished so that the strings B
may be properly pressed against it.
'I‘he outer end portion I8 of the neck I0 may
be slightly enlarged and of ornamental configura
tion. A curved or concave surface I9 is provided
65 on the under side of the neck I0 adjacent its ex
treme outer end portion I8 to form a stop or abut
ment for the hand of the player. The end por
tion I8 of the neck Iii is shaped and formed to
hold the end portions of the strings B as will be
70 hereinafter described. In accordance with the
invention a projection 20 is provided on the under
side of the neck I0 at a point spaced between its
opposite ends. 'I‘he projection is intended to form
a support or abutment engageable by a part of
75 the player’s hand as he engages or ?ngers the
strings B. The projection 20 corresponds, gen
erally, in function, to the button of a typical
violin.. In practice the projection 20 is prei’~
erably integral with the neck I0 and is substan
tially round in transverse cross section. l
'I'he invention provides means for locating the
playing hand and the string depressing nngers of
the player. A member or part l0 projects later
ally from the neck I0 at that side of the neck over
which the player extends his lingers to depress the
strings B. The part ‘Il preferably projects lat
erally outwardly from the lower side of the neck
III at the projection 20, as illustrated in Figs. 1
and 2 of the drawings. In practice the part l0
may be of substantial width and the part is pref
erably curvedor bowed, being curved laterally
outwardy and in the direction of the body portion
Il. The curved surface 8| thus presented by the
part 80 forms an eii’ective rest or means for lo
cating the player’s fingers with respect to the 20
strings B and the neck. 'I'he invention contem
plates the forming of the part 80 integral with
the neck I 0 or as a separable member attached
to the neck I0. In the simple case illustrated in
the drawings the part 80 has one end attached 25
to the projection 2l by pins or screws l2 and has
an arm or lug I3 on its other end secured to the
under side of the neck by a pin or screw Il.
Where the part GII is a separable member it may
be formed of sheet stock such as sheet aluminum 30
and the lug 82 may be twisted to properly engage
against the neck I0.
A transverse slot or notch 2i is provided in the
upper side of the neck Il to receive or carry the
pick-up unit C. The notch 2i is adjacent the 35
inner end of the neck I0 being spaced inwardly
a considerable distance from the projection 20.
The portion of the neck In provided with the
opening or notch 2| may be solid or without the
groove I5, as illustrated in Fig. 6 of the drawings 40
and may be thickened as at 22.
-
The key box portion or the peg box portion II
of the body A integrally Joins the inner end of
the neck I0 and is provided to carry the keys or
pegs 23 for tensioning the strings B. The portion 45
I I of the body A may be substantially rectangular
in its general configuration having slightly in
wardly converging sides 24. The portion II is
preferably hollow and provided with an internal
space or'cavity 2l which may be open at the 50
under side of the portion II. A central longi
tudinal web 28 extends through the interior or
cavity 25 of the body portion I I and a transverse
bridge or web 21 connects the forward or outer
portion of the web 28 with the sides 24. rI'he
upper wall 28 of the portion Il is provided with
spaced openings or slots 29 for receiving the
strings B. It is a feature of the invention that
the body portion II just described is angularly
related to the neck I Il. 'I'he key box portion or 60
peg box portion II extends downwardy and in
wardly from the inner end of the neck III as
clearly illustrated in Fig. 2 of the drawings. 'I‘his
position or formation of the body portion II pro
vides for the proper positioning of the neck I0 65
and the easy fingering of the strings B when the
body portion I2 is supported against the shoulder
of the player. The above described relationship
between the neck I0 and the body portion II
assures the comfortable engagement of the body 70
portion I2 or the shoulder pad (not shown) on
the portion I2 with the shoulder of the player
while the neck I0 is properly elevated in playing
position.
The invention provides improved means for 75
8,180,174
3
very accurately tuning the strings B by finely material to influence the pick-up unit C. Bpaced
regulating the tension of the strings. Adjustinß openings 35 are provided in the outer end portion
or regulating units U are provided onthe key .of the body neck Il to receive the end portions
box portion IlA of thebody A for eñecting the of the strings B. Suitable nuts, spools'or the
fine accurate adjustment of the tension on the like are provided on the strings B to cooperate
strings B. Fig. 4 of the drawings illustrates one with the openings 35 to hold the strings against
of these units U in detail. Each unit U includes movement in one direction. The strings B pass
a plate 13 attached to the upper face oi' the body over a bridge 35 at the~outer end of the ñnger
portion II by screws 1I or the like. The plates l board I5. A bridge 31 is provided at the inner
end oi' the finger board I6 and the strings B
10 10 of the units U are disposed below and trans
versely of the strings B. A block 12 is arranged extend inwardly over the bridge 31 to be in the
on one end part of each block 10 and screws 13 proper spaced relation- to the finger board I5.
secure the blocks 12 to the plates 13. The screws The bridge 35 is preferably integral with the one
13 project from the upper sides of the blocks 12 piece body A while the bridge 31 may be inserted
and are provided with heads 14. The units U in and secured in a notch 35. It is to be under
include tiltable or pivotable plates 15 arranged on stood that bridges of various characters may be
the blocks 12. The screws 13 freely pass through employed on the instrument if desired. The
openings 15 in the plates 15 to pivotally support upper or active string supporting edges oi' the
or retain the plates 15. The heads 14 of the bridges 35 and 31 are arcuate and support the
screws 13 limit the pivotal movement of the plates strings B in spaced relation in a curved or arcu
15 and prevent the displacement of the plates. ate series to be in their proper relation to the
surface I1 of the finger board I5. The usual
Each plate 15 carries means for engaging or bear
ing on a string B. In the simple form of the notches may be provided in the bridges 35 and
invention illustrated a slotted screw 11 projects 31 to maintain the strings B in their proper
positions. The strings B extend inwardly from
25 from the upper side of each plate 15 and the
the bridge 31 to pass through the slots 23 into
string B passes through its slot as clearly illus
trated in Fig. 4 of the drawings. ‘An adjusting the cavity 25 of the body portion II. The end
screw 13 is threaded through an opening in each
plate 15 and its inner end is adapted to engage or
30 bear against the fixed plate 10.
In practice the
ends of the adjusting screws 18 may be suitably
rounded and may cooperate with correspondingly
shaped recesses 19 in the plates 10. Knurled
10
15
20
25
portions of the strings B are wound on the keys
or pegs 23 whereby the strings may be tightened '
30
and tuned by means of the pegs 23.
The pick-up unit C is operable to convert the
actual tone producing vibrations of the strings
B into pulsations or modulations in an ampli
fying circuit 40. The pick-up unit C is such that
heads 30 may be provided on the adjusting screws
13 to facilitate the accurate manual adjustment the intensity, frequency, etc. of the sound pro 35
of the screws. Means is provided for preventing _ ducing vibrations of the strings B act through
swinging or turning of the plates 15. Pins BI
project from the plates 15 and extend into open
ings 32 preventing undesirable lateral swinging of
40 the adjustable plates 15. The plates 15 are posi
tioned or set to exert an upward force on the
strings B or to form bridges on which the strings
bear. ’I'he screws 13 may be threaded or turned
to react against the fixed plates 10 and thus pivot
45 -or adjust the bridge plates 15. By carefully
turning or adjusting the screws 15 the tension
on the vibratory strings B may be very accurately
regulated as desired.
The units U are very com
pact and are light in weight.
The portion I2 is provided on the inner end of
50
the body A for engaging the shoulder and chin
of the player or for carrying a suitable shoulder
pad (not shown) for engaging the shoulder or
for carrying a chin rest (not shown) for cooper
55 ating with the chin of the player.
The shoulder
engaging portion I2 of the body A projects later
ally in one direction from the inner end of the
portion A. 'I'he rear or inner side 30 of the por
tion I2 is curved forwardly to join its forward
60 face. The upper and lower faces of the portion
I2 may be substantially horizontal or substan
tially parallel with the plane of the longitudinal
axis of the neck III. In accordance with the in
vention the portion I2 is preferably hollow hav
65 ing an internal cavity 3i. The upper side of the
cavity 3I is closed by an integral wall 32 of the
body A while the lower side of the cavity 3l is
closed by a plate 33 cemented or otherwise fixed
in position.
'I'he strings B are strung across the finger
70
board I6 of the neck III between the outer end
portion I3 of the neck and the body portion II.
In accordance with the usual practice there are
four strings B of graduated diameters. lThe
75 strings B are formed of steel or other magnetic
the medium of a magnetic field to modulate the .
amplifying circuit 40 in a proportional or definite
manner so that the amplifying circuit 40 is influ
enced to faithfully and accurately reproduce the 40
sound. In accordance with the invention the
pick-up unit C includes a magnet or a magnet
assembly comprising a pair of like opposed mag
nets 4I. It is a feature of the present invention
that the magnets 4I are permanent magnets as 45
distinguished from electro-magnets which might
influence the amplifying circuit 4I! to produce a
hum or other undesirable sound. The magnets
4I are substantially U-shaped in their general
configuration, each having two spaced arms 42 50
and 43. The magnets 4l are arranged in the
opening or notch 2I so that their lower arms
42 rest or bear on the inner wall of the notch.
In the preferred construction the magnets 4I
are proportioned to project from the opposite 55
sides of the neck I0 to be of sufficient length to
insure the proper operation of the unit C. In
accordance with the invention the magnets 4I
are arranged in opposed relation, that is, the
confronting or opposed ends of their arms 42 and 60
43 have opposite polarity as indicated in Fig. 5
of the drawings. This provides a continuous
state of polarity at the opposite sides of the
assembly of magnets. It is preferred that the
confronting or opposed ends of the arms 42 and 65
43 of the magnets 4I be in spaced relation.
The upper or outer arms 43 of the magnets 4I
are formed or shaped to have the proper rela
tionship to the arcuate series of vibratory strings
B. The inner end portions 43'L of the magnet 70
arms 43 are curved upwardly and inwardly to
extend over the arcuate series of strings B and
be substantially equally spaced from the strings.
The several strings BB thus influence or añect the
proper zone of the magnetic ñeld of the magnet 75
4,
2,180,174
assembly 4|-4|. >The invention provides a sim
"ple and particularly effective means for securing
the pick-up unit C to the body A and for dampen
ing the magnets 4| to prevent vibration of their
arms. Screws 44 are passed through openings
45 in the neck I8 and extend through openings 48
in the lower arms 42 of the magnets 4|. The
upper ends of the screws 44 engage or bear against
the under sides of the inner portions 48' of the
10 magnet arms 43. This engagement of the screws
44 with the- arms 48 prevents vibratory movement
of the arms which might produce a ringing sound.
The screws 44 are preferably of non-magnetic
material so that -they do not short out or affect
15
the magnets 4|_.
'
.
The magnets 4| arranged or mounted as Just
described have the portions 48n or their upper
arms 48 passing over or above the strings B in
spaced relation to the strings. Thus the strings
20 B pass through the lines of force of the magnetic
field and when vibrated vary the density of the
magnetic flux. The magnets 4| may be carefully
adjusted or set when 'assembled on the body A
to be in the proper relation to the strings B. The
25 pick-up unit C provides or includes a coil 48 ar
the neck I0 and is electrically connected with the
outer winding of the coil 48. The other lead or
conductor 52 extending to the amplifying circuit
40 is electrically connected with one of the mag
nets 4|., A post or member 58 bearing on the
lower arm 42 of this magnet engages-the inner
windings of the coil 48 to complete the circuit
through the coil. The enamel on the inner wind
ings ofthe coil 48 is removed where they engage
the said member 58. 'The posts or members 88
operate to carry the stronger lines of the mag
netic force into the center of the field of the coil
48. The strings B pass between the ends of the
members 58 and the >magnet arms 48 vary the
density of or disturb the lines of force of the mag 15
netic assembly and thus set up or induce an elec
trical circuit in the coll 48 picked up from the
magnetic field.
.
.
The coil 48 of the pick-up unit C is electrically
connected to the amplifying circuit 48 which 20
may also be a speaker or sound reproducing unit.
Thus variations in the density oi' the magnetic
flux picked up by the field of the coil 48 are con
verted into sound. This sound reproduced iby
the amplifying and sound reproducing circuit 48
ranged within the magnet assembly 4|-4|. The
is a true reproduction of the sounds or tones pro
coil 48 is arranged on the inner or lower arms 42
duced by the vibratory strings B. It is to be
understood that any suitable form of amplifying
of the magnets 4| and operates to pick up or
receive an electrical current from the field of the
30 magnet assembly. The coil 48 is wound on a coil
form or spool 48 of the proper configuration. The
coil 48 constitutes a winding of suitable enameled
wire of the proper gauge trained or ~Wound on the
spool 49 between its end flanges. The spool 49 is
preferably formed of a suitable non-magnetic in
sulating material and has openings 49ß receiving
the screws 44 whereby the screws operate to hold
the coil in place. It will be understood that the
number of turns on the coil 48 and the gauge of
40 the wire forming the coil depend upon the par
ticular amplifying circuit 40 with which the in
strument is to be used. The coil C positioned
within the assembly of the magnets 4| is located
between the north and south poles of the magnet
45 assembly and is related to the strings B to be
ail‘ected by their vibration. The upper side of the
coil spool 49 is spaced some distance below the
arcuate series of strings B and disturbances in the
magnetic field or ñux of the magnets 4| resulting
50 from vibration of the strings B induces an electric
current in the coil 48.
The pick-up unit C includes a plurality of core
members 50 for attracting the lines of magnetic
force toward the center of the coil 48. The mem
55 bers 58 are in the nature of pins or posts pro
jecting from the upper side of the coil spool 49.
The lower ends of the members 58 preferably en
gage the lower arms 42 of the magnets 4|. In
accordance with the invention the upper ends of
60 the members 50 are spaced below or inwardly
from the strings 'B there being one member 5U
spaced from each vstring B. The post members
50 of the coil project dill'erent distances from the
and sound reproducing device or unit may be em
ployed in connection with the pick-up unit C and 30
that the typical unit 40 illustrated in the drawings
is not to be construed as limiting the scope or
application of the invention.
The invention includes means for conveniently
associating or connecting the coil 48 of the unit ('5v 35
on the portable musical instrument with an am
plifying and sound reproducing unit such as the
circuit 40. In the preferred _structure illustrated
in the drawings a socket or jack 53 is arranged in
an opening in the forward wall of the inner por
tion I2 of the body A. The Jack 58 projects into 40
the cavity 3| of the body portion | 2. The _jack 58
is adapted to receive a plug 54 connected with the
leads or conductors 55 from the amplifying cir
cuit 40. The conductors 5| and 52 extend through
the opening or cavity 25 of the body portion || 45
and pass through an opening 58 in the body to ex
tend into the cavity 8|. 'I'he invention includes
means for varying the amplification of the sound.
A volume control is provided on the instrument or
violin in a position to be conveniently accessible
to the artist or player. 'I'he lines or conductors 5|
and 52 extend through the cavity 8| to the jack
58, and the amplifying control or volume control
may bein the form of a variable resistance ele 55
ment or rheostat 58 arranged in the cavity 8| and
interposed or connected in the conductors 5| and
52. The control handle or knob 58 of the volume
control or rheostat 58 projects from the curved
inner surface 88 of the body portion I2 where it is
conveniently accessible to the artist or player.
In playing the instrument the body A is held or
positioned with the portion |2 resting or bearing
spool 49 so that the spaces between their upper
against the shoulder and with the neck I8 en
ends and the strings B are graduated substantially
in proportion to the graduation in diameter of
the strings. This spacing or relationship between
gaged by the finger hand of the player. It is to be 65
understood, of course, that the portion'l2 of the
instrument body A may be provided with the
proper shoulder pad (not shown) and chin rest
the upper ends of the coil members 5l) and the
strings B operates to compensate for differences in
the degree of variation of the magnetic reluctance
or variation in the magnetic reluctance when the
strings are vibrated due to the differences in the
diameter of the strings.
One lead or conductor 5| from the amplifying
75. circuit 48 extends through a suitable opening in
(not shown). As the center of greatest mass and
the center of gravity of the instrument is adjacent 70
its inner end the instrument is readily supported
or held in this manner. It is to be particularly
noted that the neck I0 is very light in weight and
does not carry or support any heavy or cumber~
some parts. The neck l0 terminates at its outer
2,180,174
end in the portion Il which merely carries tbe
5
having a iinger board, a plurality of »need ten
dead or ilxed ends of the strings B.v This stub
sioned vibratory strings extending overthe' iinger
ment is in the proper playing position imposes
the neck having its poles at opposite sides of the
strings, the magnet comprisingspaced. arms, a
coil between the poles of the magnet positioned
so that the strings pass between it and the ad
neck I0 is tubular or hollow and when the instru- ' board. in spaced relation thereto, a magnet 'on
little or no weight on the artist's hand which
fingers the strings B. The arranging or locating
of the keys or pegs 28 in the portion I i of the body
A removes the weight of the pegs and the neces
sary relatively heavy body portions for carrying
10 the keys from the outer end of the neck which is
the position they usually occupy in a typical violin.
A typical bow is drawn over the strings B be
tween the unit C and the bridge l1 or at any other
point adjacent the unit C -to cause vibration of
the strings. Vibration of the strings by the bow
or by plucking results in variations or disturb
ances in the magnetic ñeld to induce a current in
the coil 4l. The current of the coil Il is ampli
fied by the circuit 40 and converted into a repro
20 duction of the sound of the instrument by the cir
cuit 40 and its associated parts. It will be obvious
that the vibratory strings B influencing or dis
‘ turbing the magnetic flux adjacent or above the
post members 50 of the coil 4l induces a current
25 in the coil 48 having the frequencies and other
characteristics of the vibrations of the strings to
accurately or proportionately influence the cir
cuit 40. The amplifying and sound reproducing
circuit 40 receiving these pulsations or modula
30
tions faithfully produces the sound produced by
the strings B, which sound has all the tonal qual
ities of the sound of the strings. The volume of
the sound produced or reproduced by the circuit
lll may be easily and conveniently controlled »by
the artist or player by turning the knob 49. It
is to be noted that the electrical musical instru
ment of the present invention operata to amplify
the true tones produced by the vibratory strings
without vibration of any other physical parts of
the instrument proper.
The instrument or violin comprising the single
one-piece body A formed of light material and
provided with the openings and cavities described
above is extremely light and is very compact. The
45 instrument does not involve any sounding parts
or resonant boxes. The neck I0 and the portions
Ii and I2 of the body are proportioned and re
lated so that the instrument may be easily and
conveniently handled by the player or artist and
50 the relationship of the parts is such that the neck
I0 and ñngerboard I8 are properly positioned for
playing when the body portion i! is supported on
the shoulder.
-
Having described only a typical preferred form
and application of my invention, I do not wish to
be limited or restricted to the speciilc details here
in set forth, but wish to reserve to myself any var
iations or modifications that may appear to those
skilled in the art or fall within the scope of the
following claims:
'
Having described my invention, I claim:
l. In an electrical stringed instrument a neck
having a ringer board, a plurality of spaced ten
sioned vibratory strings extending over the finger
board in spaced relation thereto, a magnet on
the neck having its poles at opposite sides of the`
strings, the magnet comprising spaced arms, a
coil between the poles of the magnet positioned
so that the strings pass between it and the ad
70 jacent arms of the magnet, the coil being oper
able to convert the ñux of the magnet into a
current which is modulated by vibration of the
strings, and means for dampening the arms of
the magnet to prevent vibration thereof.
76
2. In an electrical stringed instnunent a neck
jacent arms of the magnet, the coil being oper- '
able to convert the flux of the magnet into a
current which is modulated by vibration of the 10
strings, and means for dampening the arms of
the magnet to prevent vibration thereof, said
means including securing members engaging said
arms and securing the magnet and coil to the
15
neck.
3. In an electrical stringed instrument a neck
having a finger board, a plurality of spaced ten
sioned vibratory strings extending over the nnger
board in spaced relation thereto and arranged in
an arcuate series, a magnet on the neck having 20
its poles at opposite sides of the strings, the mag
net comprising inner arms and outer arms, the
outer arms being arcuately curved to follow gen
erally the curvature of the series oi’ strings, and
a coil between the poles of the magnet positioned 25
so that the strings pass between it and the ad
jacent arms, the coil being operable to convert
the flux oi' the magnet into a current which is
puisated by vibration of the strings.
4. In an electrical stringed instrumenta neck 30
having a convex ñngerboard, a plurality of spaced
tensioned vibratory strings extending over the
fingerboard in spaced relation thereto and ar
ranged in an arcuate series, a magnet on the
neck having its poles at opposite sides of the
strings, the magnet comprising inner arms and
outer arms, the outer arms being arcuately
curved to follow'generally the curvature of the
series of strings, a coil between the poles of the
magnet positioned so that the strings pass be 40
tween it and the adjacent arms, and core mem
bers projecting from the coil toward the strings,
the spacing of the members from the adjacent
strings being substantially uniform.
5. In a stringed musical instrument having a 45
body and a plurality of spaced tensioned strings
extending across the body in spaced relation
thereto, a pick-up unit comprising a pair of op
posing magnets on the body, each magnet having
an arm above the strings and an arm below the
5.0
strings, an induction coil in the ñeld of the mag
nets operable to convert the flux of the magnets
into a current that is modulated by vibration of
the strings, and screws passing through open
ings in the body, the lower arms of the magnets 55
and the coil to secure the magnets and coil to
the body and engaging the upper arms of the
magnets to prevent vibration of the same.
6. In a stringed musical instrument having a
body and a plurality of spaced tensioned strings
extending across the body in spaced relation
thereto, the strings being graduated in diameter
and being arranged in an arcuate series, a pick
up unit on the body comprising a pair of mag
nets each having an arm spaced below the series 65
of strings and an arm spaced above the series
of strings, the last mentioned arms being curved
to follow generally the curvature oi' the arcuate
series of strings, an induction coil between the
upper and lower arms of the magnet positioned
so that the strings pass between it and the upper
magnet arms, and core members projecting from
the coil toward the upper magnet arms and each
having an upper end spaced from a string, the
spaces between the upper ends of the core mem 75
i 6
2,130,174
bers and the adjacent strings being substantially
uniform but graduated substantially in propor
tion to the graduation in diameter of the strings
to compensate for dinerences in the extent of
variation o1’ the magnetic ilux by vibration of
the graduated strings.
’1. In a stringed musical instrument having a
» body and a plurality of spaced tensioned strings
extending across the body in spaced relation
10 thereto the strings being arranged in an arcuate
series, a pick-up unit on the body comprising a
pair o! opposed U-shaped permanent magnets
each having an arm spaced below the series of
strings and an arm spaced above the series ot
strings, the magnet arms projecting laterally be
yond the opposite sides of the series of strings,
the upper arms of the magnets having substan
tially straight outer portions and having inner
portions curved to substantially conform to the 5
curvature of the arcuate series of strings. an
induction coil in the ileld of the magnets, and
core members'projecting from the coil toward
the strings whereby the vibratory strings Pals
through fields in which the lines o't magnetic 10
force converge toward the outer ends of the cors
members.
GEORGE D. BEAUCHAMP.
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
973 Кб
Теги
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа