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Патент USA US2130188

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Sept. 13, 1938.
s. KAUFFMANI ET AL
‘
2,130,188
MARKING APPARATUS
Filed’ May '7, 1936
a Sheets-Sheet 1
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Sept. 13, 1938;
2,130,188
s. KAUFFMAN ET'AL
MARKING APPARATUS
Filed May 7, 1956
5 Sheets-Sheet 5‘
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awe/whom
G. G. Doss
S. Kauffman
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Cum/“ms
2,130,188?“
Patented Sept. 13, 1938
UN l 'i'E D STA? S‘
2,130,188
MARKING APPARATUS
Saul .Kauf’frnan and George G. Doss,
Syracuse, N. Y.
Applicaticn May 7, 1936, Serial No. 78,499
8 Claims.
This'invention appertains to apparatus forem
bossing, impressing, stamping, or otherwise mark
ing workpieces, and more particularly, to an im
provedldevice commonly known as a press, which
is'primarily adapted for use in embossing and
marking leather, such as shoe parts, glove parts,
purses, hatbands, and the like. Other and vari~
ous applications of the invention will become
readily‘apparent as the description proceeds, and
lO‘it-is to be understood that there is no‘intention
that the illustrative examples vhereinafter referred
to be taken as restrictive of the general utility
of the invention. For ‘the sake of brevity, ref
erence will’ primarily be made to the applica
l5 tion'of our new and improved apparatus to the
shoe manufacturing industry, which is one of the
largest ?elds of'practical’ use thereof, but there
are numerous other ?elds in which the apparatus
can be used to great advantage, notably, in the
20 printing-or marking of guide lines and designs,
- upon rubber, cloth and other fabrics, and even
metals and various compositions of a metallic,
?brous or other nature.
Now in the shoe manufacturing industry, it
iff; is vvery desirable and frequently necessary to pro
vide guide marks‘or lines on the various leather
parts so that the assembly thereof can be speedily
effected- without sacri?cing neatness and uni
formity‘of- the ?nished product. Heretofore, the
30 producing of guide lines and the like upon the
leather has been accomplished principally by
either piercing the leather with'a series of prick
punches, or by making impressions in the leather,
or'by'stamping the leather with an ink stamp.
3:5 The ?rst of these practices presents the disad
vantage that the leather is more or less mutilated,
due to the fact that the holes produced by the
prick punches permanently remain in the leather.
The second of the above mentioned practices, that
4.4): is, marking by making impressions in the leather,
is frequently ineffective for the reason that the
impressions are not always readily discernible,
especially when the leather in which the impres
sion‘is made has a rough surface. The third
i -.method requires ‘a more or less complicated ap
(Cl. 101—297)
can'be effectively marked in a more discernible
manner, and whichv is readily adaptable to‘: the
performance of an impression or embossing op
eration, such as in producing imitation’ stitch
ing, perforations, etc., the markings being pro- 5
duced in colors or not, as desired.
A still further object of the invention is to
provide in an apparatusof this character, a suit
able control whereby the permanency and/or
discernibility of the markings may be varied as 10
desired, whether they be in the form' of impres
sions or merely ink or other coloring matter, or
combinations of both, such. control being prefer
ably afforded with the aid of heat.
Another object of the invention is toprovide T3
an apparatus wherein provision is made for a
quick changing from one type of marking to-an
other type, as for example, in changing from an
embossing or impressing type of marking to‘a
. purely printing type of marlnng, or vice versa; 20
or to combinations of the two types.
A still further object of the ‘invention is to
provide a simple and efficient means for ad
justably locating the workpieces in the press‘ so
that the embossing or marking‘ of suchv work- :1.)
pieces willbe performed thereon at the proper
points and with greater precision than has been
heretofore practiced, such adjustability being
particularly advantageous in working on shoe‘
parts and the like of various sizes and different 30
types.
Still another object of the invention is to pro
vide an improved mechanism for producing em
bossing or plain markings in colors, such mech
anism preferably embodying a color-carrying 35
medium such as a strip of carbon or other copy
ing paper, ribbon, or the like, which is arranged
to coact with the embossing or marking dies'so'
as to produce a transfer of the color from the
strip to the'workpiece with whatever degree of 40‘
prominence of the color is desired.
Other and further objects and advantages ofv
the invention will be hereinafter described, and!
the novel features thereof de?ned in‘ the append
ed claims.
paratus when adapted for factory production
work, the complications arising in the applica
In the drawings:Figure 1 is a top plan view of our improved
tion of the ink to the marking pattern or die.
Allfofr the aforementioned old practices are par~
"ticularly ineifective when Working on‘ the raw or
un?nished side of a piece of leather,
marking device or press, the same being illus—
One of the-primary objects of the present in~
vention is to- provide a simple, rugged, efficient
and relatively inexpensive apparatus, by means
Li’ U1 of which various shoe parts or other workpieces
4'1‘
trated in its closed position;
Figure 2 is a transverse sectional View, taken 50‘
approximately midway between the ends or" the
apparatus of Figure 1;
Figure 3 is a longitudinal sectional view through‘
the apparatus of Figure 1, taken approximately
midway between the front and back sides;
H
551"»
2,130,188
2 .
Figure 4 is a perspective view of the apparatus
of Figures 1. to 3 inclusive, but showing the same
in the open position and a shoe part or other
workpiece positioned therein, a portion of the
carbon orcopying strip being broken away to ex
pose the marking die which is carried by the mov
able head of the machine, and which served to
produce the markings shown on the workpiece
which is supported on the bed or base of the ma
chine;
Figure 5 is an enlarged top plan view of the
work-piece, in this instance a shoe part, showing
a typical design marked thereon;
-
Figure 6 is a view in top plan of still another
form of workpiece, in this instance a shoe insole,
and illustrating another typical form of marking
or embossing which the apparatus of Figures 1
to 4 is adapted to perform;
Figure 7 is an enlarged fragmentary view in
front elevation, of the adjustable control for ad
justing the position of the workpieces according
to their particular size and type;
Figure 8 is an enlarged fragmentary detail view
in front elevation of the forward lefthand corner
of the machine, having an arrangement as dis
upon the size of the machine and the particular
type of work which is being performed thereby.
It is to be understood that the size of the press
may be varied within comparatively wide limits.
Where the workpieces are small, as in the case of
shoe parts and the like, the press may be made
large enough to emboss or otherwise mark several
parts at one time, and this even without unduly
increasing the Weight of the apparatus or the
space occupied thereby. The compactness and
especially light weight of the press are further
marked advantages over those machines which
have previously been used for such work.
The head ‘I comprises a substantially rectangu
lar hollow shell, which is provided on its top face
with a multiplicity of ribs or ?ns I3, which have
the dual function of strengthening the shell and
radiating heat. The latter function will become
more apparent as the description proceeds.
Mounted within the head, is a block or slab M 20
which is preferably composed of a material hav
ing both thermal as well as electrical insulating
properties. An example of such material is the
well known “Transite”, and we have found that
the same is eminently suited for our purposes.
closed in Figure l, and more particularly illustrat
ing the embossing or marking die lock control, by
which the die may be locked in position on the
The lower face of the block I4 is preferably re
cessed to receive an electrical heating unit, gen
movable head, or released so as to be removed
form of a core of generally rectangular form, and
therefrom; and
which may be also composed of “Transite”, and 30
Figure 9 is a fragmentary detail view in side
elevation of the forward righthand corner of the
apparatus, having an arrangement as illustrated
in Figure 1, said view further illustrating the de
tails of the die locking instrumentalities shown in
Figure 8.
Like reference characters designate correspond
ing parts in the several figures of the drawings,
According to the preferred embodiment of our
invention, I designates the base or bed of the
press, and there is provided on the rear side of
the base a pair of laterally spaced bearing lugs
2, 2, which are preferably mounted so as to be
vertically adjustable, as by means of the fasten
Lil ing bolts 3, 3 which pass through a vertically
elongated slot 4 in each bearing lug, the bolts be
ing threadedly received in suitable openings 5
erally designated l5, said unit being shown in the
about which is wound some suitable resistance
material such as nichrome ribbon, only a few
turns of which have been illustrated, as at IS.
The heating unit I 5 is preferably covered by a
sheet or cover I‘I, which may also be composed of -
“Transite”, said cover being of substantially less
thickness than the block I4, and primarily serv
ing to protect the heating unit I5 against injury
or damage.
The heating unit I5 is provided with suitable
electrical conductors or leads I8, which extend
to the outside of the head ‘I so that the same
may be conveniently connected with a suitable
electrical power source or outlet (not shown), as
which the respective spring ends are inserted.
will be obvious. For the purpose of regulating .,
the temperature of the heating unit, and conse
quently of the head ‘I, we preferably provide a
thermostat unit which may be of any desired
type, and which is more or less diagrammatically
illustrated at I9. The thermostat is preferably
of an adjustable type, and 20 designates a control
shaft which extends through the top of the head
‘i and is provided at its outer end with a control
knob or handle 2| and pointer 22, the pointer
coacting with suitable indicia 23 on the top face
of the head, which indicia serves to indicate the
range of temperature settings. The temperature
range may be varied as desired but for practical
purposes, we preferably provide an adjustment
from 75 to 600 degrees Fahrenheit, which we have 60
found to be satisfactory for virtually all conditions which would be commonly encountered in
The springs are so tensioned as to normally urge
marking leather or the like.
formed in the rear wall of the base.
Extending
through the bearing lugs 2, 2, is a shaft or hinge
pin 6, and upon this shaft is mounted the movable
head of the press, which is generally designated
‘I. The head ‘I is provided on its rear edge with
a pair of laterally spaced ears or lugs 8, 8, which
are suitably apertured to receive the shaft 6 and
to which the same are ?xedly secured, as by means
of the pins or dowels 9, 9. Encircling the shaft
6 adjacent the members 8, are a pair of coil
springs l0, I0, each having one end anchored to
the base I, as at II, II, and the other end an
chored to the head ‘I, as at I2, l2, the anchors
being shown in the form of apertured lugs through
the head ‘I towards the open position illustrated
65 in Figure 4, wherein the head is shown swung
upwardly to a substantially vertical position. If
desired, a suitable stop may be provided to limit
the opening movement of the head so that it
cannot inadvertently be moved beyond the ‘open
70 position shown in Figure 4. For practical pur
poses, the springs are of such strength that when
the head ‘I is in its open position, it can be closed
by a relatively light pull forwardly and down
wardly, say on the order of one pound pull. Of
76 course, this may be varied, as desired, depending
,
The head ‘I is provided at its forward edge
with a handle 24, which is preferably of such 65
length as to enable the same to be grasped by
one or both hands when it is desired to manip
ulate the head in opening and closing the same,
and the handle also is preferably of such a con
struction as will not become unduly heated and 70
burn the operator’s hands. For this purpose, the
handle may be provided with a rubber or com
position grip, although other types of insulated
or heat-resisting handles may be employed if pre
ferred,
'
75
4
2,130,188,
However, when the head approaches the end of its ' will be similar parts for ladies’, young men’s,
closing movement, the tail 56 of the pawl strikes
misses’ and children’s shoes, of correspondingly
the abutment 60 which is adjustably mounted, by ‘ smaller dimensions. Moreover, each class of shoe
means of the bolt BI and vertically elongated slot part, whether they be parts for men’s, ladies’,
62, on the'base l. Upon engagement of the tail of young men’s, misses’ or children’s shoes, will have
the pawl with this abutment 60, a slight continued different sizes, according to the particular foot
movement ofthe head towards its closed position size. We have therefore provided an adjustment
will cause the pawl to be shifted longitudinally on of the guide pattern 64 which may be effected in
the pivot 54, thereby causingthe ratchet wheel 5|
a very simple manner, to accommodate the shoe '
to be rotated for a partial revolution, as will be ob
vious. Before the head reaches its fully closed
position, the toothed end 55 of, the pawl 52 moves
upwardly far enough so as to become disengaged
from the teeth of the ratchet wheel 5|-. Conse
parts in the various classi?cations, and the various 10
sizes over the normal range for each classifica
tion. This adjustment is in the nature of a shift
able mounting for the guide pattern 64, by means
of which the guide pattern may be bodily moved
quently, during the last part of the movement of
‘the head towards its closed position, there is no
rotative motion applied to the spool ‘44, and this is
very important because if the rotation of the spool
were continued until the very end of the closing
movement of the head, the strip “would very
rearwardly or forwardly on the bed of the press or
marking machine. 61 designates a screw shaft
likely be torn in two or otherwise damaged so as
to be rendered un?t forfurther use. As seen best
wall 10 of the base. Secured to the upper ex
tremities of each arm 69, as by screws ‘H, is a
plate or block 12, which is recessed in an elon
gated recess 13 in the upper face of the wall 10.
Each plate or block 12 is provided with one or
in Figures 3 and 4,'the strip extends from spool 35
which extends through the base I from front to
back, and mounted on said screw shaft is 'a yoke
68, the opposite arms 69, 69 of which extend verti
cally upwardly through elongated slots in the top 2
under and across the lower side of the head 1, and
hence across the relief face of the die 25, to the
spool 44, upon which latter spool the strip is ' more vertically disposed studs or pins 14, which
wound, the feeding of the strip being produced by
the'intermittent rotation imparted to the spool 44
project upwardly slightly above the wall 10, and
near the end of each closing stroke of the head.
30 When the head is opened, the pawl 52 moves away
from the abutment 60, and the spring 5'! causes
the pawl to automatically shift on the pivot to its
are adapted to be received in suitable openings
provided therefor adjacent the opposite ends of
the guide pattern 64.
The screw shaft 61 is extended forwardly
through the front wall 15 of the base I, and
position previously mentioned as the normal posi
tion, preparatory to the producing of the next ro-.
tative step of the spool 44 when the head is again
mounted on the outer end of the shaft is a knob
15, by means of which the screw shaft may be
closed.
'
It will be noted, particularly in Figure 3,'that
the opposite ends of the head are recessed slightly,
as at 63, where the strip 34 extends thereacross,
and by reason of this arrangement,v there is no
danger of the strip being pinched between the
head and base of the press when the head is
closed. Moreover, the braking action imparted to
the spools 35 and 44 serves to always maintain the r
strip 34 taut, and hence perfectly ?at against the
operative face of the die 25. The purpose of the
vertical adjustment of the abutment 60 is to af
ford an adjustment of the ratchet wheel actuating
stroke of the pawl 52 so that the intermittent feed
C.-- C;
, of the strip across the underside of the head can
be varied to a more or less degree, asdesired.
Passing now to the details of construction of
the base I, and referring particularly to Figures
2, 3 and 4, there is provided a guide pattern 64,
5543 which may be made of hard ?ber or other suit
able material, and upon which are arranged a
series of studs 65, or the like, which de?ne the
proper position in which the work pieces should
be placed so that the marks to be produced there
CO on will fall at their proper locations upon closing
the head 1 vdown upon the work-pieces. In Figure
4, we have shown a typical shoe part, designated
66, placed upon the base or bed of the machine ac
cording to the position de?ned by the studs or
posts 65 of the guide pattern 64. Of course, it
should be understood that the arrangement of the
posts or studs 65 will vary according to the type
and shape of the‘ workpieces which are to be
marked. The guide pattern 64 is preferably ad
justable on the base I, inasmuch as it frequently
is desired to produce the same markings or designs
upon the same type of workpieces, but which are
of different sizes. For instance, the particular
shoe part designated 66 in Figure 4 may be con
sidered as a typical part for menfs shoes, and there
rotatably manipulated. The shaft is provided 1
adjacent its outer end with an elongated slot
371, and a pin 18 extends transversely through
the knob and slot 11. The front face of the
knob 16 is recessed, as at 19, and a screw 80 is
mounted in said recess, and is threadedly con 40
nccted with the outer end of the shaft 61. Within
the recess 19 andencircling the screw 80 is a
coil spring 8i, having one end bearing against
the base of the recess 19, and its opposite end
bearing against the inner face of the head of the
screw 8, thereby normally urging the knob to
wards the front wall 15 of the base, or in other
words, urging the pin towards the inner end of
the elongated slot 11. The knob 16 carries a
pointer 82, and the pointer is provided with a ,,
rearwardly projecting pin 83, which is adapted to
be received in any of the various apertures 84
arranged in an arc adjacent to the knob, in the
front face of the wall 15. There is preferably
one aperture 84 for each setting of the guide
pattern 64, and the pin 83 constitutes, with the
knob 16, a releasable detent which serves to lock
the guide pattern 64 in its adjusted position.
Suitable indicia, generally designated 85, is pro
vided on the front wall 15 of the base I, and said ‘
indicia is preferably arranged in graduated scales
corresponding to the different classes of shoes,
that is, men’s, ladies’, young men’s, misses’ and
children’s shoes, the graduations denoting the
foot size in each class. The shifting of the guide
pattern 64, responsive to rotation of the screw
shaft 61, is preferably such that the movement
of the guide pattern is in a forward direction
as the sizes of the shoe parts progressively de
crease.
In other words, the extreme rearward "
position of the guide pattern 64 is preferably the
position for the largest shoe size, that is, the
largest foot size of the men's type shoes. As
viewed in Figure 7, rotation of the pointer 82 in a
counter-clockwise direction will produce a for
2,130,188
ward shifting movement of the guide pattern 64,
and ‘this holds true for each of the various classi
?cations represented on the different scales. It
will be noted that the foot sizes, designated
numerically on the scales progressively decrease
in a counter-clockwise direction on each scale.
When the desired adjustment of the position of
the guide pattern 64 has been eifected through
the ‘manipulation of the knob 16, the adjust
,ment ~will not inadvertently or accidentally
change by reason of the interlocking action of
the detent pin 83'.
Operation
In the‘ manufacture of shoes, gloves, and the
like, it is customary to ?rst cut out the pieces
of leather, or Whatever the material may be, to
the desired size and shape, according to the re
quirements of the article, after which these
20 pieces, which for convenience we have vtermed
workpieces, are marked to indicate the extent
of overlap which is to be made with a con
tiguous component part. Also, the outlines for
ornamental stitching' and the like are similarly
marked. By our improved construction, we are
likewise able to emboss, impress, or otherwise
suitably mark the workpieces with various de
signs, which may be in the form of ornamental
designs; and/or merely the name or trade-mark
530 »of the'manufacturer, the shoe size, pattern num
ber, etc.
In Figures 4 and 5, we have illustrated a typi
cal ‘shoe part, designated 66, which has been
marked as a typical example of ornamentation,
:5. and it will be readily understood that such marks
maybe varied as desired, not only for ornamental
purposes, but for the purposes of producing guide
lines to facilitate the assemblage of the shoe
parts, and to serve as guides for the stitching by
which the shoe parts are joined together, or
40
other stitching which is frequently employed for
ornamental purposes. In producing the particu
lar design illustrated, the marking die 25, having
thedesign 2'! formed thereon in relief, is mounted
‘on the head by inserting the rear edge of the
die in the groove or channel 28, and then rotat
ing the shaft 29, by means of the knob 3|, to
bring the shoulder 30 underneath the forward
edge of the die, whereby to ?rmly support the
same against the lower side of the head. Upon
rotation of the shaft 29 to the die supporting
‘position, the shaft is locked against inadvertent
or accidental release of the die by tightening the
set screw 32 through means of the knob 33.
Having selected the workpiece locating die or
guide pattern 64, corresponding to the particular
workpiece 66, which is to be marked, the same
is ‘placed upon the base I with the pins 14 re
ceived in the openings provided therefor in the
locator or guide pattern '64. The position of this
CO
locator or guide pattern may be adjusted from
front to back, according to the type and foot
size of- the shoe part which is to be'marked, such
adjustment being effected by rotating the knob
16 to bring the pointer 82 into register with the
corresponding calibration of the indicia 85. In
performing this adjustment, the knob 16 is
initially pulled forwardly against the action of
the spring 8|, thereby withdrawing the detent
83» so- that the knob and screw shaft 61 are free
to‘ be“ rotated, and when the desired setting is
attained, the knob is released and the detent 83
is ‘urged, into the aperture 84 which corresponds
7:'
5 .
vertently or accidentally displaced. It will be
understood that the rotation of the screw shaft
vt‘I-"ei’fect‘s a-movement of the yoke 88 forwardly
@or rearwardly, according to the direction in
which’ the shaft 61 is rotated, thereby corre
spondingly's'hifting the pins 14 which are inter
engaged' with the locator ‘64.
Now there ‘may ‘be occasions when it is desired
‘to mark the ‘workpieces simply by forming de
pressions therein, in which event the carbon 10
paper 341, or equivalent color medium carrying
strip, maybe omitted, as by removing the rolls
or spools-'35 and 44. When so omitted, the work
pieces 661 are successively placed upon the locator
die or guide pattern 64 so as to lie in the posi
15
~tion de?ned ‘by the studs'65 or other workpiecev
locating instrumentalities, and the head ‘i pulled
rdownlto its closed position, bringing the relief
pattern 21' of the die‘25 directly into engagement
with the workpiece. The downward pressure ex
erte'dilupon the ‘head in closing the same causes
‘the relief " pattern 21- to-be impressed in the work
ipiece 66, and thus produces markings on the
workpiece in the nature of impressions or inden
tations, corresponding to the con?guration of the 25
a'eliet pattern of the die '25. This type of mark
iing is suitable for certain kinds of workpieces,
and even though the press is unheated.
How
ever, we have found that by heating the die 25,
‘the marking of vithe workpieces is greatly facili
tated, particularly in that the markings will be
come more ‘pronounced and more discernible.
Therefore, where it is desired that the mark
ings be‘ pronounced and readily discernible, the
heating unit I5 is energized, and the die 25
lbrought'to the temperature which is most suit
able for ‘the performance of the marking opera
tions, according ‘to the particular nature of the
material being- mar-ked. In the case of leathers,
some vleather-s are of a tougher texture than
others, ~and hence the temperature, should be ad
'J'u‘st'ed, by- means of the thermostat control 2!, to
a relatively high degree. The various tempera
tures required under various conditions of op
eration may be readily determined with a little
experience in the use of the-apparatus. Where 45
the‘ markings are to- be produced with the aid
of heat‘, the heating unit I5 is preferably ener
gized ‘before'ithe apparatus is to be put into use,
so as to give su?icient time for the die 25 to
attain the proper- temperature. The arrange 50
ment and construction of the head 1, as dis—.
closedh'erein, has been found to be very e?icient,
and ‘the ‘heat is- conserved and utilized to great
advantage, making the cost of operation prac
tically negligible. Moreover, the temperature
may- be very quicklyv brought up to the desired
degree, and the ribbed construction of the top
face of~1the head‘ 1 keeps-the exposed surface
reasonably cool, thereby materially contributing
to the convenience and comfort of the operator. (a)
It will, of course, be understood that instead of
mar-king only one workpiece at a time, several
‘workpieces of the same ‘or different shapes and
types, or a complete set of parts of a shoe, glove,
or other type of unit, may be marked at the 65
same time, the die 25 and the locator or guide
pattern 64 being modi?ed accordingly.
Quite frequently, it is preferable to mark the
workpieces in colors, and where this is desired, 1
we employ the ?exible strip or sheet 34 of carbon 70
paper, inked ribbon, or some other suitable type
to-this particularsetting, thereby preventing the
of ‘color carrying member. We might mention
right here that the term “carbon paper” is used
locator or guide pattern 64 from being inad
in‘ a broad sense, and is intended to embrace any
75
: 2,130,188
strip or sheet of material which carries some
coloring medium. Moreover, the color may be
any color, and is not limited to merely black or
blue, which are the more widely known colors of
carbon paper. White, pink, orange, gold, and
many other colors, may be employed as desired,
and the particular color or colorsyselected are
followed in‘stitching the workpiece. The small
circles of the design 21' represent imitation per
forations, and their prominence is greatly en
hanced by the combination of the coloring and
embossing of the design, as with the aid of the
carbon or copying strip 34.
Figure 6 shows still another form of workpiece
66', such workpiece having the form of an insole
or the like, and the design 21" thereon is typical
preferably varied according to the color of the
material of the workpieces, and according to the
desired degree of prominence of the markings.
In the use of the strip 34, the rolls 35 and 44
of the application of a manufacturer's name to 10
such'part. Inasmuch as such a design should be
are mounted on their supporting axles or pins at
applied in as permanent a manner as is practical,
the respectively opposite ends of the head ‘I,
the combination embossing and coloring opera
tion, as may be performed with our improved
marking apparatus, can be employed to great 15.
advantage. The impression of the design 21",
and the ?xing of the color is greatly facilitated
contact serves to maintain a uniform tension on
through the effect of the heat in the manner pre
the strip 34 as it is intermittently fed, step by viously described. It will be readily understood
20 step, from the roller 35 to‘ the roller 44, the . from reference to Figure 6 that our improved
portion of the strip intermediate the rollers ex
marking apparatus is also equally adapted to the
and the tension of the springs 39 and 41 is so
adjusted, by means of the set screws 4| and 49,
as to produce a substantial frictional contact be
tween the spools and the axles. This frictional
tending across the lower face or relief side of the
marking of bat bands, glove parts, and other
die 25, and closely adjacent thereto.
workpieces of a similar character, which are more
When the
strip 34 is so mounted on the head, the closing
of the head results in the transfer of color from
the strip 34 to the workpiece 68, according to the
relief design of the die 25, it being understood
that the strip 34 is interposed between the die
25 and the workpiece 66. In other words, the
transfer of color to the workpiece occurs only at
those points where the strip 34 is pressed against
the workpiece by the relief pattern 21 of the
die 25. The resulting marks on the workpiece
will accordingly be clean-cut and uniform, and
35 blurring or smudging is eliminated, or at least,
reduced to a negligible amount. If only a light
pressure is applied to the head upon closing the
same, the transfer of color from the strip 34 to
the workpiece can be effected in the nature of a
~10
purely printing operation, and without the pro
duction of any material impressions in the work
pieces. Such use is best suited where the mark
ings on the workpieces are to be subsequently
removed, and by the proper selection of the color~
ing medium, virtually all traces of the mark
ings can be removed if such is desired. However,
the permanency of the markings can be greatly
increased by the impressing or embossing action
of the die 25 on the workpieces, simultaneously
with the transfer of the coloring medium from
the strip 34 to the workpieces. Moreover, We
have found that the colors may be more or less
permanently ?xed by the variation in the degree
of heat applied to the die 25; that is to say, the
higher the temperature of the die, the more per
manent the colored markings are ?xed in the
work pieces, and the lower the temperature of the
die, the less permanent the colored markings are
?xed.
(10
Acccordingly, if the markings produced
on the workpieces are to be in the nature of
permanent ornamental designs, or devices or
characters designating the source and character
of the workpieces, such markings are preferably
produced with the aid of a comparatively high
degree of heat.
In Figure 5, the lines of the design 21’ on the
workpiece 66 may be considered as guide mark
ings for ornamental stitching, and these lines
.70
75,
may be produced either in the form of colored
marks, with or without the formation of corre
sponding depressions or grooves in the work
piece, as desired. However, when the lines are
depressed as Well as colored, they stand out
prominently and can be more readily discerned.
Moreover, a depressed line may be more easily
nearly of the con?guration of the particular
workpiece illustrated in this view.
25
Where the workpieces are of considerable
length, we have found that the same may be
readily accommodated in our marking appara
tus or press by inclining the forward portion of
the bed or base, downwardly, as at 86, so as to 30
leave a space between the same and the lower
front edge 8'! of the head 1, as best seen in Fig
ure 2. With such an arrangement, space is af
forded for the ends 66” of an elongated work
piece, and without interfering with the marking 35
operations upon the portion of the workpiece
which is disposed between the die 25 and the bed
of the press.
It will be understood that after each closing
operation of the head, resulting in the marking 40
of the workpiece or workpieces, the head is swung ‘
open to the position illustrated in Figure 4, to
enable the marked workpiece or workpieces to be
removed and be replaced by a new workpiece
or set of workpieces, the marking of which will
be performed by the next closing operation of the
head. The springs l0 normally urge the head
towards its open position, and the tension
of the springs is preferably such that only a com
paratively little effort is required to close the
50
head. It will be readily apparent that the press
is simple in construction, may be quickly and
easily operated, and requires very little atten
tion on the part of the operator.
As. previously mentioned, the hinge brackets 55
2, 2 which are mounted on the base I by means
of the bolts 3, 3, are vertically adjustable by
reason of. the elongated slots 4, 4. Such adjust
ment permits the use of dies 25 of various thick
ness, and similarly, variation in the thickness of
different workpieces can be accommodated. It
is important that the die 25 be approximately
parallel to the surface of the workpiece which is
to be marked when the head ‘I is closed and the
die is brought into its marking position.
65
By intermittently or progressively feeding the
strip 34 over the operative face of the die 25, a
substantially fresh surface of the strip is main
tained over the relief at all times, so that the
color medium which is transferred from the strip
to the workpiece will always be substantially uni
form and distinct. As the strip is wound from
one roll onto the other, the rolls may be inter
changed and the same strip. consequently used
several times, as will be obvious.
w
The term “marking die” is used herein in its
55. A device‘of thei classdescribed, comprising
broad sense,v and is intended. to cover adie for
a base member and’a head member hingedly con
nected‘ together ‘at one edge, a marking die
marking by producing impressions in the work
pieces, or by printing upon the workpieces with
out producing any substantial depressionsfor-by
mounted'acrossthe lower side of said'head mem-'
ber, a flexible‘ strip carrying a coloring medium
combinations of both.
While the speci?c details of construction have
ling die, means for intermittently feeding said
beenherein shown and described; the inventionris
not con?ned thereto, as changes and alterations
10 may be made without departing from the spirit
thereof as de?ned by the appended claims.
Having thus described our invention, what we
claim is new and desire to procure by Letters
Patent is-—
l. A device of the class described, comprising a
15
base member, a head member movable towards
and away from said base member, a marking die
carried by one of said members, a workpiece
extended across the voperative-face of saidimark
strip across said marking die incident to relative
closing movement-of said- head ‘member respect
ing said base'm-ember, said? lastlnamed-meanslin
said head member at opposite sides thereof, and
about which said strip is wound, a ratchet wheel
coacting with one of said roller members so as
to rotate the same incident to rotation of the 15
ratchet wheel, a pawl pivotally mounted on said
locating die adjustably mounted on the other
head and coacting with said ratchet wheel, said
pawl being longitudinally shiftable on its. pivotal
mounting, spring means interconnecting said
20 member, and means for adjusting said workpiece
locating die, said last named means including a
screw shaft, and a yoke member threadedly en
mally rock the pawl on its pivot towards engage
ment with the ratchet wheel, and also serving to
gaged with said screw shaft and having oppo
sitely extending arms, each arm being provided
25 with means interengaging the work piece locating
die adjacent one end thereof.
2. A device of the class described, comprising a
base member, a head member movable towards
and away from said base member, a marking die
carried by one of said members, a workpiece
locating die adjustably mounted on the other
member, means for adjusting said workpiece
locating die, said last named means including a
screw shaft, a yoke member threadedly engaged
35 with said screw shaft and having oppositely ex
tending arms, each arm being provided with
means interengaging the workpiece locating die
adjacent one end thereof, detent means for re
leasably locking said screw shaft, said detent
40 means including a knob mounted on said screw
shaft so as to permit shifting of the same axially
while being prevented from rotating relatively
to said shaft, a pin mounted upon said knob and
adapted to be received in various recesses ar
ranged adjacent to said knob, there being one
recess for each position of adjustment of the
workpiece locating die, and means for yieldably
urging said knob in one direction on said screw
shaft whereby to normally urge the pin into a
cooperating recess.
3. A device of the class described, comprising
a base member and a head member hingedly con
nected together at one edge, a marking die, said
marking die having the form of a plate provided
with a relief on one face thereof, means for
releasably mounting said marking die on said
head member, said last named means including
a shaft rotatably mounted in said head member
and having an abutment shoulder for engaging
the die plate along one marginal edge, and said
head having a recess therein for receiving the
opposite edge of said die plate.
4. A device of the class described, comprising
a base member and a head member hingedly con
nected together at one edge, a marking die, said
marking die having the form of a plate provided
with a relief on one face thereof, means for re
leasably mounting said marking die on said head
member, said last named means including a shaft
rotatably mounted in said head member and
having an abutment shoulder for engaging the die
plate along one marginal edge, said head having
a recess therein for receiving the opposite edge
of said die plate, and means forlocking said shaft
75 against rotation.
10
cluding a pair of rollers rotatably mounted on
pawl and said head in such manner as to nor
20
normally shift the pawl longitudinally in one
direction, and abutment means mounted upon
said base member and engageable by said pawl 25
near the end of the closing movement of the
head, whereby to shift the pawl longitudinally in
the opposite direction and impart a rotation to
the ratchet wheel for a fractional part of one
turn.
30
6. A device of the class described, comp-rising
a base member and a head member hingedly con
nected together at one edge, a marking die
mount-ed across the lower side of said head mem
ber, a ?exible strip carrying a coloring medium
extended across the operative face of said mark
ing die, means for intermittently feeding said
strip across said marking die incident to relative
closing movement of said head member respect
ing said base member, means for maintaining a
substantially uniform tension in said strip dur~
ing the strip» feeding movement, said means in
cluding a pair of rollers mounted upon said head
at opposite sides thereof, and upon which said
strip is wound, a plurality of stub axles, one for 45
each end of each roller, one of said axles for each
roller being axially shiftable, and each axle hav
ing a tapered end adapted to be received in an
aperture in the end of the roller, and means for
yieldably urging each of the axially shifta'ble axles 50
towards its roller whereby to produce a ?rm fric
tional engagement between the tapered end of
the axle and the roller.
'7. A device of the class described, comprising a
base member and a head member hingedly con
nected together at one edge, a marking die
mounted across the lower side of said head mem
ber, a ?exible strip carrying a coloring medium
extended across the operative face of said mark
ing die, means for intermittently feeding said (7-5)
strip across said marking die incident to rela—
tive closing movement of said head member re
specting said base member, means for maintain
ing a substantially uniform tension in said strip
during the strip feeding movement, said means
including a pair of rollers mounted upon said
head at opposite sides thereof, and upon which
said strip is wound, a plurality of stub axles, one
for each end of each roller, one of said axles for
each roller being axially shiftable, and each axle‘ '
having a tapered end adapted to be received in
an aperture in the end of the roller, means for
yieldably urging each of the axially shiftable axles
towards its roller whereby to produce a ?rm fric
tional engagement between the tapered end of
'8
1,130,188
the axle and the roller, and means for adjusting
said 'last named yieldable means.
8. A device of the class described, comprising
a base membert a pair of spaced bearing lugs
having vertically elongated slots therein, fasten
ing means extending through said slots for se
curing said bearing lugs to one side of said base
member, a head member associated with said
base member and provided with a pair of spaced
in bearing lugs at one side thereof, a hinge pin pass
ing through each of the bearing lugs aforesaid for
hingedly connecting said head member and base
member together along one edge, and a marking
die carried by one of said members, the vertically
elongated slots in the ?rst mentioned bearing
lugs permitting vertical adjustment of the head
member respecting the base member to accom
modate marking dies of various thicknesses.
SAUL KAUFFMAN.
GEORGE G. DOSS.
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