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Патент USA US2130439

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Sept. 20, 1938.v
I
I
v -
c. A. WHEELER
TRAFFIC
OFFICER’S
GARMENT
Filed Dec. 30, 195'?
2,130,439
.
‘
2 Sheets-Sheet 1
Sept. 20, 1938.
-'c. A. WHEELER
' 2,130,439
TRAFFIC OFFICER’S GARMENT
‘Filed Dec.~ so. 1957
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
Patented Sept. 20, 1938
2,130,439
» UNITED )STATES
_
PATENT OFFICE
2,130,439
,
rnamc omonn's GARMENT
Charles A. Wheeler, Bridgeport, Conn., assignor
to City of Bridgeport, a municipal corporation
of Connecticut
Application December '30, 1937, Serial No. 182,420
7 Claims. (Cl. 2—-93)
This invention relates to accouterments for
tra?ic o?lcers, and more particularly,'to a gar
ment to be worn by an o?lcer.
Direction of traf?c at night, especially at some
front and back portions ‘may be drawn as close
together as desired by suitable straps and buckles
so that the panels will not ?y in the wind and
will lie ?at against the body of the wearer.
6 intersections, has become a hazardous assign
An important feature of the present inven- 5
ment for a tra?ic o?icer. It is usually necessary -tion is the provision of epaulets on the shoul
for the o?icer to stand at the center of-the inter
der portions of the garment which are pendant
} section between two adjacent lanes of tra?lc from the shoulders and hang down ?at along
where he is liable to be struck by vehicles, even the upper outer portions of the wearer's arms
10 though the latter may be travelling slowly, be
so as to present substantially large surfaces visi- 10
cause his presence is not observed by the driver. ble when the officer is facing at right angles to
Many serious accidents have occurred in this the line of vision -of the driver of an oncoming
manner. The usual clothing worn by policemen, car.
being of dark color material so that he may ap
‘ Another important feature of the present in
5 proach a scene of crime or disorder unobserved vention is the provision of light-re?ecting lenses 15
adds to the hazard when the o?icer is called upon or units placed in groups on the front panel, the
to direct tramc.
back panel, and on the epaulets, and these re?ect
\ The danger of the officer being struck is in
ing units are preferably of the cataphotic type so
creased by the use‘of bright headlights on auto
20 mobiles which partially blind the vision of the that the light rays from a vehicle will impinge
upon the units and be re?ected back in line with 20
driver of a car approaching in an opposite di~ the driver’s vision. Preferably; the groups of
rection, or render the driver’s vision so impaired light-re?ecting units on the front and back pan
that the presence of the o?icer in a dark‘ uni
els have different characteristics from those on
form is not observed.
the epaulets, so that the driver may easily deter
25
The danger is a hazard not only to the omcer mine whether the o?lcer is facing in the direction 25
but it tends to make most drivers nervous, be
of travel of the car, or is facing at right angles
cause conscientlousdrivers have more fear of thereto. Also, it is preferred that the groups
striking an unseen officer than the latter has of of light-re?ecting units be mounted on a sepa
being struck.
rate piece, as, for instance, a piece of white leath
80 _ The object of the present invention is to make,
in a simple and e?lcient way, the tra?ic o?lcer
er which itself is detachably mounted on the 30
garment so that the groups of re?ecting units
conspicuous in the dark while he is directing vmay be removed from the garment when the
tramc, and thus reduces the danger of his be-. same is being laundered;
. .
ing struck by a car, and reduces the-mental I One of the important features of the present
35 hazard on the part of the drivers of vehicles.
invention is the absence of arms or armholes in 35
'
Accordingly, the present invention provides a
very simple yet e?icient garment, made'of ‘light
color material, to be Worn by a policeman while
on tra?ic duty.
.
'
The garment of the present invention is rel
atively inexpensive and is easily laundered, and
is‘ so constructed that it may be easily and
quickly slipped on over the ofiicer’s uniform, and
may be made of one size for both stout and thin
men.
,
The garment of this invention, in the form at
present preferred, comprises front and back pan
els, connected together preferably at the shoul
der, and having their longitudinal margins ad
jacent but not permanently ‘connected to each
other at the side of the wearer._ The front and
back panels have between them a relatively large
hole so that the garment may be slipped over
the o?lcer’s head to be supported on his shoul
55 ders. The adjacent longitudinal margins of the
the garment, the presence of ‘which would re
strict the free movementsv of the o?icer’s arms
and make it difficult to slip on and remove the
garment, and make it impractical to supply a
one-size garment for persons of different sizes 40
and weights.
The garment may be full length or three-quar
ter length, but I‘ have found it preferable to
have has long as an ordinary sack coat for an '
average size person, for the sharp contrast be- 45
tween the dark trousers and the light garment
of the present invention aids substantially in in
creasing the noticeability of the o?icer. .
Other features and ‘advantages will hereinaft
er appear.
In the accompanying drawings which show one
form of the invention, that at present preferred
Figure 1 is a front view of the garment as it
appears in use, vportions of the wearer being
shown in dotted lines.
60
2
2,180,489
Fig. 2 is a similar view, showing the garment
from the side.
Fig. 3 is a plan view of the garment as it ap
pears lying on a ?at surface.
Fig. 4 is an elevation of one of the re?ector
buttons, partly in section, showing the means
for detachably securing the button to its sup
porting material.
~
Fig. 5 is a view of the back of the button with
10 its mounting means.
As shown in the accompanying drawings, the
garment of the present invention, comprises a
front panel l0 and a back panel ||. These, as
shown in Fig. 3, are preferably made of straight
pieces of material. The front and 'back panels
a group relatively close to .each other. The re
?ector buttons 2| are preferably of the cata 10
photic type, so that the light ‘impinging upon a
button from an approaching vehicle will be re
?ected back substantially in the line of vision
of the operator of the vehicle. A sufficient
number of buttons should be employed so that’
15v
In and II respectively are connected together
end to end, and the adjoining ends are so cut
that when the panels are connected, as by a
seam l2, a formed shoulder portion I 3 is pro
duced. Between the adjoining ends of the panels
l0 and N there is formed a hole ll of such size
that the head and neck of the wearer may be
a large area of the garment will be illuminated
by the lights from an approaching car.
In the form shown, the re?ector buttons 2|
are arranged within a circular area in substan
tially the middle of the panel. ‘If desired and 20
as shown, the grouping of the re?ector buttons
on tne back panel may be somewhat different
slipped freely through it when applying 'the
garment, and, when the garment is so applied,
from those on the front panel, so long as a suffi
25 the portions l3 will rest on the wearer's shoulders
I while the panel ID will hang down over the chest
and abdomen of the wearer and the panel II
will hang down the back.
cient number of re?ector units is employed to
indicate by a re?ected light the presence of the
oi?cer.
-
in Figs. 1 and 2, the open sides of the garment
may be temporarily held together by suitable
To increase the visibility of the o?lcer to
drivers approaching at an angle from the direc
tion in which the officer faces, the present inven
tion provides, on the shoulder portions of the 30
garment, epaulets 22, and, instead of these ex
tending horizontally as is the custom in formal
military uniforms, they hang down from the
shoulder portions l3 of the front and. back
panels. In fact, the upper margin 23 of the
epaulet is so cut with relation to the upper por
tions of the panels I0 and VN that the epaulet
fastening means. In the form of the invention
herein illustrated, the panel II has secured to it
portions of the panels.
The longitudinal margins I5 of the panels l0
30 and | I are free of permanent attachment to each
other, and these margins, as well as the bottom
margins Hi and the margin I‘! of the head hole
M, are suitablyhemmed or bound.
After the garment is slipped over the head of
35 the officer and rests on his shoulders, as shown
40 near its lower end straps or tapes I8 and the
panel ID has secured to it near its lower end
straps or tapes IS, the latter carrying buckles 20
to receive and secure the straps II. In the
broader aspects of the invention, however, any
45 suitable means may be employed to keep the
panels Ill and II relatively close to the body of
the wearer and keep them from ?ying in the
wind. Preferably, however, whatever means are
employed should permit the adjacent margins l5
50 of the front and back panels to be drawn closer
to or left farther from each other, depending
upon whether the wearer is thin or stout, for
it is one of the features of this invention, as
stated above, that one single garment may be
55 used by officers of both large and small girths.
By having the sides of the garment open, there
is no occasion for providing armholes, the pres
ence of which would make it difficult for an
o?icer, especially when wearing an overcoat, to
60 apply the garment over a uniform.
The panels I0 and II may have any desired
length, but it is preferable that they be equiva
lent'in lengthto the length of a sack coat for a
65
cating the presence of the o?icer in the dark is
obtained.
To increase the prominence and noticeability
of the o?i'cer, the present invention provides on
both the panels l0 and H suitable light-re?ect
ing units. In the-form of the invention herein
illustrated, these light-re?ecting units are in
the form of buttons 2|, and these are placed in
person of ordinary size. When made of such
length, the panels are easily kept close to the
body of the wearer. If the panels were made
substantially long, this would be diiIicult, and
there would be the danger of the panels being
70 caught onto projections of a passing car.
The panels may be made of any suitable or
desirable material, white duck of medium weight
has been found very satisfactory, but, of course,
other light color materials may be employed with
75 advantage so long as the desired result of indi
1
forms a partial closure for the upper or shoulder
The epaulets are preferably formed of the 40
same material as the panels Ill and II, although
they may be formed of any suitable light color
material ?exible enough to permit the epaulet to
hang by gravity in a pendant position.
Preferably, the epaulets also carry groups of 45
light-re?ecting units 2| of such size and quan
tity that a substantial amount of light is re
?ected back toward the driver of a car when
the car is approaching from the side of the
o?icer.
50
So that one who knows the distinction may
determine whether the of?cer is facing a lane
of traf?c or stands at right angles thereto, the
re?ecting units on the epaulets are preferably
arranged to outline a different design than 55
those on the front and back panels.
The epaulets are joined to the front and back
panels so high that there is a substantial space,
as indicated by the reference numeral 24 in Figs.
1 and 2, for the free movement of the o?icer’s 60
arms backwardly and forwardly, and the material
of the epaulet being ?exible, the epaulet may
swing upwardly and outwardly with such move
ments of the o?icer’s arms.
The light-re?ecting buttons 2| may be remov
65
ably mounted directly on the material of which
the garment is made. As shown in Fig. 4, the
button 2| extends through a hole 25 in the mate
rial 26 and has its movement therein limited by
a ?ange 21. At the'rear end of the button there 70
are projections 28 adapted to be engaged by lugs
29 on a ring 30 which is slipped over the rear end
of the button and rotated until the lugs 29 en
gage the projections 28. The ring 30 is held in
this position by the pressure of a sp'ring 3| en 75
3
2,180,439
gaging the inside margin of the aperture through
which the button extends.
With the buttons so mounted, when it is desired
to launder the garment, it is necessary to remove
each button individually, and, besides, they pro
ject through the garment and rub against the
o?icer’s uniform.
,
To avoid this, the present invention provides
ence of a person in tra?ic in the dark, comprising
front and back panels of light-diffusing material
covering the front and back portions of the per
son’s clothing, said panels being united in coex
tension with each other and having an aperture cl
whereby the garment may be slipped over the‘
head'of the wearer and be supported on the lat
ter’s shoulders; a pendant of light-diffusing ma
for the attachment and removal of each group of ' terial connected to the garment at each shoulder
10 buttons as a unit. For this purpose, as shown in
down over the upper arms of the wearer provid
front and back panels are mounted on separate
pieces 32 and 33, and the re?ector buttons for
the epaulets are mounted on separate pieces 34
ing a substantial surface visible from the side of
the latter; groups of light-re?ecting units car
ried by the" front and back panel respectively;
and additional groups of light-re?ecting units 15
15 and 35. These pieces themselves are detachably
mounted on the garment preferably by separable
fasteners 36 of which there may be as many as
are required to hold the piece to the garment.
The pieces 32, 33, 34 and 35 may be of any suit
20 able material, but, preferably, they are formed of
white leather, for the latter may be cleaned with
out immersing the same in water, and forms a
strong body on which the re?ector buttons may
be mounted. The re?ector buttons carried by the
25 pieces 32, 33, 34 andv 35 may be permanently
30
35
40
50
engaging portion thereof and adapted to hang 10
Figs. 1, 2 and 3, the re?ector buttons for the
mounted thereon, or, if desired, they may be de
tachably mounted thereon, as by the means shown
in Fig. 4.
The re?ector buttons 2| may be of any de-_
sired color. I have found that red is best, for it
.not only is indicative of danger, but contrasts
sharply with the white of the garment.
With the use of the garment of the present in
vention, the tra?ic oilicer standing at a poorly
illuminated intersection is made noticeable and
conspicuous by the lights from approaching cars,
and thus the danger of his being hit is greatly
reduced, and the danger of a person failing to
notice his presence and his signals is also reduced
to a minimum. Yet, if the o?icer is required for
other duty in which it might be dangerous to
proceed while wearing the garment, he may sim
ply and quickly slip the garment over his head
and be rid of it. On coming on tra?ic duty in
the dark, the o?icer may likewise quickly~ slip the
garment over his‘ head onto his shoulders by
simply removing his cap so that his head and
neck may pass through the central aperture l4.
The garment of the present invention may be
used by officers and others engaged in emergency
or otherwork requiring their presence on the road
at night. It may also be used with advantage by
motorcycle policeinen.
Variations and modi?cations may be made
55 within the scope of this invention and portions of
the improvements may be used without others.
I claim:
'
'
1. A slip-on garment for displaying the pres
ence of a person in traffic in the dark, compris
60 ing front and back panels of light-diffusing ma
terial covering the front and back portions of the
person’s clothing, said panels being united in co
carried by the pendants.
_
3. A slip-on garment for displaying the pres
ence of a person in tra?ic in the dark, compris
ing front and back panels of light-diffusing ma
terial covering the front and back portions of the 20
person's clothing, said panels being united in
coextension with each other and having an ap
erture whereby the garment may be slipped over
the head of the wearer and be supported on the
latter’s shoulders; pendant shoulder portions of 25
light-diffusing material connected to the garment
at the shoulder-engaging portions thereof and
adapted to hang down over the upper arms of the
wearer,-said pendant portions providing a sub
stantial surface visible from the side of the 80
wearer; groups of light-re?ecting units carried
by the front and back panels respectively; and
additional groups of light-re?ecting units car
ried by the pendant shoulder portions, each group
of light-re?ecting units being mounted on a sep 35
arate piece of light-diffusing material and said'
pieces being mounted on the garment for quick
removal and replacement.
4. A slip-on garment for displaying the pres
ence of a person in tra?ic in the dark, compris
ing front and back panels of light-diffusing mate 40
rial covering the front andback portions of the
person's clothing, said panels being united in co
extension with each other and having an aper
ture whereby the garment may be slipped .over
the head of the wearer and be supported on the 45
latter’s shoulders; pendant shoulder portions of
light-diffusing material connected to the garment
at the shoulder-engaging portions thereof and
adapted to hang down over the upper arm of the
wearer, said pendant portions providing a sub
stantial surface visible from the side of the
50'
wearer; groups of light-re?ecting units carried
by the front and back panels respectively; and
additional groups of light~re?ecting units car
ried by the pendant shoulder portions, said last 55
named groups of light-re?ecting units having a
different characteristic appearance from the ?rst
named group of light-re?ecting units.
_ 5. A slip-on garment for displaying the pres
60
ence of a person in traffic in the dark, comprising
front and back panels of light-diffusing material
covering the front and back portions of the per
.son’s clothing, said panels being united in co
extension ‘with each other and having an aper 65
latter's shoulders; a pendant of light-diffusing ture whereby the garment may be slipped over
the head of the wearer and be supported on the
material connected to the garment at each shoul
der-engaging portion thereof and adapted to latter’s shoulders; pendant shoulder portions of
hang down over the.upper arms of the wearer light-diffusing material connected to the garment
providing a substantial surface visible from the at the shoulder-engaging portions thereof, said 70
side of the latter; light-re?ecting means carried shoulder pendant portions adapted to engage the
by the front and back panels respectively; and outer portions of the wearer's upper arms and
additional light-re?ecting means carried by the provide a substantial surface visible from the side
pendants.
of the latter; groups of light-re?ecting units car
2. A slip-on garment for displaying the pres ried, by the front and back panels respectively;
75
extension with each other and having an aper
ture whereby the garment may be slipped over
65 the head of the wearer and be supported on the
4
2,180,489
and additional groups of light-re?ecting units
units carried by the pendant shoulder portions
carried by the shoulder pendant portions and via
ing front and back panels of light-di?using ma.
and visible from the side of the wearer.
' 7. A slip-on garment for displaying the pres
ence of a person in tra?ic in the dark, comprisq
ing front and back panels of light-diffusing ma
terial covering the front and back portions of the
person’s clothing, said panels being united in co
extension with each other and having an aper
terial covering the front and back portions of the
ture whereby the garment may be slipped over
ture whereby the garment may be slipped over
of the front and back panels together; and
pendants of light-diffusing material connected to
the garment at the shoulder-engaging portions
thereof, said pendants engaging the outer por 15
ible from the side of the wearer, said light-re
?ecting units being individually removable from
the garment preparatory to laundering the same.
6. A slip-on garment for displaying the pres
ence of a person in tra?ic in the dark, compris
the head of the wearer and be supported on the 10
10 person's clothing, said panels being united in ca
extension with each other and having an aper- _ latter’s shoulders; means for holding the ends
the head of the wearer and be supported on the
latter's shoulders; pendant shoulder portions of
15 light-diffusing material connected to the gar
ment at the shoulder-engaging portions thereof,
said pendant portions adapted to engage the
tions of the wearer’s upper arms and providing
a substantial light-diffusing surface visible from
outer portions of the wearer's upper arms and ' the side of the wearer.
provide a substantial surface visible from the
20 side of the wearer; and groups of light-re?ecting
CHARLES A. WHEELER.
20
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