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Патент USA US2130574

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2,130,574
Patented Sept. 20, 1938
UNITED STATES
,
PATENT OFFICE
2,130,514
FLOTATION or CARBONACEOUS ‘omis
Charles H. Breerwood, Narberth, P-a., assignor to
Separation Process Company, a corporation‘v of
Delaware
No Drawing. Application September 10, 1937,
Serial No. 163,302
16 Claims. (Cl. 209-167)
This invention relates to froth ?otation and of precious metals because the natural ?occula
more particularly to the concentration of the tion caused by the carbonaceous matter involves
useful or valuable constituent minerals of car
a prohibitive loss of the ?ne particles. Even in
bonaceous ores. It has especially to do with processes for the recovery of minerals of com
5 the use of lignin sulphonates to depress the paratively little commercial value, the weight 5
carbonaceous matter to permit the selective re
losses are uneconomical and in some ‘cases ef
‘ covery of the desired minerals by the use of
7
known collecting reagents. It is of general utility
~ in the concentration of both sulphide and oxide
10 ore minerals, including the precious and base
metals and the oxide compounds of the ‘alkaline
earth metals.
The ores contemplated and which respond suc
cessfully to ?otation in the present process are
those containing graphite, or carbon compounds .
which behave similarly to graphite in a ?otation
pulp. They are commonly referred to in this art
as “graphitic ores”, although the carbonaceous
matter, in many of them at least, probably is not
20 true
graphite.
'
fective concentration cannot be made, as in the
treatment of extremely ?ne grained materials
such as some of the “blue limestones” of the
Lehigh Valley district of Pennsylvania. Even 1‘!
where the practice is effective, it will ‘be under
stood that it requires an increased ?otation time
and there-fore additional ?otation cell capacity as
well as the consumption of frothing agents, and,
in some cases, an unavoidable excess of frothing
6
agent unbalances the frothing characteristics of
one or more of} the succeeding stages.
Another important class of carbonaceous ores
are those containing silver and gold. Precious
metal ores are frequently treated by a combina
tion process of ?otation and cyanidation, usually
Such carbonaceous matter, even in quantities
less than 1% of the weight of the ore, inhibits by ?oating the precious metal minerals and then
successful concentration of_ the desired ore cyaniding the ?otation concentrate. Because of
25 mineral or minerals, particularly when at least r the ready ?oatability of the graphitic carbon,
a. substantial proportion of the latter is present especially in the presence of collecting agents 25
in ?nely divided forms or slimes. Graphite and for precious metals, .a large portion of carbon
the carbon compounds of similar behavior occur appears in the concentrate. The presence of
in ?otation pulps in colloidal or near fcolloidal
carbon, in a concentrate which is to be cyanided,
30 sizes. They have “natural ?oatability”, and as is undesirable because carbon acts as a precipi
they have a non-selective coating effect and also tant for precious'metals from their cyanide solu 30
cause non-selective natural ?occulation, ,the tions. This tendency of the precious metals to
?otation concentrates are contaminated by the reprecipitate lowers the 'recoveryin the cyanida
?ne gangue minerals, and frequently in ?nely tion process.
’
i
35 divided oxide ore mineral pulps the grade of the
' It is impractical to ?oat off the carbonaceous
concentrates is little or no better than that of material before ?oating the precious metals, as
the feed. These compounds‘ have the further referred to herein in connection with the ?ota
disadvantage of absorbing substantial quantities
of collecting reagents, particularly the fatty acids.
40
It has been discovered heretofore that the
carbonaceous matter can be removed by froth
?otation prior to the introduction of the collect
ing reagents by relying upon the natural ?oata
bility of the carbon compounds. This prelimi
tion of carbonaceous limestone, because of the
loss of precious metals if the ?otation is suf
?ciently e?ective to remove practically all of the 40
carbon.
Unless the carbon is removed com
pletely, the harmful results from the presence
of carbon in a concentrate to be cyanided remain
because relatively small amounts of carbon will
45 nary step of concentration may be carried out in -, cause serious reprecipitation.v
45
one or more stages in which common frothing‘
It is accordingly the purpose of the invention
agents remove su?icient quantiLes to permit se
lective concentration of the desired mineral with
to retain but depress the carbonaceous matter
and render it completely innocuous, preferably to
known collecting reagents in the later stages. a degree that satisfactory concentration by
5° This practice is uneconomical for the recovery ‘reference to both grade and weight recoveries
I‘.
2
'
2,130,574
pulps containing carbon, but react normally and
appropriate collecting reagents and frothers, i. e., with normal consumption, following the described
can be made and with normal quantities of the
to render the pulp as amenable to froth ?otation
as one equivalent in mineral composition but free
of carbon.
Ingeneral, the practice of the invention com
prises conditioning the ?otation pulp at usual
water “dilutions” with a relatively small quantity
of a lignin sulphonate, preferably calcium lignin
10 sulphonate. The optimum quantities to be em
ployed are quickly determinable from the ap—
pearance of the concentrate, the proper balance
being obtained when the froth behaves similarly
to a carbon free pulp of equivalent composition.
15 A guide to the practical quantities of the de
pressing reagent will be found in the examples
to be given hereinafter to illustrate the ap
plication of the process to distinct types of pulps,
and which also indicate that excessive quantities
20 of this reagent do not improve the results, and
25
conditioning step with a lignin sulphonate.
The invention can best be understood by ref
erence to the following examples which illustrate
the effectiveness of lignin sulphonates, and par
ticularly calcium lignin sulphonate in depressing
the carbon compounds and which will also serve
as a guide for the practical application of the
process. They cover the principal types of ore 10
minerals, namely a precious metal, with a base
metal sulphide in the same ore, and an oxide
compound of an alkaline earth metal. The latter
also includes a parallel- demonstration of in
verted ?otation in which the siliceous compo 15
nents are ?oated by a “cation” reagent and the
oxide ore mineral is recovered as the residue of
the ?otation operation. The examples accord
ingly illustrate the use of the invention for re
in some cases that excessive quantities are less
covering one each of the principal mineral types, 20
but it will be realized that the invention is of
effective. Further, excessive conditioning time,
general utility.
'
in some cases at least, decreases the effective
ness in depressing carbonaceous matter.
Example No. 1
The depressing reagent is ordinarily added to
the pulp prior to the introduction of the collect
ing reagent, and preferably before the frothing
agent is added. Conditioning may be carried out
This example demonstrates the “natural ?oata
bility" of carbonaceous matter without collecting
reagents and the depressing effect of small, in
creasing quantities of calcium lignin sulphonate.
in a conditioner or blunger of conventional type,
30 the reagent being added directly to this appa
ratus or its feed launder. If the conditioner is
The specimen was pure graphite and the recov
eries were as follows:
provided with an over?ow to return excess pulp
to storage, the addition of the depressing reagent
at this point may involve increasing concentra
Tes tN0.
Conat
'I‘ailrrt
R_1
teen
wen
pewt.
pewt.
lbs'lton
36
tions beyond an effective limit and will increase
‘the conditioning time, in which case it is pre
ferred to employ additional conditioning appa
ratus specifically for the purpose, or to add the
depressing reagent only to the ?rst ?otation cell
40 of the circuit, this cell then serving only as a
conditioner. In circuits where the pulp water is
_________________________________ _.
tration of the naturally ?oatable carbonaceous
matter and the ?occules created by it. These
concentrates are, however, quickly destroyed
when the depressing reagent is introduced, and
substantially no ?otation time loss is involved.
50
Following the step of conditioning, mineral
concentration is carried out with the usual quan
2.20
72.18
83.94
None
0. 50
1.0
12. N
87. 20
2. 0
40
R~l=Calcium lignin sulphonate.
recovered and returned to the conditioner, .or to
the ?rst ?otation cell with the feed, the pres
' ence of frothing reagent usually causes concen
973)
27.82
16.06
Example No. 2
This example illustrates the practice and util
ity of the invention in the recovery of both a
45
precious metal, gold, and a base metal sulphide,
pyrite, occurring together in a carbonaceous
pyritic gold ore. It comprises four groups of
twenty-two tests.
Group I includes Tests 6 to 9 inclusive, in which
the specimen used was pyritic gold ore, 'contain
50
tities of the appropriate collecting and frothing
reagents, the operations and their effects being
ing little or no carbon.
substantially identical to those of a carbon free
pulp of similar type. Neither calcium nor sodium
9 were made with the same ore mixed with 81/2% 65
.55' "lignin sulphonate appears to modify the action of
the common collecting reagents for the precious
metals, sulphides, oxides or siliceous minerals.
Thus, the xanthates commonly employed for the
60 ?otation-of sulphides are unaifected at least in
their practical action. In the ?otation of oxide
ore minerals, the usual fatty acids, such as oleic
and ?sh oil fatty acids, their mixtures with fuel
oil, their soaps and emulsions have been found to
react normally. It has also been found‘ that
fatty acid and resin acid mixtures or combina
tions such as talloel, its mixture with mineral oil,
and refined saponi?ed talloel may similarly be
employed.
The “positive ion” or “cation” re
Test 6 was a rougher
concentration of the natural ore.
Tests 7, 8 and
of pure graphite. Test 7 was equivalent to Test 6,
in that the depressor was not used and the poor
grade and ratio of concentration are especially
to be noted. Test 8 was made after conditioning
the pulp with 1 lb. per ton of calciumlignin sul
phonate, and is equivalent, particularly in ratio
of concentration,‘ to blank Test 6. Test 9 illus
trates the eifect of an excess of the depressing
reagent, the excess in this case having the effect
of depressing pyrite.
Group II includes Tests 10, 11 and 12. The
specimen was a natural carbonaceous pyritic gold
ore.
Test 10 was a blank test i. e., without the
depressing reagent. Tests 11 and 12 were made
after conditioning respectively with 1 and 2 lbs.
of calcium lignin sulphonate. Note the high
70 agents, eifeitive for concentrating the siliceous
components of oxide ore minerals, are those
which in solution give a positively charged sur ' grade and high ratio of concentration of Test 11
face-active ion, and which will be fully described and that the excess of depressor was of no ad
75
hereinafter, are usually inei?cient in mineral vantage in Test 12.
75
_r
_
The specimen was natural carbonaceous gold con
centrates. No depressing reagent was used in
Tests 13 and 14. The e?’ect of the calcium lignin
sulphonate on the iron ‘recovery is especially to
be noted: The natural concentrates used as the
specimen assayed Fe-19.2%, insoluble-47.3%.
The ?otation concentrates assayed: Test 13,
10
‘3
2,180,574
_ ~ 7 Group III includes Tests Nos. 13 to 20 inclusive
Fe-20.5%, insoluble-44.38%; Test 14, Fe
21.70%, insoluble-39.86%; Test 15, Fe—31.40%,
insoluble—20.66%; Test, 16, Fe-24.6%, insol
1' 4
. vJ ..
737411991; No. 3
This example illustrates the usebf the invenfv
tion for the recovery of a non-metallic oxide ore
mineral, calciterirom carbonaceous argillaceous
limestone, the objective being to produce concen 5
trates suitable for use in cement manufacture.
Each test was made with a separate quantity of
X the same specimen. The naturalcrystallization
was extremely ?ne, substantially complete min
eral bond breakage occurring only in the particle 10
tibia-31.66%. The cleaned concentrates Test‘17 size fraction below 20 microns. The rock assayed
CaCOa and 0.5% carbon. It was ground to
assayed Fe—36.58%, insoluble 13.08%; Test 18, 74.2%
the following ?neness for ?otation:
15 the cleaned concentrate assayed Fe—34.26%, in
Per cent
soluble-15.48%; Test 20, the cleaned concentrate Minus 325 mesh sieve, 44 microns ________
__ 88.8 15
assayed Fe—38.50%, insoluble-41.72%.
Minus 325 mesh sieve, plus 30 microns____ 6.1
Group IV includes Tests 21 and 22. The speci
Minus 30 microns, plus; 24 microns ______ __ 9.3
men was natural carbonaceous pyritic gold ore
20 and the procedure was the same as Test 11 ex
cepting that the secondary butyl xanthate was
staged. Test 22 is included to show that doubling
the quantity of copper sul' .L‘ate failed to increase
the recovery of gold.
Minus 24 microns, plus 17 microns ______ __
8.8
Minus 17 microns, plus 12.5 microns_______ 13.8
'
Minus 12.5 microns, plus 10 microns ____ __
7.2 20
Minus 10 microns--. __________________ __ 43.6
The tests are divided into three groups, Group
I including Tests 23 to 30 inclusive, Group II in
25
25
Assay feed _
30
Concentrate
Cleaner tail
Reagents, lbs/ton
Test N0.
Au Percent Assay
Au
oz/ton weight
02mm
Pement
recovery
Au
Ratio Percent Assay
of
Au
cont,“
weight
oz/ton
13. 76
0. 442
83. 56
7. 3/1
20. 65v
0. 300
88. 57
4. 8/1
13.80
11. 84 ,
0.400
0.460
88.71
84.38
7.2/1
8.4/1
0. 850
1. 280
91. 12
92. 31
8. 2/1
13. 3/1 ______ _.
1. 120
92. 55
12. 9/1
9o. 97
81. 61
48. 05
2. s40
2. 600
4. 520
' 0s. 93
97. 48
92. 46
1. 1/1
1. 23/1
2. 1/1
95. 67
R--1
CuSO
‘
R-2
Pine
.
Soda
o1]-
R"—3
ash
30
_
7. 77
3. 360
Au
____
_ ______ __
______ __
_
' 12. 13
7. 51
67. 76
Percent
recovery
__
_
1. 5/1 ______________ -_
40. 69
5. 260
91. 65
2. 46/1
6. 54
0. 720
44. 45
40. 12
4. 920
5. 340
93. 42
90. 57
2. 25/1 1 15. 46
2. 5/1
13. 18
0. 580
, 1. 120
34. 98
5. 460
82. 22
2. 86/1
7. 01
7. 08
1. 520
1.540
91. 45
90.08
14. 3/1 ______________ -_
14. 1/1 ______________ __
9. 69
1. 180
The reagents are: R-l calcium lignin sulphonate, R-2 secondary butyl xanthate. R-3 higher‘ alkyl dithiophosphate.
50
50.
Additional practical ?otation details are as fol- ( eluding ‘Tests 31, 32 and 33,’ and Group III in
lows:
The ?otation cell feed of the specimen in Group
55 I was ground to 38% minus 200 mesh sieve. The
dilution of the pulp during conditioning and ?o
tation was 22% dry solids, and the ?otation time
(rougher concentration) was 6 minutes. The
specimen used in each of the tests of Group II
cluding Tests 34, 35 and 36. In the tests of Group
I, a fatty acid, oleic, was used as the collector.
In Group II the same frothing and collecting re
agents were employed but'in stage oiling, and 55
the concentrates were cleaned by ?otation with
out additional reagents. Group III were inverted
?otation tests in which'a positive ion reagent was
60 was ground to 68% minus 200 mesh sieve, and was used to concentrate the siliceous components in
60
both conditioned and ?oated at 22% dry solids the froth. It is to be understood that the "re
and the flotation time of the rougher ?oat was ten jects" of this group are to be compared with the
concentrates oi’ the fatty acid ?otation tests.
minutes. In Group III, the carbonaceous concen
trates had a fineness of 92% minus 200 mesh Each group contains one test in which the carbon
65
sieve in the feed. The pulp dilution in condition-w was concentrated by a preliminary step prior to 65
ing and ?otation was 22% in Tests 13 and 15, and ' the introduction of the collecting reagent, to show
11% in Tests 14 and 16, and conditioning dilutions the weight losses and to compare the recoveries
were 43% and ?otation dilutions 11% in Tests 17 with the tests in which a lignin sulphonate was
used to depress the carbonaceous matter. The
70 and 20 inclusive. The ?otation time of Tests 15 ?rst group includes two blank tests in which the
70
and 16 was 7 minutes and the remainder 12 min
utes. In Group IV these conditions were the same carbon was retained and concentration carried '
as in Group II.
a
'
The conditioning time for the four groups was
75
10 minutes.
-
,
out solely by the collecting and frothing reagents,
Test 24, the second of the blank tests illustrating
failure to improve grade by increasing the quan
tity oi’ collector, although increasing the weight 75
I“‘MW
4
2,190,571».
\
My,
recovery.‘ Group III also includes a blank test
utes and a ?otation time of 5 minutes, 5565555
for purposes of comparison.
the carbon concentration, Test 35, required 1
.
-
Reagents, lbs/ton
Carbon cone.
Cone.
Reject
5
TestNo'
Sd P
t?
tPi'tP
D
tP
11>
t
5
F-1 H R—1 H C—2 it.“ ‘$552,757 5286. ‘352m 5%‘. W521‘. 525%‘.
23 ______________ -_~0.15
1.11
24 ______________ __
1.55
.... __
i
55.0
73.5
35.0
3413
88.2
78.6
11.8
41.8
79.8
51.2
15.5
42.8
59.4
82.2
30.5
55.9
10
V
15
10
0.16
______________________________________ __
25 ______________ _- 0.15
1.11 ______________________
25 ....... -.' _____ --
1.11
0.15
1.0
27 ______________ --
0.15
1.11
2s .............. __
0.15
1.11
.... -_
____ __
29 ______________ _-
0.15
1.11
30 ______________ __
0.16
1.11
0.15
1.11
0.15
1.55
'
0.15
0.15
1.55
1.0
____ __
__________________________
_,
57. 7
s 1.9
44 . a
54.
1.0
__________________________ ._
45.8
54.0
59.2
554
1.0
.... _-
1.0
______________ __
73.2
91.2
25.2
54.5
__________ __
1.0
______________ __
77.3
80.2
27.7
64.6
59.2
79.5
0.5v
91.5
79.95
5.7
14.9
84.6
51.25
15.5
36.8
15.0
54.4
35.0
7a2
13.4
60.8
53.5
77.0
5.2
55.0
93.8
754
. . _. _ _
1.0
____ .-
1.0
4.3
. . _ . -_
0.3
________ _-__ _________ _-
0.3
____ __
0.9
9.0
,
55.0
____________________ __
Reagents used:
30
50.0
__________________________ __
________________ __
0.15 .......... -_
0.10
59.0
0.5
______________________ __
1.0
4.7
________________________________ --
.
15
9.1
'
'20
minute of conditioning and 4 minutes of ?ota
tion, followed by 3 minutes of conditioning and 5 30
minutes of ?otation to concentrate the siliceous
R-5
matter, principally mica.
Oleic acid.
“F-l” is a frothing agent comprising a mix-
_ture of branched and straight chain aliphatic
monohydric alcohols boiling between about 152°
40 C..and about 162° C. obtainable along with methanol by the catalytic hydrogenization of carbon
oxides.
-
A
25
R-l Calcium lignin sulphonate.
F--1 Alcohol frother.
R—6 Sodium lignin sulphonate.
C—2 Positive ion reagent.
35 The unusual reagents referred to in the foregoing table are as follows:
-
a
’
'
Tests 2'7, 28 and 29 show that in pulps of some
ores, at least, sodium lignin sulphonate is not as
effective as calcium lignin sulphonate; Test 27
demonstrating that a relatively small quantity
of the sodium compound is more satisfactory
with relation to weight recovery. Test 29 shows
that the addition of soda ash is sometimes eifec
tive in combination with this reagent to increase 40
the weight recovery.
It should be understood that an objective in
“C—2” is a reagent of the class discovered by
Lenher and described in his co-pending applicationSerial No. 730,551, ?led June 14, 1934, for
45 “A'?otation reagent”. The reagents of this class,
effective for the purpose of concentrating sili-
treating such limestones by fatty acid ?otation
or its equivalent, as in the tests of Group I is to
raise the grade of the concentrates well above
‘76% 05.00: whereby corrections can be made by 45
the addition of iron compounds to combine with
ceous components of oxide ore minerals, are those
which in solution give a positively charged surface-active ion containing an aliphatic hydro50 carbon group of at least 8 carbon atoms, prefer-
a part of the alumina in the clinkering reaction,
or to permit correction by the addition of a sub
stantially pure silica, such as sandstone, or both.
It is a further objective to obtain a relatively high 50
ably quaternary ammonium compounds contain-
weight recovery in view of the cost of grinding
ing a hydrocarbon group of from 12 to 18 carbon
atoms wherein the aforesaid constituents in so-
the rock to such an extreme degree of ?neness.
As alumina, principally in the form of mica, is
lution give a positively charged surface-active
55 ion, preferably the negative ion in solution being
a halogen. Of this class dodecyl amine hydro;
chloride is an example. “C—2" is of this class
and is, specifically. a mixture of hydrochlorides
of the higher primary aliphatic amines in which
the alkyl groups correspond in carbon content
the mineral occurring in excessive proportions in
this rock, it will be seen that the concentrates of 55
Tests 23 and 24 are unsatisfactory. The tests 7"
of Group II are satisfactory because the concen
trates have been cleaned and the alumina ‘con
tent lowered, and the high weight recoveries are
desirable. In Group 111, Test 36, the micaceous 60
v and composition to the fatty acids occurring na-
material was concentrated and the rejects‘ are
turally in coconut oil. The use of these reagents
accordingly satisfactory for cement manufacture,
‘
for bene?ciating cement raw materials is more
fully described, and claimed, in the co-pending
applications of Breerwood and Williams, 4 Serial
with the addition of a small quantity of silica.
It is an important advantage of the present in
vention that the prevention of carbonaceous ma- 65..
Nos. 163,304 and 163,305, ?led September 10, 1937. terial from contaminating ?otation concentrate,
In the foregoing tests, the conditioning time which forms the subject matter of the invention,
for carbon ?otation, tests 25 and 31, wasl minute is applicable to carbonaceous ores of such widely
and the ?otation time was 4 minutes, followed by differing character as argillaceous limestones and
further conditioning for5 minutes and a ?otation ‘ precious metal ores, which are normally consld- 70
time of 4 minutes to concentrate the calcite. In
ered to be completely unrelated from a ?otation
contrast,- for the remaining tests of Groups I and
standpoint. This general applicability of ‘the in
II, the conditioning. time was 5 minutes and the
?otation time was 4 minutes. In Group III, Tests
34 and 36 required a conditioning time of 5 min-
vention to such various types of carbonaceous
ores is one of its important advantages and makes
the process almost unique in the ?otation art, 75
because practically all ?otation processes appli
lecting reagent, a step which‘ comprises adding up
cable to precious metal or sulphide ores cannot
to about four pounds of calcium lignin sulphon- ,
be used with any degree of success on oxidized ‘ ate to a ton of dry solids to a pulp of the ore,
ores, particularly those containing compounds of
the alkaline earth metals.
I claim:—
and subjecting the pulp to froth ?otation in the
presence of the calcium lignin sulphonate and
of the carbonaceous matter.
10. In a method treating carbonaceous argil
.
1. In a method of froth ?otation of minerals
from carbonaceous ores in the presence of a col
laceous limestones by froth ?otation, the step
lecting reagent, a step which comprises adding a
lignin sulphonate to depress the carbonaceous
matter to a pulp» of the ore, and subjecting the
which comprises conditioning a pulp of the lime
stone with calcium lignin sulphonate before'add 10
ing a collecting reagent, and subjecting the pulp ,
to froth ?otation in the presence of the calcium
pulp to froth ?otation in the presence of said
lignin sulphonate and in thepresence of the car
lignin sulphonate, a collecting reagent and the
.carbonaceous matter.
bonaceous matter.
2. In a method of froth ?otation of minerals
11. In a method of froth ?otation of precious 15
metal values from carbonaceous ores in the pres
ence of a collecting reagent for the precious metal
from carbonaceous ores; a step which comprises
conditioning a pulp of the ore with a lignin sul
phonate to depress the carbonaceous matter be
fore adding a mineral collecting reagent, and
subjecting the pulp to froth ?otation in the pres‘
ence of said lignin sulphonate and in the pres
minerals, the step which comprises adding a
quantity of 'a lignin sulphonate to a pulp of the
ore to depress the carbonaceous matter, and sub-. 20
jecting the pulp to froth ?otation, in the pres
ence of the carbonaceous matter.
ence of the lignin sulphonate and in,the pres- _
3. In a method of froth ?otation of minerals
ence of the carbonaceous matter.
12. In a method of froth ?otation of precious
metal values from carbonaceous ores in the pres 25
ence of a collecting reagent for the precious
from carbonaceous ores in the presence of a col
lecting reagent, a step which comprises adding
calcium lignin sulphonate to a pulp of the ore,
and subjecting the pulp to froth ?otation in the
metal minerals, the step which comprises adding
presence of saidllignin sulphonate and in the a quantity of calcium lignin sulphonate to a pulp
presence of the carbonaceous matter.
"of the oreto depress the carbonaceous matter,
4. In a method of froth ?otation of minerals and subjecting the pulp to froth ?otation, in 30
from carbonaceous ores, a step which comprises the presence of the calcium lignin sulphonate and
conditioning a pulp of the ore with calcium lignin in the presence of the carbonaceous matter.
"sulphonate before adding a mineral collecting re
13. ‘In ' a method. of froth ?otation of gold
agent, and subjecting the pulp to froth ?otation values from carbonaceous gold ores in the pres
in the presence of said lignin sulphonate and in ence of a collecting reagent for the gold minerals,
the presence of the carbonaceous matter.
the step which comprises adding a quantity of a
5;\In a method of froth ?otation of minerals lignin sulphonate to a pulp of the ore to depress j
from carbonaceous ores in the presence of a col,
the carbonaceous matter, and subjecting the pulp
lecting reagent, a step which comprises adding to froth ?otation, in the presence of the lignin
sodium lignin sulphonate to a pulp of the ore, sulphonate and in the presence of the carbona
40
and subjecting thepulp to froth ?otation in the ceous matter.
presence of said‘ lignin sulphonate and in the
14. In a method of froth ?otation of gold
' presence of the carbonaceous matter.
values from carbonaceous gold ores in the pres
6. In a method of froth ?otation of minerals ence of a collecting reagent for the gold minerals,
from carbonaceous ores, a step which comprises the step which comprises adding a quantity of
conditioning a pulp of the ore with sodium lignin calcium lignin sulphonate to a pulp ‘of the ore to 45
sulphonate before adding a mineral collecting depress the carbonaceous matter, and subjecting
reagent, and subjecting the pulp to froth ?ota
the pulp to froth ‘?otation, in the ‘presence of the
tion in the presence of said lignin sulphonate calcium lignin sulphonate and the presence of
and in the presence of the carbonaceous matter. the carbonaceous matter.
,
’
'I. In a method of froth ?otation of minerals
15. In a method of froth ‘?otation of gold
from carbonaceous ores, the steps which comprise values from carbonaceous ores, the steps which
conditioning a pulp of carbonaceous ?otation comprise conditioning a pulp of carbonaceous
concentrates with a lignin sulphonate to depress ?otation concentrates containing gold minerals
the carbonaceous matter, and cleaning the con
with a quantity of a lignin sulphonate to depress
ditioned pulp by froth ?otation, in the presence the carbonaceous matter, and cleaning the pulp 55
of the lignin sulphonate and of the carbonaceous by froth ?otation, in the presence of the lignin I '
matter.
‘
8. In a method of froth ?otation of minerals
from carbonaceous ores, the steps which com
sulphonate and the carbonaceous matter.
16. In a method of froth ?otation of gold
values from carbonaceous ores, the steps which
comprise conditioning a pulp of carbonaceous
_' Prise conditioning. a pulp of carbonaceous ?ota
‘tion concentrates with calcium lignin sulphonate ?otation concentrates containing gold minerals
to depress the carbonaceous matter, and clean; ‘with a quantity of calcium lignin sulphonate to
ing the conditioned pulp by froth ?otation, in depress the carbonaceous'matter, and cleaning
the presence of the calcium'lignin sulphonate
and of the carbonaceous matter.
9. In a method of froth ?otation of minerals
' from carbonaceous ores in the presence of a col
the vpulp by froth ?otation, in the presence ,of ‘
the calcium lignin sulphonate and the carbons-‘
ceous matter.
'
>
.
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_ CHARLES H. BREERWOOD.
_
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