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Патент USA US2131452

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Sept. 27, 1938.
F. PARDEE, JR.. ET AL
2,131,452
MOUNTAINSIDE CAR TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM
'
Filed Feb. 25, 1957
e Sheets-Sheet 1,
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L a WO/P TH CuRT/N. Q
BY
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'
ATTORNEYS
Sept. 27, 1938-
2,131,452
F. PARDEE, JR.. ET!‘ AL.‘
MOUNTAINSIDE CAR TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM
Filec} Feb. 25, 1937, '
6 Sheets-Sheet 2
INVENTORS
IFP'AA/K RA/PDEE JR’.
ATTORNEYS
Sept. 27, 1938.
H
F. PARDEE, JR.. El‘ AL
2,131,452
MOUNTAINSIDE CAR TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM
Filed Feb. 25, 1937
6 Sheets-Sheet 3
INVENTORS
‘A zv/r Bah-J0 EEJé
Larva/P771 CuRr/vv.
ATTORNEY3
Sept. 27, 1938.
Q
F. PARDEE, JR., ET AL
I
Z,131;452
MOUNTAINSIDE CAR TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM
Filed Feb. 25, 1937
6 Sheets-Sheet 4
U
‘INVENTORS
LLswo/Pr? Cu/Pr/N.
ATTORNEYS
Sept. 27, 1938.
2,131,452
F. PARDEE, JR., Err-AL
MOUNTAINSIDE CAR TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM
Filed Feb. 25, 1937
6 Sheets-Sheet 5
kw. MN
\wan
INVENTOR)‘
iPT/N.
ATTORNEYS
Sept. 27, 1938.
F.._PARDEE, JR., El‘ AL v
2,131,452
MOUNTAINSIDE CAR TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM
Filed Feb. 25, 1957
6 Sheets-Sheet 6
/
INVENTORS
f7f-A/v/r/oAR’0EEc/E',
ELLSWORTH CUE-‘77M
ATTORNEYS
Patented Sept. 27, 1938
2,131,452
UNITED STATES PATENT‘ OFFICE
2,131,452
MOUNTAINSIDE CAR TRANSPORTATION
SYSTEM
Frank Pardee, Jr., Hazleton, Pa., and Ellsworth
Curtin, Webster Springs, W. Va., assignors to
Anthracite Separator Company, Hazleton, Pa.,
‘a corporation of Pennsylvania
-..Application February 25, 1937', Serial No. 127,582
14 Claims. _ (Cl. 214-99)
they passage of the car therebeneath, and thus to
This invention relates to apparatus for convey
ing material, such as coal, down extensiveslopes', drop the coal accumulated on the chute into the
as-for example, from'a mine or tunnel down the car immediately beneath it.‘ Thereafter, the bin
returns upwardly past the end or edge of the
side of a mountain or hill to a loading point and
chute and interrupts further discharge of coal.
5.3 more particularly to apparatus of this general
type capable of use'over a variable and uneven
grade.
~
~
-
I
A number'of different apparatus have been
employed, or- tried, for conveying mineral .mate
102 rials, such as coal, from an elevated point down
10v
discharge of coal therefrom.
a sloping contour to a lower point. Some of such
apparatus has required a constant grade ‘free
The various features of ‘the invention are illus
trated by way of example in the accompanying
from hollows thereby necessitating the making of
drawings, in which—
?llsor cuts or trestle work in order to obtain a
Fig. 1 shows a general arrangement of appara—v
tus embodying the invention showing the passage 1.5.1
of the cars from an upper loading station or tip
ple to a lower discharge tipple; Fig. 2 is a plan
view on a foreshortened enlarged scale of the
apparatus shown in Fig. 1; Fig. 3 is a side view
on a larger foreshortened scale of the apparatus 20
shown in Fig. 1; Fig; 4 is aside viewof the ap
paratus for loading the cars near their upper sta-'
tion; Fig. 5 is a plan View of a part of a mecha
nism of Fig. 4; Fig. 6 is a side view of mecha—
nism of Fig. 4 in discharge position; Figs. 7, 8 and
9 are side views of the apparatus of Fig. 6 in dif
ferent positions; Figs. 10 and 11 are vertical sec
tional views showing the direction of movement
of coal to the loading apparatus; Fig. 12 is a de
tailed plan view of a portion of the mechanism 30
of Fig. 4; Fig. 13 is a vertical section of the upper
cable sheave; Fig. 14 is a side view of a lower‘
cable sheave. and Figs. 15 and’ 16 are, respectively,
side views of the loading mechanisms‘ showing‘
the positions in different positions of operation 35
continuously inclined path of travel. Others have
avoided the nesessity of grading of this type, but
have required expensive installations, or- have re
sulted in an excessive breakage or disintegration
of'the material conveyed.
20,
Mechanisms arranged to, operate in properly
timed relation to the movement of the cars and
bin are also provided to interrupt the ?ow of coal
on the chute above themovable bin during the
I
-In thepresent invention, we provide a con
veyor system in which coal or similar material
may be conveyed down the side of a steep incline
such as a hill or mountainside over variable
slopes or terrain to a point of discharge with a
25,. minimum of ‘breakage and in which. the energy
generated by the descent of the coal is efficiently
transformed for useful purposes.
In this invention, a series of spaced cars are
connected in spaced relation by endless. cables,
30. which pass over' sheaves, each cable engaging a
sheave. at the upper or receiving end and at the
lower end. The cars are successively ?lled or
loaded near the upper end of the run and then
pass- downwardly to the point of discharge over
tracks, which need not have a uniform grade or.
inclination.- Herethey are inverted as they pass
around the lower sheaves or wheels and then are
carried upwardly by the cables to the upper
sheaves, where they are righted and again
40 brought to loading position on the tracks. There
upon, their cycle of movement is repeated. In this
thereof.
'
>
'
.
_
Referring more particularly to Figs. 1, 2V- and 3,
the apparatus is illustrated as applied to the. con
veying of coal or similar ores, which may be ob
tained from a mine or tunnel indicated at 2!! and 40
stored for conveyance in the head house 2i of the
tipple. From this point, the ore is conveyed as for
example by a belt conveyor 22 to mechanism indi-.
cated at 23 for loading the material into successive
cars 24. These cars then pass downwardly on, a‘ 45
systems, that is, those which may change in grade, track 25 to a lower point of discharge and then,
return by return track 26. The cars are kept in
or inclination.
.
In the above arrangement, as each car passes spaced position relative to each other while pass-V
ing downwardly and returning by means of apair
through a loading station, it automatically re
5.0 ceives aload of material such as coal, or ore, _ of cables 21, one at each side of the car, which 50
pass about a pair of upper sheaves 28 above the
from a feedchute. This charge or load is de
posited in the car by a mechanism operated from loading station 23 and a pair of lower sheaves 29'
at the lower discharge point. The energy gen
the upper sheaves of the cables to move an open
bottom retaining bin downwardly past the lower‘ erated in the downward'passage of the loaded
end or edge of the feed chute simultaneously with cars serves to draw the empty car's back to their
arrangement, the cars in their downward passage
are supported by the tracksystem and are held
in end to-end succession by the cables, so that
45 they readily ride over relatively uneven track
2
2,131,452 7
supporting position and provides an excess which
is transmitted through the shaft 30 of the upper
sheaves to an electric generator 3|, which acts
as a brake and which supplies power for other
purposes. The shaft 39 may also drive an auto
matic loading mechanism as hereinafter de
scribed. Thus, the loading mechanism may be
said to be energized by the weight of the down
wardly traveling loaded cars.
10
Cable 21, as more fully shown in Figs. 4, 5 and 6,
has blocks 32 mounted at regularly spaced inter
vals, which correspond with notches 33 in the
peripheries of the sheaves 28, thereby to insure a
uniform rotation of the sheaves with the cables.
be changed accordingly to provide one revolution
of the crank 44 for each car.
The belt 22 moving at a constant rate of speed
receives a layer of coal or other mineral from a
hopper 41 in the head house 2|, the thickness of
the layer ‘being regulated by a movable gate 48
(Fig. 10). The belt 22, therefore, discharges the
coal or other mineral onto the inclined chute 35
at a constant rate or volume at a given time.
For a given rate of delivery of mineral by the 10
belt 22 a quantity will be discharged by the bin
37 from the chute 35 into a car 24 depending upon
the time between successive upward swings of
the swinging gate 39.
15 Regularly spaced blocks, for example, each ?fth
block, is secured to the front end of a respective
car 24, by a cross-bar 34 of
13 or other
means. The other blocks between the said ?fth
The belt 22 and the cars 24 during normal 15
operation are both moving continuously at a sub
stantially uniform rate of speed, but inasmuch as
blocks are independent of the cars and freely fall
20 into the notches 33.
cannot continuously discharge material thereto
As each successive car travels around the pe
riphery of the upper sheaves 28 and comes right
side up onto the track 25, it is brought to a posi
tion below a loading mechanism driven from
25 the shaft 30 of the sheave. This loading mecha
nism comprises a ?xed discharge chute or plate
35 inclining downwardly to its lower edge 36
and coacting with a movable open bottom bin 31
actuated by mechanism from the shaft 39 so that
30 its lower end wall 38 is above the edge 36 until a
car passes the lower edge, whereupon the bin is
shifted to the position of Fig. 6, to permit coal to
discharge into the car. Thereafter, the mecha
nism moves or returns the bin and stops it in its
original position.
While the bin is in its lower discharging posi
tion, a swinging gate 39 is moved upwardly
through a slit in the chute 35 to the position
shown in Fig. 6, thereby interrupting the further
40 ?ow or passage of the coal or other material
down the chute until the discharge bin returns
to its original position, at which time the swing
ing gate returns to the position shown in broken
lines in Fig. 4, leaving a free and unobstructed
45 passage for the coal on the chute.
The mechanism for moving the bin 31 and the
swinging gate 39 is actuated or driven from the
shaft 39 and therefore in synchronism with the
movement of the cars 24. For this purpose, power
50 is transmitted from the shaft 30 through a
sprocket wheel 40 and chain 4| to a sprocket
wheel 42 keyed or rigidly secured on a shaft 43.
Accordingly, the shaft 43 is driven in clockwise
direction as indicated by the arrow in Fig. 4.
55 Also rigidly secured on the shaft 43 are crank
arms 44, one at each side of the bin, to the re
spective free ends of each of which are con
nected one end of a link 45, the opposite end of
each link being pivotally secured, as at 46 to the
60 bin 31 near its upper end.
65
'
Accordingly, with each complete rotation of
the shaft 43 and crank arms 44, the bin 31 is
moved to its extreme upper position on the chute
surface 35 and to its lowermost position with its
end wall 38 below the edge 36 of a chute, so as
to permit a free discharge of coal therefrom. It
is to be noted that, the sprocket wheels 40 and 42
being of the same diameter, there is one complete
70 revolution of the shaft 43 and crank arms 44
for each revolution of the sheave 28, which con
tains ?ve notches and thus corresponds to the
spacing of one car at each ?fth block 32. It will
be understood that, if different spacings are used,
75 the speed relations of the sprockets 4|] and 42 will
the cars are spaced from one another the belt
in an ef?cient manner without an enormous spill
age and breakage. In the improved apparatus,
20
we interpose between the belt 22 and the travel
ing cars 24, mechanism effective to intercept the
flow of material from the belt to intermittently
transfer it in measured quantities to successive 25
cars as they reach the loading station. This
mechanism is so designed that in a transfer of
material there will be a minimum fall thereof so
as to prevent undue breakage or production of
?nes, which results in a lessening of sale value 30
of many products such as ore, coal and the like.
The swinging of the gate 39 is coordinated or
synchronized with the movements of the bin 31,
the gate being actuated and controlled by a pair
of cams 49, one at each side of the gate 39 and 35
mounted on the links 45 at the respective sides
of the bin 31. Each of the cams 49 has formed
therein a. cam groove 5|] which coacts with roller
5| (Figs. 5, 11 and 12) projecting outwardly from
side walls 52 integral with the swinging gate 39. 40
The gate is pivoted at 53 and the cam groove 50,
as shown in greater detail in Figs. 15 and 16, is
so shaped that it will open the swinging gate and
permit the coal to flow past, when the bin 31 is
above the lower edge 36 of the chute, that is, 45
While the bin is in closed position.
The gate closes, when the bin passes the edge
36, and remains closed until the bin again re
turns to closed position. For this purpose, the
groove 50 has a length 54 (see Fig. 16) extend 50
ing from the point A to the point B, sloping up
wardly relative to the center line of the respec
tive link 45 and then substantially parallel there
with, so that as the link 45 moves clockwise,
downwardly from the dead center position indi 55
cated at A in Fig. 15 to the position indicated
at B, the roller 5| will move relatively upwardly
an equivalent amount, so as to hold the upper
edge of the swinging gate 39 approximately
level with the surface of the chute 35, thus 60
permitting the coal to flow from the upper part
of chute 35 to the lower part thereof, which closes
the bottom of the bin.
An extension 55 of this length from the point B
to the point C curves slightly downwardly, so 65
that in the upward swing of the link from the
point B to the point C of Fig. 15, the gate 39 is
swung very rapidly upwardly (to position of Fig.
9) to intercept the accumulated ?ow of coal.
As the link swings upwardly to the point D, the
roller 5| moves back to the point B of Fig. 16
(see Fig. 9), maintaining the gate 39 in its in
tercepting position.
As the roller reaches the point D, it tends to
drop into a downwardly extending length 56 of
3.
2,131,452:
the cam groove so that, although the link 45
skilled in the art without departing from the in-;
vention as de?ned in the appended claims.
rises to its mid-stroke‘, the gate isv falling so that
at the point E in the cycle'when the lower-end
of the bin 31 registers with the edge 36 of} the
chute the gate 39 is nearly open and by the time
the roller drops to the point F in Fig. 16 the gate
is entirely open, again permitting the ‘flow of
What we claim is:
- '
-
1. Apparatus for transporting material down a
mountainside which comprises sheaves at di?er
accumulated mineral or coal. ‘This fully open
position of the gate and corresponding positions
10 of the bin, link and crank areillustrated in Fig.
7. In the length 51 between the points F and A
(Fig. 16) while thelink 45 is falling from the
raised position at F (Fig. 15) to the dead center
point A, the cam groove rides ‘idly’ ‘over the roller,
15 so as to compensate for this drop and ‘thus per
mit the left edge of the swinging gate 39 to dwell
at approximately the level of the chute 35, so as
to permit the free passage of coal thereover but
ready to- intercept it in the next closing operation.
It is to be noted that the chute 35 is inclined
20
downwardly at a sharper angle than that'of the
tracks 25 so that, when the bin is in discharging
position as in Fig. 6, the caris spaced very closely
to it so that there is a minimum fall of the ma
25 terial. Also the bin 31 moves on rollers 58, as
indicated in Fig. 10, riding on rails 59 so as to
avoid undue friction on the chute 35.
'At the lower end of the travel of the cars, as
ent levels, an endless cable extending from a‘
sheave at an upper level to a sheave at a lower
level, a series of cars secured at spaced intervals
to said cable, a track following approximately
the contour or slope of the land to support said 10~
cars in descending from an upper level to a lower
level, a crank operated member carrying a cam
driven through said upper sheave from said de
scending cars, a loading bin moved by said mem
ber and a gate actuated by said cam, said bin 15
and
gate
being
effective
to
intermittentlyv
load said cars near said upper level.
2. Apparatus for transporting material down
a slope comprising a succession of cars ?exibly
connected with one another in end to end rela 20?
tion in a continuous circuit, lower tracks over
which the cars travel in descending and upper
tracks over which the cars travel in inverted
position in ascending, endless conveyor means
delivering material at a substantiallygconstant 28?
rate to said cars, car loading means interposed
between said delivery means and the cars at a
loading station and operating means synchronized
they move upwardly about the lower sheaves 29,
80 the discharge end of the cars, as indicated in the
broken lines in Fig. 14, is only slightly spaced
with the movements of the cars for intermit
tently causing said loading means to release ma
aterial successively to said cars.
,
above a conveyor belt 60 so that the coal slides
3. Apparatus for transporting materials down
‘readily onto this belt from which it is discharged
to a discharge chute 6|. In this way, the height
a slope which comprises a series of cars ?exibly
connected in a continuous circuit with one‘ an
of fall of the coal or other mineral is reduced
other in uniformly spaced end to end relation, re
spective lower and. upper supporting guides over
which the cars travel in descending and ascend
ing, a ?xed loading chute, a movable loading bin
between said guides coacting with said chute for
transferring material to said cars, a gate for
intercepting the flow of material to the loading
bin, and an oscillating crank actuated cam and
related mechanism whose operation is synchro-'
nized with the travel of said cars for intermittently
to a minimum and unnecessary breakage is there
by avoided.
'
The movements of the loading bin and the in
tercepting gate as well as the cycle of their
40 operating mechanism can be traced graphically
from the starting position of Fig. 15 to- the dis
charge position of Fig. 6 by comparison of the
relative position of the corresponding parts as
illustrated in the intermediate positions of Figs.
45 4, 7, 8 and 9.
-
.
While in the illustrated embodiment of the
invention, we have shown a conveyor belt 22 ‘for
continuously supplying material to the inclined
chute of the loader, it will be understood that
said conveyor belt could be dispensedwith and
a substantially constant supply discharged directly to the inclined chute from a storage hop-'
per by proper adjustment ‘of the outlet gate
thereof. It is apparent from the foregoing de
actuating said bin and said gate whereby upon 45
the arrival of each car at said loading station a
predetermined load of material is delivered there
to.
4. Apparatus for transporting of material down
a mountainside comprising a series of moving cars 50;
?exibly connected to one another in uniformly
spaced intervals in an endless circuit, upper and
lower inclined supporting guides following ap
proximately the contour of the mountainside
along which the cars travel, a loading station 55.
of material is being fed continuously to the con
between said guides including an inclined chute
tinuously moving cars or other carriers and that for the delivery of material to the cars, a bot
the mechanism disclosed includes intermittently tomless loading bin mounted for sliding move;
operated loading means interposed between the ment lengthwiseof the chute and located be
constant supply means and the constantly mov
tween said upper and lower guides, a movable 60'
ing carriers.
~gate effective to intercept the ?ow of material
from the upper part of the chute to said loading
In the normal operation of the loader, the mov
scription that a substantially constant. supply
ing bin and the intercepting gate are so» coor
dinated with the movements of the carriers that
65 as each carrier arrives in succession at a load
ing station a measured quantity of material will
bin, means for feeding material to the upper por-1
tion of the chute at a substantially uniform rate,
and mechanism synchronized with the movement
of the cars effective to actuate the gate and the
be delivered thereto. It is also apparent ‘from ‘ loading bin at predetermined time intervals so
the description that the loading mechanism is that as each car of theseries reaches the loading
driven or energized by the weight of the descend
station a measured load of material will be re
70 ing loaded cars or other carriers. Thus, the auto
leased thereto.
‘
'10
75
matic loading of the carriers, while they descend
5. Apparatus for transporting of material'd'own
down a hill or mountainside, is accomplished
a mountainside comprising aseries of moving cars
without the necessity of providing expensive
?exibly connected to one another in uniformly ,
motors or other prime movers.
spaced intervals in an endlesscircuit, upper and
lower inclined supporting guides following ap
Various modi?cations may be made by those
4.
2,131,452.
proximately the contour of the mountainside
along which the cars travel, a loading station in-'
cluding an inclined chute located between said
guides for the delivery of material to the cars, a
bottomless loading bin mounted for sliding move
ment lengthwise of the chute, a movable gate
effective to intercept the flow of material from
the upper part of the chute to said loading bin,
means for feeding material to the upper portion
of the chute at a substantially uniform rate, and
means operatively associated with said ?exibly
connected series of cars and energized by the
weight of the loaded descending cars of said series
e?ective'to actuate the gate and the loading bin
15 at predetermined time intervals so that as each
car of the series reaches the loading station a
measured load of material will be released thereto.
6. Apparatus for transporting material down
a mountainside, comprising a succession of cars
20: ?exibly connected with one another in end to end
relation in a continuous circuit, respective tracks
supporting the cars in their descent and ascent,
means delivering material at a substantially con
stant rate to said cars, and car loading means in
;terposed between said delivery means and the
cars at a loading station, said loading means
including a ?xed inclined chute, a reciprocating
loading bin with a bottom outlet slidable there
over, a gate for intercepting the ?ow of material
30. along the chute to the loading bin, means for re
ciprocating the bin synchronized with the move
ment of the cars, a gate for intercepting the ?ow
of material from the upper part of the chute to
the loading bin and means for intermittently
- actuating said gate in predetermined time rela
tion with respect to the movements of said loading
bin.
7. Apparatus for transporting material down a
mountainside, comprising a succession of cars
?exibly connected with one another in end to end
relation in a continuous circuit, respective lower
and upper guides over which the cars descend and
ascend, means delivering material at a substan
tially constant rate to said cars, and car loading
45 means interposed between said delivery means
and the cars at a loading station, an inclined
chute between the guides at the loading station,
the lower end of said chute terminating a short
distance from the path of travel of the tops of
descending cars, a bottomless loading bin mount
ed for movement lengthwise of and beyond the
lower end of the chute, a gate for intercepting the
flow of material from the upper part of the chute
to the loading bin, a rotary member driven in syn
55 chronism with the movement of the cars, an ele
ment actuated thereby for reciprocating the bin,
and actuating means for the gate operating in
response to the movements of said element.
8. Apparatus for transporting material down
60 a mountainside, which comprises sheaves at dif
ferent levels, an endless cable traveling over the
sheaves, a series of substantially uniformly spaced
cars operatively connected with the cable, respec
tive upper and lower tracks for supporting and
guiding the cars, an inclined chute located be
tween said tracks at an upper loading station, a
bottomless loading bin coacting therewith and
mounted for reciprocating movement thereover
and beyond the lower end thereof, a gate con
trolling the ?ow of material along the chute to
the bin, and mechanism driven through the upper
sheave for reciprocating said bin and actuating
said gate at predetermined time intervals whereby
as each car moves past the loading station a load.
is delivered thereto.
-9. Apparatus for transporting material, com
prising respective sheaves at different levels, a
?exible element passing therearound, a series of
carriers secured at spaced intervals to said ele
ment, means preventing relative slippage between
the sheaves and said element, an inclined ?xed
chute at a loading station, means delivering a
substantially constant ?ow of material thereto,
a reciprocating loading bin having end and side
walls and an open bottom slidable over said chute, 10
a gate movable relatively to the chute controlling
the flow of material to said bin and operating
mechanism for said bin and gate driven through
one of said sheaves.
'
V
10. Apparatus for transporting material com
15
prising respective sheaves at different levels, a
?exible element passing therearound, a series of
carriers secured at spaced intervals to said ele
ment, means preventing relative slippage be
tween the sheaves and said element, an inclined 20
?xed chute at a loading station, a conveyor de
livering a substantially constant supply of ma
terial thereto, a reciprocating loading bin hav
ing end and side walls and an open bottom slid
able over said ?xed chute, a gate movable trans 2.5.
versely of the chute controlling the ?ow of ma
terial to said bin, operating means energized by
the weight of the downwardly traveling loaded
carriers effective to actuate said gate and said
bin at recurring predetermined time intervals 30
so as to intermittently load empty carriers as
they move in succession past said loading station.
11. In combination, means for-maintaining a
substantially constant ?ow of material to a load
ing station, wheeled cars connected in a con
35.
tinuous circuit moving at a substantially con
stant speed past said station, lower and upper
tracks supporting the wheeled cars respectively
in their descent and ascent, and mechanism, lo
cated between said tracks and driven by the 40
weight of loaded descending cars including inter
mittently acting means for individually loading
each car while it is moving past said loading
station.
12. Apparatus for transporting material down 45
a mountainside, which comprises a respective
sheave at an upper and a lower level, a ?exible
element looped around both sheaves, wheeled
cars engaging the ?exible element at uniformly
spaced intervals, ?xed tracks following approxi 50.
mately the contour and slope of the land for co
action with the wheel of the cars as they descend
from an upper to a lower level, and intermit
tently actuated means synchronized with the
traveling movement of said cars for loading them 55.
individually as they pass a predetermined point.
13. Apparatus for transporting material down
a
mountainside
which
comprises
an
upper
sheave, a lower sheave, an endless belt compris
ing cars at uniform intervals, a lower track for 60
said cars as they pass downwardly from said
upper sheave to said lower sheave, an upper track
to support and guide said cars in inverted posi
tion on their return to said upper sheave, a load
ing station below said upper sheave and com 65
prising means for supplying a continuous stream
of material to said loading station, means for
accumulating the material thus fed at said load
ing station, and means driven by said upper
sheave and said endless belt for loading the 70
accumulated material on successive cars as they
reach said loading station,
14. Apparatus for transporting material down
a mountainside which comprises an upper sheave,
a lower sheave, an endless belt passing about 75.
5
2,131,452 '
said sheaves and comprising cars at uniformly
spaced intervals, a lower track for supporting
said cars in passing downwardly from said upper
sheave to said lower sheave, an upper track for
supporting and guiding said cars on their re
turn from said lower sheave to said upper sheave,
an endless conveyor for supplying material be- ’
tween said tracks below said upper sheave, means
for accumulating the material‘ thus supplied,
and means operated in synchronism with said
cars to load material accumulated successively
into successive, cars as said cars pass down
wardly from said upper to said lower sheave.
FRANK PARDEE, JR.
ELLSWORTH CURTIN.
5
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