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Патент USA US2131720

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sel?- 27, 1938-.’
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E. ST. PIERRE '
2,131,720
KNITTED FABRIC AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME
Fil'ed Aug. 15, 1938
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Sept. 27, 1938.
E. s1'. PIERRE
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2,131,720
KNITTED’ FABRIC AND METHOD ‘OF MAKING THE SAME
Filed Aug. 15, 1938
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Patented Sept. 27, 1938
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' UNITED-STATES PATENT OFFICE
KNITTED. FABRIC AND'METHO-D OF
.
MAKING THE
Eugene St. Pierre, Pawtucket, R. 1., assignor to,
_ Hemphill Company, Central Falls, R. -I., a cor
poration of Massachusetts _
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Application August 15, 1938, Serial No. 224,873
8 Claims. (0]. 66-172)
This invention relates to a knitted fabric and
method of making the same and more particularly
to knitted fabrics having an elastic thread vor
threads incorporated: therewith in combination
5 with ornamental threads commonly known as
wrap threads. While the wrap threads may be
incorporated in a manner similar to that shown in
Taubel Patent #1,619,'l88, March 1, 1927, they are
herein shown as incorporated in a knitted fabric
other words, the rib effect is not‘ due to the draw
ing together of the spacedintermediate wales by
the-elastic thread, the same‘v being knitted under
very light tension,_that is, underwhat is commonly
known as knitting tension similar to that disclosed a
in the Sturgess British Patent #4418 of 1886.
The relatively inelastic, cotton thread 3| is
knitted by all theneedles at the main feeding sta
tion M while the elastic thread 32 is fed to and
]0 in a manner similar to that shown in Lawson Pat-
knitted by the alternate needles at the auxiliary 10 ,
ent #1,'702,608, February 19, 1929.
feeding station A. Knitting cams (not shown)
In the drawings:
'
Fig. 1 is a view showing the outer face of the
fabric and including a few wales and courses of
act upon all of the needles in the usual or any de
sired manner at the main feeding station while
alternate needles only are actuated by cams (not
15 the fabric;
shown) at the auxiliary feeding station A, the 15
.
Fig. 2 is a view similar to Fig. 1 but showing the
fabric distorted somewhat by reason of an elastic
intermediate needles passing-beneath the elastic
thread‘ 32 as indicated in Fig- 3- To Select the
thread;
needles preparatory ‘to knitting at the auxiliary
,
'
Fig. 3 is a view showing the movements of the ‘ feeding station A, jacks may be provided which
20 needles to engage the main thread, the elastic > jacks are controlled to elevate needles that knit 20
thread and one or more wrap threads;
Fig. 4 is a diagrammatic plan view supplementing Fig- 3;
Fig. 5 is a perspective view showing the posi25 tion the elastic thread takes with respect to the
needles as the said needles pass the auxiliary feeding station; and
Fig. 6 is a conventional view of a stocking showing-a series of patterns similar to'the one disclosed
30 in Fig. 1.
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alternate wales 18, 20, etc., only, just prior to the
said needles reaching the cams at feeding station
A. Other jacks which may include some of the
mentioned jacks, act upon needles selectively to
elevate them to a position to be wrappedby the 25
wrap thread, such as 35, which thread or threads
is or are fed to the needles by means of the wrap
Ding mechanism ,39 which may be identical With
or similar to the wrap mechanism illustrated in
the Lawson Patent #1,702,608, February 19, 1929, 30
Referring particularly to Fig; 1, courses 1 to 17
noting particularly the disc 1 l1 and ‘associated
_ are shown, said courses including wales 18 to-30.
The base fabric is knitted with one or more in-'
Darts Shown in the Said Patent- Between the
auxiliary feeding station A and the wrap mecha
elastic threads 3|, fed through a guide 3|’, and
nism 39, a cam relowers the alternate needles
35 which may hereinafter, for convenience, be referred to as being of cotton and an elastic thread
32 which may be of uncovered or covered rubber
such as is commonly known as Lastex.
In alter-
nate wales 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28 and 30, etc., the
40 elastic thread 32 isshown as knitted by alternate
needles 33 only. The cotton thread 3! is knitted
by the said alternate needles 33 as well as the
intermediate needles 34 which knit-the intermedi-
ate wales 19, 21, 23, 25, 27,29, etc.
45
,
By knitting the elastic thread 32 with the alternate needles 33, the intermediate wales 19, 21,
etc.,‘are forced to the outer face of the fabric,
some of the said wales, as well as. some of the
alternate wales 18, 20, etc., being wrapped with
- 50 one or more wrap threads 35.
The rib e?ect pro-
that were elevated to knit the elastic thread 32,. 35 '
such relowering being indicated by the‘inclined
path 40 0f theneedles after they pass the guide M
which feeds thread 32.
The elastic thread is fed
to the needles through a vertically disposed guide
‘ll-Which passes between the needles and the latch 40
ring (not‘shown). The guide 4| may be sup
ported in any convenient manner and, preferably,
on the latch ring.‘
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It is desirable that the elastic thread 32 be fed
intojthe hooks of alternate needles with as little '45
tension as possible consistent with the knitting of
uniform fabric. The tension imposed upon the
elasticfis what may be termed, a light, knitting
tension. > The 'close' feeding of‘the elastic thread
32 by the guide 4|. making it unnecessary to,_im'- 50
duced by the forcing of the intermediate wales to pose any - considerable tension upon the elastic
the outer face of the fabric, is due primarily to the thread 32in order to cause the same to be fed into
elastic thread or strand 32 being between‘ a loop of - the hooks of alternate needles {33 and above the
the cotton or other thread, e. g., the 1621p ‘36, Fig. 2, intermediate needles 34 so that upon elevation of
55 and adjacent loops, e. g., 31 and 38, Fig. 2. ‘In 1 ‘the latter they shall pass forward of the elastic 55
2
thread.
2,181,720‘
The lack of any substantial tension upon
the manner hereinbefore described. Within the
base fabric, wrap or other design areas 50 may be
the elastic thread 32 causes the same to remain
more or less in contact with the hooks of the
incorporated, one form of such patterning being _
needles which do not knit the said elastic thread,
as indicated in Fig. 5.
,
illustrated in Fig. 1. Subsequent to the knitting
of the rib top 49, the remaining portion of the CR
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Fabric, as shown in the drawings and knitted
as previously described, is essentially a two-feed
stocking may be knitted in any desired manner.
The rib stitches may extend into the leg, foot and
other portions of the stocking, if desired.
fabric, alternate courses 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, etc., being
knitted with the cotton or other relatively in
10 elastic thread 3| with all the needles, while the
The invention is preferably practiced upon a
circular independent needle machine as illus 10
trated in Figures 3 and 4. In operation, the cir
intermediate courses 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, etc., are knitted
by alternate needles only engaging and knitting
the elastic thread 32 only. ’
cular knitting machine effects the knitting of
what is commonly known as a seamless fabric,
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The lack of substantial tension on the elastic
such as a stocking.
15 thread serves a useful purpose in that itpermits
the wrapping of consecutive needles of a group as
As hereinbefore described, the elastic thread 32
is, preferably, knitted by the alternate needles,
distinguished from every other needle only which
is necessary in order‘ to obtain a satisfactory
fabric when imposing substantial tension on an
elastic thread. However, any desired selection of
needles may be utilized for wrap selection; in
other words, any of the needles can be elevated
but the elastic knitted thread may be fed to the
alternate needles in such a manner as not to be ~
knitted, one example of such feeding being dis
closed in the Sturgess British Patent #4418 of 20
1886. Furthermore, regardless of whether the
elastic thread is knitted or inlaid as disclosed in
to knit a wrap thread such as 35.
When knitting the base fabric only, i. e., with
the Sturgess patent, a separate or relatively in
elastic thread may be knitted by alternate or all
out wrap threads, the'needl'es move along .until
elevated by the usual raise cam in‘ advance of the
guides, such as 3|’, the effect of the raise cam
of the needles at the auxiliary feeding station, in
addition to the inelastic thread 3| which is
knitted by all the needles at the main feeding
being indicated by that portion of the dot and
dash line, Fig. 3, inclined upwardly and indicated
at 42. Subsequently to passing the guide 3|’, all
station.
The elastic thread 32 is knitted, as illustrated
in Figures 1 and 6, in a sumcient number of 30
courses to give to the fabric the rib appearance
of the needles move downwardly to the position
43 and knit the yarn 3|; thereafter to the latch
clearing position 44 then being moved down to
normally resulting from the knitting of fabric
upon two sets of opposed needles, notwithstand
ing the fact that the stocking is knitted plain, i. e.,
move along the level 45, the cycle thereafter be
ing repeated beginning with selection for the
elastic thread 32.
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with‘ one set of_ needles only. As speci?cally 35
herein disclosed, the elastic is knitted throughout
the top 49 of the stocking as illustrated in Fig
_
When knitting pattern fabric as by means of a
wrap thread or threads 35, jacks' (not shown)
ure 6.
. selectively elevate needles as indicated at 46, said
.
.
.
The terms employed in the foregoing descrip
40 needles then moving along the horizontal path tion are used solely for the purpose of clearly de
41 where they receive a wrap thread or threads in ‘ scribing the knitted fabric and method of knit
their hooks, as indicated in Fig. 3. Thereafter
the needles are depressed to join the non-wrap
. needles, the wrap needles then knitting the
.45 cotton or other relatively inelastic thread 3|’ in
g the same manner as the non-wrap needles.
The wales 24, 26, etc. comprise loops of'cotton
or other relatively inelastic yarn 3| and elastic
yarn 32, whereas the wales 25, 27, 29, etc., are
50 knitted of the cotton or other yarn 3| in every
course, the elastic yarn 32 passing back of the
said wales which constitute the face wales of the
fabric. In the wrap areas, Fig. 1, wales, such as
20 and 22, are alternately knit with the elastic
ting, without the intention of limiting the inven
tion to the precise methods of knitting and details
-of construction disclosed. As an example,
‘.‘threads” and “yarns" are interchangeably used
to refer to 3|, 32, or 35 without in any way call
ing for speci?c characteristics of the several
threads or yarns other than that the thread or
yarn 32 must be relatively elastic.
In the foregoing description and in some of
the claims, reference has been made to “alter-'
nate" with respect to wales and courses: by "al
ternate" it is not intended to limit the invention
to "every other” either as applied to wales or
yarn 32 and then with both the cotton or other
yarn 3| and the wrap thread 35; in other words.
the elastic thread in said wales 20 and 22, is
drawn through two loops while the two loops of
the yarn 3| and thread 35 are drawn through
single loops of the elastic thread 32.
When starting the, knitting, a selvage maybe
knitted by ?rst causing the elastic thread to-be
fed to every other needle in the manner herein
before described for one or two courses, the cotton
65 or other yarn then being fed to and knitted by all
the needles in the usual manner. In knitting the
selvage as just described, the guide 3|’ is not
moved to feeding position until all the alternate
needles‘have engaged the yarn in their hooks or?
until said alternate needles have caught the yarn
for two courses of knitting thus knitting the said
elastic yarn during the second course.
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The stocking 43 diagrammatically illustrated
in Fig. 6, may include a rib' top 49, the rib effect of
which is produced by knitting the base fabric in
‘courses, as the elastic and inelastic courses may 55
alternate in other than in a one and one relation,
e. g., one and two, two and one, and two and two.
Ashereinbefore described, the elastic thread 32
is fed to the needles under a light tension, said
tension being su?icient to effect the proper plac
ing or the said elastic thread with respect to the
needles in the manner illustrated in Fig. 5. In
other words, the amount of tension imposed upon
the said elastic thread 32 is substantially the same
‘as the amount of tension imposed upon the elastic
thread as disclosed in the Sturgess British Patent
#4418 of 1886. '
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. Although the description and some of the claims
refer to the knitting of the thread 3| by "alP’ the
needles, ornamental or other effects may be pro
duced by occasionally omitting the knitting by
some of the needles.
I'claimz,
70
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1. A plain knitted, seamless stocking fabric
comprising ‘wales and courses, a relatively in 1
2,131,720
elastic'yarn alone knitted in alternate courses
_ only and a relatively elastic yarn knitted in inter
mediate courses only, the relatively inelastic yarn
being knitted at all of the wales in the said alter
G1 nate courses and the said elastic yarn being.
knitted at alternate wales only in the said inter
mediate courses, the said elastic yarn being
knitted under‘a light tension and in a su?icient
number of courses to cause the intermediate
10 wales to appear as rib wales on the outer face of
the fabric.
.
'2. A knitted fabric comprising wales and
courses, a relatively inelastic yarn alone knitted
in alternate courses only and a relatively elastic
yarn knitted in intermediate courses only, the
relatively inelastic yarn being knitted at all of
the wales in the said alternate courses and the
said elastic yarn being knitted at alternate wales
only in the said intermediate courses, and a wrap
El- thread knitted in some of the courses at some of v
the wales, the said elastic yarn causing the inter
mediate wales to appear as rib wales on the outer
face of the fabric.
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3. A method of knitting including feeding a
relatively inelastic yarn to all the needles at one
feeding station, and feeding a relatively elastic
thread to alternate needles only at a second feed
ing station, knitting the yarns separately at their
respective feeding stations while imposing a light
30 knitting tension upon the elastic yarn, and wrap
ping some of the needles with an additional
thread.
.
4. A method of knitting a stocking top on a
circular knitting machine and including knitting
35 a relatively inelastic thread at 'one feeding sta
tion and knitting a relatively elastic thread at
another feeding station and under a light ten
sion only so that the elastic thread is engaged in
theihooks of alternate needles and at the back of
hooks
40 intermediate needles adjacent to the
thereof.
_5. A sea
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ess plain knitted stocking top com
prising, thr gughout the greater portion thereof,
3
alternating courses of elastic'and inelastic yarns,
said inelastic yarn being knitted at every wale
and said elastic yarn being knitted at alternate
wales only and ?oated across intervening wales,
said elastic yarn being knitted under light tension
and producing a. rib effect.
6. Almethod of knitting a seamless stocking
top with one set of independent needles, said
method including feeding a relatively inelastic
yarn to all the needles in alternatecourses and
causing the said needles to knit the said yarn,
and‘ feedingan elastic yarn only to alternate
needles, the said alternate needles knitting the
said elastic yarn to constitute courses intervening
between the first mentioned courses, and impos 15
ing a light tension upon the elastic yarn, all for
the purpose of causing alternate wales to appear
as face wales in the knitted fabric.
'1. A seamless, plain knitted stocking top com
prising, throughout the greater portion thereof, 20
alternating courses of elastic and inelastic yarns,
said inelastic yarn being knitted at every wale
and said elastic yarn being knitted at alternate
wales only and ?oated acrossintervening wales,‘
said elastic yarn being knitted under light ten- _
,sion and producing a rib effect, one or more warp
threads being knitted'at some of the wales in
some of the courses.
8. A method of knitting a seamless stocking
top with one set of independent needles, said 30
method including feeding a relatively inelastic
yarn to all the needles in alternate-courses and
causing the said needles to knit the said yarn,
and feeding an elastic yarn only to alternate
needles, the said alternate needles knitting‘the
said elastic yarn to constitute courses intervening
between the ?rst mentioned courses, imposing a.
light tension upon the elastic yarn, all ,for the
purpose of causing alternate wales to appear as'
face ‘wales in the knitted fabric, and wrapping
some of the needles during the knitting of some,
at least, of the courses with onelor more threads.
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EUGENE ST. PIERRE.
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