close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Патент USA US2131777

код для вставки
ch 4, 113.,
2,131,777
R. H. WHLLCOX
METHOD OF PRODUCING OILCLOTH
I
Filed‘ Aug. 24, 1937
‘T
141110141111411/1/1/1/1143
v@293
JNVENTOR.
Patented Oct. 4, 1938
2,131,777
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,131,777
METHOD OF PRODUCING OILCLOTH
Roderick H. Willcox, deceased, late of Columbus,
Ohio, by Bertha P. Willcox and Richard V.
Willcox, co-executors, Columbus, Ohio
Application August 24, 1937, Serial No. 160,658
2 Claims. (Cl. Ell-67.9)
This invention relates to an oilcloth product
and method of producing the same. It has to do,
more speci?cally, with an oilcloth which is par
ticularly useful as a table cover and which has
the back thereof printed with a solid or all-over
color so as to simulate a dyed effect and present
a pleasing appearance.
In the making of oilcloth, the back of the fabric
is usually left uncoated and uncolored. Conse
quently, the back is not very pleasing to the eye,
since it appears to be gray or a soiled white.
The back of oilcloth in the past has been left
uncolored because, heretofore, a satisfactory and
economical method has not been devised for col
15 oring the back of the oilcloth.
It has been proposed in the past to coat both
sides of the oilcloth with 'a heavy coating of oil
paint applied in the usual manner so as to pro
duce a smooth ?nished oil paint coating on both
20 sides. When both sides of the cloth are coated
in this manner, the product becomes too stiff and
willpreadily crack. Also, if it is used as a table
cover, the under side will tend to stick to the
table since the cloth texture surface usually pro
vided on the back of the oilcloth has been elim
inated. Furthermore, coating both sides of the
cloth in this manner would render the cost of the
oilcloth prohibitive for the ordinary purposes for
which it is used.
As previously stated, the back of the oilcloth
is usually left uncolored or in the condition which
results during the manufacture of the oilcloth.
It has been customary, however, in making arti
?cial leather, to dye the cloth which is to be
coated in order that the back of the leather will
be colored or dyed. In making the arti?cial
leather, the original cotton fabric used for the
backing is usually put in vats and dyed. The
'40
fabric must then be taken out and wrung to
squeeze out the excess liquid dye. Then, it must
be washed or rinsed a number of times.
It must
then be stretched to bring it back to its original
size. Thus, a number of time-consuming opera
tions are necessary in order that the back of the
45 arti?cial leather might be colored and present a
more pleasing appearance. These operations
make the resulting product quite expensive and,
therefore, this method is not feasible in the mak
ing of oilcloth, inasmuch as it would make the
50 cost of the oilcloth prohibitive.
One of the objects of this invention is to pro
vide an oilcloth product which is particularly
useful as a table cover and‘ which has the back
thereof printed with a solid or all-over color so as
to simulate a dyed effect and which blends or
harmonizes with the front coated surface of the
cloth, thereby presenting a very pleasing appear
ance.
-
Another object of this invention is to provide an
oilcloth product having the back thereof printed
as indicated to simulate a dyed effect but having
the cloth texture and cloth appearance on the
back surface preserved.
Another object of this invention is to provide a
method of making oilcloth wherein the back of 10
the oilcloth may be printed with a solid all-over
color in a very efficient and inexpensive manner.
Another object of this invention is to provide
an oilcloth of the type indicated having the back
thereof treated not only to make it more pleasing 15
in appearance but also to make it water-repel
lent.
In its preferred form, this invention contem
plates the provision of an oilcloth product which
has the back thereof colored to simulate a dyed
effect. This oilcloth product is made by printing 20
a solid or all-over color on the back thereof in _
such a manner that dyed effect is produced. The
printing is preferably accomplished by means of a
printing roll which has a plurality of ?ne lines
or depressions in the surface thereof so that, when Ni 5
it rotates in a bath of the coloring liquid, it will, _
due to capillary attraction, take up some of the
coloring liquid and retain it until the roll con
tacts with the cloth to be printed. The coloring
liquid retained in the small depressions will be a:
absorbed by the cloth when it contacts with the
roll.
Since the entire surface of the roll is pro
vided with these closely~spaced minute depres
sions, a solid or all~over color will be printed on
the cloth. The color printed on the back of the
cloth preferably blends or harmonizes with the
color of the front surface of the cloth which is
provided with a smooth oil paint coating produced
in the usual way.
The coloring liquid used for printing the back
of the cloth is of such a nature that when it is
absorbed by the strands of cloth- it will make the
back of the cloth water-repellent. In applying
this liquid, it is preferably of such a consistency
that it will be absorbed readily by the strands
of the cloth but will not ?ll the interstices thereof
in order that the cloth-like appearance and cloth
texture of the back of the fabric will be preserved.
This will prevent the back surface of the cloth 4
from sticking to surfaces with which it contacts
and will result in other advantages. Thus, the
back surface of the oilcloth product will still have
the comparatively rough'cloth texture and cloth
appearance which is common to the ordinary oil
2,181,777
2
cloth. However, the back surface will be so print
ed that it will simulate a dyed effect, and will be
uniform throughout. Since it appears to be dyed
cloth, the appearance of the back of the oilcloth
pressions are illustrated in enlarged detail in
Figures 3 and 4. However, they need not, neces
sarily, be of the same shape illustrated in Figure
3 although this shape is preferred. Due to capil
lary
attraction caused by the innumerable de
product is greatly enhanced. Furthermore, print
ing the back surface in the manner indicatedv pressions I3 in the printing surface of the print
ing roller, when the printing roller rotates in ‘the
makes the back water-repellent.
This application is a continuation, in part, of bath of coloring liquid, all the depressions will
the application of Roderick H. Willcox, Serial
10 No. 37,202, filed August 21, 1935.
In the accompanying drawing, there is illus
trated, more or less diagrammatically, the meth
0d and apparatus which is preferably employed
in making the product and the finished product
15 is also illustrated.
In the drawing:
Figure 1 is a diagrammatic view illustrating a
roll of oilcloth with the back surface thereof be
ing printed according to this invention.
20
Figure 2 is a view of the printing roll which is
preferably used‘in printing the back of the oil
cloth.
Figure 3 is a microscopic view of a portion of
the printing surface of the printing roll.
25
Figure 4 is a section taken substantially on line
4-4 of Figure 3.
Figure 5 is a perspective view showing a roll of
oilcloth with the back of the cloth printed ac
cording to this invention.
80. With reference to the drawing, in Figure 5 is
illustrated a roll of oilcloth made in accordance
with this invention. It is to be understood that
this ?gure is merely a diagrammatic illustration
of the cloth inasmuch as it is practically im
35 possible to illustrate in the drawing the exact
appearance of the cloth. This oilcloth product
has the front surface I thereof coated in the
usual manner with a coating of heavy oil paint
to provide a smooth ?nished coated surface. A
part of this coating when applied'passes through
the natural interstices in the fabric and is ex
posed on the opposite side thereof. The back 2
of the cloth, however, is not left in the unsightly
condition which results during the manufacture
of the oilcloth, as was done in the prior art, but
is printed with a solid all-over color uniform
throughout which is applied to the exposed sur
faces of the oil paint forming the oilcloth mate
rial projecting through the openings in the fabric
50 and to the exposed surface of the fabric adjacent
said openings; and preferably blends or har
monizes with the front coated surface I of the
cloth. The back surface is printed or colored
in such a manner as to simulate a dyed effect, the
55 cloth texture and cloth appearance being pre
served.
become ?lled with such liquid and, consequently,
the printing roller picks up a considerable
amount of such liquid, as illustrated in Figure 4.
In making this roll, a copper roll having a smooth
surface is preferably employed. This roll is
covered with a photogravure film and is then
etched in order that the small depressions l3 will 15
be formed therein. However, the small depres
sions may be formed by machining or in other
ways. After the minute depressions are pro
duced in the surface of the copper roll, it is
preferably plated with chromium or other suit
20
able metal in order to produce a harder and more
lasting surface.
As previously indicated, the coloring liquid
which is used in printing the back of the cloth
is of such a nature that it will render the back 25
surface of the cloth water-repellent. This liquid
preferably comprises a liquid carrier which is
immiscible with water and a suitable pigment.
As the carrier, any oxidizing or drying oil may be
employed. For example, oxidized sardine oil 30
may be used. Synthetic resins or lacquers also
may be employed. Any of the various pigments
may be used, depending upon the color desired.
In preparing this printing liquid, the pigment is
mixed in the oil and the mixture is ground in a 35
colloid mill. Then, enough naphtha or other
solvent is added to bring it down to water con
sistency.
In printing the back of the cloth, the cloth is
passed between the rollers 5 and 6, as indicated 40
in Figure 1. The roller 5 rotates in the bath [0
of the printing or coloring liquid. The printing
roller picks up the coloring liquid and the doctor
blade I l wipes off the excess liquid from the sur
face of the roll, leaving only the coloring liquid 45
that has been drawn into the minute depressions
on the roll.
The pressure drum or roll 6 presses
the cloth 3 ?rmly against the surface of the
printing roller. The coloring or printing liquid
which remains in the fine depressions in the 50
printing roll is taken up or absorbed by the cloth.
The coloring liquid is evenly distributed through
out the entire back surface of the cloth so as to
give it the apearance of having been dyed. Since
the coloring liquid used is substantially of water 55
consistency, the ?bers or strains of the cloth will
readily
absorb it. However, the interstices in the
Figures 1 to 4, inclusive, illustrate the method cloth will
not be filled and consequently, the cloth
and. apparatus which is preferably employed in appearance
and cloth texture at the back of the
printing the back side of the cloth. Figure 1
60
oilcloth
will
be preserved.
shows a roll of oilcloth 3 which is fed around a
In
manufacturing
the
oilcloth,
it
is
preferable
number of rollers 4 and then between a printing
to ?rst coat the cloth backing with one or several
roller 5 and a pressure roller 6. It then passes
coatings of ?ller material in the usual way.
over other rollers ‘I and 8 into a drying oven 9. ,
drying, the back side of the cloth is pref
The roller 6 is preferably of considerable weight After
erably printed in the manner discribed above. 65
and
is
permitted
to
press
the
cloth
3
firmly
65
After it is so printed, it is passed through the
against the surface of the printing roller 5. The oven 9 where the solvent used in the coloring
printing roller 5 rotates in a bath III of coloring liquid will be evaporated and, consequently, the
liquid and a doctor blade H is provided for
scraping off excess coloring material from the back surface of thecloth will be dried. Then,
the front surface of the cloth which has been 70
70 surface of the printing roll.
with the filler coating is coated with one
The printing surface of the printing roller 5 is coated
or more coatings of heavy oil paint to produce the
illustrated best in Figures 2, 3 and 4.‘ The
printing surface I! of the printing roller is so smooth finished front surface. In this manner,
made that a plurality of closely-spaced minute the ?nished coating is not applied to the surface
of the cloth until after the back of the cloth has 75
75 depressions l3 are formed therein. These de
2,131,777
been printed to simulate a dyed effect. Thus,
there will be no danger of the ?nished surface
of the oilcloth being smeared or otherwise in
jured during the printing of the back of the cloth.
It will be apparent from the description above
that the oilcloth product of this invention is dif
ferent from any product heretofore made. This
oilcloth has the back thereof printed in such a
manner that it simulates a dyed effect but the
10 cloth appearance and cloth texture is preserved.
The coloring liquid is applied to the back surface
of the cloth in such a manner that a solid or all
over color is produced and, consequently, the back
of the oilcloth will appear tobe dyed. The color
on the back of the oilcloth preferably blends or
harmonizes with the color or colors of the ?nished
front surface of theoilcloth so that the product
is very pleasing in appearance. The coloring
liquid not only serves to enhance the appearance
20 of the back of the cloth but is of such a nature
i‘ that it will make it water-repellent. The method
which is employed for producing this oilcloth
product is simple but very eii‘icient and the oil
cloth may be produced in an inexpensive manner.
25 This method is much more simple and much more
economical than the method previously discussed
for producing a colored backing on arti?cial
leather and which would make the cost prohibi~
tive.
The product produced by this method,
3
Having thus described the invention, What is
claimed is:
1. The method of producing an oilcloth or simi
lar product which comprises applying to the front
surface only of a base cloth of textile material a
coating of oil paint to form a ?nished surface,
some of which paint passes through the inter—
stices of the cloth and appears upon the opposite‘
side thereof, drying such coating, and thereafter ‘
printing the back surface of the cloth with a 10
coloring liquid which is applied both to the coat
ing of oil paint which appears through the inter
stices of the cloth and to the fabric of the cloth
adjacent the same, said liquid being of such con
sistency that it will be absorbed by the back of
the cloth to form a solid, uniformly applied color
so as to simulate a dyed effect which will not
destroy the cloth texture and cloth appearance at
the back of the oilcloth.
2. The method of producing an oilcloth or simi 20
lar product which comprises applying to the
front surface only of a base cloth material of
‘textile fabric a coating of oil paint to form a
?nished surface and which fills the interstices
of the cloth and appears upon the reverse side, 25
drying the same, and then printing the back
surface ‘of the cloth and the coating material
which appears through the interstices thereof
30 however, will be as pleasing in appearance as a
on the reverse side with a coloring liquid in such
coated cloth product wherein the backing is dyed.
By the term “cloth", used in the preceding de
scription and the following claims, it is intended
cloth texture and which will produce a uniform,
to cover fabrics of various kinds. By the term
35 “oilcloth", used in the description and the fol
lowing claims, it is intended to cover other simi
lar coated fabrics.
a. manner as to preserve the cloth appearance and
solid all-over color, and thereafter drying the
product as thus formed.
BER'I'HA P. WILICOX,
RICHARD V. WILLCOX,
Co-executors of the Last Will and Testament of
Roderick H. Willcoz, Deceased.
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
516 Кб
Теги
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа