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Патент USA US2132052

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Oct. 4, 1938.
R. C.'SOLLENBERGER
2,132,052 Y
SELF TRAINING IDLER
Filed Dec. 16, 1935
2 Sheets-Sheet l
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Oct-'4, 1938-
R. c. SOLLENBER'GER
2,132,052
SELF TRAINING IDLER
Filed Dec. 16, 1935
2 Sheets-Sheét 2
2,132,052
Patented Oct. 4, 1938
UNITE
ATENT OFFKIE
STATES
2,132,052
SELF-TRAININ G IDLEE
Reuel Clem Sollenberger, South Bend, Ind., as
signor to Dodge Manufacturing Corporation,
Mishawaka, Ind., a corporation of Indiana
Application December 16, 1935, Serial No. ‘54,619
(Cl. 198—202)
This invention relates to belt conveyors, and shown equipped with sealed and grease-packed
bearing units of the type comprising concentric
more particularly to training idlers.
' 20 Claims.
A training idler, as the name implies, will func
tion to train the conveyor belt traveling thereon,
5- so as to maintain the belt in a centered position
on the idler, thereby counteracting tendencies of
the belt to deviate from a straight line course.
In a long belt conveyor, it is desirable to support
the belt at one or more points along its length
10 by a training idler or idlers, to keep the belt from
running out of line.
Objects of the present invention are to obtain
improvement in the functioning of training
idlers, and improvements of practical advantage
15 with respect to construction.
The invention will be hereinafter described with
reference to an illustrative embodiment thereof,
shown in the accompanying drawings, and will
be more particularly pointed out and de?ned in
20 the claims following the description.
In the drawings:
Fig. 1 is a top plan view of a training idler of
one practicable type and construction contain
ing an embodiment of the invention; a portion of
25 the conveyor belt which travels on the idler being
represented in this ?gure by dotted lines.
Fig. 2 is a sectional View of a portion of the
idler, showing the manner of mounting the idler
rolls.
3-1") 'Fig; 3 is a top plan view of the right-hand
half of the idler, indicating in dotted lines a dis
placed position of the right-hand training roll of
the idler.
'
1
Fig. 4 is a front elevation of the half of the
33 structure shown in the preceding ?gure.
Fig. 5 is an end elevation, also indicating by
dotted lines a displaced position of the right-hand
training roll.
In the drawings, 1 denotes a conveyor belt,
M traveling in the direction indicated by the arrow
in Fig. 1.
As shown, the conveyor belt is supported on an
idler comprising a number of conveyor rolls, in
this instance three rolls 2, 3, 4,, arranged trans
43 versely of the belt in end to end relation, the
intermediate roll 3 being horizontal and the two
end rolls 2 and 4 being oppositely inclined. This
is one example of the familiar type of conveyor
idler which comprises a plurality of conveyor
rolls arranged end to end on relatively inclined
axes to provide a trough-shaped support for the
conveyor belt.
Freely rotating on frictionless bearings, the
I conveyor rolls support the traveling belt without
55 exerting a frictional drag. In Fig. 2 the rolls are
racer-rings and interposed balls, the outer race
rings 5 of these units being ?tted and secured
in properly centered hub sockets in the ends of
the rolls. The inner race members of these bear
ing units are shown constructed as socket mem
bers 6 which receive and are supported on ball
shaped ends ‘I of stub shafts carried by the
roll supporting standards. Double-headed stub 10
shafts 8 clamped in the upper ends of the inter
mediate supporting standards 9 carry the roll
bearings in adjacent ends of adjacent rolls, and
single-headed stub shafts In clamped in the up
per ends of the end standards H carry the roll 15
bearings in the outer ends of the end. rolls 2 and
4. The ball-shaped ends or heads of thesestub
shafts are adapted to-be inserted through and
withdrawn from the supporting standards, thus
permitting ready assembly and disassembly of the
parts. The construction here alluded to with
reference to the roll bearings and stub shaft
mountings therefor exempli?es one practicable
manner for the mounting of the roll bearings, the
same being of a special advantage in connection “
with other features of the idler structure herein
to be described.
The conveyor rolls are mounted in a manner
permitting either of the two end rolls 2 and 4,
hereinafter referred to as training rolls, to be
skewed or canted for training the belt, and means
are provided whereby the lateral shifting of the
belt to either side from a centered position will
cause the canting of the training roll at that side,
as suggested by the dotted line showing in Figs.
3 and 5, with-the effect of training the belt back
to centered position, whereupon the canted roll
will resume its normal position at right angles to
the direction of travel of the belt. The construc
tion embodied in the illustrative idler for mount- » -
ing the conveyor rolls and accomplishing the
training action as above indicated, will now be
described.
'
Pivotally supported at their inner ends on ?xed
supports, and at their outer ends on movable sup
ports, the training rolls 2 and 4 are capable of
being rocked or swung'on their inner end sup
ports in parallelism or approximate parallelism
with the inclined side portions‘of the conveyor
belt riding on said training rolls. The ?xed sup
ports referred to are typi?ed by the intermediate
roll supporting standards 9, carried by a station
ary supporting structure represented in the draw
ings by the angle bar l2 which may be a ?xed part
of the supporting frame-work for the belt con 55
2
veyor.
2,132,052
Movable supports for the outer ends of
v . the training rolls are provided by pivotally mount
ing the end supporting standards I I on base mem
bers l4 affixed to the angle bar l2. Said angle
bar l2, carrying the ?xed intermediate roll sup
porting standards 9 and pivotally mounted end
standards H, typi?es a stationary stand in which
the conveyor rolls are mounted. The pivot pins
or trunnions l3 of the pivotally mounted end
10 standards H are shown horizontally disposed‘at
right angles to the direction of travel of the belt,
acting between an abutment [8 on the standard
and an abutment l9 carried by an adjusting screw
20. Said screw 20 engages in a threaded hole
in the boss 2| onthe ball member M. A lock nut
22 secures the screw at any desired adjustment.
With the construction shown, adjustment of the
spring I? is depended upon to adjust the resistance
to displacement of the standard from normal
position, and thereby to determine the shifting
effort required. If an adjustable counterbalanc
ing means were employed in lieu of the spring,
so that these standards can rock or tilt in a ' it would be on the opposite side of the standard,
manner to'move the outer ends of the training ' and the right-hand side thereof would be designed
rolls in approximate parallelism with the direc
to limit the tilting motion, which in the illus
15 tion of travel of the belt, or so as to swing said
rolls as above-described. In this swinging move
ment, the training rolls must not only pivot on
their ?xed supports at their inner ends, but must
also have axial and universal play with respect
to the movable supports carrying their outer ends.
This action is allowed by the use of the type of
bearing units and mountings therefor previously
referred to. ,The ball-headed ends 7 of the stub
shafts carried by the supporting'standards ?t
rotatably and slidably in the socket members 6
constituting the inner members of the bearing
units. With the use of these bearing units and
stub shaft mountings, it will be apparent that the
training rolls can rock properly on their inner end
supports, and that the roll bearings in the outer
ends of said training rolls will move with the nec
essary rotational and slip' motions on the stub
shafts ID of the movable outer end supports.
Within the broader aspects of the invention, other
suitable mounting constructions may be em
ployed for the same general purpose. For ex
ample, the training rolls could be mounted on
axles extending therethrough and ball~seated on
?xed supports at their inner ends and slidably
40 ball-seated on movable supports at their outer
ends. But the illustrative construction, wherein
the roll bearing units include socket members en
gaging ball-shaped ends of short stub shafts ?xed
in the'supporting standards, is admirably adapted
for the purpose and of special advantage, making
a simpler and more practicable construction than
would be required if the roll bearings were car
ried on axles extending through the rolls.
The pivotally mounted end standards I I should
be held in normal position in such manner as to
require a substantial effort to tilt them, in order
to prevent any accidental displacement of the
training rolls from their normal positions at right
angles to the direction of travel of the belt, and
the standards should return to normal position as
soon as relieved from the displacing effort. In the
illustrative apparatus, the standards H are nor
mally erect, so that they carry the roll-support
ing stub shafts ll! directly over the pivot pins l3.
Movement of the standards from normal posi
tion in a direction contrary to the direction of
travel of the belt is prevented by motion limiting
stops l5 engaged by abutments IS on the stand
ards. These motion limiting stops l5 are pointed
‘ or ridged so as to prevent any obstructing of their
functioning by accumulation of dirt or trash. For
yieldingly urging the standards to and holding
them in normal position, either a counterbalanc
ing Weight means or spring means, or both, could
be employed. In ‘ the construction shown, the
75.
standards are held in normal position by the
Weight of the‘hereinafter mentioned shifter rollers
Y23 and by spring means. As best shown in Fig. 5,
the spring means associated with each standard
I i is represented by a compression spring I? re
10
trated construction is limited by the compression 15
action of the spring.
Since the several conveyor rolls including the
training rolls 2 and 4 are freely rotatable on
frictionless bearings, the veering of the conveyor
belt from centered position on the idler would 20
not in itself exert such a frictional drag effect
as to cant the proper roll for training the belt,
in view of the resistance to displacement of the
training rolls which is imposed by the means for
yieldingly holding the end rocker standards H 25
in their normal positions.
Other means are
therefore provided in the illustrative apparatus
for causing the canting of the proper training
roll as required to train the conveyor belt to
centered position when it veers therefrom. ' For 30
this purpose, shifting devices to be actuated by
the belt are associated with the respective rocker
standards H to rock them backwardly or in'the
direction of travel of the belt. These shifting
devices include guide rollers 23 arranged adja 35
cent to the edges of the belt, said rollers being
carried by the rocker standards H preferably on
the forward side thereof so as to utilize the Weight
of the guide rollers and their carrying arms to
assist in holding the rocker standards in nor 40
mal position. Assuming the conveyor belt to be
properly centered on the idler, there would or
dinarily be a clearance, of say an eighth or a
quarter of an inch between each edge of the belt
and the adjacent guide roller, and only when the 45
belt veers from centered position will either of
these guide rollers be engaged. To avoid undue
wear on the belt edges, the guide rollers 23- are
preferably disposed at right angles to thesur
faces of the respective side portions of the belt.
These guide rollers, which may be otherwise re,
ferred to as shifter rollers, are of the friction
bearing type, so that a certain resistance is im
posed to their rotation.
Hence when an edge of >
the conveyor belt running out of line engages 55
either of these guide rollers, the pressure result
ing from such resistance to rotation will be trans
mitted to the rocker standard carrying such guide
roller, causing the rocking of said standard in
the direction of travel of the belt to an extent
in proportion to the thrust exerted. Such rock-.
ing of the standard ll correspondingly shifts the
outer end of the training roll with which it is
associated, canting the training roll as indicated
in dotted lines in Figs. 3 and 5, thus training the 65
belt back to centered position on the idler,.where—
upon thetraining roll resumes normal position.
Thev canted position of the right-hand training
roll indicated by dotted lines‘ in Figs. 3 and '5
is rather exaggerated for convenience of illustra 70
tion. In‘ actualpractice the propertraining of
the conveyor belt may be accomplished by slight . >
deflections in the positions of the training rolls.
Means for adjusting the positions of the guide
rollers 23 and for adjusting the frictional drag 75
3.
2,132,052
exerted by these rollers are provided as follows.
Each guide roller is carried from the rocker stand
ard II with which it is associated by a bracket
arm 24'bolted to the lug 25 on said standard by
the bolt 26 parallel with the axis of the guide
roller. Upon loosening the bolt.26, the arm 24
can be swung to adjust the position of the guide
roller, according to the clearance desired between
the guide roller and the edge of the conveyor
belt. The guide roller is journalled on the shaft
21 rigidly secured to its carrying arm 24. The
upper end of said shaft extends above the top
much superion Another objection to the prior
device was that it required a special supporting
framework, whereas the idler ‘herein described
does not require special framing for its support,
and can be installed at any point in the conveyor
line in the same manner as an ordinary support
of the guide roller and is screw threaded and
has an adjusting nut 28 thereon, a washer 29
15 being interposed between said nut and the upper
end of the guide roller. The adjusting nut can
be screwed down to give any desired amount of
drag tothe guide roller when it is contacted by
the edge of the belt. Thus the guide roller is
20 a friction bearing roller with anadjustable fric~
tion bearing, the nut 28 and washer below it serv
ing for adjusting the friction. So if the guide
roller should turn too freely, the nut 28 may be
tightened to increase the drag of the roller on
the belt when contact with the belt occurs, and
thus increase the rocking. movement imparted to
the standard H against the resistance of its
spring.
From the foregoing, it will be apparent that the
training idler herein shown and described is of
highly practicable and efficient character. The
mode of operation is such that its training action
does not depend upon the exertion of a frictional
drag on the conveyor belt by the training rolls,
35 nor upon a skewing of the idler as a whole.
All
of the conveyor rolls of the idler may be freely
rotatable on frictionless bearings, avoiding drag
and undue wear on the undersurface of the belt
at all times, and obviating resistance to the nor
mal travel of the belt when running true. Only
when the belt veers from a centered position does
an. edge thereof contact with one of the guide
rollers 23, which then imposes a su?icient drag
to cause the shifting in the direction of travel of
45 the belt of the outer end of the training roll with
which such guide roller is associated, with the
effect of gently training the belt back to centered
position, the training roll resuming its normal
position as the training takes place or as soon as
50 the training is effected. In the prior art there
was used a training idler which depended upon
employment of friction bearings in the training
rolls, and upon a turning of the idler as a whole
about a central vertical axis to accomplish the
training
action. Not only was such prior device
55
ing idler. As the prior idler depended for train
ing action upon pivoting of the stand in which
the conveyor rolls were mounted, it might fail
to function properly if the stand should become 10'
clogged by material falling from the conveyor
belt, whereas in the illustrative apparatus the con‘
veyor rolls are mounted in a fixed ‘stand and in
terference with the proper functioning is not like
ly to occur.
.
15
Obviously the illustrative apparatus may be
variously modified as to details of construction
and arrangement to suit various different condi
tions and requirements. Moreover it is not indis
pensable that all of the features of the invention 20
be used conjointly since various features may be
used to advantage in various different combina
tions and subcombinations.
What I claim as my invention, and desire to
secure by Letters Patent, is:
1. A training idler comprising conveyor rolls
arranged end to end on relatively inclined axes
to provide a troughing support for a conveyor belt,
?xed means for supporting the roll ends other
than at the idler extremities, movably mounted 30
means supporting the roll ends at the idler ex
tremities, means yieldingly maintaining the rolls
in normal relationship, and means whereby the
shifting from centered position of the conveyor
belt traveling on the idler will cause a roll dis
35
placement to train the belt back to centered posi
tion.
2. A training idler comprising conveyor rolls /
arranged end to end on relatively inclined axes to
provide a troughing support for a conveyor belt, 4.0.»
?xed means for supporting the roll ends other
than at the idler extremities, movably mounted
means supporting the roll ends at the idler ex
tremities, said movably mounted means being
yieldingly urged to position to maintain the last
mentioned roll ends in normal position, and
means controlled by the conveyor belt for caus
ing displacements of said last mentioned roll ends
as required to train the belt to centered position
on the idler.
50
3. A training idler comprising conveyor rolls
arranged end ‘to end, including intermediate and
end rolls, said end rolls being arranged on oppo
sitely inclined axes, each of said inclined end
rolls being independently movably mounted and 55
subject to the objection that it constantly imposed
adapted to be individually skewed for training a
a frictional drag on the belt, but also its training
action was liable to be too violent. As the con
veyor belt would shift laterally from centered
whereby the shifting of the traveling belt from
centered position will cause the inclined end roll
up which the belt rides to be skewed to train the 60
position, the drag imposed by the training roll at
the side toward which the belt shifted would be
increased, and when this increase was sufficient to
overcome the inertia of the idler it would pivot on
its center bearing, one end of the idler being pulled
forward and the other end moving backward.
Thus the training action was doubled, and the
belt was liable to be jerked from one off-center
position to the opposite off-center position, where
upon the training action would be repeated in the
reverse manner, and a condition might be set up
whereby the belt would ?uctuate from side to side.
It was found necessary to impose arbitrary motion
limits on such prior devices to obtain satisfactory
results. As compared with such prior devices, the
75 training action of the idler herein described is
conveyor belt traveling on the idler, and means
belt back to centered position, said means com
prising a pair of independently operable roll skew
ing devices, one operable by the belt when shifted
laterally to the right for independently skewing
the right hand end roll, and the other operable by
the belt when shifted laterally to the left for
independently skewing the left hand end roll.
4. A training idler comprising conveyor rolls
arranged end toend, including intermediate and
end rolls, said end rolls being arranged on oppo- Ii
sitely inclined axes, ?xed roll supports each ar
ranged between and supporting the adjacent ends
of a pair of rolls, movably mounted supports for
the outer ends of the end rolls movable for shift
ing said outer ends in a manner to swing said rolls
4
2,132,052
on their inner ‘end supports in parallelism or'ap
proximate parallelism with the inclined side por
mentioned means to effect'thevtraining of the
belt back to its intended normal running posi-il
tions of a conveyor belt traveling on the idler, the
end rolls being suitably mounted on their sup
10. In a training idler, a training roll posi
ports to permit such action, means engageable by , tioned to support an edge portion of a conveyor
the traveling belt for moving said movable sup
belt, stationary means for axially supporting the
ports to cause displacement in the direction of inner end of said roll, means for axially support
travel of the belt of the inclined end roll up ingthe outer end of said roll movable to shift
which the belt rides when it shifts laterally from said outer end in the direction of travel of the
10 a centered position, and means resisting such dis
belt, said last named means comprising an un
placement and causing resumption of normal po
stably mounted tilting support, means for yield
sition of the displaced roll when sufficiently re
ingly holdinglthe same in normal position, and
lieved of the displacing effort.
» l
means contactable by the belt for tilting said sup
5. A training idler comprising conveyor rolls
port.
7,
.
7'
~
15 arranged end to end, including intermediate
11. In a training idler, a conveyor roll for sup
and end rolls, said end rolls being oppositely porting an edge portion of a conveyor belt, said
inclined to support inclined side portions of a roll mounted to permit skewing the roll for train
conveyor belt traveling on the idler, ?xed inter
ing the belt, a substantial eifort being required
mediate sup-ports each arranged between and for the skewing, means contactable by the belt
20: supporting the adjacent ends of a pair of rolls,
for exerting such effort, and means for adjusting
supports for the outer ends of the end rolls mov
the effort exerted by contact of the belt with
able for shifting said outer ends to swing said
said ?rst named means.
'
>
'
rolls on their inner end supports substantially
12. A self-training idler having training rolls
parallel with the inclined side portions of the arranged for supporting a traveling belt at op
25 belt, stub shafts having ball-shaped ends car
posite sides of its longitudinal center, said rolls 25
tion;
ried by the respective supports, and antifriction
bearing units in the roll endshaving socket mem
bers on which the inner race rings of the bear
ings are provided,said socket members ?tted on
30 said ball-shaped ends of said stub shafts, where
by the end rolls can pivot on their respective sup
ports and move axially relative to their outer
end supports when the latter'are moved.
6. In a training idler, a movably mounted
35,1 Itraining roll adapted to be skewed, supports,
vtherefor including a support movable 'to shift
one end 'of the roll relative to the other, ball
shaped ended stub shafts carriedby said sup
ports, and roll bearings having socket members
40 universally movably mounted on the ball-shaped
ends of said stub shafts, the socket member of
the roll bearing adjacent to the movable sup
port being also slidablev on the ball-shaped end
of the stub shaft carried by said movable sup
port.
7. A training idler having independently mov
ably mounted training rolls adapted to be indi
vidually skewed and means operable by the belt
traveling on said idler whereby the shifting of
the belt from centered position will cause the
independent skewing of the training roll at the
side of the center to which the belt shifts, said
' training rolls being yieldingly urged to normal
position, and said belt-operating means inde
pendently skewing each roll in a manner to center,
the belt.
8, A training idler having independently mov
ably mounted training rolls adapted to be indi~
vidually skewed for centering the ‘belt, said rolls
60 being freely rotatable on frictionless bearings,
and means controlled by the belt traveling on
said idler to cause the independent skewing of
the training roll at the side to which the belt
shifts.
'
9. In a training idler, a training roll positioned
to support an edge portion of a conveyor belt
and having its axis inclined to the horizontal,
stationary means for axially supporting the lower
end of said-roll, movably mounted means for
axially supportingthe upper end of said roll nor
mally maintaining it at right angles to the path
of the belt‘but movable for shifting said upper,
, end in the direction of travel of the belt, and
means contactable by a belt edge running abhor:
75, mally high on said roll for so moving said last
'
l
being independently movably _mounted to per
mit them to 'be individually skewed, and a pair of
independently operable means for independently
skewing said training rolls, one of said means
operable by the traveling belt when shifted from 30
centered position to the right for skewing the
right hand roll to train the belt to centered po
sition, and the other of said'means operable by
the traveling belt when shifted from centered
position to the left for skewing the left hand 35-.
roll to train the belt to centered position, each
roll automatically resuming itsnormal position
pursuant to the performance of its training func
tion.
‘
'
13. A self~training idler having training rolls 40
for supporting a traveling belt at opposite sides
of its longitudinal center, a stationary ‘base,
standards in ?xed position on said base support
ing the inner ends ‘of said rolls, standards inde
pendently movably mounted on'said base sup
porting the outer ends of said rolls, said last
mentioned standards being movable transversely
of the vertical plane of the roll axes, said ‘rolls
being mounted in their respective standards in
a manner permitting them to be swung on their ,
inner end supports in parallelism or
mate parallelism with the portions of
traveling on said rolls, and mechanism
by the traveling belt for moving said
approxi
the beltv
operable
movable
standards to effect roll skewing operations‘ to ,
center the belt, the organization including means
whereby the rolls resume a normal position pur
suant to the centering of the'belt.’
"
14. A self-training idler having training ‘rolls
for supporting a traveling belt at opposite sides
of its longitudinal center, a stationary base,
standards in ?xed position on said base support
ing the inner ends of said rolls, standards inde-1
pendently movably mounted on said base sup
porting the outer ends of said rolls, said last
mentioned standards being movabletransversely
of the vertical plane of the roll axes, said rolls
being mounted in their respective standards in
a manner permitting them to be swung on their
inner end supports in parallelism or approximate 70
parallelism with the portions of the belt travel-.
ing on said rolls, means yieldingly holding said
movable standards in normal position, and means
associated with each movable standard and op
erable by the traveling belt when it shifts from 75
2,132,052
centered position toward said standard for mov
ing said standard to skew the corresponding roll
for training the belt to centered position.
15. A self-training idler having training rolls
for supporting a traveling belt at opposite sides
of its longitudinal center, a stationary base,
standards in ?xed position on said base support
ing the inner ends of said rolls, standards inde
pendently movably mounted on said base support
10 ing the outer ends of said rolls, said last men
tioned standards being movable transversely of
the vertical plane of the roll axes, said 'rolls being
mounted in their respective standards in a man
ner permitting them to be swung on their inner
15 end supports in parallelism or approximate par
allelism with the portions of the belt traveling on
said rolls, means yieldingly holding said movable
standards in normal position, and belt-engage
able devices carried by said movable standards
whereby the traveling belt if it shifts laterally
from centered position toward either of said
standards will move it for skewing the corre
sponding roll to train the belt to centered posi
tion.
-
16. A self-training idler having training rolls
for supporting a traveling belt at opposite sides
of its longitudinal center, a stationary base,
standards in ?xed position on said base support
ing the inner ends of said rolls, standards inde
30 pendently movably mounted on said base sup
porting the outer ends of said rolls, said last men
25
5
ports in parallelism or approximate parallelism
with the portions of the belt traveling on said
rolls, belt-engageable means for operating said
movable standards whereby the traveling belt if
it shifts laterally from centered position toward
either of said standards will move it for skewing
the corresponding roll to train the belt to cen
tered position, and means for automatically re
turning each roll to its normal position pursuant
10
to the performance of its training function.
18. A self-training idler having training rolls
for supporting a traveling belt at opposite sides of
its longitudinal center, tiltable supporting stand
ards for the outer ends of said rolls, said stand
ards being independently pivotally mounted be
ly of said axes, the rolls being'supported by said
standards and at their inner ends in a manner
permitting the shifting of their outer ends by said
standards, means operable by the belt for tilting 20
the right-hand standard forwardly when the belt
shifts from centered position to the right, means
operable by the belt for tilting the left-hand
standard forwardly when the belt shifts from cen
tered position to the left, and means causing the 25
standards to resume normal position pursuant
to the centering of the belt.
19. A self-training idler having training rolls
for supporting a traveling belt at opposite sides
of its longitudinal center, tiltable supporting 30
standards for the outer ends of said rolls, said
tioned standards being movable transversely of
standards being independently pivotally mounted
the vertical plane of the roll axes, said rolls being
versely of said axes, the rolls being supported by
mounted in their respective standards in a man
35 ner permitting them to be swung on their inner
end supports in parallelism or approximate par
allelism with the portions of the belt traveling on
said rolls, belt-engageable means carried by said
movable standards whereby the traveling belt if
40 it shifts laterally from centered position toward
either of said standards will move it for skewing
the corresponding roll to train the belt to cen
tered position, and means for automatically re
turning each roll to its normal position pursuant
to the performance of its training function.
17. A self-training idler having training rolls
for supporting a traveling belt at opposite sides
of its longitudinal center, a stationarybase, stand
ards in ?xed position on said base supporting the
inner ends of said rolls, standards independently
movably mounted on said base supporting the
outer ends of said rolls,_ said last mentioned
standards being movable transversely of the ver
tical plane of the roll axes, said rolls being mount
55 ed in their respective standards in a manner per
mitting them to be swung on their inner end sup
15
low the roll axes for tilting movement transverse
below the roll axes for tilting movement trans
said standards and at their inner ends in a man
35
ner permitting the shifting of their outer ends by
said standards, means yieldingly holding the
standards normally erect, means operable by the
belt for tilting the right-hand standard forward
ly when the belt shifts from centered position to 40
the right, and means operable by the belt for
shifting the left-hand standard forwardly when
the belt shifts from centered position to the left.
20. A self-training idler comprising a roller
support for a traveling belt, tiltable supporting 45
standards for the ends of said roller support, said
standards being pivotally mounted below said
ends for tilting movement transversely of said '
roller support and being independently operable,
means yieldingly holding the standards normally 50
erect, and means operated by the belt when it
shifts from centered position toward either end
of said roller support for independently operat
ing the standard at that end to tilt it forwardly.
65
REUEL CLEM SOLLENBERGER.
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