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Патент USA US2132372

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Oct. 4, 1938.
A. s. LOCKE
2,132,372
AIR CONDITIONING APPARATUS
'
Filed April 27, 1934v
5 Sheets-Sheet 1
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Oct. 4, 1938.
A. s. LoçKE
2,132,372
AIR CONDITIONING APPARATUS
Filed April'2‘7, 1954
5 Sheets-Sheet 2
INV ENTOR
A . 5. /_ Oc/fe
Oct. 4, 1938.
A. s. LocKE
2,132,372
AIR CONDITIONING APPARATUS
Filed April 27, >19254
5 Sheets-Sheet 3
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INVENTOR
Á. 5. LOC/fe
Oct. 4, 1938.
2,132,372
A. s. LocKr:
AIR CÓNDITIONING APPARATUS
Filed April 27, 1954
5 Sheets-Shes?l 4
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INVENTOR
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Oct. 4, 1938. l
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A. s, LQCkE
2,132,372
AIR CONDITIONING APPARATUS
Filed April 27, 1934
5 Sheets-Sheet 5
2,132,372
Patented Oct. 4, 1938
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,132,372
AIB CONDITIONING APPARATUS
Arthur S. Locke, Philadelphia, Pa., assignor to
Baldwin-Southwark Corporation, a corporation
of Delaware
Application April 27, 1934, Serial N0. 722,714
15 Claims. (Cl. 675-129)
This invention relates generally to self-con
tained air conditioning units for homes, oiiices or
other enclosures, and more particularly to an im
proved combination and construction of re
5 frigerating elements such as a compressor, con
denser and evaporator, and means for circulating
outside air over the condenser for cooling the
same and for circulating room air over the
evaporator.
10
A great many combinations havey heretofore
been proposed for air conditioning apparatus of
the type especially adapted to be located in a
room to be cooled, but such combinations have
either required a relatively large amount of space
15 for a given cooling capacity or have been com
paratively expensive in manufacture. It is de
sirable to have a unit of relatively large air cool
ing capacity consistent with minimum space re
quirements, to have a unit that is economical in
manufacture both as to its component parts and
their assembly, that is efficient in operation, and
that is adapted to be easily installed and readily
enclosed within a cabinet of attractive appear
ance.
It is one object of my invention to provide an
improved self-contained air conditioning unit
wherein the compressor, condenser and evapo
rator are so cooperatively arranged as to require
minimum space consistent with efficient opera
30 tion and economical manufacture of the com
ponent parts and their assembly.
A further and more specific object is to accom
plish the foregoing desirable results by providing
three parallel vertical compartments disposed side
35 by side whereby outside air ñows into one of said
compartments and out through another in a rela,
tively simple path while the room air is circulated
in a substantially straight path from the blower
over the evaporator.
40
A
Another object is to provide an improved com
bination of compartments so arranged that the
compressor, condenser and condenser air cir
culating means may be totally enclosed in two ad
jacent compartments by a soundproof housing
45 without in any Way requiring excessive space or
of restricting in any way the eiilciency of air flow
over the compressor and condenser. Another ob
ject in this respect is to have the evaporator dis
posed in a third compartment in a substantially
50 exposed condition, but so constructed that a fan
motor may effectively circulate room air over the
evaporator.
A further object is to provide improved con
denser and evaporator units that are relatively
55 elongated in the direction of air ñow thereovei‘
whereby the air passes over these complementary
heat exchange elements at a relatively high ve
locity thereby increasing not only the heat trans
fer between the elements and air but also creating
a more positive air motion or circulation within
5
a room so as to insure uniform cooling thereof.
A more specific object of the invention is to
provide improved self-supporting and self-duct
forming condenser and evaporator units, this
being specifically accomplished by having their
walls elongated or suitably extended to form
standards or supporting end plates adapted to
rest directly upon a base thereby eliminating the
necessity of any supporting frames while at the
same time permitting the end plates to define air 15
passage walls.
A still> further object is to provide condenser
and evaporator units whereby their end walls
function not only as supporting standards but also
perform the `additional function of forming part
of the fan housing. It will of course be under
stood that the condenser and evaporator may
have their functions interchanged to permit the
unit to operate as a heater instead of a cooler,
this mode of operation and the necessary revers 25
ing mechanism being well known.
Another object is to provide an improved ar
rangement of compressorand fan motor to insure
not only minimum space requirements but also
minimum noise in the room together with efficient
air cooling of the compressor and fan motor by
the iiow of the outside air through the unit.
Other objects relate to improved means for
stream-lining the condenser or evaporator tubes,
to an improved manner of having the return bends 35
of the condenser or evaporator tubes extend
through the supporting end sheets, and to pro
‘ vide an improved pumping means for disposing of
condensate with a relatively simple but novel
driving mechanism between the fan and pump,
this driving mechanism preferably employing an
oscillating device such as is normally used for
desk fans.
Other objects and advantages will be more ap
parent to those skilled in the art »from the follow
ing description of the accompanying drawings in
which:
Fig. l is a vertical sectional view of my improved
unit:
5o
Fig. 2 is a plan view of Fig. 1 with the top
thereof removed;A
Fig. 3 is a perspective of one of the heat ex
change elements, namely, the evaporator, show
ing the manner in which it is self-contained both
2
2,132,372
as to its mode of support and as functioning to
guide the air flow therethrough;
Fig. 4 is a perspective similar to Fig. 3 but
showing the condenser together with its self-con
tained supporting and air passage features and
showing especially the manner in which the fan
scroll is associated with the supporting extension
of the end plates, this latter feature also being
applicable to an evaporator in case a similar type
10 of fan is employed therewith;
Fig. 5 is an enlarged sectional view of a pump
particularly adapted to be driven by the air cir
culating motor disposed either on a horizontal
15
or vertical axis;
Fig. 6 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view
with a modified arrangement of fans for the room
air and outside air;
Fig. 'I is a perspective of one form of my im
proved condenser embodying improved stream
20 lining for the refrigerant tubes and embodying
improved means for turning the air flow through
90° to discharge the same outwardly, these fea
tures providing not only less resistance to the
air flow but also increasing the heat transfer be
tween the tubes and fins. The stream-lining
feature is also employed in the evaporator, the
air turning means being omitted in this case.
Fig. 8 is an enlarged perspective of a portion of
a ñn with one form of stream-lining for the tubes;
80
Fig. 9 is a sectional plan view showing a series
of fins and the manner in which the stream-line
flanges of one fin cooperate with the adjacent
fin to provide a uniform stream-line effect
throughout the length of each tube, this section
being substantially on the line 9--9 of Fig. 8;
Fig. 10 is a perspective of a preferred form of
tube, this having a stream-lined shape so as to
obtain’various advantages in addition to less re
sistance to the air flow;
Fig. 11 is an enlarged fragmentary perspective
of condenser fins showing air-turning baiiles
thereof;
Fig. 12 is a perspective of the upper portion of
the adjacent sides of the condenser and evap
orator showing a modified arrangement for heat
and sound insulating the condenser chamber;
Fig. 13 is a diagrammatic elevational view of
a modified condensate disposal means utilizing an
ejector communicating with the base sump and
actuated by air supplied directly from the fan
casing or passage;
Fig. 14 is a sectional view of a modified tube of
elliptical formation.
In the illustrated embodiments of my inven
55 tion which are shown herein merely for the pur
pose of disclosing certain specific forms among
possible others that the invention might take, I
have provided a suitable and preferably pressed
‘ sheet metal base I having a sump-portion 2 and
marginal flanges 3. A motor-compressor unit
generally indicated at 4 is preferably, but not
necessarily, of the vertical axis hermetically
sealed piston and cylinder type. This compres
sor unit and a fan motor 5 are disposed in -su
65 perimposed relation preferably with the motor
compressor unit supported above the fan motor
as by any suitable brackets 6 extending up from
base I.
A pair of complementary heat exchange ele
70 ments such as a condenser 9 and evaporator III
are vertically disposed in sidewise alignment with
the end compartment in which the motor-com
pressor is disposed.
In order to obtain the utmost in simplicity of
arrangement together with economical manu
facture while at the same time maintaining the
proper passage walls by which outside air flows
into one compartment and out through another
separately from the flow of room air through the '
third compartment, I provide condenser 9 so
that it inherently performs a multiplicity of func
tions such as forming its own supporting stand
ards, partially forms its own fan housing, conduit
walls and walls for the compressor and condenser
compartments. This is accomplished as shown
in Fig. 4 by having a vertical condenser whose
end plates or sheets II and II’ continue down
wardly at I3 and I4, as either integral or sepa
rately secured pieces, to be supported on base I.
Supported between the extensions I3 and I3’ is
preferably a fan scroll I5, the edges of this scroll
being welded or otherwise suitably secured to the
>inner faces of said extensions. As a result, the
extensions are not only reinforced by the fan
scroll but also function as part of the fan casing. 20
A circular inlet I6 is formed in the extension I3
while a fan rotor Il is directly secured to the
armature shaft of fan motor 5. 'I’he end sheets
II and II’ preferably have a small flange I8 and
I 8’ extending for the full length thereof to 25
strengthen the sheets.
As a result of the simplicity of the heat ex
change element as above described, it is only nec
essary in assembling a unit to place the heat ex
change element on base I and suitably secure the 30
same thereto as by welding or bolting. There is
no need of forming separate ducts, walls, parti
tions or the like because the same are inherently
formed merely by the positioning of the element,
- in this case the condenser.
85
'I'he compressor and condenser are entirely en
closed by a suitable enclosure generally indicated
at I9 having four sides and a top. The two end
sides I9a, IBb, front side I9c and top IBd -are
entirely solid while the rear side I9e has an inlet 40
opening I9g and an outlet opening I9h. The
outlet I9h is in alignment with the condenser
9 so that the end wall I I thereof forms a natural
partition between the inlet and outlets |99 and
I 9h. 'I'hese inlets and outlets are directly con 45
nected through a suitable duct with a suitable
opening thereby to permit outside air to be
drawn inwardly through opening |99 and down
wardly over motor-compressor unit 4 and motor
5 and thence inwardly through inlet I6 and up 50
wardly over condenser 4 to be discharged to the
outside through opening I9h.
'I‘he evaporator I0, shown particularly in Figs.
l and 3, is constructed similarly to condenser I
in that end walls or sheets 20 and 20' have ex 55
tensions 22 and 23 secured to base I. A fan
scroll 24 is disposed between and supported in a
manner similar to scroll I5 by one or both of the
end sheets 20 and 20’ depending upon the axial
length of the scroll as determined by the fan ca 60
pacity. A room air fan rotor 25 is mounted on
a common shaft with rotor I1 for rotation by
motor 5, the end of the shaft being journalled in
a bearing bracket 26 secured to base I. Room air
flows inwardly preferably beneath the lower edge 65
21 disposed at the end, front and back of a suit
able cabinet C loosely set Vover the unit, thence
flows inwardly through preferably opposed inlet
openings 28 formed in the extensions 22 and 23,
although if desired only one of either of said 70
inlets may be used. The air is propelled by
blower 25 upwardly over evaporator III and thence
discharged verticallyinto the room through a
cabinet opening C'.
Itis thus seen that this ar
rangement results in an extremely simple path 75
8,182,879
of room air flow, as indicated by arrow 29, -it
being noted that from the fan to the point of
discharge into the room a- vertical straight ñow
is created. Hence a high degree of efficiency re~
sults in the flow conditions in addition to a sim
ple but effective structure. Suitable vertical
sheet metal plates 29a and 29h (Fig. 2) secured
to flanges 2| and 2|', provide the necessary front
and back walls for completing the -vertical air
passage through the evaporator> and ’ milarly‘for
the condenser if so
desired.
l
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'I'he evaporator is spaced from the; condenser
by a distance equal to the thickness 'of lthesound
enclosure. It is by such a simple relation of
15 parts that the enclosure forms not only a very
effective sound enclosure .means but also com
pletes the remaining passage walls for the con
denser and compressor compartments. '
To discharge water that condenses on'evapora
tor I0 during flow of room air thereover,l I have
provided a reciprocating piston type pump gen
erally indicated at 30 driven from the end of the
armature shaft of motor 5 through a set of- suit
able worm reduction gears diagrammatically in
3
grammatically indicated by dotted lines 40. Figs.
1 and 2. The arrangement of the compressor
and condenser compartments is particularly
adapted for the location oi a filter as described.
In the modification shown in Fig. 6, the room
air fan 60 is shown as of the vertical axis pro
peller type suitably supported by the evaporator
end sheets through brackets 5|. Room air flows
inwardly beneath the cabinet edges as previ
ously described and thence inwardly between the 10
evaporator end sheets at their lowermost por
tion and also, if desired, inwardly through an
opening 52 formed in the end sheet. The out
side air fan 53 for the condenser is separately
driven by a motor 54 located in the compressor 15
compartment. The fan scroll construction is the
same as previously described. 'I'he pump 30 and
operating mechanism therefor are the same as
previously described for the preferred modifica
tion, the pump however, being turned in the re
20
spective modiñcations to suit either the vertical
or horizontal axis motors.
In Figs. '7, 8 and 10 I have provided improved
means for directing the air ñow over the con
denser and evaporator tubes and of turning the 25
A crankpin 32 is suitably con
nected to the outer end of wormvgear shaft 33 - vertical ñow of condenser air at right angles to
25 dicated at 3|.
discharge the same through lateral outlet |971»,
.Fig. 1. I have provided improved stream-lined
in connection with another modification. The tubes, this being effected for tubes of circular
cross-section, Fig. 8, by bending in narrow flanges 30
30 cylinder is located in the base sump! end_is
supported for oscillationas Aat 36L‘ A suitable 6| , and 6|' in the form of a triangle immediately
inlet check valve 31 and outlet check valve 38 above the >circular tube openings or collar flanges
permit condensate accumulated, in sump' 2 to be .66. Fianges 6| and 6|' will terminate just short
drawn into the pump cylinder 35 anddischarged of the circular pipe 62 so that a portion of the
through a pipe 39 into the path of outside room >air may circulate around the upper half of the 35
air preferably by being discharged through jet pipe while the main body of air is efllciently
openings (Fig. 1) in a pipe 40 over the top of guidedgby the stream-line flanges 6| and 6|’
condenser 9, and also over the top of evaporator Without causing excessive eddy currents and
otherwise‘retarding the flow. These stream-line
I0 if desired.
.
Again referring to Fig. 1, suitable refrigerant flanges are formed in each pipe iin 64 for coop
40
expansion means are diagrammatically indicated eration With each of the pipe openings therein,
at 42 connected as by pipes 43 and 44 to the heat whereby when these fins are successively posi
exchange elements 9 and I0. As it is desired to tioned against each other as shown in Fig. 9, the
and reciprocates a plunger 34 in aiêcylinder 35.
The pump cylinder is shown in‘detail in. Fig. 5
maintain the expansion means 42 in a cool zone
and also to provide ample space for its location,
45
it is disposed wholly or partly Within the evap
orator compartment I0, although as shown in Fig.
1 an opening 44a is provided in the enclosure wall
- to receive the expansion means. If desired, this
opening may be suitably closed around one side
50
of the-expansion means or this opening, if left
open, may be used to admit to the flow of room
air, fresh outside air through an opening 44h
formed in the condenser end sheet at any suit
able point such as adjacent fan |1 or higher if
55
desired.
-
As a result of my improved arrangement, it is
seen that the motor-compressor unit and fan
motor are disposed in one vertical compartment
60 generally indicated at 45, the condenser 9 and
fan I1 arev disposed in the second vertical com
„ partment 46 while the evaporator I0 and fan 25
are disposed in the third vertical compartment
41. It is also seen that the return bends 48 of
65 the condenser and evaporator are disposed out
side of the condenser and evaporator end sheets.
This permits, in connection with the condenser,
additional pipe area to be located directly within
the path of outside air, as the return bends pro
70 ject into the compressor compartment and are
therefore subject to the air flow therethrough.
This result is accomplished even though a curved
or fiat air filter of suitable construction is ver
tically disposed to the side of the condenser
75 and in front of the blower inlet I6 as dia
stream-line flanges 6| and 6|' will engage the
opposed face of the adjacent iin in alignment 45.
with the stream-line flanges 6| and 6I' on the
other side of said adjacent ñn. Hence the com
plete assembly of fins over the pipes will result
in a uniform stream-lining eiïect for the full
length of the pipes.
In the case of the evaporator I0, these stream
lining flanges will extend vertically throughout
the length of the evaporator whereas with the
condenser I0 the stream-line flanges near the top
will be increasingly turned toward the horizontal 55
as diagrammatically shown in principle in Fig. '1,
thereby to gradually and positively turn the high
velocity air flow through a right angle with mini
mum eddy currents and loss of efllciency. The
passage leading from outlet opening |9h is pref
erably curved at the corner 61 and gradually in
creases in cross-sectional area preferably by a
downwardly sloping bottom wall 69, the other
walls remaining horizontal or sloping outwardly.
In the form of refrigerant tubes shown in Fig.
l0, I am able to accomplish not only stream
lined tubes but also an actual increase of heat
transfer tube area together with the further de
sirable feature of increasing the surface contact
between the tube and the heat radiating fin. As 70
shown in Fig. 10, the portion 10 of the tube ex
tending through the series of ñns 1| has either an
elliptical or tapered formation to provide an in
herently stream-lined tube. The direction of air
ñow is of course upward. This tube may be
4
2, 1 82,872
rolled to a preferably tapered form from an ini
tially round piece of tube or it may be otherwise
originally formed as a tapered tube. However,
to construct a condenser or evaporator employing
my improved tube, I provide a series of fins 1|
similar to the fins for the other forms of con
densers, and each finis provided with openings
to receive a tube. Each of the openings is prefer
ably provided with a flange 12 for contacting with
The edge of
this flange abuts against the adjacent ñn to serve
10 the surface of the tapered tube 10.
as a spacer and also to perform the additional
desirable function of reinforcing the relatively
straight tapered sides of the tube, thereby pre
venting a relatively high pressure, of say 200
pounds or thereabouts, bulging the tube out of
shape. However, due to the straight sides, the
high pressure will tend to force the sides of the
tube into more intimate contact with the flanges
20 12, and it is preferable that after the fins and
tubes, together with their return bends, are en
tirely assembled and ready to be dipped for gal
vanizing or other similar operation, they should
be so dipped while the tubes are under pressure,
25 thereby insuring permanent retention of the
close huid-pressed contact between the tube and
flange 12. As is seen from Figs. 3 and 4, the
usual return bends 48 lie in an inclined plane so
as to give a staggered effect between the tubes.
30 To accomplish this staggered effect in a simple
and yet effective manner, while at the same time
insuring that the tapered tube will extend ver
tically as indicated at 14 in Fig. '7 and will ex
tend in the direction of outfiow such as at 15, I
35 form the return bends 48 so they have a circular
cross-section, thereby permitting the bend to be
bent in an inclined direction without imposing
any undue stress on the tapered tube when lying
in the vertical direction. This combination of
40 tapered tubes with return bends of circular cross
section may be most effectively obtained by first
taking a straight piece of circular tubing, then
rolling the tube to a tapered formation starting
near the center of the length of the tube thereby
45 leaving a short portion of the tube at its middle
of circular section. The tube will then be bent
into a U shape with the circular cross-section
forming the return bend 48. This U shape tube
will then as is customary with this type of heat
50 exchange element be inserted through two groups
of aligned openings in the fins. After all of the
U shape tubes have been inserted through the
fins, the free ends of the tapered tubes will now
be preferably reformed to a cylindrical cross-sec
55 tion for a short distance from their ends. This
will permit return bends of cylindrical cross-sec
tion such as diagrammatically indicated in Fig. 1
at 11 to be easily soldered or otherwise hermeti
cally secured to the tubes so as to effect a series
60 connection thereof as shown in Fig. 1.
While tapered tubes of the foregoing type will
insure minimum resistance to the air iiow over
the heat exchange elements, yet in connection
with the condenser I provide improved means for
65 obtaining still greater eñiciency of flow and to
this end it will be noted in Fig. 7 that a series
of bailles 18 are formed on the surface of the
fin. These bafiles preferably are of the same
radius and due to the vertical distance of out
70 let |871. being less than the depth of the con
denser, the baffles 18 will form passageways which
contract toward the downstream end of the baf
ñes, thereby obtaining more efficient turning of
the flow than if the baille passages were merely
75 of uniform cross-sectional area or of increasing
cross-sectional area as the discharge end is ap
preached. To form the bailles in a moet simple
and yet effective manner, it will be noted from
Fig. 11 that the baille for each fin 1| is formed by
cutting the originally fiat iin along arcuate lines
such as 18 and then pressing the baiiies 18 out
wardly at right angles to the face of the un.
Each fin is formed with such a set of baiiies so
that when they are placed together the baiiies of
the successive fins will not only be in alignment
as shown in Fig. 11 but will also contact with the
adjacent face of the next successive ñn, thereby
providing a continuous baille throughout the
width of the condenser.
The open spaces formed
adjacent the bames due to being cut along lines
18 will not affect the flow as the pressure in the
various ñn passages is equal.
In the modification shown in Fig. 12 I have
provided outwardly extending end ñanges 80 and
8| for the condenser and evaporator respectively
whereby these flanges may be placed against each
other, thereby providing a chamber 82 in which
the return bends and headers 83 and 8l, if de~
sired, are disposed. The chamber 82v is then
filled with suitable sound and heat insulating
material 84 preferably in powdered form. This
arrangement results in additional compactness
of the unit due to eliminating the enclosure
member |82; of Fig. 1.
In the modification of Fig. 13 I have provided
15
20
25
30
an improved condensate disposal means com
prising a vertical pipe 81 having a Venturi throat
88 which is supplied with air from any suitable
point of the condenser air passage, such a point
being diagrammatically shown by a pipe 88 ex as'
tending into the discharge of the fan casing I8.
If it is desired to increase the flow through pipe
89, a small deñector may be formed on the inside
of the scroll i5 adjacent the pipe inlet 88. An
ejector tube 98 projects preferably vertically into 40
cooperating relation with evaporator passage 88.
'I'he lower end of ejector tube 98 has preferably
a bell mouth disposed slightly above the bottom
of base sump 2. Any condensate which collects
in the sump will be drawn in by the action of 45
the ejector and carried directly upwardly through
pipe 81 to a horizontal discharge pipe 8| over
lying the top of the condenser. Suitable ports
in this pipe may direct the water downwardly
over the condenser to assist in cooling the same 50
or the ports may direct the water horizontally
in the direction of outfiowing air. Also if de
sired, the horizontal pipe may extend through
the condenser ñns near the center thereof so that
a greater portion of the condenser tubes and fins 55
will have a wetted surface. If it is desired to
augment the upward flow of condensate through
p-ipe 81, one or more booster ejectors 82 may be
disposed within pipe 81. 'I‘hese booster ejectors
may be supplied with air through a pipe such as 60
93 connected into the condenser passage prefer
ably just above the fan. In each case where
either the pump or ejector arrangement has been
shown in cooperation with the base sump 2, it
will be understood that moisture which condenses 65
on evaporator I8 will drip down into the fan
scroll 24 and thence through suitable openings,
Fig. 1, 94 therein to flow into the base sump.
The water therein may readily flow to the pump
or ejector by the provision of suitable small open 70
ings such as 85 in the partition |8b or similar
holes in any other walls that might obstruct the
flow of water to the pump. As shown in Fig. i,
the condensate discharge pipe 40 and likewise
for the pipe 9| of Fig. 14 may extend over the
5
9,182,879
evaporator I0 as well as over the condenser 0.
thereby allowing condensate to be pumped over
each of these elements to maintain a uniform
wetted surface of each but with the assurance
I claim:
l. An air conditioning unit comprising, in com
bination, a base, means forming three parallel
that condensate will be efficiently disposed of
vertical compartments extending upwardly from
said base, a refrigerating system having opera
due to the fact that some of the condensate dis
charged over the condenser will be carried to the
outside atmosphere in the air flow.
From the foregoing disclosure of the various
partments, air circulating means communicating
with said condenser and evaporator compart
10 modifications, it is believed that their operation
tively connected compressor, condenser and evap
orator elements disposed respectively in said com
ments for circulating outside air and room air l0
is apparent but briefly the compressor unit 4, con
respectively therethrough, and means whereby
denser 9 and evaporator I Il are connected to form
outside air flows in opposite directions over said
compressor and condenser, the air circulating
a suitable compressor-condenser-evaporator cir
cuit and the condenser is cooled by outside air
flowing inwardly through a suitable Window open
ing, thence through opening I9g in the back panel
I9e and thence downwardly along the iiow line
99 into inlet I6 to be propelled upwardly over
condenser 9 by blower I1 and discharged to the
20 outside through opening I9h. These various ele
ments are entirely disposed within two vertical
compartments disposed side by side and totally
-enclosed within enclosure I9.
The room air is
circulated upwardly by fan 25 which draws air
25 in through or under a suitable cabinet enclosing
the complete unit, the air thence flowing inwardly
through inlets 28 and over evaporator I0 to cool
the room air after which it is discharged ver
tically and with considerable velocity into the
30 room. Condensate from the evaporator I0 ac
cumulates in sump 2 and is discharged by pump
30 through pipe 39 from which it flows through
horizontal pipe 40 either directly into the out
going flow of air or over the condenser to assist
in cooling the same. The unit may be used for a
heater as well as a cooler. Assuming that heat
exchange element I0 is operating as an evapo
rator (cooler operation), the condensate dis
charged thereon from pipe 40 would merely ilow
40 down over the iin surfaces of the evaporator and
accumulate in sump 2 to be discharged upwardly
again over both the condenser and evaporator.
Due to the fact that the condensate which flows
over the condenser would be carried to the out--v
45 side, it is seen that a proportionate part of any
condensate ñowing over the evaporator would be
continuously discharged to the outside. When
the unit is reversed so that heat exchange element
means including a motor supported by said base
beneath said compressor and a fan driven by said 15
motor disposed .in the lowermost portion of said.
condenser compartment for discharging air ver
tically,
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2. An air conditioning unit comprising, in com
bination, a casing having a substantially flat 20v
base, partition means cooperating with said cas
ing to divide the interior thereof into parallel
compartments extending from the base to the top
of the casing, an evaporator in one of said com
partments, refrigerant liquefying mechanism con 25
nected to said evaporator and comprising a motor,
a compressor and a condenser arranged in the
remainder of said compartments, an outside air
inlet and outlet disposed at the upper portion of
said casing in substantially adjacent relation to 30
each other for conducting outside condenser cool
ing air into the unit, said partition means form
ing a passage connecting said inlet and said out
let to bring the outside air into heat absorbing
relation with said condenser, a blower disposed in 35
said condenser compartment for circulating said
outside air inwardly of said inlet and over said
condenser and outwardly through said outlet, and
a blower in said compartment which contains the
evaporator for circulating room air thereover.
3. An air conditioning unit comprising, in com
bination, a casing having a substantially ñat base,
partitiom means cooperating with said casing to
divide the interior thereof into a plurality of com
partments one of which extends vertically sub
stantially from said base to the top of the cas
ing at one end of the unit and another of which
is located at the other end of the unit, an evap
9 functions as an evaporator and element I0 as a orator in said latter compartment, refrigerant
liquefying mechanism connected to said evap
50 condenser (heater operation), then moisture from
orator and comprising a motor, a compressor and
the outside air condensing on heat exchange ele
a condenser arranged in the remainder of said
ment 9 will accumulate in sump 2 and be dis
charged over condenser I0 to humidify the room compartments, an outside air inlet and outlet
air. In this way the condensate will ñnally bel disposed at the upper portion of said casing in
55 disposed of on the condenser side even though a substantially adjacent relation to each other, said 55
portion of the condensate is discharged over the partition means forming a vertically extending
heat exchange element now functioning as the passage located intermediate of said end com
evaporator.
It is also seen from the foregoing disclosure
60 that an extremely simple and eiîective means is
provided for supporting the condenser and evap
orator, for forming the air passages and compart
ment walls simply by assembling the condenser
and evaporator units on base I whereupon these
05 various features are automatically created, for
effectively housing the compressor and condenser,
and for efliciently obtaining maximum heat trans
fer area of the refrigerant tubes and insuring
minimum resistance to the air ñow thereover.
70
It will ofcourse be understood that various
changes in detalls of construction and arrange
ment of parts may be made by those skilled in the
art without departing from the spirit of the in
75 vention as set forth in the appended claims.
partments and extending substantially from the
base to the top of the casing for connecting said
inlet and said outlet to bring the outside air into
heat absorbing relation with said condenser, a
blower disposed in said condenser compartment
for circulating outside air inwardly of said inlet
and through said intermediate vertical passage
to said outlet, and a blower in said evaporator
compartment for circulating room air thereover.
4. An air conditioning unit comprising, in com
bination, a base, means forming three parallel
vertical compartments extending upwardly from
said base, a refrigerating system having opera
70
tively connected compressor, condenser and evap
orator elements disposed respectively in said com
partments, air circulating means communicating
with said condenser and evaporator compart 75
6
2,132,2372
ments for circulating outside air and room air re
spectively therethrough including a blower dis
side air flows in opposite directions over said com
pressor and condenser, and a propeller type fan
posed inthe lowermost portion of said evaporator
compartment for circulating room air vertically
over the evaporator therein, and means whereby
outside air flows in opposite directions over said
for circulating/room air vertically over said evap
compressor and condenser.
y
5. An air conditioning unit comprising, in com
bination, a base, means 'forming three parallel
10
vertical compartments extending upwardly from
said base, a refrigerating system having opera
tively connected compressor, condenser and evap
orator elements disposed respectively in said com
partments, air circulating means communicating
16 with said condenser and evaporator compart
ments for circulating outside air and room air
respectively therethrough, means whereby out
side air flows in opposite directions over said
compressor and condenser, and means cooperat
20 ing with the walls forming said compressor and
condenser compartments for totally enclosing the
compressor and condenser therein while said
evaporator compartment is outside of said en
closure.
25
6. An air conditioning unit comprising, in com
orator.
i'
10. An air conditioning unit comprising, in
combination, a base, means forming three par
allel vertical compartments extending upwardly
from said base, a refrigerating system having op
eratively connected compressor, condenser and
evaporator elements disposed respectively in said 10
compartments, air circulating means communi
cating with said condenser and` evaporator com
partments for circulating outside air and room
air respectively therethrough, means ,whereby
outside air flows in opposite directions over said
compressor and condenser, and the air circulating
means includes a propeller type fan for circulat
ing the room air vertically over said evaporator,
and a pump driven by said room air fan for dis
charging condensate to the outside air.
11. An air conditioning unit comprising, in
combination, a base, means forming three parallel
vertical compartments extending upwardly from
said base, a refrigerating system having opera
tively connected compressor, condenser and evap
bination, a base having a sump, operatively con
orator elements disposed respectively in said com
nected condenser and evaporator elements dis
posed over said base to discharge into said sump
water condensed on the evaporator surface,
partments, air circulating means communicating
with said condenser and evaporator compart
30 means for circulating room air over one of said
ments for circulating outside air and room air
respectively therethrough, means whereby outside 30
elements and means for circulating outside air
over the other element, and condensate disposal
means including an air operated ejector disposed
adjacent to said sump and means for conducting
35 ejected water into the path of outside air.
pressor and condenser, and the air circulating
means includes a propeller type fan for circu
lating the room air vertically over said evaporator,
7. A self-contained air conditioning unit for
charging condensate to the outside air, said base
installation in a room adjacent a window or other
suitable wall opening comprising, in combination,
a compressor and motor therefor disposed at one
40 end of the unit, an evaporator disposed at the
other end of the unit, means for circulating room
air over said evaporator, a condenser, and means
for circulating outside air over said condenser in
cluding a blower located at an intermediate por
45 tion of said unit near the bottom thereof and
walls forming a passage for outside air extend
ing upwardly from said blower and disposed to one
side of said motor and compressor.
8. A self-contained air conditioningl unit for
50 installation in a room adjacent a window or other
suitable wall opening comprising, in combination,
a compressor and motor therefor disposed at one
end of the unit, an evaporator disposed at the
other end of the unit, means for circulating room
55 air over said evaporator, a condenser, and means
for circulating outside air over said condenser in
cluding a blower located at an intermediate por
tion of said unit near the bottom thereof and
Walls forming a passage for outside air extending
60 upwardly from said blower and disposed to one
side of said motor and compressor, said unit hav
ing a lateral opening in its back side near the top
portion thereof for allowing communication be
tween said vertical passage and the outside air
65 through said window or wall opening.
9. An air conditioning unit comprising, in com
bination, a base, means forming three parallel
vertical compartments extending upwardly from
said base, a refrigerating system having opera
70 tively connected compressor, condenser and evap
orator elements disposed respectively in said com
partments, air circulating means communicating
with said condenser and evaporator compart
ments for circulating outside air and room air
75 respectively therethrough, means whereby out
air flows in opposite directions over said com
and a pump driven by said room air fan for dis
35
having a recessed portion forming a sump into
which condensate accumulates from said evap
orator.
12. An air conditioning unit comprising, in 40
combination, a base, means forming three par
allel vertical compartments extending upwardly
from said base, a refrigerating system having op
eratively connected compressor, condenser and
evaporator elements disposed respectively in said 45
compartments, air circulating means communi
eating with said condenser and evaporator com
partments for circulating outside air and room
air respectively therethrough, means whereby
outside air flows in opposite directions over said "
compressor and condenser, and the air circulating
means includes a propeller type fan for circu
lating the room air vertically over said evaporator,
a pump driven by said room air fan for discharg
ing condensate to the outside air, and fan oscil
lating mechanism for driving said pump.
13. The combination set forth in claim 6 fur
ther characterized in the provision of means
whereby air from said outside air circulating
means is supplied to the ejector at a point near 60
said sump.
14. A self-contained air conditioning unit for
installation in a room adjacent a window or other
suitable wall opening comprising, in combination,
a compressor and motor therefor disposed at one
end of the unit, an evaporator disposed at the
other end of the unit, means for circulating room
air over said evaporator, a condenser, and means
for circulating outside air over said condenser in
cluding a blower located at an intermediate por 70
tion of said unit near the bottom thereof, and
walls forming passages for infiowing and out
fiowing outside air, said passages having verti
cally extending adjacent portions located between
said compressor and evaporator and communi
75
2,189,872
eating respectively with the inlet and outlet of
said blower, and said unit having a pair of lat
eral openings in its back side near the top there
of for allowing communication between the ver
tical portions of said passages and the outside air
through the window or wall opening,
15. A self-contained room cooler unit for in
stallation in a room adjacent a window or other
suitable wall opening comprising, in combination,
an evaporator, means for circulating room air
thereover, a condenser, means forming an air pas
sage therefor having one portion extending ver
7
tically from the lower portion ot the unit and
terminating in a lateral opening in the back side
oi' the unit, a blower disposed at the lower por
tion of said vertical passage. a motor disposed
laterally of said passage for driving said blower, a
compressor supported over the top of said motor,
and means including said blower and said pas
sage forming means for causing the air to ñow
in one direction over said compressor and in the
10
opposite direction over said condenser.
ARTHUR S. LOCKE.
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