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Патент USA US2132512

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2,132,512v
Patented Oct. 11, 1938
I UNITED STATES
PATENT OFFICE
‘2,132,512
METHOD‘ OF KNITTING
Charles La Villette, Ozone Park, N. Y., assignor
to Nusbaum Knitters, Inc., New York, N. Y., a
corporation of New York
Application October 30, 1935, Serial No. 47,416
5 Claims.
My present invention relates to methods of
knitting and aims to provide methods which are
simple andeasy to practise and which result-in
the production of a novel fabric, the detailed
5 construction of which will be fully described in
later portions of this speci?cation.
My present invention further relates to- the
novel fabric produced by means of the methods
of the present invention, and further aims to pro
10 vide a, fabric which has incorporated therein,
without involving any increase in the cost of
production of knitted fabrics as presently made,
certain features which enable the same to be uti
lized in a much Wider fashion than was hereto
fore possible.
»
In the accompanying speci?cation I shall de
scribe and in the annexed drawing show several
illustrative embodiments of the methods of the
present invention and the knitted fabric pro—
20 duced thereby. It is, however, to be clearly
understood that variations thereof may be made
Without the exercise of invention, and within. the
scope of the claims hereto appended.
Before describing my invention in detail, I
deem it ‘advisable, brie?y, to refer to the prior
art in the ?eld to which the present invention
relates, and to point out the limitations thereof
and the manner in which the present invention
overcomes and eliminates the same.
30
,
I
It has heretofore been proposed to knit a
fabric in such a fashion that it acquired a di
agonal appearance. This was accomplished by
racking. It follows that if a fabric is’knitted
diagonally in one direction, its design can be
35 formed into a horizontal V by reversing the
sequence of the racking after a certain length
thereof has been knitted by racking in the ?rst
direction. However, it has not heretofore been
known how to knit a fabric, the courses of which
(Cl. 66-—69)
be inserted anywhere in the body portion of the
fabric, or a series of straight courses can be al
ternated with V-shaped or chevron-shaped
courses. Furthermore, the fabric may be made
with colored chevron stripes knitted therein
either parallel to the start or ?nish, or opposite
to each other. Finally, the fabric produced'by
the practice of the methods of the present inven
tion is reversible, having practically the same
appearance on both sides.
In the accompanying drawing:—
Fig. 1 is a fragmentary, schematic View of the
apex portion of a V-shaped fabric produced by
the practice of the methods of the present in
vention, and a similar view of the portion of the is:
fabric which includes one of the side arms of the
V and the adjacent vertical wales of the. fabric
itself;
Fig. 2 is a plan view of one type of fabric which
can be produced by the practice of the methods
of the present invention;
Fig. 3 is a similar, fragmentary view of a mod
i?ed form of fabric which can be produced by
the methods of the present invention;
'
Fig. 4 is a view similar to Fig. 2 illustrating still 25:
another form of fabric which can be produced
by the practice of the methods of the present
invention;
7
>
’
Fig. 5 is a plan View showing the arrangement
of the knitting needles of a double-bed knitting 310T
machine preparatory to starting the knitting of
a fabric in accordance .with the present inven
tion;
7
Fig. 6 is a similar view of the same with the
lower or front bed racked over one needle; and
Fig. 7 is a similar View of the same having the
front ‘or lower bed racked over'two needles.
' Referring now more in detail to the aforesaid
illustrative embodiments of the methods of the
presented a vertical V or the many rami?cations
present invention, and the products resulting
thereof. These disadvantages are eliminated by
means of the present invention, and I have pro
vided methods whereby a fabric is made which
has a start or ?rst course which is in the shape
therefrom, and with particular reference to the
drawing illustrating the same, the numeral I!)
of a vertical V at an angle of approximately 135
or 45 degrees to their vertical wales. I have fur
ther provided methods which enable the produc
tion of a knitted fabric having the end thereof
likewise in the‘ shape of a V which may be par
50 allel to the sides of the V of the starting course‘
or‘may have its sides at van angle of approximate
ly. 90 degrees to the sides of the starting course.
Obviously the fabric can be made so that the
start or ?nish or both can be horizontal and
55 _ vertical V’shaving their. points up or down can
generally designates a needle bed of a double
bank, ?at knitting machine, and the numeral ll
generally designates the other bed thereof. For’
the purpose of description in this speci?cation,
I shall refer to the bed If! as the'rear bed, and
thebed l l as the front bed. It is, however, to be
clearly understood that they may be reversed,
and the arrangements of the needles hereinafter
described in connection with the rear bed may
apply to the front bed and the arrangements‘of
the needles hereinafter described in connection
with the front bed may apply to ‘the rear bed.
vSecured to the front bed H is an arm I2 car
2
2,132,512
rying pins I3 adapted to cooperate with opposite
faces of a cam I4 which are stepped in such a
manner as to cause the front bed I I to» be racked
or shifted sidewise with respect to the rear bed
IIJ. Obviously the front bed II may be racked
in either direction depending upon the direction
of the rotation of the cam I4, the latter being
operable either automatically (not shown) or
manually by means of the handle I5.
10
The needles in the front bed II are arranged
therein so that they are in alternately raised and
lowered positions; in other words, alternately
permanently in action and out of action. Those
which are raised I have designated by the refer
15 ence character I6, and those which are lowered
I have designated by the reference character VII.
The needles in the rear bed II] are arranged for
a portion of the length of the bed in a manner
similar to those in the front bed I I, that is, alter
20 nately raised and lowered, or alternately in ac
tion and out of action. The needles which are in
points. Thus any number of V’s can be incor
porated into the fabric and I am not limited
merely to two V’s as shown in Fig. 3 of the draw
ing wherein the numeral 30 designates one of the
V’s and the numeral 3| designates another of
the V’s. At this point, before describing the 10
fabric illustrated in Fig. 4 of the drawing, I deem
it advisable to set forth the manner in which the
knitting is carried out after the needles have
been arranged in any one of the several modes
previously described. I shall, however, limit my
description to the mode of operation of the ma
chine to produce the fabric illustrated in Fig. 2
of the drawing which I might designate as the
basic fabric. I call this fabric the basic fabric
because other fabrics which may be produced by
the practice of my ‘methods are merely modi?ca
action in the rear bed II) I have designated by
tions of the same starting fabric.
the reference character I8 and those which are
The locks or cams which operate the needles on
both the front and the rear beds of the machine
are arranged or set to make a cardigan stitch so 25
out of action I have designated by the reference
25
than one point I position two consecutive needles
either raised or lowered, and follow each of such
points with an alternation of the sequence of
the needles immediately preceding each of such
character I9.
The needles of the rear bed I6
'
just described correspond to or are intended to , that the resultant fabric is ribbed and is of the
produce one of the sides of the V which will
hereinafter be described.
At the point where I
desire the apex of the V I either raise or lower
30 two consecutive needles, that is, I position two
consecutive needles so that they are either in
action or out of action. These needles are pro
vided with the reference character 20. I now
proceed to arrange the balance of the needles in
35 the rear bed III alternately lowered and raised,
in other words, out of action and in action, which
arrangement is in opposite sequence to the
needles of the rear bed arranged before the point
corresponding to the apex of the V.
In this
40 portion of‘ the rear bed I 0 the lowered needles are
provided with the reference character 2|, and
the raised needles are provided with the refer
ence character 22. The needles arranged alter
nately in this portion of the rear bed II] corre
45 spond to, and produce the remaining side of the
V which will hereinafter be more fully described.
When the needles of the rear bed II} are ar
ranged as just described with a single alterna
tion of sequence, and the knitting is carried out
50 as hereinafter described, the fabric produced will
take the form illustrated in Fig. 2 of the draw
ing; that is, the fabric will have a start in the
form of a V and a ?nish in the same form as
the start. In Fig. 2 the numeral 23 designates
type known as a “full cardigan” fabric. With
the needles and cams arranged as described, I
knit a course, let us assume, from left to right.
I then rack the front needle bed II to the left,
the distance of one needle. This is accomplished
by operating the cam M. With the front needle
bed so racked I knit another course, obviously,
from right to left, after which I again rack the
front needle bed to the left, the distance of one
needle and knit another course, this time, ob
viously, from left to right. I now rack the front
needle bed I I in the direction opposite to which it
had been racked on the two previous occasions,
in other words, to the right, a distance of one 40
needle and run a course which will be from right
to left, after which I again rack the front needle
bed to the right, a distance of one needle and run
another course from left to right. By following
closely the racking movements it will be noted
that at this point the needles have been returned
to their original positions, having been'racked
twice in one direction, and twice in the opposite
direction‘. By continuing to repeat the racking
operations just described, I obtain the fabric 50
shaped as illustrated in Fig. 2 of the drawing.
By referring to Fig. l of the drawing, there can
be observed in detail the courses taken by the
yarn in the production of this fabric, and par
55 one of the sides of the V, the numeral 24 desig-'
ticularly those portions immediately adjacent
nates the other side of the V, and the numeral
the apex 25, and the area immediately adjacent
the arm 23 of the V and the connected vertical
25 designates the upwardly directed apex of the
V. The vertical wales of the fabric are desig
nated by the numeral 26. One of the sides of
60 the V at the ?nish is designated by the reference
character 21, the other side thereof, by the refer
ence character 28, and the apex by the numeral
29. It will be noted that the sides 23 and 24 are
at an angle to each other of approximately 90
65 degrees. It will further be noted that the angle
between either of the sides 23 or 26 and the ver
tical wales 26 of the fabric itself is approximately
135 or 45 degrees, and it will ?nally be noted.
that the V at the ?nish of the material is parallel
70 to the V at the start of the material.
If it is desired to produce a fabric having more
than one V at the start, I arrange the needles
in the rear bed II] so that there is more than one
75
alternation of the sequence thereof. In other
Words, I arrange these needles so that at more
wale 26.
_
In Fig. 6 of the drawing I have shown the
positions of the needles and the beds carrying 60
the same when the front bed II has been racked
to the left, a distance of one needle, and in Fig.
7 I have shown the arrangements of the needles
and the beds with the front bed racked to the
left, a distance of two needles.
65
If it is desired to produce the fabric set forth
in Fig. 4 of the drawing in which fabric the
?nish has the sides 32 and 33 of the V with the
apex 34 thereof extending downwardly instead
of upwardly and parallel to the V at the start of
the fabric, I proceed in the same manner as in
connection with the fabric'illustrated in Fig. 2,
but upon reaching the point in the knitting of
the fabric when I desire to reverse the chevron
effect, I run an uneven number of courses without
3
2,132,512
any racking at all. The result is to bring the locks
to a point opposite to that in which they were
when the original racking started and then I
proceed to rack as previously described. with
1 the result that the V becomes inverted, and ex
needles of one of the beds of a double-bed knit
tends downwardly instead of upwardly.
ting machine alternately in and out of action,
It is obvious that by means of variations in
the arrangements of the needles on the rear bed
then arranging the needles of the other bed of
the machine in a plurality of predetermined oper-,
ating sequences, thereafter knitting a fabric on
the machine by racking one of the beds thereof 10
a predetermined distance in a predetermined di
rection and operating the machine to knit a
single row of fabric, then again racking a pre
determined distance in the same direction and
operating the machine to knit another single row 15
10, and by changing the number and sequence
10 of the rackings, I can produce varying designs
and effects, the details of which I do not deem it
necessary to set forth herein. It is thought that
one skilled in the art will obviously understand
such variations upon learning the basic principles
15 already set forth in detail.
This completes the description of the methods
of the present invention and the products result
ing therefrom. It will be noted that such meth
ods are simple to practise, requiring no additions
20 to standard knitting machinery, and result in
various fabrics, the uses of which will be obvi
ous to those skilled in. the art to which the
present invention relates. The fabric herein dis
closed whether alone or combined with straight
25 knitting may be used for scarfs, neck pieces,
wristlets, vests, blankets, garments, hats, de
signs, etc., as well as striped and other types of
~ borders and trimmings.
What I claim as my invention is:
30
the production of a predetermined length of
fabric.
3. The herein described method of knitting
which consists in the steps of .arranging the
l. The herein described method of knitting
which consists in the steps of arranging the
needles of one of the beds of a double-bed knit
ting machine in a predetermined operating se
quence, then arranging the needles of the other
35 bed of the machine in a plurality of predeter
mined operating sequences, thereafter knitting a
fabric on the machine by racking one of the beds
thereof a predetermined distance in a predeter
mined direction and operating the machine vto
40 knit a single row of fabric, then again racking
a predetermined distance in the same direction
and operating the machine to knit another single
row of fabric, then racking a predetermined dis
tance in the opposite direction and operating the
of fabric, then racking a predetermined distance
in the opposite direction and operating the
machine to knit another single row of fabric,
then racking back to the original position and
operating the machine to knit another single row 20
of fabric, and thereafter repeating said racking
and knitting operations for the production of a
predetermined length of fabric.
4. The herein described method of knitting
which consists in the steps of arranging the 25
needles of one of the beds of a double-bed knit
tig machine alternately in and out of action,
then arranging the needles of the other bed of
the machine in a plurality of predetermined
oppositely disposed operating sequences, there
the same direction and operating the machine to
knit another single row of fabric, then racking
a predetermined distance in the opposite direc
tion and operating the machine to knit another
single row of fabric, then racking back to the 40
original position and operating the machine to
knit another single row of fabric, and thereafter
repeating said racking and knitting operations for .
the production of a predetermined length of
machine to knit another single row of fabric, then
fabric.
racking back to the original position and oper~
ating the machine to knit another single row
fabric, and thereafter repeating said racking
and knitting operations for the production of a
5. The herein described method of knitting
which consists in the steps of arranging the
50 predetermined length of fabric.
2. The herein described method of knitting
which consists in the steps of arranging the
needles of one of the beds of a double-bed knit~
ting machine in a predetermined operating se
30
after knitting a fabric on the machine by rack
ing one of the beds thereof a predetermined dis
tance in a predetermined direction and operat
ing the machine to knit a single row of fabric,
then again racking a predetermined distance in 35
'
45
needles of one of the beds of a double-bed knit
ting machine alternately in and out of action,
then arranging the needles of the other bed 50
of the machine so that a predetermined number
thereof are alternately in and out of action and a
predetermined number thereof, immediately ad
jacent the last needle out of action of said ?rst
mentioned predetermined number, are alternate
ly out of and in action, thereafter knitting .a fab
mined oppositely disposed operating sequences, ric on the machine by racking one of the beds
thereafter knitting a fabric on the machine by thereof a predetermined distance in a predeter
racking one of the beds thereof a predetermined ~ mined direction and operating the machine to
knit a single row of fabric, then again racking a 60
60 distance in a predetermined direction and oper
ating the machine to- knit a single row of fabric, predetermined distance in the same direction and
operating ‘the machine to knit another single
then again racking a predetermined distance in row of fabric, then racking a predetermined dis
the same direction and operating the machine to tance in the opposite direction and operating
knit another single row of fabric, then racking a the machine to knit another single row of fabric, 65
65 predetermined distance in the opposite direction
then racking back to the original position and
and operating the machine to knit another sin
~ operating the machine to knit another single row
gle row of fabric, then racking back to the orig
of fabric, and thereafter repeating said racking
inal position and operating the machine to knit and knitting operations for the production of a
another single row of fabric, and thereafter re
predetermined length of fabric.
70
peating said racking and knitting operations for
CHARLES LA VILLETTE.
55 quence, then arranging the needles of the other
bed of the machine in a plurality of predeter
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