close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Патент USA US2132956

код для вставки
Oct. 11, 1938.
‘H, M. KIECKHEFER
2,132,956
ART OF MANUFACTURING CONTAINERS OR PARTS THEREOF
Filed Oct. 16, 1937
IN%DR.
Patented Oct. 11', 1938
2,132,956
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,132,956
‘
ART OF MANUFACTURING CONTAINERS OB
'
PARTS THEREOF
HerbertM. Kieckhefer, Riven-ton, N. 1., aasignor
to Kieck-hefer Container Company, Delair,
-.N. J., a corporation of Delaware
Application October 16, 1937, Serial No. 169,417
17 - Claim.
(Cl. 93-36..)1)
This invention relates to improvements in the provide a method which is particularly adapted
art of manufacturing containers or parts thereof,
and is a continuation in part of application Serial
No. 84,148, ?led June 8th, 1936.
It has heretofore been proposed to treat as
sembled ?berboard boxes with sulphur for the
purpose of increasing the rigidity thereof and to
render the same impervious to moisture. How
ever, these boxes when so treated, could not be
10 collapsed for shipment and therefore were im
practical ‘for most purposes. The present inven
tion relates in general to this type of treatment
but contemplates a different and improved
method of procedure and an improved article of
manufacture whereby the impregnated container
partsmay be compactly and economically shipped
to the user in flat form and subsequently assem
bled by the user into the proper form for use as
a container element such as a box liner.
20
In prior attempts at sulphur impregnation,
solid ?berboard material has been used and ef
forts to ?rst treat the material and then sub
sequently form containers therefrom were entire
ly unsatisfactory as the sulphur treated material,
for the manufacture of impregnated liners for
containers, which method comprises scoring a
7 sheet of corrugated board along desired lines to
‘form a plurality of foldably related sections, 5
folding said sections-on said lines of scoring to a
position wherein each section forms an angle
with respect to each adjacent section, dipping the
sheet thus disposed into melted sulphur, moving
the sections to a position of substantial aline ~10
ment after removal from the sulphur and prefer
ably before the solidi?cation of the sulphur has
been a completed, and subsequently folding the
collapsed liner to assembly form on the lines of
scoring when the sulphur is in solidi?ed form.
15
A further object of the invention is to provide
a method of manufacturing containers consist
ing of forming an outer container in collapsed
form, and of material which is not impregnated
with sulphur, forming out of corrugated board 20
a continuous liner for those walls of the container
which are adapted to be vertically disposed, scor
ing said continuous'liner along lines adapted 'to
substantially coincide with the corners of the
outer container, dipping the liner into melted 25
the liners or outside plies of the solid sheet, re
sulphur while sections thereof are positioned at
sisted bending, and if bending were ?nally ac- ' an angle with respect to one another, moving the
complished, there would be a wedging action at sections of the liner to substantially ?at position
the line of fold which would break the board at before solidification of the, sulphur has been com
pleted,‘subsequently assembling the outer con
It has been found-that corrugated material, tainer for use, and then folding the liner on the 30
due to the fact that it is constructed of two liner lines of scoring to assembly position while the
members spaced apart by a corrugated member sulphur is in solidi?ed form, and inserting the
25 due tolthe penetration of the sulphur throughout
the
score.
,
»
'
_
so that the center is not solid, can be bent much
more readily after impregnation than solid ?ber
board. When said bending is performed on im
pregnated corrugated board, the center corru
gated member, even if impregnation has extended
thereto, will crush very readily due to the fact
40 that it is so light in calibre. However, even with
the use of corrugated board, difficulties were en
countered in endeavoring to form impregnated
containers therefrom which ‘could be shipped in
knockdown form or bent at a score produced prior
to sulphur treatment.
-
-
'
It is accordingly an object of the present in
vention to provide an improved method of manu-'
facturing containers or parts thereof which in
cludes the use of corrugated board and the ma
50 nipulation of said board in a particular way dur
55
liner in the outer container. '
.
A further object of the invention is ‘to provide a 35
method of manufacturing containers and parts
thereof which includes the use of wide lines of
scoring to facilitate the drainage. of sulphur dur
ing dipping,‘ said wide lines of scoring also per
mitting bending of parts to a ninety-degree angle 40
during assembly, there being an inherent resist
ance' to further bending due to the impregnation
and the type of scoring.
,
With the above and other objects in view, the
invention consists of the improved art of manu 45
facturing containers and parts thereof in all its
parts and combinations as set forth in the claims,
and all equivalents thereof.
, In the accompanying drawing illustrating pre
ing and after impregnation so that the sulphur
impregnated containers and parts thereof may be
ferred embodiments of the invention in which
formed which can be shipped in knockdown con
'parts in all of the views:
dition.
A more specific object of the invention is to
container illustrating the form in which it is pre
the same reference numerals designate the same
Fig. 1 is an end view of a liner for a shipping
50
2
2,182,959 "
,7
ferred to hold: said liner during immersion in the
' impregnatingfmaterial;
Fig. 231s an edge view showing one way in which
a liner may be folded to compact position after
impregnation; the dot-'and-dash lines? indicating
how parts thereof are bent te'assembly form;
Fig. 3 is an enlarged sectional view through
one of the lines of scering of the liner;
Fig. 4 is a similar view showing one of the parts
10 adjacent said line of scoring bent to assembly
form;
,7
5 is an end view of a stack of liners which
have been fdlded to compact position in accord
ance with the method of Fig. 2 illustrating how
said liners may be'shlpped or stored; ’'5
Fig. 6 is a perspective View? of a shipping con
tainer, one of the liners being inserted therein;
Fig. 7 is a horizontal sectional view through a
shipping container showing an impregnating liner
20
therein;
,
'
'
Fig. 8 is an edge, view of a liner showing another
way in which it may be positioned afteriim
pregnation, 'to provide for compact’ storageiand
shipment; and
i
,
Fig. 9 is an end view of a stack of liners each in
the compact elongated position of Fig. 8, showing
how said liners maybe shipped or stored.
Referring ‘more particularly to the drawing,
it is proposed to reenforce an ordinary unim
30 pregnated shipping container 3| by the use of
a sulphur impregnated liner. However, the prob
lem of constructing the liner in such a way that
it could be shipped ?at and still fold it to as
sembly position without breaking the material
35 at the lines of scoring, was present and had to
be solved. With the present method, a box liner
of corrugated board consisting of a plurality
of foldably connected sections 24, 25, 26 and 21,
and score-:1 along the lines 28, 29 and 30, which‘
40 in this instance extend parallel to the corruga
tions of the board, is utilized. The ordinary way
of impregnating a liner thus comstructed would
be to dip it in molten sulphur while in unbent
?at stretched-out position.
This, however, is
45 not practical because after the sulphur solidi
?es, then it is di?cult to bend the board on the
lines 28, 29 and 30 for assembly purposes with
out rupturing portions of the board. It has
been found that the board must ?rst be bent on
50 the lines of scoring to break some of the ?bres
thereof before it is dipped in the sulphur. It
may then be returned to original position and
dipped while ?at, but it is preferable to retain
the board in bent'position during dipping as
55 hereinafter described. it is preferred to bend
the sections 24,v 25, 2G and 21 at oblique angles
with respect to one another as shown in Fig. 1,
and hold the liner in this position by means
of a suitable frame while it is being dipped in
60 the sulphur. After the liner has been thus
dipped, the sections thereof are preferably moved
to a compact shipping position before the solidi
?cation of the sulphur has been completed. Ac
cordingly, the impregnated liner may be folded
65 to the flat position of Fig. 2 wherein some of
the sections are superimposed on other sections,
or the liner may be stretched out to the ship
ping pesition of’ Fig. 8. .Either method provides
for compact shipment of a stack of liners in the
manner shown in either Fig. 5 or 9.
In the
claims, the expression “moving said sections to
a position of substantial alinement” contemplates
movement to either the position of Fig. 2 or 8.
In
at the surface of the board and the sulphur is
permitted to flow through the ?utes of theicor
rugated board and impregnate the center cor
rugated member. This results in'substantially
greater rigidity. To obtain'fstill greater ?exibility
at the lines of scoring, the scoring may extend
transversely to
corrugations of the corru
gated boar'rl. This will prevent any large amount
ofrsulphurr from entering the flutes of the cor
riigated board at the lines of scoring.
'
10
These liners may then be shipped in stacked
form as shown in Figs. 5 and 9ftogether with
the collapsed containers proper. The user then
assembles the containers 3! in the ordinary man
ner preparatory to inserting the liners therein. 15
To prepare liners which have been stacked in
accordance with the method of Figs. 2 and 5 for
insertion; the section 26 is swung out toward the
dot-and-dash line position of Fig. 2, causing
breakage of some of the sulphur-coated? ?bers
aiong therline 25’ on one side of the line (if scor- ‘
ing 28 and there will be a natural tendency to
resist bending past ninety degrees. Thesection
21 is bent outwardly in azsimilar manner toward
the dot-and-dashline position of Fig. 2 and there
will be a similar tendency to resist bending
past ninety degrees. In the case of the sections
25 and ‘it, these sections are bent relative to one
another on the line of scoring 29, from the"
position of Fig. 3 to the position of Fig. 4, and
it will be noted that the sulphur-impregnated
shoulder 32 which is a part of the line of scoring
29, forms a stop to resist bending of the section
25 past ninety degrees, as indicated in Fig. 11.
‘The fact that the liner was formerly dipped in
sulphur'while bent on all of the lines of scor
ing, makes it possible to do this folding to as!
sembly form with a minimum amount of break‘
ing of sulphur-coated ?bers.
' To prepare liners which have been shipped in 40
the form of Figs. 8 and 9, for assembly, said
liners are folded on lines of scoring 28. 29, and
30 until the sections form right angles with re
spect to one another. Substantially the same
action takes place during said bending, as here 45
tofore described in connection with Figs.‘ 2, 3
and 4 when the'liner of said ?gure is bent on
the line of' scoring 29.
As a result of the particular method of impreg
nation and of the use of corrugated board, these 50
liners may be shipped ?at as shown in Figs. 5
and 8, and due .to the impregnated construction
at the lines of scoring, the corners of the liner
will have unusual strength to brace the contain
er against external forces on said corners.
In
addition, the stiffening throughout the liner re
sultin-lr from the impregnation reinforces all of
the side walls and also lends to the shipping
container a vertical rigidity which permits stack
ing of a number of boxes one above another
without danger of crushing the boxes below.
This feature of the invention is particularly ad
vantageous when containers are stored in cold
storage rooms, as even if the walls of the con
tainer proper are weakened by absorption of
moisture, nevertheless, waterproof liners will
hold the container in proper shape.
The important feature of the invention resides
in the dipping of the scored liner which has
previously been bent on lines of scoring, the 70
dipping preferably being performed while the
sections of the liner are disposed at an angle
with respect to one another, and while the sul
' By dipping the liner while it-is held' in the phur may be permitted to completely solidify
position of Fig. 1, proper drainage is-permitted " after removal from the bath and while the liner “
3
2,132,956
is in this position, it is nevertheless preferred to
immediately move the sections of the liner to
the position of Fig. 2 or 8 before the sulphur
has solidified. While theuse of corrugated board
is much preferred in connection with carrying
out the present method, due to the features
thereof heretofore described, it is of course pos
sible to carry the method out in connection with
uncorrugated ?berboard, and the term “?ber
10 board" as used in some of the claims, contem
plates either corrugated board or solid ?berboard.
ments, comprising scoring a sheet of corrugated
board along desired lines to form a plurality of
foldably related sections, folding t least one of
said sections on a line of scoring. to an oblique.
angle with respect to an adjacent section, dip
ping‘ the sections thus disposed into melted sul
phur, moving said sections to a position of sub
stantial alinement after removal from the sul
phur and before solidi?cation of the sulphur has
been ‘completed, and subsequently folding the 10
container elements to assembly form on said
Although twolvariations of the method have ‘ lines of scoring while the sulphur_ is in.solidi?ed
been shown and described, it is obvious that vari
form.
>
ous other changes may be made without depart
6. The method-of manufacturing container ele—
15 ing from the spirit of the invention and all of ments, comprising scoring a sheet of corrugated 15
such changes are contemplated as may‘ come board along desired lines to form a plurality of
, within the scope of the claims.
'
foldably related sections, folding all of said sec
What I claim is:
I
-
1. The method of manufacturing container ele
ments,- comprising scoring-a sheet of ?berboard
along desired lines to form a plurality of foldably
related sections, folding at least one of said sec
the sections to a position of substantial aline- -
tions on a line of scoring to an angular position
ment after removal from the sulphur and before
less than 180 degrees with respect to an adjacent
section, dipping the sections thus disposed into
melted sulphur, moving said sections to a posi
tion of substantial alinement after dipping and
before solidi?cation of the sulphur has been com
pleted, and subsequently folding the ‘container
elements to assembly form on said lines of scor
ing while the sulphur is in solidi?ed form.
2. The method of manufacturing container ele
ments, comprising scoring a sheet of ?berboard
along desired lines to form a plurality of foldably
tions thus disposed into melted sulphur, moving
solidi?cation of the sulphur has been completed,
and subsequently folding the container elements 26
to assembly form on said lines of scoring, with
each section forming a right angle with respect
to each adjacent section while the sulphur is in
solidi?ed form.
7. The method of manufacturing container ele 30'
ments, comprising scoring a sheet of corrugated
board along spaced parallel lines to form a plu
rality of foldably related sections, folding all of
related sections, folding at least one of said sec
tions on a line of scoring to an oblique angle
said sections on said lines of‘ scoring to a position
wherein each section forms an oblique angle withv 35
respect to each ‘adjacent section, dipping'the sec
with respect to an adjacent section, dipping the
sections thus disposed into melted sulphur, mov
ing said sections to a position of substantial aline
ment after removal from the sulphur and before
solidi?cation of the sulphur has been completed,
the sections to a position of vsubstantial aline
ment after removal from the sulphur and before
solidi?cation of the sulphur has been completed,
and subsequently folding the container elements
to assembly form on said lines of scoring while
the sulphur is in solidi?ed form.
3. The method of manufacturing container ele
ments, comprising scoring a sheet of ?berboard
along desired lines to form a plurality of foldably
‘related sections, folding all of said sections on
said lines of scoring to a position wherein each
section forms an oblique angle with respect to
each adjacent section, dipping the sections thus
disposed into melted sulphur, moving the sec
tions to a position of substantial alinement after
removal from the sulphur and before solidi?ca
tion ofthe sulphur has been ‘completed, and
subsequently folding, the containerv elements to
assembly form on said lines of scoring,‘ with'each
section forming a right angle with respect to
each adjacent section while the sulphur is in
solidi?ed form.
4. The method of manufacturing container ele
ments, comprising scoring a sheet of corrugated
board along desired lines to form a plurality of
foldably related sections, folding at least one of
said sections on a line of scoring to an angular ‘
position less than 180 degrees with respect to an
adjacent section, dipping the sections thus dis
posed into melted sulphur, moving said sections
to a position of substantial alinement after dip
ping and before solidi?cation of the sulphur has
been completed, and subsequently folding the
container elements to assembly form von said
lines of scoring while the sulphur is in solidi?ed
form.
75
tions on said lines of scoring to a position where
in each section forms an oblique angle with ‘re
spect to each adjacent section, dipping the sec 20
5. ~The method of manufacturing container ele
tions thus disposed into melted sulphur, moving
and subsequently folding the container elements
to assembly form on said lines of scoring, with
each section forming a right angle with respect
to each adjacent section while the sulphur is in
solidi?ed form.
'
_
'
8. The method of manufacturing container
45
elements, comprising scoring a sheet of corru
gated board along desired lines to form a plu
rality of foldably related' sections, folding at
least one of said sections on a line of scoring
to an angular position less than 180 degrees 50
with respect to an adjacent section, dipping the
sections thus disposed into melted sulphur, mov
ing said sections to an elongated stretched-out
position after dipping and before solidi?cation 55
of the sulphur has been completed, and subse
quently folding the container elements to‘ as
sembly on said lines of scoring while the sulphur
is in solidi?ed form.
9. The method of manufacturing container ele
ments, comprising scoring .a sheet of corrugated
board along desired lines to form a plurality of
foldably related sections, folding said sections
on said lines of scoring to a position wherein each '
section forms an oblique angle with respect to
each adjacent section, dipping the sheet thus
disposed into melted sulphur, folding said sec
tions to a ?at position wherein some of the sec
tions are ‘superimposed on other sections after
removal from the sulphur and before solidi?ca 70
tion of the sulphur has been completed, and sub
sequently folding the container elements to as
sembly form on said lines of scoring while the
sulphur is in solidi?ed form.
10. The method of manufacturing containers, 75
4
2,182,958
comprising, forming an outer container in col
lapsed form and of material which is not impreg
nated with sulphur, forming a continuous liner
for those walls ,of said container which are adapt
ed .to be vertically disposed, scoring said con
tinuous liner along lines adapted to substantially
coincide with the corners of the outer container,
: dipping said liner into melted sulphur while sec
tions thereof are folded at an angle with respect
10 to one another on said lines of scoring, moving
the sections of the liner to substantially flat po
lapsed vform and of material which is not im
pregnated with sulphur, forming from corrugated
board a liner for walls of the container, scoring
said liner along at least one line adapted to co
incide with a corner of the container, dipping
said scored liner into melted sulphur, allowing
said sulphur to solidify, assembling‘the outer
container, folding the liner on the lines of scor
ing to assembly position while the sulphur is in
solidi?ed form, #and inserting the liner in the 10
outer container.~~v
‘
"
15. The methodv of manufacturing containers,
sition before solidi?cation of the sulphur has
been completed, assembling the outer container, comprising forming an outer container in col
lapsed form and of material which is not im
folding the liner on the lines, of scoring to as
pregnated withrsulphur, forming from corrugated 15
15 sembly position while the sulphur is in solidi?ed
board a liner for walls of‘the container, scoring
form, and inserting the liner in the outer con
said liner along at least one line adapted to co
tainer.
11. The method of manufacturing container incide with a ‘comer of the container, folding
elements, comprising scoring a sheet of ?ber _ said liner on the lines of scoring to break some
board along desired lines to form a plurality of of the ?bers at the lines of scoring, dipping said 20
foldably related sections, folding at least one ‘of scored liner into melted sulphur; allowing said
said sections on a line of scoring to an angular sulphur tosolidify, assembling the outer con
position less than 180 degrees with respect to tainer, folding the liner on the lines of scoring
an adjacent section, dipping the sections thus to assembly position while the sulphur is in so
lidi?ed form, and inserting the liner in the outer
25 disposed ‘into melted sulphur, moving said sec
tions to a position of substantial alinement after container.
16. The method of manufacturingcontainers,
clipping, and subsequently folding the container
elements to assembly form on said lines of scor
comprising forming an outer container in col- ‘
ing while the sulphur is in solidi?ed form.
lapsed form and of material which is not im
- 12. The method of manufacturing container
elements, comprising scoring a sheet of corru
pregnated with sulphur, forming from corrugated 30.
board a liner for walls of the container, scoring
gated board along desired lines to form a plu
said liner along at least one line adapted to co
rality of foldably related sections, folding all of
incide with a comer of the container, folding
‘said liner ‘on the lines of scoring to break some
of the ?bers at the lines of scoring, dipping 35
said sections on said lines of scoring to a posi
tion wherein each section forms an oblique angle
with respect to each adjacent section, dipping
the sections thus disposed into melted sulphur,
moving the sections to a position of substantial
alinement after removal from the sulphur, and
40 subsequently folding the container elements, to
assembly form on said lines of. scoring, with each
section forming a right angle with respect to
each adjacent section while the sulphur is in so
lidi?ed form.
13.~The method of manufacturing container
45
elements, comprising scoring a sheet of corru
gated board along desired lines to form a plu
rality of foldablyrelated sections, folding said
sections on said lines of scoring to break some
of the ?bers at the lines of scoring, dipping the
sheet into melted sulphur, removing the sheet
from the sulphur and allowing the same to so
lidify while the sheet is in ?at completely
stretched out condition for shipment, and sub
sequently folding the container element to as
sembly form on said lines of scoring while the .
- sulphur is in solidi?ed form.
14. The method of manufacturing containers,
comprising forming an outer container in col
said scored liner into melted sulphur, allowing
said sulphur to solidify while the sections of the
liner are disposed in a ?at position, assembling
the outer container, folding the liner on the
lines of scoring to assembly position while the 40
sulphur is in solidi?ed form, and inserting the
liner in the outer container.
17. The method of manufacturing containers,
comprising forming an outer container in col
lapsed form and of material which is not im d5
pregnated with sulphur, forming a continuous
liner of corrugated board for those walls of the
container which are adapted to be vertically dis
posed,-scoring said continuous liner along lines
adapted to substantially coincide with the cor
ners of the container, dipping said scored liner
into melted sulphur, moving the sections of the
liner to substantially ?at position, assembling
the outer container, folding the liner on the lines
of scoring to assembly position while the sulphur - 55
is in solidi?ed form, and inserting the liner in
the outer container.
HERBERT M. KIECKHEFER.
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
702 Кб
Теги
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа