close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Патент USA US2133323

код для вставки
Oct. 18, 1933.
A. FRIEDMANIN
3
2,133,323
KNITTED FABRIC AND METHOD OF KNITTING THE SAME
Filed April 9, 1935
' ."__
l
'
‘INVENTOR
(11 bar? Jvtedmann
BY
s§\-%Q>
‘3 ATTORNEY
I
2,133,323
Patented Oct. 18,1938
UNITED STATES PATENT;
.
2,138,328
OFFICE
»
‘ KNITTED FABRIC AND METHOD OF
’
,
KNITTING‘THE SAME
Albert Friedmann, Wyomissing, Pa, assignor to
Louis Hirsch Textile Machines; Inc., New York,
N. Y... a corporation of New York
Application April 9, 1935, Serial no. 15,311
.8 Claim.
(Cl. 86-178)
This invention covers a new and useful im
provement in knitted fabric and a method of
knitting it upon a flat knittingmachine.
The invention is especially useful and valuable
5 in‘ relation to sheer silk full fashioned hosiery
fabric in which defects‘ and irregularities are par
ticularly noticeable and objectionable, but is also
of value in relation to any other sheer or semi-.
is. somewhat more ?exible and elastic than
equivalent single yarn fabric, features which also
improve its wearing and run resisting qualities.
In the drawing:
\
-
Figures 1, 2 and 3 are diagrammatic illustra
tions of the manner in which the yarns may be
laid by the yarn carriers for the production of
the
fabric;
and
,
V
>
_
Figs.'4, 5 ‘and 6 illustrate diagrammatically
three
fragments of fabric made in accordance 10
desirable or essential.
'
with this invention, all characterized by the two
- The defect which this invention substantially.
yarn feature throughout each course. 7
eliminates is the extremely common and objec
As already'stated, the primary object ,of the
{tionable one of .horizontal rings‘or stripes which
transparent knitted fabric in which uniformity vis
1o
seriously mar the appearance of much otherwise
15 perfect sheer silk fabric.‘ This results, ‘as is well
known, from lack of uniformity in the silk thread
which, in spite of the greatest care in manuface
ture, varies in diameter in different. parts and
from the practice of knitting such fabric from
0 a single thread. ‘This brings such inequalities
ainto adjacent courses thereby accentuating them
invention is the production of silk fabric of any
desired sheerness which is substantially .ringless 15
and otherwise similar in appearance to ordinary
single thread silk fabric.
'
‘
To produce the fabric of Fig. 4 two yarnsyl
and 2 of similar. characteristics are laid simul
taneously for each course, as shown in Fig. 1 and 20
are then knit simultaneously by the usual ‘knit
and producing‘ variations in ‘fabric thickness .ting operations. The gauge of each yarn will
which appear as bands or rings. All sheer silk
hosiery knit from a single thread contains the
25 defect and a great'deal of otherwise perfect fabric
is consequently discarded or sold as “seconds"
entailing a serious loss to the manufacturer
' The fabric of this invention may be as sheer
as desired and yet substantially free of the ob
Unlike other sheer silk fabric
30 jectionable rings.
the courses are equalized by the employment of
two similar yarns throughout, laid simultane~
ously and also knit simultaneously. vEach of
these yarns is composed of any desired number
a of threads corresponding to the desired weight of
fabric. For example, a four yarn fabric maybe
knit from ‘two two-thread yarns. In appear
ance, the fabric resembles fabric knit from, say,
a single four-thread yarn with the important dif
4 O ference that it is subtsantially ringles‘s. , This
results from the presence in each course of two
threads. Each thread contains the unavoidable
irregularities, but those of one will seldom coin
cide with similar irregularities in the other.
45 Consequently they tend to equalize each other so
that no varying pattern which can be observed
by the eye as rings, remains.
,
An additional feature of the fabric is that it
is run resistant. The breaking of a single yarn
will not expose a wale to an unopposed open run
because the second yarn will tend to hold the‘
broken yarn and if it ‘does succeed in running the
general loop structure will still be maintained and
the run will be largely concealed by the remain
ing unbroken thread. Furthermore, the fabric
depend upon ‘the weight of fabric desired. They
may each be two-thread yarns if a four-thread
yarn fabric isdesired, one may be a' two-thread 26
and‘ the other a single thread yarn for ‘a three
thread fabric, etc.
>
A double yarn fabric having the same total
number of threads as _a single yarn fabric may
appear slightly heavier since two yarns will, ob 30
viously, occupy more space than a single yarn of
the same number of threads. However, the ap
parent weight or sheerness of the fabric can be
controlled at will by the utilization of yarns of
suitable sizes and loops of suitable length to pro 35
duce the desired appearance. In fact, a distinct
saving in cost of manufacture is obtainable ,
through the possibility of using lighter yarns to
produce a fabric of greater apparent weight.
Aside from the gauge of the yarns they should,
obviously, have characteristics as, identical as
possible to produce in the fabric the same ap
pearance‘ as fabric made from a single yarn in
each
course.
‘
.
-
The two threads may be laid by two yarn car 45
riers moving together or closelyfollowing one.
another or, if desired, by a single yarn carrier
through which both yarns have been threaded
from separate cones.
The yarn carrier or car
riers may be operated by the usual frictions. 50
The ‘fabric may be fashioned- and also reenforced
at the heel, sole and toe in the usual way and
possesses in all respects the appearance of vthe
familiar single thread fabric minus the objection
able rings.
,
5.5
2
2,183,328
The fabric illustrated by Fig. 5 is similar .to
that of Fig. 4 in that it consists of equalized
courses each containing two separate yarns
throughout, but differs from that of Fig. 4 in that
four separate yarns are employed in the fabric in
stead of two.
As shown in Fig. 2 one of the yarns
3 is laid in every course, whereas the other yarn
broken yarn will still maintain the loop structure
and will partially conceal the run, by maintain
ing theaifected wale and adjacent wales intact
and the loop structure undistorted.
It will be understood, of course, that the ,in-_
vention is not limited to the fabric or exact
method of yarn laying described herein. Any
when the series is completed. Thus course A . knitted silk fabric each course of which contains
10 contains yarns 3 and 4, course B contains yarns 3 throughout two yams of identical character and
and 5, course 0 contains yarns 3 and 6. In which together are the substantial equivalent of 10
course D yarn 4 again appears with yarns 3, and a single silk yarn of a weight ordinarily employed
and of su?icien't sheerness or translucence that
so on through as many series as necessary.
any rings whichmay be present are clearly visible
Yarns 4, 5 and 6 must, of course, be as nearly is within the scope of the invention, and also any
15 identical as possible and yarn 3 also except, per
haps, in size. The actual knitting of these yarns method of ‘producing it upon a ?at knitting ma
changes in each course of a series repeating only
into fabric is performed in the usual manner.
The yarn carrier mechanism disclosed in my
pending application Serial No. 709,730 filed Feb
20 ruary 5, 1934, may be employed to advantage for
laying the'alternating yarns 4, 5 and 6 in con
junction with a carrier operated by an ordinary
friction for laying the common yarn 3.
v
The fabric of Fig. 6 is also the same as the
25 fabrics of Figs. 4 and 5 in that it consists of
equalized courses each composed throughout of
two yarns identical except, possibly, as to size,
but differ from that of Fig. 4 in that four yarns
instead of two are required ‘and from that of
30 Fig. 5 in that the four yarns are laid in a differ
ent order. That is to say, course E is composed
of yarns ‘I and 8‘laid simultaneously (see Fig.
3)—course F of yarns 8 and 9, course G of yarns
9 and I0, course H of yarns l0 and 1, and so on
in repeated series. Each course, it will be noted,
contains a yarn found in thepreceding course
and a yarn not so found. The actual knitting is
performed in the usual manner.
If yarns of different sizes are employed these
40 must, of course, be distributed properly so that
yarns of ‘the same size will appear in each course.
For example, if yarns 1 and 8 employed in course
E are one-thread and two-thread respectively,
then yarn 9 must be one-thread and yarn l0
two-thread. Each course will then contain a
one-thread and a two-thread yarn of otherwise
identical character.
The method of producing ‘the fabric may be
carried out advantageously by yarn carrier op
erating mechanism of my pending application
Serial No. 709,730 ?led February 5,1934, referred
to above, suitably modi?ed by the addition of an
additional ?nger for the fourth yarn and an ad
ditional selector cam for this ?nger, the control
of cams being arranged so as to maintain two ?n
gers in carrier rod operating position during each
yarn laying stroke and to select the correct pair
of ?ngers for each course.
The three fabrics described are, in reality, one
and the same fabric produced by variations in the
method of laying the yarns. Each consists of a
series of equalized courses composed throughout
of two yarns each, the yarns being identical ex
cept, possibly, as to size and which combined pro
65 duce sheer fabric similar to single yarn fabric but
substantially free of rings. At least one yarn in
each course is interlooped with itself in the fol
lowing course. The fabric is more flexible than
ordinary fabric and, consequently, more durable.
70 It is also run resistant for the same reason and
because each loop contains two yarns in fric
tional engagement. Both yarns are not likely to
break at the same loop and the unbroken one will
exert a restraining effect upon slippage by the
75 other. Also, if the other yarn does run the un-.
chine which includes the laying of two yarns
throughout each course to equalize them and the
interlooping of one of these with itself in the
> following course.
What I claim is:
~
1. A translucent knitted hosiery fabric of a
weight in which horizontal rings or bands can
ordinarily be observed, each course of said fabric
20
being knit throughout, exclusive of reenforce
ment, of two separate yarns of similar charac
ter, one yarn of each course being the same as
one yarn of the immediately preceding course and
distinct from both yarns of the immediately suc
ceeding course, the other yarn being the same as
one yarn of the immediately succeeding course
and distinct from both yarns of the immediately
preceding course whereby any inequalities in one
yarn are substantially equalized and diffused by
the inequalities in the other yarn of the same
course.
‘
2. A full-fashioned selvedged silk stocking fab 35
ric of a weight in which so-called washboard
effects, horizontal streaks, bands or light and
heavy shade characteristics can ordinarily be ob
served, as for example in a substantially trans
lucent stocking, composed throughout a substan 40
tial portion thereof of a plurality of yarns laid
in courses, each course comprising a group of
separate natural silk yarns, the groups of sepa
rate yarns in adjacent courses being of substan
tia‘ly the same color and character, each group of 45
yarns being laid for single course only until all
of said plurality of yarns have been so laid, the
said groups of yarns being similarly laid in re
peated series, each group for a single course only
in each series throughout said substantial por
tion of the length of the stocking, whereby the
inevitable inequalities in different portions of the
same yarn of natural silk are diffused and dis
tributed, and said inequalities are all blended
by the said interposition'of ‘single courses of dif 55
ferent groups of yarns so that the so-called wash
board effects, horizontal streaks, bands or light
and heavy shade characteristics are substantially
v eliminated.
3. A full-fashioned selvedged silk stocking-$3
60
ric of a weight in which so-called washboard
effects, horizontal streaks, bands or light and
heavy shade characteristics can ordinarily be ob—
served, as for example in a substantially trans
lucent stocking, composed throughout a substan 65
tial portion thereof of at least four separate
yarns of natural silk laid in pairs to form each
course of said portion until all of the yarns of
natural silk have been so laid to provide a series
of courses, in which series no two adjacent 70
courses contain the same pair of separate yarns,
and in which series each course contains a pair
of yarns of substantially the same color and
character as the pair of yarns in the other 75
3
2,188,828
courses, the said pairs of yarns being similarly
laid in repetition, each pair for a single course
only in each series throughout said substantial
portion of the length of the stocking, whereby
the inevitable inequalities in different portions
of the same yarn of natural silk are diffused and
distributed, and said inequalities are all blended
by the said interposition of single courses of dif
fer nt pairs of yarns so that the so-called wash
10 board effects, horizontal streaks, bands or light
and heavy shade characteristics are substantially
interlooped courses with notwo courses of the
series containing the same pair of yarns; then
continuing. in successive series of courses, each
of which is composed of at least four separate
yarns laid in the same manner as in forming the
first series of courses, until at least the leg of the
stocking below the top welt thereof has been
knitted, whereby a full-fashioned selvedged silk
stocking is provided wherein the silk-thread ir
regularities are so distributed that a silkstock
sented.
eliminated.
4. That method in distributing full-fashioned
selvedged silk hosiery or blank therefor the varia
tions existent in the yarns of natural silk from
15 which such silk hosiery is made and thereby pro
ducing full-fashioned silk hosiery of uniform tex
ture notwithstanding such yarn variations, which
consists in the following steps in the production
of-hosiery of a ‘weight in which so-cailed wash
20
board e?ects, horizontal streaks, bands or light
and heavy shade characteristics can ordinarily
be observed, as for example in substantially trans
lucent hosiery:-—laying a plurality of separate
yarns of natural silk in groups of substantially
25 the same color and character for each course of
loops and knitting a series of successive inter
looped courses with no two courses of the series
containing the same group‘ of yarns; and con
tinuing in successive series of courses, each series
30 consisting of a plurality of separate yarns laid
in the same manner as in forming the first series
10
ing of uniform texture and appearance is pre
'
6. That method of distributing in full-fash
ioned selvedged silk-hosiery or blank therefor
the variations existent in the yarns of natural
s‘lk from which such silk hosiery is made and
thereby producing full-fashioned silk hosiery of
uniform texture notwithstanding such yarn va
riations, which consists in the following steps in
the production of hosiery of a weight in which 20
so-called washboard effects, horizontal streaks,
bands-or light and heavy shade characteristics
can ordinarily be observed, as for example in sub
stantially translucent hosieryz-laying a pair of
yarns of natural silk of a series of yarns from 25
one edge of and across a bank of needles to form
one course; then dropping one of said yarns and
picking up a third yarn at the opposite edge of
said bank of needles and laying the selected pair
of yarns across said needle bank; then dropping 30
the yarn previouslypaired with said third yarn
and picking up a fourth yarn at the first-men
tioned edge of said needle bank and laying the
of courses, until a substantial portion of said , selected pair of yarns across said- needle bank,
stocking or blank is knitted.
.
‘5. That method of distributing in full-fash
ioned selvedged silk hosiery or blank therefor the
variations existent in the yarns of natural silk
from which such silk hosiery is made and thereby
producing full-fashioned silk hosiery of uniform
texture notwithstanding such yarn variations,
40 which consists in the following steps in the pro
duction of hosiery of a weight in whichso-called
then dropping said third yarn and picking up the 35
yarn dropped after forming the ?rst course at
the second-mentioned edge of the needle bank
and laying the selected pair of yarns across the
needle bank and thereby completing a series of
courses, in which no two courses contain the same 40
pair of yarns, and continuing through at least
the leg of the stocking the laying of series after
series of courses of said yarns as speci?ed, each
washboard e?ects, horizontal streaks, bands or course of each series being of a pair of yarns of
light and heavy shade characteristics can ordina
natural silk separate and distinct from every 45
rily be observed, as for example in substantially other pair of yarns of that series.
translucent hosieryz-laying a series of at least‘
four separate yarns of natural silk in pairs of sub
ALBERT- FRIEDMANN.
stantially the same color and character for each
course of loops and forming a series of successive
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
533 Кб
Теги
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа