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Патент USA US2133397

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Oét. 18, 1_938.
2,133,397
A. PlcKFoRD
MACHINE FOR EFFECTING RELATIVE MOVEMENT BETWEEN SHOES AND THEIR LASTS
'Filed Nov. 29, 1937
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2,133,397
Patented Oct. 18, 1938
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,133,397
MACHINE FOR EFFECTING RELATIVE
MOVEMENT BETWEEN SHOES AND' THEIR
LASTS
Albert Pickford, Leicester, England, assignor to
United Shoe Machinery Corp., Paterson, N. J.,
a corporation of New Jersey
Application November 29„1987, Serial No. 176,992
In Great Britain December 21, 1936
7 Claims.
This invention relates to machines for effect
ing relative movement between shoes and their
lasts and is herein illustrated as embodied in a
machine for separating shoes from lasts.
10
I and is connected by parts similar to those
described in the above-mentioned patents to
Whelton et al. No. 1,820,952 and Miner No.
1,882,083 to a treadle 23, the arrangement being
such that when the treadle 23 is depressed the
It is an object of the presentl invention to pro
vide an improved machine for effecting relative
movement between shoes and lasts with a mini
mum of efîort on the part of the operator and
parts of the machine so far described are similar
without danger of damaging the shoes.
In accordance with the invention the illustrated
to the corresponding parts described in the above
mentioned patents except that the roll 5, as will 10
last-pulling machine is provided with a block of
yíeldable material having a recess to receive the
heel end of the shoe. This block is normally
struction.
stationary and is arranged to- be pressed between
15 the shoe and a constantly rotating roll. The
block, which in the illustrated machine is com
posed of rubber, has fríctional characteristics
which cause it when thus pressed between the
shoe and the roll to partake of the movement of
20. the roll and in turn to impart movement to the
shoe, raising the heel portion of the shoe 01T the
last.
'
The invention will now be explained with ref
erence to the accompanying drawing, in which
25
(Cl. 12-15.1)
Fig. 1 is a view in side elevation of the im
proved machine;
Fig. 2 is a view in front elevation of the im
proved machine; and
Fig. 3 is a sectional view taken on the line
30 III-III of Fig. 1 showing the shoe-engaging
member.
The supporting structure of the machine con
sists of a hollow frame I in the upper portion of
which is journaled a shaft 3 driven in a clockwise
35 . direction as viewed in Fig. 1 and carrying a roll 5.
The shaft 3 may be driven by any convenient
mechanism such, for example, as is disclosed in
United States Letters Patent No. 1,820,952,
granted September 1, 1931 upon the application
of John M. Whelton and Arthur S. Pym, and No.
1,882,083, granted October 11, 1932, upon the
application of George A. Miner.
A last jack in the form of a swinging arm or
lever 1 is fulcrumed> upon trunnion pins 9 for
45 movement toward and away from the roll 5.
The trunnion pins 9 are carried upon a sleeve II
which is adjustably secured upon another sleeve
I3 journaled upon a pin I5 secured in the frontwall of the frame I. At its upper end the lever 1
50 carries a last pin I1 which can be adjusted for
up and down movement by means of a rack and
pinion controlled by a knurled head I9. The
lever 1 has a rearwardly extending arm (part of
which is indicated by the reference numeral 2I in
55 l Figs. 1 and 2) which passes into the hollow frame
lever 1 is swung (clockwise as viewed in Fig. 1)
about the trunnion pins 9 toward the roll 5. The
later be pointed out, may be of a different con
Secured by screws 25 to the lever 1 at each side
thereof is an upwardly extending frame member
21 which comprises a stout metal strip bent into 15
the form shown in Fig. 2. The frame member
serves as a support for an intermediate shoe
engaging member 29 which comprises a block of
rubber or like resilient material. The block 29
has metal plates 3| and 33 respectively at its 20
upper and lower surfaces and these plates are
held together by rods 35 (see Fig. 3) which pass
through the block and are fastened at each end
to the plates. The upper plate 3| has also two
rods 31 extending downwardly therefrom and 25
passing through slots 39 (Fig. 3) formed in the
horizontal cross portion of the frame member 21.
Threaded upon the rods 31 above the slots 39 are
nuts 4I. The block 29 is normally held in low
ered position with the nuts 4I in contact with the 30
frame member 21 by means of a tension spring 43
which at its upper end is connected to a hook on
the plate 33 and at its lower end is connected to
a hook 45 on the lever 1.
The intermediate shoe
engaging member 29 is normally located at the 35
level seen in Fig. 1v so that when a shoe unit S
upon a last is placed upon the last pin I1 the
heelward end portion of the shoe unit is received
within a V-shaped recess 41 (see Fig. 3) which is
formed at the front surface of the block. The 40
level of the block may be adjusted by turning the
nuts 4I on the rods 31.
In operating the machine a last having a shoe
S` thereon is mounted in inverted position on the 45
last pin I1. The treadle 23 is then depressed to
swing the arm 1 toward the roll 5. The heel end
of the shoe enters the recess 41 and presses the
rear surface of the shoe-engaging member 29
against the rotating roll 5. 'I'he guide slots 39 50
afford a limited freedom of movement of the
shoe-engaging member 29 toward and from the
last pin I1 suñìcient to enable pressure to be
developed between the shoe and the walls of the
recess 41 when further rearward movement of the 55
2
2,133,397
shoe-engaging member is arrested by the roll 5.
shoes to avoid the transfer of color to light-col
Pressure exerted through the treadle thus causes
the shoe-engaging member 29 to be pressed be
tween the shoe S and the roll 5, the pressure
between the shoe-engaging member and the roll
serving to develop suihcìent friction to enable
the roll to drive the block upwardly and the pres
sure between the shoe and the walls of the recess
ored shoes.
di' serving to develop sufficient friction to enable
10 the shoe-engaging member to raise the heel end
Having thus described my invention, what I
claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Pat
ent of the United States is:
1. A machine for effecting relative movement
between a shoe and a last comprising a support
for a last, a driven member, said support and
said driven member being constructed and ar
of the shoe off the last. The upward thrust of
ranged for relative movement of approach with
respect to each other, and a normally stationary
the shoe-engaging member will cause the last pin
I? to be tightly cramped in the thimble hole of
the last to hold the last against upward move
ment of the shoe. The operator may insure such
said driven member and having a recess to re
cramping of the last pin by pressing downwardly
on the toe portion of the shoe. After the heel
portion of the shoe has been raised clear of the
last the forepart can easily be removed from the
last by hand. Upon release of pressure between
the shoe and the shoe-engaging member the
latter is returned by the spring 43 to its normal
lowered position.
The frictional engagement developed between
25 the shoe and the recessed rubber block above de
scribed is particularly effective because of the
relatively great area of contact between the shoe
and the block and. also because the walls of the
recess, held from spreading by the resilience of
30 the block and by the guide rods 31, embrace the
sides of the heel end of the shoe with gripping
pressure. The operation thus requires only a
relatively light pressure between the shoe and
the block, calling for a minimum of- eiîort on the
35 part of the operator and avoiding any danger of
damaging the shoes.
block interposed between a shoe on the last and
ceive the heel end of the shoe, said block being
constructed and arranged when pressed between 15
the shoe and the driven member to partake of the
movement of the driven member and by frictional
movement of the shoe to move the shoe rela
tively to the last.
2. A machine for effecting relative movement 20
between a shoe and a last comprising a support
for a last, a block of yleldable material recessed
to accommodate the heel end of a shoe on the last,
means frictionally engageable with said block to
move the block, and means for e?îecting frictional 25
driving pressure between said block and said mov
ing means to cause the block to be moved and also
between the block and the shoe to cause the shoe
to partake of the movement of the block and thus
to move relatively tothe last on said last sup 30
port.
3. A machine for separating shoes from lasts
comprising a support for a last with a shoe there
on, a roll, a block having a recess to receive the
heel end of the shoe, means for effecting fric
rI‘he machines disclosed in the above-mentioned
patents are described as having rolls the outer
portions of which are composed of rubber. The
40 roll 5 of the machine illustrated herein may be
composed of wood or other inexpensive material
and is not only cheaper than a rubber-covered
roll but lasts indelinitely. The frictional force
developed between the rear surface of the shoe
45 engaging block 29 and the wooden roll is amply
sufiicient to overcome the resistance between the
shoe and the last.
Furthermore, the machines described 'in the
above-mentioned patents to Miner and Whelton
said block and said roll and between said block
and the heel end of the shoe, and means for driv
ing said roll in a direction to cause the block to
move the heel portion of the shoe oiï the last.
40
4. A machine for separating shoes from lasts
comprising a support for a last with a shoe there
on, a roll, a block of yieldable material interposed
between the shoe and the roll and having a recess
to receive the heel end of the shoe, means oper 45
ating on said last support to press the shoe
against said block and thereby to cause the block
to press against said roll, and means for driving
said roll to move the block frictionally in a direc
50 et al. are provided with a mechanism, identified
tion to cause the block to move the rear por
in the said patent to Miner by the reference nu
meral S6, for imparting to the last jack a slight
movement lengthwise of the roll for each actua
tion of the treadle. rI‘he purpose of this 4arrange
55 ment is to cause successive engagements to take
place at diiîerent localities of the roll Vto prevent
tion oí the shoe frictionally off the last._
5. A machine for separating shoes from lasts
undue wear at any one portion. In the machine
herein illustrated however, wear, either of the
shoe-engaging block or ofV the wooden roll, is
60 altogether negligible.
Consequently the above
mentioned mechanism for imparting movements
to the last jack lengthwise of the roll may ad
vantageously be omitted in the illustrated ma
chine and the jack lever 'i arranged to swing
65 toward and from the roll 5 in a single plane.
In order to insure movement of the jack in a
single plane there is provided a stationary pin
t9 extending forwardly from the frame I and en
70
35
tional driving pressure simultaneously between
gaging aV slot 5l in the lever'l.
The resilient block 29, together with the rods
31 as a unit, may readily be removed by unscrew
ing the nuts Si and unhooking the spring 43,
and a similar unit may be substituted.
It is
sometimes desirable thus to replace a block which
75 has been used in operations upon dark-colored
50
comprising a support for a last with a shoe there
on, a driven roll, a rubber block interposed be
tween the shoe and said roll and having a recess 55
to receive the heel end of the shoe, and treadle
operated mechanism for moving the last support
to cause the shoe to press against the rubber block
and to press the rubber block against the roll,
whereupon the roll will frictionally drive the rub 60
ber block and the rubber block will frictionally
move the heel end of the shoe oiî the last.
6. A machine for separating shoes from lasts
comprising a last pin, a driven roll, an arm car
rying said last pin and pivotally mounted for 65
movement of the last pin toward and from the
roll, a rubber block interposed between said roll
and said last pin, a support for said block mount
ed on said arm, and means for swinging said 70
arm to cause the heel end of a shoe on a last
on said last pin to press against said block and
to press the block against said roll, said block
support being constructed and arranged to enable
said block to be moved by said roll, whereupon 75
2,133,397
the block will move the heel end of the shoe oiî
the last.
'
'7. A machine for separating shoes from lasts
comprising a last pin for supporting in inverted
position a last >with a shoe thereon, a driven roll,
an upstanding arm upon the upper end of which
is mounted said last pin and the lower end'of
which is pivotally mounted for swinging move
ment of the last pin toward and from said roll,
10 a rubber block interposed between said roll and
said last pin, a guide on said arm, said block be
ing slidably mounted on said guide for heightwise
movement with limited freedom for movement
3
toward and from the last pin, resilient means
for holding said block normally down, a stop for
determining the normal heightwise position of
said block under the inñuence of said resilient
means, and means for swinging said arm toward
said roll to cause the block to engage the roll
and to cause the heel end of a shoe on a last on
said last pin to press against the block, whereupon
the roll will raise the block and the block will
carry the heel end of the shoe upwardly off the 10
last.
>
ALBERT PICKFORD.
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