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Патент USA US2133586

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Patented oct. 18, 1938
I 2,133,586
' came.» STATES
.
PATENT orrics
‘ 21,133,586
FROZEN CONFECTION, COATING COMPOUND .
THEREFOR, AND PROCESS OF
COATING QCOMPOUND
-
>0tto C(Stanger and Alva Thompson, Chicago,
Ill., assignors, by mesne assignments, to Corn
Products Re?ning Company, New York, N. Y., ' >
a corporation of New Jersey
No Drawing. Application January. 16, 1936,
Serial No. 59,407
14. Claims. (or 99-136)
This invention relates to the production of
frozen or low temperature confections, or food
products such as ice cream bars which are cov
ered with edible coatings; and the primary object
solution and dextrose crystallizes out of solution
as the hydrate. Among the advantages accruing
from the use for ice cream bars and like articles
of coating material compounded on this princi
' pie are the following: a coating is provided ‘which
5 of the invention is to provide an improved coat
ing'for confections or food products of this type, is soft, ?rmly adherent to the ice cream and of
more especially for ice cream bars or other bodies much the same texture and consistency as the ice
or articles made of ice cream or like compounds . ‘cream itself so that when the bar is eaten or cut
requiring low temperature storage.
with ,_a knife, fork or spoon, the coating will not
bars have been composed of a fat containing sub
tent; the coating is not limited to a ‘chocolate
10
The coatings heretofore used' for ice cream ' crack and break away from the bar to any ex
10
stance such as' chocolate to which additional fat \ flavor or to the color of chocolate, but can be
substance and sugar have sometimes been added; ?avored with any desired ?avoring material and
can be given any desired color; if a chocolate coat
and the method is to melt the fat of the choco
15
' late, chocolate consisting of about 50% fat, and to ing is desired, it is possible to use only so much
chocolate
as
may
be
necessary
to
give
the
desired
dip the bars into the thus lique?ed coating sub
and it is possible to use cocoa, i. e. choco
stance, the fat of which congeals in contact with ?avor,
the cold ice cream so that coatings are formed late from which a large part of the fat has been
removed, which reduces cost; and the dipping
on the bars that make the articles easier to han
process when the coating is performed in this 20
20 die.
>
manner
is facilitated because of the lower dipping
A coating of this sort is subject to certain ob
' jections and limitations: the ‘coating is hard and
brittle at the temperature of the ice cream, giving
an unpleasant sensation in the mouth and having
25 a tendency to crack‘ and break away in large
pieces from the bar whenv the bar is bitten into or
cut; the coating is practically limited to one which
is chocolate flavored, chocolate apparently being
the only 'fat containing substance that has ‘been
temperature.
-
In exempli?cation 'of the invention two speci?cv
examples will be given, one for a chocolate flav- .
-
ored coating and the other for a coating having 25
some other desired ?avor. The formulas given
are purely exemplary and illustrative and are not
to be considered as limiting the invention todthe
preferred‘ data given.
Example 1-Formula-j0r chocolate ice cream
30 found us‘eable for this purpose ;» it is necessary to , vcoating.—_'I'he following ingredients are used in
use a chocolate ‘high in fats, and this increases
the cost of the article; any coating consisting pri
' marily of chocolate is quite expensive; also the
dipping temperature is undesirably high.
35
According to the present invention a coating is
provided for low temperature or frozen confec
tions-which term is intended to include ice
substantially the proportions as follows, these
,materials being divided into three groups to indi
cate the preferred method of compounding:
.
Corn syrup (43° Baumé glucose) ______ __
Powdered dextrose hydrate; ________ __
cles of food-which is‘ changed from the liquid to
and forming its basic and principal ingredient,
instead of by the solidi?cation of a melted fat.
The sugar used is dextrose in a dry or crystalline
45 state and, in part at least, anhydrous dextrose;
Water
__
____
50
2
105
Water
.
\ Coma
___
130
____
100
‘ Salt___
1
(c) ,‘Gelatin ______________ __'__»_ _________ __
15
Water ______________________________ __ 100
hydration of the anhydrous dextrose, that is, the
A fondant is ?rst prepared by combining the
ingredients in the (a) ‘group. The corn syrup is
dextrose hydrate, which operation takes place,
with the amount of water used, during the prep
aration of the coating compound due to the fact
that at the concentration and temperature em
ployed, the solution is unsaturated as to‘ anhy
drous dextrose and supersaturated as to dextrose
56 hydrate, so that the anhydrous dextrose goes into '
40'
(Mb) Dextrose hydrate or anhydrous dextrose- 220
‘and the method of crystallization involves the
re-crystallization ofrthe anhydrous dextrose as
35
Parts
(a) Anhydrous dextrose ___________ __'____-__ 300
cream bars and other frozen confections or arti
40 the solid state by the crystallization of a-crystal
. lizable sugar contained in the coating compound
I
dissolved in the water, preferably at ordinary 50
room temperature, or slightly above, the, dex
trose added, and the mixture beaten. until pal
pable graininess disappears.’ The product is a
fondant of very ?ne crystals.
_‘
,
e
The ingredients of the (1)) ‘group are placed in
2,138,586
' 2
a double boiler and heated until the sugar is all
in solution. The gelatin of group (c) is dispersed
in the water by, heating. While the (_b)' and (c)
respect to the crystals which can be produced
through the hydration of the anhydrous dextrose.
Example 2-—_FormuIa for non-chocolate coat
ing.—The following ingredients are used in the
proportions asfollows:
‘ ingredients are still warm, they are beaten uni
formly into the fondant formed from the (a)
ingredients.v If the resulting mixture is too vis
cous for dipping at the working'temperature' of »
.
_
Parts
(a) Anhydrous dextrose _______________ __ 300
about 86° Fahrenheit, it is warmed to 95°-104°
Corn syrup (43° Baumé glucose)_____
Fahrenheit, and then cooled quickly to 86° Fahr
Powdered dextrose hydrate ________ __
2
Water ___________ _'____ ____________ __
105
10 enheit before using.
7
' Ice cream which has been molded or formed
into the desired shape and cooled to a .tempera—
ture near that of dry ice is then coated with
this mixture by dipping the bars or other forms
15 into the ,mixture’with the latter-preferably at
about 86° Fahrenheit. The coated pieces are
then placed in a chamber and cooled at approxi
mately the temperature of dry ice until hard
enough to handle. After which, they may be“
held at the preferred storage temperature for;
the ice cream.
,
aration of the coating, brings vabout the .hydra
25 tration indicated and at ordinary room temper
atures, in fact at any temperature below 122°
Fahrenheit, the solution will be unsaturated in
respect to anhydrous dextrose but saturated in
respect to hydrate dextrose; so that in the mak
ing of the. compound the anhydrous dextrose
will go into‘ solution and dextrose hydrate crys
tallize .outof'the solution, the crystallization of
the hydrate continuing after the‘ coating com-‘'
1O
drous dextrose __________________ __ 1'75
(0)
Gelatin __________________________ __
Water-
,
__
71/2
15
50
(a) Fat (melting point 92° F.>__. _____ __
20
(e) Flavoring substances such as vanilla, lem- ,
on, orange, almond, etc., and/or coloring 20
matter.
tion of the anhydrous dextrose. At the concen
50
(b) 45% dextrose solution made by dis- ,
solving in water hydrate or anhy
-
The ?rst step of the process, that is the prep
30
.
I
.
.
The corn'syrup is dissolved, preferably at or"v
' near room temperature, in the quantity of wa
ter speci?ed under (a), the solid dextrose added
and the mixture beaten until palpable graininess
has
disappeared.
.
‘
Y
The gelatin is dispersed in the water speci?ed
under (0), by heating in a double boiler, pref
erably below boiling temperature. The mate
rials speci?ed under (b), (c), (d) and (e) are
mixed unifomily in the fondant formed by the
(a) ingredients, and the mixture applied to- the
ice cream bars as in Example 1.
_
I
pound has been transferred to the ice cream
as
The fat speci?ed under (0) corresponds to
bars because of the lower temperature to which the fat element in the cocoa of Example 1.
the coating is exposed. The quantity of water '
In'each example the coating mixture at the
used is such that the coating compound will be - dipping temperature, so far as the dextrose and
unsaturated as to the anhydrous form of dex
watersystem is concernedhconsists ofv a sus
trose but slightly supersaturated with respect to pension of ?nely divided hydrate‘mcrystals ina
the hydrate form.
'
slightly supersaturated solution of dextrose.
With the quantities of sugar and water 'speci
trose, preferably'powdered, is used, as speci?ed, , ?ed the supersaturation will necessarily be
in order} to provide nuclei for initiating the de
slight; and this is important since material in
sired hydrate crystallization. If, however, ordi-‘ crease in the degree of supersaturation will re
nary commercial anhydrous dextrose is used, sult in coatingstoo viscous. for convenience in‘
particularly if the anhydrous dextrose be pow- , dipping. Such coatings do not adhere well to
The small quantity of crystalline hydrate dex
dered, it may not be necessary to use the dex
the ice cream and may require a long time for
trose hydrate for nucleation, since commercial
anhydrous dextrose is always to some slight ex
ageing to the point where the necessary amount
oi’ crystallization has taken place. The solid
dextrose hydrate in suspension was brought to
its ?nely divided condition by means of recrys
50 tent,‘ at least, hydrated.
It is preferable to use a certain amount 0
non-crystallizable sugar substance, such as the ‘ tallization through the agency 01’ the hydration
corn syrup speci?ed,
certain amount of reaction of anhydrous dextrose, the principle of
an edible colloidal substance, such as gelatin, in
55 order to give the coating a close and smooth.
texture. The fat 01' the cocoa, of which the cocoa
contains about 10 to 20 percent, is a desirable
ingredient in order to give the coating the proper
consistency and inhibit bubble‘formationr By
60
using anhydrous dextrose as a primary ingre
_ dient and taking advantage of the fact that at
room temperatures and at the properv concen-'
which, broadly considered, is covered in co-_
pending applicatiomof Carl S‘. Miner, ?led Jan
uary .16, 1936, Serial No. 59,409, ‘and is not
claimed herein except as applied to the coat- ‘
ing of low temperature confections. This ?nely
divided- condition of the suspended dextrose in
a saturated dextrose solution could be. obtained 60
by. boiling'dextrose, either anhydrous or hydrate,
with water, to a‘concentration which would give
tration a dextrose solution will be unsaturated ' a solution vsupersaturated with respect to dex
65 in respect to the‘ anhydrous and saturated in trose hydrate. The more convenient and eco1
respect to the hydrate, it is possible to bring the nomical method, however, is that described in
coating material to a- state of supersaturation, connection with the.Examples 1 and 2 above.
.for the type of~_crystallization desired without 7 It is understood that ‘all modi?cations of proc
‘any evaporating operation. Also one obtains,_ ess and product within the scope oi- the ap
through the hydration of the anhydrous dex
pended claims are' intended to be covered herein.
trose, a very ‘great reduction in the particle size
We claim:
'
'
1- Process of making a coating for frozen con
of the solid phase dextrose without having to,
completely dissolve the dextrose a d bring about‘ fections which comprises mixing with crystalline
supersaturation through evapor tion. Even anhydrous dextrose water in such quantity that
75 ?nely ground»: crystalline dextrose‘ is coarse in a dextrose solution exists unsaturated with re 75
'
2,183,586
spect to anhydrous dextrose but slightly super
saturated with respect to dextrose hydrate.
2. Process of making a coating for frozen con
fections which comprises mixing with crystalline
anhydrous dextrose, and a small quantity 'of' dex
trose hydrate to initiate hydrate crystallization,
water in such quantity that a dextrose solution
exists unsaturated with respect to ‘anhydrous
dextrose but supersaturated with respect to dex
trose hydrate.
.
3.‘ Process of making a coating for frozen con
fections which comprises mixing with crystalline
anhydrous dextrose dextrose in solution together
3
‘
anhydrous dextrose but supersaturated with re
spect to dextrose hydrate.
I.
8. A product consisting; of a frozen confection
and an edible coherent coating which is solid at
the temperature of the frozen confection and
contains corn syrup and, as its solidifying in
gredient, hydrate dextrose.
'
9. A product consisting of a frozen confection - '
and an edible coherent coating which is solid at
the temperature of the frozen confection and
contains gelatin and, as its solidifying ingredient,
‘hydrate dextrose.
- 10. A product consisting of a frozen confec
hydrous dextrose but supersaturated with respect
tion and an edible coherent coating which is
solid at the temperature of the frozen confection
and contains corn syrup, gelatin and, as its solidi
to dextrose hydrate.
fying ingredient, hydrate dextrose.-
with enough water so that a dextrose solution,
15 exists which is unsaturated with respect to an
’
4. Process of making a coating for frozen con
fections‘ which comprises mixing with crystal
20 line‘ anhydrous dextrose, and a small quantity of
dextrose hydrate to initiate hydrate crystalliza
tion, dissolved dextrose together with enough
v
ll. A product consisting of a frozen confection
and an edible coherent coating which is solid at
the temperature of the frozen confection and '20
containsgelatin, corn syrup, a fat and hydrate
dextrose.
-
Y
water so that a dextrose solution exists unsatu
12. -An edible coating compound adapted to
rated with respect to anhydrous dextrose but su
solidify in contact with a frozen confection which
compound contains ‘corn sugar, gelatin, a fat, 25
25, persaturated'with respect to dextrose hydrate.
5. Process'of making a coating for frozen con
dextrose hydrate crystals and dissolved dextrose
fections which consists in forming a suspension
of dextrose hydrate crystals in dextrose solution
with the liquid phase in supersaturated condition
supersaturated in respect to dextrose hydrate and
13. Process of making a coating for frozen
confections which comprises mixing together ap v30
proximately 300 parts of anhydrous dextrose, 50
parts of cornsyrup, 2 parts of dextrose hydrate
30 containing also corn syrup, a fat and gelatin.
. 6. Process of making acoating for frozen con- -
fections which comprises mixing together an
during the coating operation.
and 105 .parts of water and beating the same to
form a?ne grained fondant; and mixing into this
fondant 220 parts of dextrose and 100 parts of
and adding the same to the mixture; the water cocoa dissolved and dispersed in 130 parts of wa
‘being used in such quantity that a solution is ' ter, and also 15 parts of gelatin dispersed in 100
hydrous dextrose and water and beating the same
to form a ?ne grained fondant; adding dextrose
dissolved in water; dispersing gelatin in water
formed unsaturated with respect to anhydrous
dextrose but supersaturated with respect to dex
40 trose hydrate.
'7. Process of making a coating for frozen con
fections which comprises mixing together anhy
drous dextrose and water with a small quantity
of powdered hydrate dextrose and beating the
parts of ‘water.
14. Process of making a coating for frozen
confections which comprises mixing together ap
proximately 300 parts of anhydrous dextrose,
50 parts of corn syrup, 2 parts of dextrose hy
drate and beating the same to form a ?ne grained
fondant; and adding to said fondant 175 parts
dextrose dissolved in water; dispersing gelatin
of 45% dextrose solution, 71/2v parts of gelatin
dispersed in 50 parts of water, and 20 parts of
in water and adding the same to the mixture;
fat.
45 same to form a ?ne grained fondant; adding,
the water being used in such quantity that a
solution is formed unsaturated with respect to
1
'
OTTO C.
STANGER.
_, ALVA THOMPSON. .
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