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Патент USA US2133707

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Oct. 18, 1938.
H. LAHDE
2,133,707
BURNER FOR INCANDESGENT LIGHT
Filed March 6, 1936
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Patented Oct. 18, 1938
_ 2,133,707
UNITED »STATES PATENT OFFICE y
2,133,7 07
BURNER FOR INCANDESCENT LIGHT
Hermann Lahde, Berlin, Germany, assignor to
Ehrich & Graetz, Aktiengesellschaft, Berlin,
Germany, a corporation cf Germany
Application March 6, 1936, Serial No. 67,469
4 Claims. (Cl. 67-38)
si
The present invention relates to burners for in
candescent light and has particular reference to
kerosene round wick blue ilame burners for heat
ing .mantles to incandescence.
In a blue flame burner used for incandescent
light purposes, it is necessary to 'increase the
velocityoi the >air `flowing through the -burner so
that it may penetrate the ordinary yellow flame
burning on top of Athe wick and change it into a
10 blue flame. When this has been done, a small
blue flame will burn directly on 'top of the wick.
In order to increase the size of this blue flame
and thereby increase the amount of heat given
off, it has Vbeen customary in the past to provide
a llame ilange of -some kind below the top of the
wick and usually placed upon the outer wick
tube so that the air rising through the burner will
_ be deflected outwardly away from the outer sur
face of the wick extending above the wick tubes.
20 Without some such flange, all ñame on the side of
the wick will be >blown out-` With the use of such
a ilange the flame may creep down the outside
surface of the wick, increasing the size of the
blue flame and aiding in the production of vapors
from the wick.
As this horizontal ilange has heretofore been
in contact with the wick above the wick tube, it
receives -the heat from the flame and the in
candescent mantle above and passes it on to the
wick, causing increased vaporization of the kero
sene and creating an unstable condition in the
burner» This increased vaporization will increase
the flame over and above its operating height
causing the burner to smoke and sooting up the
35 mantle where yellow tips of the blue ñame may
touch the same. This ñange also receives gummy
and tar-like deposits from this vapor.
It is, therefore, necessary to cool the burner
parts adjacent the wick and this has been done
40 in the past by attempting to cool the horizontal
flame ilange by taking the flame flange away from
the outer wick tube and placing it in close con
tact with the wick above the wick tube. Others
have suggested perforating the ilange with a
45 series of holes, attempting to cool the flange by
passing air upwardly therethrough. Even if an
ordinary ilange is sufliciently cooled, hot vapors
touching it will condense making a wet and messy
burner. None of these types of burners has been
50
wholly successful.
The principal object of my invention is to pro
vide a blue flame burner that is inexpensive and
simple to manufacture.
Another object of my invention is to provide a
55 blue flame burner that is stable throughout a
long period of operation.
A further object of my invention is to provide a
burner, the outer wick tube of which is relatively
cool compared to the Vaporìzation point of kero»
60 sene.
A still vfurther object of my invention is to pro
vide a burner whose metal parts touching the wick
are relatively cool so -that there will be no added
vaporization caused by that contact.
Another object of my invention is to maintain 5
the outer 'wick tube in a cool and dry state.
Still other and further objects ci my invention
will be pointed out or indicated hereinafter or
will be apparent to one skilled in the art upon
understanding of the invention or Iits employment
in practice.
For aiding in the disclosure of the invention, I
show 'in ‘the `accompanying drawing, forming a
part of Ithis speciñcation, certain arrangements
of parts by reference to which the improved bur
ner is described. This description and drawing
are presented for purposes of illustration onlyand
are not 'to be construed so as 'to limit the scope
of the appended claims unnecessarily.
In the drawing:
.
20
The ligure is a view ‘through the burner struc
ture partly in section, omitting the chimney and
mantle, which may be of 'the usual type, and
showing 1a small portion of the usual supporting
kerosene front.
25
In a preferred embodiment of my invention I
use the customary inner and outer wick tubes I6
and I I, respectively, which support and guide a
round wick I2 between them. The inner wick
tube I'Il is supported from the base of the lamp. 30
The outer wick tube II is mounted upon the bur
ner 'assembly which includes the usual burner
basket I3, the gallery I 4 with its chimney-sup
porting fingers I5, and the burner cone Itâ which
is bent inwardly at its -top to direct the upwardly 35
flowing air into the flame.
As previously mentioned, without some inter
vening structure to divert the air away from the
outer surface of the wick only a small blue flame
will burn on top of the wick. Instead of using 40
the customary flame flange upon the cuter wick
tube I prefer 'to support my air-diverting flange
free from both the wick tube and the wick so that
it may have no metal contact between any por
tion of either >of these two members. At the same 45
time, the inner portion of this air diverter must
be suiflciently close to the wick that the air flow
ing upwardly between the diverter and the Wick
will not be sullicient to disturb the ñame burning
upon the outer surface oi the wick. For this
purpose I have found that a horizontal space of
about .035 of an inch or less will give satisfactory
results.
The space should be 'suiñciently large,
however, to permit a small quantity of air to ex
ist between the air-diverting flange and the wick 55
or wick tube for insulating purposes.
To accomplish this result I prefer to support
the air-diverting ñange I8 by means of spaced legs
2li mounted upon the burner basket or other parts
of the burner structure other than the outer 60
2,133,707
2
By means of this simple structure there are only
two air currents flowing between the burner cone
slightly as they approach a height slightly above and the outer wick tube. The major air current
the upper end of the outer wick tube where the flows into the burner through the perforations 24
inwardly turned flange I8 is formed. For the in the basket I3 and then flows upwardly between
most efficient operation of this burner the inner the spaced supporting legs 20 and around the air
end of the air diverter I8 should be spaced slightly diverter I8 and between it and the burner cone I6
above the upper end of the outer wick tube II'.' to the flame. A very small quantity of air flows
This diverter member may be imperforate as heat inside the diverter I8 and between it, the outer
wick tube. These supporting legs 20 are prefer
ably bent upwardly and inwardly converging
given to it is not conducted to the Wick tubes or
wick, but is carried away to other parts of the
burner or by the cool air rising through the legs
ZIJ.
By forming the air diverter in this way it may
15 be made very simple and inexpensively by stamp
ing a metal sheet into the desired form, providing
a one-piece diverter and requiring no excess
material or complicated machining operations.
As tests have shown, the effect of this simple
20 air diverter, positioned as described and shown,
is equal to or better than those of the previously
known llame flanges in so far as the prevention
of over-evaporation is' concerned. Altogether,
it is more simply designed and easier to manu
25 facture than any of these.
At the upper end of the inner wick tube an
improved type of flame spreader is shown. This
llame spreader 2| consists of a one-piece sub
stantially cylindrical structure closed and imper
30 forate at its upper end. The lower portion of the
flame spreader is likewise imperforate and fits
within the inner wick tube where it is supported
by a bead 22 upon the wall of the inner wick
tube I0. That portion of the flame spreader ex
35 tending above the inner wick tube is perforated
with a plurality of small openings 25 so that air
flowing upwardly within the inner wick tube may
be distributed evenly from the flame spreader
through these holes to the flame. That portion
40 of the flame spreader immediately adjacent the
upper end of the inner wick tube I0 is bent in
wardly to form a perforated bead 23 preventing
any possible contact between the ñame spreader
and the vapors leaving the inner exposed sur
face of the wick I2 above the inner wick tube I0.
The many perforations through this flame
spreader keep it comparatively cool even though
it is adjacent the flame burning on the wick.
These perforations also help to break up the pathV
50
of heat conductivity through the flame spreader
to the inner wick tube.
Consequently, vapors
’ given off upon the inside surface of the wick I2
might condense upon the llame spreader caus
ing a wet condition unless this beaded portion
55 23 were formed so that the air rising through the
inner wick tube I0 may prevent contact between
these vapors and the flame spreader.
In earlier types of burners where attempts have
been made to use the ordinary flame flange and to
60 cool the same, these flame flanges, if cooled suili~'
ciently, likewise condense kerosene vapors that
come in contact with them, forming a wet and
messy burner. In the present structure the air
diverter I8 is always of a sufficient heat during
operation to prevent condensation of vapors upon
it, and the small air gap between the air diverter
IB and the outer wick tube prevents vapors from
coming into contact with the outer wick tube I I.
70
As a result of this formation the inner and outer
wick tubes of this burner are not only cool but
entirely dry during the operation of the burner.
wick tube II and the outer surface of the wick 10
I2 above the wick tube.
It has been found that
with the use of only these two air currents the
burner gives satisfactory operation and a com~
plete cool and dry condition is effected.
Various modifications of the embodiment of 15
my invention, as described herein, are possible
without departing from the scope of the inven
tion; for instance, the air diverter may be sup
ported or suspended from the burner cone or
other parts of the burner and formed in various
ways. All such changes and modifications are
intended to be included in the appended claims.
I claim:
l. In a burner of the type described, having a
wick, inner and outer wick tubes for guiding said 25
wick, and a burner cone, means for maintaining
said outer wick tube in a cool and dry state, in
cluding a substantially horizontal, imperforate
flame flange member supported above and free
from contact with said outer wick tube, said 30
member being spaced slightly from the outer
surface of said wick.
2. In a burner of the type described, having a
wick, inner and outer wick tubes for guiding said
wick, and a burner cone, means for maintaining 35
said outer wick tube in a cool and dry condition,
including a substantially horizontal, imperforate
flame ilange member supported above said outer
Wick tube and between it and said burner cone,
said member being substantially spaced from said
burner cone and slightly spaced from said wick
above said wick tube.
3. In a burner of the type described, having a
wick, inner and outer wick tubes for guiding said
wick, and a burner cone, means for maintaining 45
said outer wick tube in a cool and dry condition,
including a burner basket, supporting means
mounted on said basket and extending upwardly
to aheight proximate the upper end of said outer
wick tube, an imperforate inwardly bent flame 50
flange member formed integrally with said means
at their upper end, said member terminating ad
jacent but spaced from said wick and above said
outer wick tube.
4. In a burner of the type described, having a 55
wick, inner and outer wick tubes for guiding said
wick, a burner cone and a flame flange for pre
venting a flame on the outer side of said wick
from being blown ofi, means for maintaining the
outer wick tube in a cool and dry condition in 60
cluding said flame flange being formed into an
imperforate annular horizontal flange, the inner
edge of said flange being positioned above said
wick tube and spaced slightly away from said
wick to receive heat from a flame burning on 65
said wick, and supporting means extending from
the outer edge of said flange to a part of the
burner other than said wick tubes for transport
ing heat received by said ñange directly away
from said wick tubes.
HERMANN LAHDE.
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