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Патент USA US2133774

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Oct. 18, 1938-
2,133,774
w_ H, VAUGHAN
HIGH PRESSURE GAS PROCESS
Filed Aug". 20, 1937
WM. H.VAUGHAN
INVE
BY
OR
ATTORNEY
Patented Oct. 18, 1938
UNITED‘ ‘STATES PATENT ,orrlcs
men ‘rasssmm GAS raoosss
William H. Vaughan, Rodessa, La., assignor to ‘
Tidewater Associated Oil Company, Tulsa,‘
0th., aecorporation- of‘ Delaware, and Sea
board Oil Company of Delaware, Dallaa,.'1‘cx.,
a corporation oi’ Delaware
Application August 20, 1931, Serial No. 160,192
14‘Elaims. (01. 62-1155)
This invention relates to a process of recover
ing desirable constituents from gases and particu
larly to a process of recovering gasoline con
stituents from natural gas;
5
'
.
An object of this invention is‘ to recover de
sirable constituents from gas while said gas is at
relatively high pressure.
I
Another object of this invention is to recover
desirable constituents from gas initially at rela10 tively high pressures without dissipating more
than a minimum amount of the pressure energy
initially present in the gas.
A further object is to recover desirable con-
_15
stituents from a gas by treatment thereof at pressures above 700 pounds per square inch.
. This invention further contemplates the treatment of gas initially available from gas or oil wells
at pressures substantially above 700 pounds per
square inch, to recover therefrom gasollne'hy20 drocarbons, while maintaining the gas at high
pressures of the order of the initial pressure, in
order that the residue gas from the process may‘
For example, with a gas available at 1400‘pounds
per square inch at the well, when the pressure is
_reduced to 400 pounds for absorption and even
this pressure is comparatively high for present
day absorption processes, the gas will- expand to 5 ,
more than three and one-half times its' initial ‘
volume. On the other hand, by the process of
this invention, a gas at 1400 pounds pressure may
be processed at that pressure, for the recovery of
desirable constituents therefrom, and the pres- 10
sure thereafter reduced to 1000 pounds, and thus
expand to about 40 percent of the volume occupie
in the first example.
‘
Another advantage obtained in processing gas
at the high pressures contemplated by this inven- is
tion, is that at such high pressures, gases exhibit
heat exchange and flow characteristics approach-_
ing those of liquids, and the e?iciency of heat ex
changer and other equipment,through which high
pressure gases are transmitted, is correspondingly. 20
' increased.
‘
'
'
V
-
Another factor which becomes of great im
be available at pressures sufficiently high to per-;' portance when dealing with gases under’ high
mit its direct use for repressuring of high prese
25 sure oil or gas formations or for other purposes
for which high‘ pressure gases-are particularly
desirable, to thereby avoid the excess cost of
equipment andpower now required for the recompression of. gases to'be used under high pressure.
30 conditions.
-
‘-
pressures is that condition now generally termed
“retrograde condensation". This term may be 25
explained as follows: when liquid such as .a
hydrocarbon liquid of mixed composition is in"
contact with vapors thereof and uncondensible
gases such as methane and is subjected to in
creasingly high pressures, above ‘700 pounds per 30
Heretofore, because of the relatively limited in- " square inch, the liquid will go into solution in
formation available with regard to the behavior increasing amounts in the vapor, as the pressure
of gases and lique?able constituents contained
‘therein when under relatively high pressures, the
35 recovery of such lique?able constituents was ac-'
complished in the conventional manner by ?rst re-
ducing the'pressurelofthe gas to a relatively low‘
pressure‘ and then processing the gas for the
- recovery of desired constituentsby conventional
40 methods such as the conventional absorption sys-tom.
I ‘
, ‘
_" '
'
increases above this lower limit, though there is
no change in temperature and even though the
temperature is below the condensation tempera- 35
tures of the-various components of the liquid.
perature remains constant.
Such conventional methods necessitated the > liquid
dissipation'ofa relatively large proportion of the
.
When the pressure of such gases- containing the
dissolved components is reduced throughalimited
range above 700 ‘pounds per square inch, con
densation of liquid occurs, even though the tem- ' 40,
by - reduction
in
This condensation of
pressure
is
termed
,“retrograde condensation", and takes place in a
~ initial pressure energy in thegas, whicnenergy .' particular pressure range for each particular
45' would votherwise be .useful. for various purposes " composition of liquid, at each particular tempera- 45
and particularly where it is-desired- to return the ture. The range of Pressure Within which ret
gas to anzoil orother producing ‘formation for re- rograde condensation occurs is the retrograde
pressuring suchv formation. Furthermore, in ‘re- condensation range. and belowv this range .110
' ducing the pressure of gas from the comparatively additional liquid will condense‘ without reduc
50 high pressure at which it is frequently available tion in temperature, but instead, as the pressure 50
I
at oil or gas wells to the comparatively lowpres-
is further reduced, the liquid components will re
sure necessitated when processing the gas by con-
dissolve in the vapors in proportion to their 1'6
ventional methods, great increases in volume of
spective vapor pressures and molal concentra'—
_ the gas result, requiring“ equipment of propor-p
66 tlonately increased size for-the handling thereof.
tions at the particular temperature employed in
accordance with the well known gas laws; I t
‘5
2
2,188,774
‘This invention makes use of this hitherto
little understood factor for the control of the
pressure at-which efficient extraction of desirable
constituents of high pressure gases may be ac
pipe 26 around compressor 90 to well B. A pipe
41, equipped with a;\ valve 45, is connected ‘to pipe
3| and leads to a connection with branch pipes
5 and I0 connected to wellcA. A by-pass pipe 49,
equipped with a valve 50, is connected into pipe 24
at a point between separator I1 and valve 25,
01 complished and also to some extent for the con
trol of the composition of the extracted con
stituents, for it has been found, that retrograde
and leads to a connection with pipe 26 between
valves 21 and 29. A pipe 5|, in which is mounted
a regulating valve 52, leads from a point in pipe
24 on the discharge side of valve 25 into pipe 26 10
at a point between cooler I5 and valve 21, thus
condensation is comparatively selective in its ac
tion upon a liquid of mixed composition, in that
with initial increases in pressure within the retrograde condensation range, it appears that the
' lower boiling components of the liquid will be
providing a vby-pass connection between pipes
reabsorbed ?rst, and as the pressure increases,
successively higher'boiling components ‘will be_
reabsorbed by the gas, or conversely, as the pres
sure is reduced in the retrograde condensation
range from higher to lower pressures, successively
of separator I1. ’ Pipes 55 and 56, respectively,
provide inlet and exit pipes to cooler I4 and pipes
51 and 58, respectively provide inlet and exit pipes
lower-boiling components will be condensed from
the gas.
20
-
4
,
Other objects and advantages of' this inven
tion will become apparent from the following de
tailed description in conjunction with the accom
panyingv drawing which diagrammatically illus
trates an arrangement of apparatus suitable for
25 practicing the process of this invention.v '
Referring to the drawing:
An oil well, designated A, comprises casing |
and tubing 2 conventionally mounted therein, a.
pipe 3. in which is mounted a valve 4, is con
30 nected to tubing 2 and pipe 3 has connected
thereto oppositely disposed branch pipes 5 and 6 .
equipped with valves ‘I and 8, respectively. Cas
ing I also has connected thereto oppositely dis
posed branch pipes 9 and III, in which are mount
35 ed valves II and I2, respectively. Branch pipes
5 and 9 are connected to a pipe I3, equipped with
a pressure control valve I3a, which leads through
a series of coolers I4, I5 and I6, respectively, and
from cooler I6 leads into a scrubber or separator
40 IT. A pressure release‘valve I9 is mounted in
1
pipe I3 at a point in advance of its entry into
separator I1. Coolers I4,‘ I5 and I5 are prefer—
ably conventional shell and tube type exchangers,
adapted to withstand relatively high pressures
and pipe I 3 is connected successively to the tube
sections’ of these coolers. Separators I1 is a high
pressure vessel preferably ?tted with ba?les or
bubble trays of conventional design, and equipped
with a side draw-o? pipe I9, in which is mounted
50 a valve 29.
24 and 26 around cooler I5. _Valve 52 is operated
by a connection 53 leading from a thermostatic
control means 54 mounted in the upper portion 15
Separator I ‘I is also equipped with a
liquid level controller 2|, which is operatively
connected to valve 20. A pipe 22, equipped with
a valve 22 is vconnected to the lower portion of
separator l'lsbelow the level of the point of exit
of pipe I9 from separator II. A pipe 24 in which
is mounted a pressure control valve 25 is con
to cooler I6.
-
The above described apparatus is used in the 20
following manner in ‘conducting the .process of
this invention:
Gas containing desirable constituents and un
der a high pressure such that these constituents
will remain in vapor state in the gas, even though 25
‘the gas is cooled below the critical temperature
of such constituents, is discharged from well A
through pipe'I3, thence through coolers I4, I5
and I6 and into separator IT. The gas may be
taken from casing I through branch pipe 9 and 30
valve II or from tubing 2 through pipe 3, branch
pipe 5 and valve ‘I. Valve Ila is maintained in
its fully open position and valve I8 adjusted to
maintain the desired high pressure, on the gas
in its passage from well A to separator II.
In its passage through coolers I4, I5 and I6,
the gas issubjected to a series of cooling or heat
extraction steps, whereby the temperature of
the gas is progressively decreased in order that
a ?nal temperature may be reached in separator 40
IT, at which the desirable constituents will liquefy
in separator I‘I when the proper pressure adjuste
ment is made as will be more fully explained
hereinafter. The ?rst heat extraction in cooler
I4 is generally accomplished by introducing water
at ordinary atmospheric temperatures in the shell 45
of cooler I4 and through pipe 55, the water, after
serving. its purpose, being discharged from cooler
I4 through pipe 56. In cooler I5, additional heat
is extracted from the gas by exchanging therewith
the same gas which has been additionally cooled
in cooler I6 and further cooled by expansion from
the initial pressure to a lower pressure, all as will
be more fully described hereinafter. The gas
used for the heat extraction step in cooler I5 is 55
introduced into‘ the shell thereof through pipe 24
nected into the upperportion of separator I1 -and discharged therefrom through pipe 26.
and leads therefrom into the shell of cooler I5.
The next extraction of heat from the original
A pipe 26, equipped with a valve 21, leads from the gas then is accomplished in cooler I6, through the
00 shell of cooler I5, and connects with a pipe 26,
shell of which an arti?cial refrigerating medium, 60
equipped with a valve 29, which leads to them
take of a compressor 29. A pipe 3| leads from
the discharge of compressor 90 and connects to
a second oil or gas well designated B.
Well B,
like well A, has a conventional casing 32 and'
tubing 39. A pipe 54, equipped with a valve 35,
connects to tubing 93 and has branch pipes 26
‘and 91, ?tted with valves 38 and 39, respectively,
and casing 32 has branch pipes 40 and 4|, ?tted
.70 with, valves 42 and 43, respectively. Pipe 3| is
such as expanded liquid propane, ammonia or
other refrigerating ?uid is passed. Such fluid is
introduced into the shell of cooler I6 through
rape,“ and discharged therefrom through pipe
By the described heat extraction steps, sum
cient heat will have been extracted from the gas
in its passage through coolers I4, I5 and I6 to
reduced the temperature of the gas to below the
critical temperatures of the desirable constituents,
connected to branch pipes 26 and 40 and a pipe and under ordinary conditions, these constituents 70
44 connects to branch pipes 31 and 4|. A pipe would condense and separate from the lighter
45, in which is mounted a valve 46, leads from a
constituents of the gas.‘ However, under the
point in pipe 26 between valves 21 and 29 and \ highhpressure at which these heat extraction
75 connects to pipe 3|, thus providing a by-pass in
steps are ‘conducted, the desirable constituents 75
3
a,1sa,774
will be reabsorbed in the gas as rapidly as they
are condensed due to the reabsorption effect at
quired. higher pressure and then discharged
through pipe 3| into well B through either of
high pressures, abovereferred to, and no separa
pipes 36 and 46 as desired. Or the gas may be
tion of A desirable constituents as liquids will
re-compressed by compressor '30 to a pressure
occur.
sufficient to permit its use in re-pressuring the
formation from which it was originally taken
,
The cooled gas is then discharged into separator
i‘l through pressure relief valve it, which re
through well A. _ In this ‘case, valves 38 and 42 are
leases the pressure on the gas entering separator ' closed and‘ valve 48 in pipe "opened and the
l1 and is adjusted to reduce the pressure to'that . re-compressed gas recycled to well A, into which '
.10 at which retrograde condensation will occur at
it is introduced through either of branch pipes
the particular temperature to which the gas is ' 6 or III by opening the corresponding valve 6
?nally‘cooled. The reduction of the pressure 'of or l2.
'
'
‘ the gasthrough valve Illv will produce an addi- _
In any case, since only a minimum amountof
tionalreduction in temperature of the gas in ‘the initial pressure energy of the gas has. been
separator. H, which, together with the reduction
in pressure will result in the .‘condensation in
dissipated ‘during ‘the recovery of'the-desirable '15 I
constituents therefrom, a maximum ‘amountof
separator ll of substantially all the constituents, ' the initial pressure energy will- be available'in
which it is desired to remove from the gas. The the gas and even where re-co'mpressionis re
condensed constituents will collect in the lower sorted to to raise the pressure of the gas, the
portion of separator l1 and will be discharged power and equipment required for re-compres
therefrom .through pipe 49 to a conventional sion will be very much less than has heretofore
stabilizing system, not shown. The condensed been required for this purpose.
constituents will‘be withdrawn under control of
The cooling of the original gas in cooler i5
liquid level controller 2| which will operate valve may be controlled by by-passing around cooler
20 in line I 9 to permit discharge-of condensed 15 a portion of the cool gas leaving separator I1
constituents at a rate such as to maintain a con
stant level thereof in separator I1. The uncon
densed gas, separated from condensate in sepa
rator ll, wlll'be discharged therefrom through
30 pipe 24 and valve 25 thence ‘through cooler I5
vand into pipe 26. As noted, the reduction in
pressure of the gas entering separator l_‘| will
cause expansion thereof and consequently reduce
the temperature of the gas below that at which
it enters valve l6. This reduction. in tempera
ture is then utilized in extracting heat from the
original gas passing through cooler l5v as men
tioned heretofore.
.
r
The degree of pressure reduction of the gas in
40 separator I1 is controlled by adjustment of pres
sure release valve 25 in pipe 24,-and as noted
above. the particular pressure thus maintained
in separator I‘! is that at which the desirable
constituents will condense and at which no sub
stantial reabsorption of the condensed constitu
ents will occur. Under these conditions, conden
sation of the desirable constituents of the orig
inal gas may be accomplished while maintaining
the gas at a relatively high pressure, since the
pressure at which retrograde condensation oc
curs, when the gas has‘been cooled to the critical
. temperature of the desirable constituents is
always relatively high and as a'result, the resi
dues gas will be available for disposal for any
suitable purpose at relatively high. pressures.
For example, residue gas discharged from
cooler .l5 through .pipe 26, may be utilized for
repressuring another oil or gas producing forma
tion. .Well Brepresents a well in communication
with such a formation. If the formation pressure
is the same or below ‘that of the residue gas, the
gas may be discharged directlyfrom cooler l5.
through pipe 26, thence through pipe 45 into and
‘
_ through pipe 24. By-pass pipe 5| and valve 52
are provided for this purpose and valve 52 is
controlled .by the temperature in the upper por
' tion of separator I‘! in regulating the by-passing
- of the gas around cooler l5. Pipe 49 and valve.‘
‘50 provide an additional by-pass connection be
tween pipe 24 and pipe 26, whereby all or any‘
J part of the gas leaving separator‘ ll may be
, diverted from its normal ?ow through cooler l5.
Instead of conducting the heat extraction steps
of coolers l4, I5 and I6 under the initial pres
sure of the original gas, the pressure of the gas
may ?rst be reduced to the- desired ?nal pressure
by reduction through valve l3a and controlby
valve 25, and, the cooling may then be conducted
at the‘ reduced pressure. In this case, of course,
valve I8‘ is not utilized as a pressure reducing
valve, the control of the ?nal pressure being
subject to adjustment of valve 25. The results'
_ in the latter case will be substantially the same
as in the former modification. However, when
the temperature to which the gas is to be ?nally
cooled is below a temperature at which forma
tion of hydrates of the desirable constituents oc
curs, the former modi?cation may prove more
satisfactory in that the ?nal reduction in tem
perature in that case will be accomplished in
separator l1, and in many cases, hydrates will
be formed only during this final temperature
reduction step with the result that since sepa
rator I1 is of relatively large size with corre
spondingly large gas passages therein, the formation of hydrates will be unlikely to stop up such’
passages and,'in addition, the hydrates will be
continuously subjected to the washing ‘action or" I
the down-?owing condensate, which will tend
to break up thevhydrate crystals and wash them
to the bottom of separator IA'I from which they
through either of branch-pipes 86 and 46, thence ' may; then be'withdrawn throughv pipe 22 and
into tubing 33 or casing 32, as-may be desired,
v.valve- 23.:
‘
and
into the formation to be repressured, In
Y
one'speci?c example of the application of
this particular case, valve v29 in pipe 28 will be 4 the above process,v gas, initially at ,a' pressure of
closed and valve 46 in pipe 45 opened.
.
'2250‘ pounds-per square inch- gage,‘ was cooled,
In case the oil. or gasformation to .be re “while under this pressure, to'a temperature of
pressured requires a gas for this purpose ‘at a plus 10° F. 'bywater-cooling in cooler; H, ex
pressure higher than that of the residue gas in
change with expanded gas in cooler l5, by ex—
pansion‘of liquid propane in cooler‘ l6 andv by
pipe 26, valve 46 may be closed and valve 29.
opened and the gas from pipe 26 introduced \ expansion through valve I 8 into separator I‘!
through pipe 28 to the intake of compressor 30
75 wherein the gasmay be re-compressed to the re
from'the initial pressure of 22‘50'pounds to a
?nal pressure of i600 pounds per square inch
10
9,188,774
gage. The yield of liquid products in separator
I‘! was 2.0 gallons per 1000 cubic feet of the
without departing fromithe scope of the ap
original gas.
In a second case, with gas initially available
For example, instead of cooling the gas by three
di?erent cooling mediums as described above,
only one or two of thesemediums may be used.
pended claims.
~
_
at 1400 ‘pounds per square inch, approximately
84% of the original gasoline content of the gas . In some cases, expansion of the gas from the ini
was recovered by the above described process tial pressure to the ?nal pressure may produce
with a ?nal reduction in pressure to 1000 pounds
per square inch.
‘
Generally speaking, the process described is
applicable particularly to the treatment of gases
sumcient cooling to condense the desired con
Or propane or other arti?cial refrig
stituents.
erants alone may be used. Again, only water 10
cooling may be suf?cient.
Since high pressure
under a pressure above 700 pounds per square gases coming from oil or gas wells are initially
inch gage, as it appears that below this pressure. at temperatures substantially above normal at
there is no material deviation cfrom the recog- 4 mospheric temperatures, the initial cooling of the
16 nized gas laws and conventional processes may gas to atmospheric temperature is generally best 15
accomplished by means of water cooling because
be used more or less successfully on lower pres
sure gases.
Since the critical temperatures of the various
hydrocarbons, which are ordinarily desirable in
the recovered product,vsuch hydrocarbons being
generally butanes, pentanes, and hexanes and
of therelative cheapness of this medium. Any
additidnal cooling required may then be supplied
by either one or both of the other mediums re
20
,
What I claim and desire to secure ‘by letters
heavier, are well above ordinary atmospheric _ Patent is:
1. The-method of recovering desirable lique?
temperatures, it is generally unnecessary to go
to extremely low temperatures to recover these able constituents from natural gas which is ini
constituents by the described process, although tially at a high pressure within the retrograde 25
at lower‘temperatures, the ?nal pressure, within condensation range of said constituents which
the retrograde condensation range, at which comprises, cooling said gas sufficiently to con
dense said constituents while reducing said high
these products may be recovered, may be in
creased somewhat.
The temperature range pressure substantially only within the retrograde
found in practice to be most generally suitable condensation range of said constituents at the 30
for most ?eld conditions is from about -5° F. to reduced temperature, and separating the result
ferred to.‘
40° F., although higher or lower temperatures
ing condensed constituents from uncondensed
may be used depending upon the composition of
the original gas and upon the particular com
ponents or mixture of components which it is de
sired to recover, and upon the temperature and
pressure conditions which are found most eco~
gas.
nomical to apply.
Another important advantage arising from
this invention is that the composition of the re—
covered constituents may be controlled, in some
degree, by control of the pressure in the range
in which retrograde condensation of the desired
constituents occurs. As noted above, retrograde
condensation is apparently selective, for it ap
pears that at any particular temperature, when
the pressure is, initially increased in the retro
'
2. The method of recovering desirable lique?
able constituents from natural gas which is ini 35
tially at a high pressure within the retrograde
condensation range of said constituents which
comprises, cooling said gas su?iciently to con—
dense said constituents while the gas is main
tained under said high pressure, thereafter re
ducing said high pressure substantially only with—
in the retrograde condensation range of said con
stituents at the reduced temperature, and sepa
rating the resulting condensed constituents from
uncondensed gas.
'
3. The method of recovering desirable liquefi
40
45
able constituents from natural gas which is ini
tially at a high pressure within the retrograde
condensation range of said constituents which
cuts of the recovered products will ?rst be reab
comprises, pre-cooling said gas while under said 50
sorbed in the high pressure gas and as the pres
sure is increased, successively heavier constit ‘high pressure to a temperature below its initial
uents will be reabsorbed. Conversely, as noted temperature but above the ?nal desired tempera
above, at a particular temperature, as the pres ‘ ture for condensation of said constituents, then
reducing said high pressure substantially only
sure is reduced within the retrograde condensa
tion range, successively lighter components will within the retrograde condensation range of said 55
55
constituents at said ?nal temperature and there
condense. For example, in a gas at the high pres
sure of the order above noted, and containing by to further cool said gas to said ?nal tempera
in vapor state propane, butanes, pentanes and ture, and separating the resulting condensed con
stituents from uncondensed gas.
heavier, as the pressure is reduced from its up
4. The method of recovering desirable lique?— 60
per limits in the retrodgrade condensation range,
largely pentanes and heavier will ?rst condense, able constituents from natural gas which is ini
and as the pressure is further reduced, butanes tially at a high pressure within the retrograde
and then propane will condense in succession. condensation range of said constituents which
’ Thus by selecting a particular pressurewithin comprises, cooling said gas below its initial tem
the retrograde condensation range, a liquid con
perature while said gas is maintained under said 65
high pressure, thereafter reducing said high pres
densate of at least partially controlled composi
sure su?iciently only to produce retrograde con
tion may be recovered. In this way, while con
densation of said constituents at the reduced tem
ducting the foregoing process under high pres
perature, separating the resulting condensed con
sures, the recovered product may be at least par
stituents from uncondensed gas, and utilizing the
70 tially stabilized by proper regulation of .the con
densation pressure, and thereby e?ect a material refrigeration effect produced in the gas by the re
duction in pressure to accomplish the aforesaid
saving in the cost of stabilizing and fractionat
' grade condensation range, the lightest constitu
ing the recovered product.
‘
Various changes and modi?cations may be
made in the process steps heretofore set forth
cooling.
v
5. The method of recovering desirable lique?
able constituents from natural gas which is ini
76
8,188,774
tially at a high pressure within the retrograde‘ gressively decreasing temperature to a ?nal tern-~
. condensation range of said constituents which perature suitable to condense said constituents,
comprises,'cooling said gas below its initial tem
reducing said pressure only in the ?nal one of said
perature while said gas is'maintained under said cooling stages and suiiiciently only to produce
‘ high pressure, thereafter reducing said high-pres
retrograde condensation'of said constituents and
sure su?iciently only to produce retrograde con
to cool said gas by the expansion thereof to said
densation of said constituents at said reduced ?nal temperature, separating condensed constitu!
temperature, separating. the resulting condensed ents from uncondensed gas in said ?nal cooling
constituents‘ from ‘uncondensed gas, and accom
stage. and utilizing said uncohdensed gas as a
cooling medium in an earlier one of said cooling 10
10, plishing the aforesaid ‘cooling in part by the re
rrigeration ‘effect produced in said gas ‘by the re
duction in pressure thereof ‘and in
‘sta'ges. ‘
part by‘ artl-y
ll. The method of recovering desirable lique?
.able constituents from 'natural gas which is ini—
_ f i 6- The method of-érecov'ering desirable iique?e 'tially ‘at a/high pressure within the retrograde
115,. able constituents from natural ‘gas which is im condensation range of - said constituents which
,
.?cial
refrigeration.
_
.v
-
.
4
I
, ‘ tially at a pressure above ‘700 pounds per square
comprises, cooling said gas in a series of'cooling
' inch which comprises, cooling said gas to a suit
stages oi progressively decreasing temperature to
able condensation temperatureior said constitu
a ?nal temperature suitable to condense said con
"ents, reducing the initial pressure of the gas sub- - stituents, reducing said pressure only in the ?nal
20 ‘stantially only within the retrograde condensa
one of said cooling stages su?iciently only topro
20
duce retrograde condensation of said constituents -
tion range of said constituents at said condensa
tion temperature but not below 700 pounds per
square inch, and separating the resulting con
and to cool said gas by the expansion thereof to
said ?nal temperature, separating condensed con
stituents from uncondensed gas in said ?nal cool
ing stage, utilizing said uncondensed gas, as a 25
cooling medium in an earlier one of said cooling
stages, and utilizing an arti?cial refrigerating
medium in‘ an intermediate one of ‘said cooling
densed constituents from uncondensed gas.
25
'7. The method of recovering desirable liquefi
able constituents from natural gas which is ini
tially at a pressure.‘ above 700~pounds per square
inch which comprises, cooling said gasv while un
der said pressure to a temperature below its initial
30
temperature‘ but above the ?nal desired tempera
ture, then reducing said initial pressure substan
stages.
'
12. The method of recoveringdeslrable lique? 30
able constituents from gas which is initially at a
tially only within 'the retrograde condensation
_ high pressure within the retrograde condensation
range of said constituents and to thereby further
cool said gas to said ?nal temperature, and sepa
range of said constituents which comprises, reduc- '
ing the initial pressure of the gas substantially
35 rating the resulting condensed constituents from 'only within the retrograde condensation range of
35
uncondensed gas.
said constituents, thereafter cooling said gas to
8. The method of recoveringidesirable lique?
condense said constituents, and separating the re-‘
able constituents from gas which is initially at a
pressure above 700 pounds per square inch which
suiting- condensed constituents from uncondensed
gas.
40 comprises, subjecting said gas to multi-stage cool
ing to condense said constituents while reducing
the initial pressure of said gas substantially only
substantially only withinthe retrograde conden
arating condensed constituents from uncondensed
sation range of said constituents but not below
700 pounds per square inch, thereafter cooling
said gas to condense said constituents, and sepa
gas, and cooling the gas in at least one of the
cooling stages by the refrigeration effect produced
by the reduction in pressure of the gas.
.
able constituents from gas which is initially at a
pressureabove ‘700 pounds per square inch which
comprises, reducing the initial pressure of the gas .
within the retrograde condensation range of the
desired constituents at the ?nal temperature, sep
45
‘
13. The method of-recovering desirable lique?
'
rating the resulting condensed constituents from
9. The method of recovering gasoline constitu
uncondensed gas.
50 ents fromnatural gas which is initially at a pres
14. The method of recovering desirable lique? 50
sure above 700 pounds per square inch which able constituents from natural gas which is ini
comprises, subjecting said gas to multi-stage cool
tially at a high pressure within the retrograde
ing to condense said constituents while reducing condensation range of said constituents which
the initial pressure ‘of the gas substantially only ‘comprises, cooling said gas su?iciently to con
within the retrograde condensation range of the dense said constituents while the gas is main
desired constituents at the ?nal temperature but tained under said high pressure, thereafter reduc
not below 700 pounds per square inch, separat
ing said high pressure substantially only'within
ing condensed constituents from uncondensed the retrograde condensation range of said con
gas, and cooling the gas in at least one of the' stituents at the reduced temperature, separating
60 cooling stages by the refrigeration eii’ect produced the resulting condensed constituents from un
60
by the reduction in pressure of the gas. I
condensed gas, and passing said uncondensed gas
into. indirect heat-‘exchange relationship with
said natural gas prior. to the reduction in pressure
10.‘ The method of recovering desirable lique?
able constituents fromgas which isinitially at a
high pressurewithin the retrograde condensation
range 01 said constituents which comprises, cool
ingvsaid gas in a series of cooling stages oi pro
-
thereof.
WILLIAM H‘. VAUGHAN. '
DISCLAIMER
2,133,774‘.'——Will12zm H. Vaughan, Rodessaz La.‘ HIGH PRESSURE GAB PROCESS.
Patent dated October 18, 1938-. Dlsclaimer ?led February 17, 1941, by the
ees, Tide Water Associated Oil Company and Seaboard Oil Company of
ware.
-.
.
Hereb enter this disclaimer to claims 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13', and 14.
-
I
'
Gazette March 18, 1941.]
_
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