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Патент USA US2133920

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Oct. 18, 1938.
e. A. GOESSLING
2,133,920
CONTROLLING SIZE OF PRINTED IMPRESSIONS ON CYLINDRLCAL SURFACES
Filed April 9, 1936
5 Sheets-Sheet .1
Oct. 18, 1938.
G_ A’ GQESSUNG"
2,133,920
CONTROLLING SIZE OF PRINTED IMPRESSIONS ON CYLINDRLCAL SURFACES
Filed April 9, 1956
5 Sheets-Sheet 2
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Oct. 18, 1933-
2,133,920
G. A. GOESSLING -
CONTROLLING SIZE OF PRINTED IMPRESSIONS ON CYLINDRICAL SURFACES
Filed April 9, 1956
5 Sheets-Sheet 3
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Oct. 18, 1938.
G, A, G¢ESSUN¢ '‘
2,133,920
CONTROLLING SIZE OF PRINTED IMPRESSIONS ON CYLINDRICAL SURFACES
Filed April 9, 1936
5 Sheets-Sheet 4
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Oct. 18, 1938.
e. A.- GOESSLING
2,133,920
CONTROLLING SIZE OF éRINTED IMPRESSIONS ON CYLINDRlCAL SURFACES
Filed April 9, 1936
5 Sheéts-Sheet 5
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Patented Oct. 18, 1938
_ 2,133,920
UNITED STATES PATENT oFFIcE
2,133,920
CONTROLLING SIZE OF PRINTED IMPRES
SIONS 0N CYLINDRIOAL SURFACES
Gerald A. Goessling,‘ St. Louis, Mo.
Application April 9, 1936, Serial No.‘ 73,429
6 Claims.
_ My invention relates to the printing on tubu
lar articles of celluloid and the like and is particu
larly concerned with the printing in the nature
of an “all-over” design, that is, with covering
in substantially the entire surface of Celluloid and
like tubing with printing. Theinvention consists
principally in rotating the work independently of
the usual friction drive associated with the print
ing plate, whereby the printing can be positively
10 controlled.
It also consists in the printing press
and in the parts and combinations of parts and in
the process hereinafter described and claimed.
In the accompanying drawings—
_
Fig. 1 is a plan view of a press for ‘printing
15 tubular Celluloid articles embodying my inven
tion,
.
.
-
Fig. 2 is a side elevation, looking from theleft
of ;Fig. 1,
.
Fig. 3 is a frontend elevation,
.20 Fig. 4 .is a partial plan view, with ‘carriage
moved rearwardly over ?rst printing plate,
Figs. .5 to 11, inclusive, are sectional views on
the lines 5—5, 6—-6, 1-1‘, 8-8, 9-9, l0—l0 and
l l-l i, respectively, of Fig. 1,
.
-Fig. 12 is a diagrammatic View showing aplu
rality of printed tubes on a mandrel ready for
spraying to protect the printing,
_.
Fig. 13 is a sectional view-of the coated printed
tube,
'
Fig. 14 is a diagrammatic plan view of a print
ing plate,
.
~' Figs. 15, 16 and 1'7 are sectional views of tubes
of three different sizes as printed by said plate;
Figs. 18, 19 and 20 are developmental views of
.35 the printed-surfaces of the tubes of .Figs. :15, 16
and 17, respectively and ~
Fig. 21 is a diagrammatic view of a rotary type
press having the work mounted in accordance
with my invention.
4.0
Mounted on a base i are longitudinally extend
ing spaced rails 2 which have outwardly ‘project
ing guide ribs 3 near their tops that ?t in-guide
grooves 4 formed near the bottoms'of the inner
faces 5 of slide frame members 6 which are con
,45 nected together by means of suitable transverse
frame members ‘i. The frame members 6 are
reciprocable along the rails 2, the drawings illus
trating diagrammatically a pair of links 8 piv
otally secured to one end of one of each of said
frame members 16 and having pivotallysecured
‘thereto levers 9 that areconnected to any suit
able device for causing reciprocatory motion.
Vertically disposed bolts I0 have plates ll se
cured to their upper ends and their lower ends
(01. 101_3s)
nuts I 2 being mounted on the projecting lower
ends of said bolts Ill. Springs l3 surrounding
said bolts and engaging the bottoms of said sup
porting plates II hold them yieldably in upper
most position. Said supporting plates II have :5
printing plates 14 mounted thereon and secured ‘
thereto, as by some suitable adhesive. By means
of the nuts 12, it is possible to vary the height
of the ‘printing plates l4.
,
Mounted in guide slots I5 in said longitudinal 1.0
frame members 6 are bearing blocks l6 in‘which.
are rotatably mounted the ends of shafts I‘! on
each of which is mounted an inking roller, :I8,
said rollers preferably being grouped in pairs.
Said shafts I‘! are provided with rollers I9 that ‘15
run on track surfaces 20 on the top of said vrails
.2. The cam rollers [9 of the shafts ll of a pair
will run on a tracksurface different from those
of the other rollers. The levels of these tracks 20
are arranged so that each inking roller l8'or pair ‘20
of rollers 18 engages only one of the printing
plates l4, being raised above the level of the other
printing plates. By this arrangement, each ink
ing roller or pair of inking rollers applies ink to
only one of the plates. Suitable inking disks 2| ,25
are provided, only one being shown in the draw-
‘
.ings, and track means 22 are likewiseprovided so
that each roller or pair of rollers engages only
the disk having a single color of ink thereon.
Supported above the bed I is a longitudinally .30
extendingrack .23 provided with means for ad
justing its level. The means shown in the draw
ings include bolts 24 whose ends project into re
cesses 25 in the rack, the level of the rack being
adjustable by means of nuts 26 on said'bolts sup- .35
,
porting the bottom of the rack-member.
Rotatably mounted in the longitudinal frame
members 6 is a shaft 21 on one end of whichis ‘
mounted a pinion 28 whose teethemesh with the ,
teeth of said rack 23. As shown -in-.the drawings, .40
one longitudinal frame member =6.is provided with
.a recess 29 in whichsaid-pinion 28 ?ts. Mounted
.on the shaft 21 adjacent to the inner faces of
the rails are :friction bushings .30 which are nor;
zmally rotatable with the shaft, but in which the .45
shaft may rotate if the bushingsare held against
rotation.
,
a
'
.Mcunted-on one of said bushings 30 is a bracket
arm 31 that has a split hub portion._32 with pro
jecting lugs 33, in which is mounted a screw 34 .50
:for drawing ‘the hub parts tight so as to hold
the bracket arm 3| in place. . i-Rotatabl-y mounted
on a stub shaft 35 securedrto said arm 3! isan
idler gear 36 that meshes witha-gear 37 thatis
.55 extend through openings in the bed -.I, securing secured-to theshaft Zl'by means of a set screw 55
2,133,920
2.
38 alongside said bushing. Alseconrd gear 39 is
mounted on a rotatable spindle 40 secured to said
bracket arm 3| and the inwardly projecting end
of said spindle 45 is provided with a chuck 41
Ul or center for receiving one end of the tubular
work 42, which is shown as being a cylindrical
celluloid tube. Mounted on the other friction
bushing 39 is a similar bracket arm 43 in which
is mounted a spindle 44 having a center or chuck
and provided with a spring 46 for resiliently
pressing it into engagement with the other end
' of the work, and facilitating invention and re
- moval of the work. An arm 41 secured to the
side frame member as by a screw 48 rests on top
of the second bracket arm 43 and limits the up
ward movement thereof. A pin, 49 projecting
from the tip of said arm engages a stop plate 50
secured to one of the transverse frame members
If a larger tube is printed than one whose pe
riphery is exactly the same as the lengh of the
printing plate, the printed impression will be
correspondingly enlarged or stretched circumfer
entially of the work and if a smaller tube is
printed, the printed impression will be condensed
circumferentially of the work. Thus a single
plate can be used to print larger or smaller tubes
and the printed matter will always occupy the
same portion of the circumference of the work 10
regardless of the size of the work. That is, if the
plate is arranged to print an over-all design on
a tube, the pattern will accurately cover tubes of
various sizes without any gap and without any
overlap in the printing; and if the printing is ar 15
ranged to cover any portion, say one-half, of
the circumference of the work, it will cover that
much of the circumferential portion of the work,
variations in work size. Likewise,
to limit the downward movement of saidlarm, regardlessvof
a single plate can be made to produce impressions 20
20 A similar arm 41a secured to the other side frame
member by screws 48a carries an adjustable pin
which limits upward movement of arm 3 I. These
stops 4? and 41b are adjustable to accommodate
work of different lengths.
Secured ‘to the bed I of the press as by screws
5| ?tting in notches 52 is an angle member 53
whose vertical web 54 is disposed alongside the
printing plates M. -The position of the vertical
web 54 with respect to the printing plates may be
varied by means of said notches 52.
' As the parts move rearwardly, toward the top
of the sheet in Fig. 1, the inking rollers l8 will
ink the respective printing plates 14, each roller
H3 or pair of rollers preferably being given a
different color and inking only one of the plates.
This movement of the frame causes the shaft 21
to rotate and the bracket arm 43 is swung down
wardly until the pin 49 engaging the plate 50
stops the downward movement of said bracket
arm 43 and the downward movement of the other
bracket arm 3| is stopped by one end of the tubu»
'lar work 42 engaging the top of the web 54. At
the same time, the work spindle is rotated by the
gearing.
"it
The length of the printing plate 14 in the direc
tion of travel of the work is normally the same
as the outer circumference of the tube 42, so that
the entire periphery is printed when the work
st
55
70
passes over the plate. The distance between the
printing plates I4 will ‘likewise be an exact multi
ple of the distance covered by a single rotation
of the work, preferably being just one rotation
and the work then passes over the second plate,
where it is printed with the second color or with
larger-or smaller than those appearing on its
surface.
-
'
I
v
The importance of this control of the size of
the printed impression is obviously increased by
the fact that a given variation in tube diameter
is multiplied by 3.1416 in the cylindrical surface,
so that even a slight- variation in tube diameter
will create a serious discrepancy between the
cylindrical surface and the plate, thus causing
either. a gap or an overlap in the case of all
30
over printing. Figs. 14 to 17 illustrate diagram
matically the control of the size of printed im
pressions that is obtainable by positive rotation
of-the tubular work. Fig. 14 is a plan view of a
plate having a dimension a in the direction of 35
travel of the work thereover. In Fig. 15 is shown
a sectional view of a tube 42 having a circum
ference exactly equal to a, and in Fig. 18 a de
velopmental view of the printed surface of such
tube, which is an exact replica of the plate.
In Fig. 16 is shown a smaller tube 422)‘ having
a circumference b smaller than the distance a
and the developed printed surface thereof shown
in Fig. 23 has the printed matter compressed or
shortened in the direction of travel that is cir 45
cumferentially of the tube.
In Fig. .17 is shown a larger tube 420 having a
circumference c larger than the distance a; and
the developed printed surface thereof shown in
Fig. 24 has the printed matter elongated in the
direction of travel, that is circumferentially of
the tube. These views indicate the possibility,
‘not merely of varying the size of printed impres
so
sions to compensate for minor variations in work
different printing matter which will obviously be size but. also of printing cylindrical bodies of 55
in exact register with the matter printed by the widely different sizes from a single plate.
The printed tube is adapted for polygonal
?rst plate. The third plate is similarly spaced
with respect to the second plate, so as to print ‘shaping in accordance with my Patent No.
2,016,425 by applying to the tube a protective
the third material in exact register with the mat
coating 56 for printing 55, as shown in Fig. 13, i
ter printed by the ?rst and'second plates.
To compensate for any variations in tube size and then shaping the tube. This shaping is
or plate size and to control the size of the printed especially advantageous in the case of tubes that
impression, the tubular work is positively driven are larger than the plate, since the slight cir
so that its rotary movement is independent of the cumferential distortion of the printing operation
frictional engagement between its surface and is offset’ or corrected by the slight longitudinal
the printing plate or the guide for the printing distortion of the shaping operation.
When a plate of a different size is used, it
plate. Thus, the tubular work makes a complete
revolution in a given longitudinal travel of the becomes necessary to change the drive so as to
carriage, regardless of variations in the size of cause the work to have the necessary rate of
the work itself. The drive is arranged so that rotation for that particular plate.
the work holder and hence the tubular work will
make a complete revolution as the work travels
completely across the printing plate and will
make a complete revolution or multiple thereof
'in passing from printing plate to printing plate.
It is advisable to use printed plates made of
rubber or other somewhat yieldable material.
This avoidsrmarring the surface of the work and
minimizes any tendency to blur as the result of
slippage between the work and the printing plate.
575
2,133,920
The invention is equally applicable to rotary
presses having arcuate printing plates 90 on a
rotary roll 9|. In such presses, the work has its
own positive rotating means, independent of the
means for rotating the printing roll 9|. Such a
press is shown diagrammatically in Fig. 21.
The above described invention has numerous
advantages. The positive rotation of the work
independent of the printing plate makes it pos—
10 sible to compensate for variations in printing
plate size and in tube size and to produce an
all-over pattern from a given plate on tubes of
widely different sizes without gap or overlap in
the printed impression. Great economy is cre
15 ated by the fact that a single plate can be made
to produce printed impressions of many different
sizes, some larger and some smaller than the
plate itself. Thus, in the case of printed matter
not intended to cover the entire periphery of a
tube, the height of the printed matter may be
varied by changing the gearing so as to change
the rotation of the work relative to the printing
plate. The positive control of the rotation of the
work insures the accurate matching of the im—
25 pressions made by successive plates and makes
color printing on cylindrical articles feasible.
Obviously, numerous changes may be made with
out departing from the invention and I do not
wish to be limited to the precise construction
30 shown.
What I claim is:
1. A printing press for cylindrical articles com
prising a rack, a longitudinally movable frame,
a shaft rotatable in said frame, a gear ?xed on
35 said shaft meshing with said rack whereby said
shaft is rotated as said frame moves, a work sup
port having rotatable centers for supporting the
work, a second gear on said shaft, an idler pinion
meshing therewith, a gear on one of said centers
40 meshing with said pinion, and 'a printing plate
arranged to be engaged by the rotating work
moving thereover.
2. A printing press for cylindrical articles com
prising a rack, a longitudinally movable frame,
45 a shaft rotatable in said frame, a gear ?xed on
said shaft meshing with said rack whereby said
shaft is rotated as said frame moves, spaced fric
tion bushings on said shaft, an arm projecting
from. each bushing, each of said arms having
50 mounted thereon a rotatable center for support
ing an end of the work, a second gear ?xed on
said shaft, an idler pinion supported on one of
said arms and meshing therewith, a gear on one
of said centers meshing with said idler pinion,
55 and a printing plate arranged to be engaged by
the rotating work moving thereover.
3. A printing press for cylindrical articles com
prising a rack, a longitudinally movable frame,
a shaft rotatable in said frame, a gear ?xed on
said shaft meshing with said rack whereby said
shaft is rotated as said frame moves, spaced fric
tion bushings on said shaft, an arm projecting
3
from each bushing, each of said arms having
mounted thereon a rotatable center for support
ing one end of the work, a second gear ?xed on
said shaft, an idler pinion supported on one of
said arms and meshing therewith, a gear ‘on one 5
of said centers meshing with said idler pinion,
a trackarranged to be engaged by the work ad
jacent to the driven center and a stop for limit
ing the movement of the arm supporting the '
other center, and a printing plate arranged to
be engaged by the rotating work moving there
over.
4. A printing press for cylindrical articles com
prising a rack, a longitudinally movable frame,
a shaft rotatable in said frame, a gear ?xed on 15
said shaft meshing with said rack whereby said
shaft is rotated as said frame moves, a Work sup
port having rotatable centers for supporting the
work, a second gear on said shaft, an idler pinion
meshing therewith, a gear on one of. said cen '20
ters meshing with said pinion, and a plurality of
printing plates arranged in the path of travel
of the rotating work to be engaged thereby, the
space between plates being an exact multiple of
the distance covered by a single rotation of the 25
work, whereby the impressions of the several
plates register.
7
5. A press for printing cylindrical articles
which comprises a printing plate, a rotatable
work support, means for moving said work sup 30
port bodily to carry the rotating work across said
plate, and means for positively rotating said
work support to cause it to make one complete
revolution during its bodily movement across said
plate regardless of ordinary variations in'the size 35
of the work, said positive work rotating means
involving slippage as between said work and said
plate, whereby the size of the imprinted pattern 7
circumferentially of the work varies in accord
ance with the size of said work and'produces
an overall pattern free from gaps and overlaps. 40
6. A press for printing cylindrical articles
which comprises a printing plate, a rotatable
work support, means for moving said work sup- '
port bodily to carry the rotating work across
said plate, and means forpositively rotating said 45
work support to cause it to make one complete
revolution during its bodily movement across said '
plate regardless of ordinary variations in the
size of the work, said positive work rotating
means involving slippage as between said work
and said plate, whereby the size of the imprinted
pattern circumferentially of the work varies in
accordance'with the sizeof said work and pro
duces an overall pattern free from gaps and
overlaps, said work rotating means including a 55
movable gear whereby the‘rotation of said work
may be varied in the event of an extreme varia
tion in the size thereof and changing the size
of said removable gear;
'
~
GERALD 1A. GoEssLING.
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