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Патент USA US2134424

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Oct. 25, 1938.
s. WALTERS
2? 34,424
WOVEN WICK FOR QIL BURNERS AND THE LIKE
Filed June 1, 1937 >
55/
6245
@UM @247
Patented Oct. 25, 1938
,
PATENT omen;
UNITED STATES
I
2,134,424“
2,134,424’
WOVEN WICK ron gliliEBURNE?S AND THE
Gustav Walters, Middleto‘wn, Conn, assignor. to
The Russell Manufacturing Company, Middle
town, Conn, a corporation of Connecticut
Application June 1, 1937, Serial No. 145,652.
(01. 139-388)
4 Claims.
This invention relates to an improvement in
wicks and more particularly to woven wicks for
oil stoves, etc. Woven wicks as heretofore pro
duced have been generally characterized by two
5 opposite face plys tied together by the usual lon
gitudinal binder-strands extending between the
said plys and have possessed many objections
among which may be mentioned relatively low
strands which inthe present instance comprise
six strands, each respectivelydesignated [2, I3,
l4,’ I5, l6 and I1. The said'warp strands pass
through the fabric on a long gentle slope and
alternately pass over weft strands or picks IS m
in one face of the fabric and overlweft strands
or picks IS in the opposite face of thefabric; '
By way of example the warp'strand "I2 may
be considered and itv will be'gnoted» by reference
10 possession of longitudinal rib-like bulges at di- ’ to Fig. 3 that after passing vover the first, of 10
ametrically-opposite points thereon, unevenness the upper weft picks l8a'the said'strand-misses
in their edges, etc., .etc. The present invention engagement with a‘total of'six ‘weft picks l8
andv 19 before appearing onthe-opposite' face
contemplates a woven wick of such character as
of the fabric for extension around the weft pick
will obviate many of the defects above men
Illa. The warp strand l2 then extends'diago'n'al Is
15 tioned.
‘
One of the objects of the present invention is ly throughthe fabric on'a long-gentle. slope to
to provide a woven wick which will maintain a the opposite'face of the fabric and again misses
burning-edge of superior uniformity when in six Weft picks before looping over the‘weft pick
use.
I8”. The remaining warp strands I3, I4, [5, I6
capillarity, variation from standard thicknesses,
20
A further object is to provide a woven wick
having superior capacity for conducting liquid
and H are all staggeredrwith'respect to the 20
strand‘ l2 and each‘ other in the ‘order named
and. each thereof similarly misses six picks be
tween its appearance on the respective opposite
provide a woven wick characterized by a superior faces of the fabric, as clearly‘shown in Fig.‘ 3..
25 degree of'uniformity in thickness and resiliency...
It will be understood, vof course, that other
A still further object is to provide a superior sets of warp strands corresponding to'the warp
woven wick characterized by relative freedom strands l2 to I‘! inclusive exist in the ‘fabric in
from objectionable longitudinal rib-like bulges the background 'of' the strands shown in Fig. 3.
fuel to its burning-edge.
Y
’
Another object of the present invention is to
30
common in prior types of tubular woven wicks.
With the above and other objects in view, as
will appear to those skilled in the art from the
By' way of example, the next strand ,back' of
present disclosure, this invention includes all
strand
features in the said disclosure which are novel
' over the prior art.
35
In the accompanying drawing:
Fig. l is a View in side elevation of a seamless
tubular woven wick embodying the present in
vention and shown as mounted in a perforated
carrier;
m
Fig. 2 is a perspective view of the wick prior
to its introduction into a carrier;
Fig. 3 is a schematic view in longitudinal sec
tion illustrating one weave suitable for carrying
out the present invention; and
.15
Fig. 4 is a similar view of still another weave
suitable for use in wicks of the present inven
tion.
The particular woven wick l0 herein chosen
for the illustration of one embodiment of the
50 present invention is of seamless tubular form
as shown in Fig. 2 and may be inserted into a
tubular perforated metal carrier II in accord
ance with usual practice.
the warp strand .l'l would be a strand corre
sponding inposition and inclination to the warp
l2.
‘
'
"
The weave illustrated in Fig. 3 may be aptly '
characterized as an interwoven twill inasmuch
as each of the warp strands extends through
the fabric from one side to the other thereof and
does not require the use of binder-strands to tie
the two sets of weft strands l18‘andvl-9‘ together.
‘ The particular weave illustrated in Fig.4 in-,
cludes a plurality of sets or groups of warp strands
which comprise six strands each respectively des
ignated 20, 2|‘, 2:2, 231, 24 and 25‘ arrangedjv from
the foreground to the background 'in the‘3order‘ Y
named.
In the‘ upper face of the fabric'~ (as
viewed in the drawing) is a series of weft strands
or picks 26 and in the opposite face is a cor?
responding series of weft‘ strands or picks 21..
The said weft strands or picks 26 in one face
are tied to the weft strands or picks 21 in the
other face solely by the warp strands 20 to 25
inclusive before referred to. The said' warp
strands all extend on a long gentle slope from.
one face‘ of the fabric to the other, and like the ‘
The particular weave illustrated in Fig. 3 in- ' weave shown in Fig. 3 each of the said warp
55 cludes a plurality of sets or groups of warp
strandsv misses six weft picks between its appear
2
2,134,424
ance upon the respective opposite faces of the
fabric.
.
It may be explained in this connection that
in the weave ‘of Fig. 4 the next strand in the
background beyond the strand 25 would be an~
other strand corresponding in position to the
weft picks located adjacent one surface of the
wickj another set of weft picks located adjacent
the'other surface of the wick; and’ a plurality
of warp strands, all of which warp strands ex,
tend diagonally back and forth through the fab—
ric, and each of which warp strands alternately
position of the strand I 0 and: constituting the.
passes over a weft pick of one set of weft picks
?rst strand of another group of similar warp and then over another pick of the other set of
strands.
weft picks, and passes between a plurality of the '
Both of the weaves illustrated and above de _ intervening weft picks of both sets of weft picks
scribed are characterized by high capacity for ' between its leaving and returning to a given set
conducting oil to the burning-edge of the wick, of weft picks.
which in' each of the ?gures of the drawing is
2. A woven wick substantially free of binder _
designated by the reference character 28, and as strands and consisting substantially of: a set of
7' the said burning-edge chars in use, the said edge weft picks located adjacent one surface of the 15
will remain substantially even owing largely to wick; another set of weft picks located adjacent
the fact that all of the longitudinal strands are the other surface of the wick; and a plurality
of the same length, which has not been the case
in prior types of tubular woven wicks which have
of ‘groups of more than three warp strands, all
of which warp strands extend diagonally back
employed binder-strands which havev very ma-_
terially exceeded the length of the ordinary warp
strands in the various plys so‘that as the ma
terial of, such prior wick burns back, the longer
warp strands alternately passes over a weft pick
of one set of weft picks and then over another
binder-strands are free to extend themselves be
yond the nominal edge of the wick, thus pro
and forth through the fabric, and each of which 20
pick of the other setof weft picks, and passes
betweena plurality of the intervening weft picks
of both sets of weft picks between its leaving and
returning to a given set of weft picks, and the
individual strands composing a given group'of
warp strands being in longitudinally-staggered
‘thickness much more accurately than has been , relationship with respect to other warp strands
possible with prior types of weaves employed in of the same group.
30
seamless tubular woven wicks, since in most of ‘
3. A woven wick substantially free of binder
the prior types of seamless tubular woven wicks, strands andconsisting substantially of: two sets
the tension applied to the binder-strands during only of weft picks, one set located adjacent one
the weaving operation very materially varies the surface and the otherset located adjacent the
thickness of the fabric. Also in the prior tubular other surface of the wick; and. a plurality of 35
woven wicks, the presencefof the great multi
groups of six warp strands, all of which warp
ducing an uneven ?ame.
,
Furthermore, by means of the present inven
tion the wickmay be woven to predetermined
~
plicity of ‘binder-strands not only deprived'the
strands extend diagonally back and forth through “ '
wick of desirableresiliency but also so closely
the fabric, and each of which warp strands alter~
?lled the, interstices between the various warp
strands as materially retarded the .capactiyof
the wick to, conduct oil or other liquid fuel to its
nately passes over a weft pick of one set of weft
picks and then over another pick of the other 40
burning-edge.
setof weft vpicks, and passes between a plurality
of the intervening weft picks of both sets of
weft picks between its leaving and returning to
In weaving seamless tubular; woven wicks of
many of the types prior to the present invention, _ a given set of weft picks.
a a very marked deformation took place at dia
4. A seamless tubular woven wick substantially
metrically opposite points on the wick where the free'of binder strands and consisting substan 45
Weft or ?lling picks reversed. The defect just tially of: two sets only of weft picks, one set lo
mentioned ‘has been so minimized when wicks are cated‘ adjacent one surface and the. other set
woven in seamless tubular form by means of the located adjacent the other surface of the wick;
~ present invention that. it mayv be regarded as and a plurality of groups of six warp strands, all
50
of which warp strands vextend diagonally back
The invention may be carried out in other and forth through the fabric, and each of which
speci?c ways than those herein set forth without warp strands alternately passes over a weft pick
negligible.
,
'
-
departing from the spirit and essential charac
teristics of the invention, and the present em
bodiments are, therefore, to be considered in all
respects as illustrative and not restrictive, and
all changes coming’ Within the meaning‘ and
Y‘ ‘equivalency range, of the appended'claims are
intended to be embraced therein. ‘
of one set of weft picks and then over another
weft pick of the other set of weft picks, and
passes between a plurality of the intervening
weft picks of both’ sets of weft picks between
its leaving and‘ returning to agiven set of weft
picks, and the individual strands composing a
given group of warp strands being in longitudi 60
nally-staggered relationship with respect to- other
, l. A’ woven wick substantially free of ‘binder
warp strands of the same group.
strands and consisting substantially of :» a set of
1
GUSTAV WALTERS.
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