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Патент USA US2134626

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Oct. 25, 1938.
E. SHIPTON ET AL »
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IMPULSE
7
TRANSMITTER
2,134,626
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Filed Dec. 12, 1934
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E. SHIPTON ET AL
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IMPULSE TRANSMITTER
Filed Dec. 1?, 1934
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NVVENTORS
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2,134,626
Patented Oct. 25, 1938
UNITED STATES
‘PATENT OFFICE *
2,134,626
IMPULSE TRANSMITTER
Edward Shipton, London, and Oscar Douglas _
Kennedy, Burnham, England
Application December 12, 1934, Serial No. ‘757,245
In Great Britain December 12, 1933
8 Claims. (Cl. 179—90)
The present invention relates to impulse trans; looking at the letters and numerals displayed in
mitters for automatic telephone systems or the the various windows, the calling subscriber can
see the called number which he has set up. If,
like.
'
The impulse transmitters hitherto employed desired, in addition to or instead of setting up
5 have generally been of the dial or ?nger hold numbers in the windows, the setting up devices 5
type, and have the disadvantage that errors may maybe provided with pointers moving over a
be easily made in selecting the required number, scale on which the numbers or letters are writ
which results in loss of time in completely redial- .
ling the number to be called,_ and also in expense
110
if the call to the wrong subscriber is completed.
According to the present invention, a calling
impulse transmitter for automatic telephone sys
terms or the like comprises means for setting up
the impulses to be transmitted and giving a Visi
15 ble indication thereof to the calling subscriber.
After the number to be called is thus set up and
ten.
.
.
'
A feature of' the invention consists in con
structing the selecting means for the impulse 10
sender so that they may be set in an easy fashion
to impulse'accurately the desired number of im
pulses; This may be effected by ‘providing a
spring pressed member adapted to engage in an
indentation so as to locate the selecting means 15
in the 'correct position.
Alternatively, the se
can be seen by .the calling subscriber to be cor- 1 lecting means may be so constructed that accu
rect, a calling lever, button or the like is oper
ated to send out the calling impulses. The oper
20 ation of this calling lever or button, can restore
all the setting up members to zero. Preferably,
however, this action does not take place, the set
ting up members remaining in the same position
after the calling lever or button has been oper25
ated.’
1
.
-
It will thus be seen that with the arrangement
according to the invention there can be no possi
bility of the subscriber accidentally calling the
wrong number. Moreover, the arrangement has
30 the advantage that, if the same number has to
be called a second time, the setting up means is
already set and it is thus only necessary for the
calling lever or button to be operated, thus re
sulting in a saving of time. Further, in several
35 cases it is not necessary to alter all the elements
set up and in such cases less operations than are
necessary with the ordinary dials need be effected
to complete the call. Another advantage of the
(arrangement is that it is possible to preselect a
40 call; for example whilst still talking on one call
a second call may be set up and impulsed out
immediately the ?rst call is ?nished.
According to one embodiment of the invention,
the arrangement comprises a number of setting
up means corresponding to the number of groups
of impulses to be transmitted in effecting a call,
for example, when calling with seven groups of
impulses, the?rst three setting up devices may
represent the ?rst three letters, and the remain;
50 ing four setting up devices the four digits of the
number to be called. Each setting up device com
prises a knob, thumb disc or the like, and,’ on
moving the setting up device, the letter or nu
meral selected appears in a-corresponding win
dow or aperture in the device. In this way, by
rate setting is not essential, that is to say, so
that there will be no fear of incorrect impulses
being sent if the setting knobs or the like are 20
not very accurately positioned. . A further fea
ture of the invention consists in so constructing
the apparatus that the movement of the setting
up devices is large compared with the movement
'of the actual selecting means thus still further 25
simplifying accurate setting of the selecting
means.
i
In the calling systems in use in many auto
matic telephone areas in which the subscribers’
numbers include one or more alphabetical num- 30
bers followed by numerical digits, e. g. TEL. 4321,
the alphabetical letters are usually arranged in
groups of two or three, the same number of im
pulses being sent out for each letter of a group
which is dialled. For instance, in the London 35
area for the letters A, B, C, the same number of
impulses, two, is transmitted. Another feature of
the invention, therefore, consists in arranging the
setting-up devices for the letter impulses so that
only one letter is indicated at a time, there being 40
two, three or more positions of the setting-up
devices which transmit the same number of im
pulses. This may be effected by connectingthe
setting-up disc or knob with the selecting device
by means of epicyclic gearing or by a lost-motion 45
connection. For example, in the case of a thumb
disc and associated selecting disc, the connection
may bemade by a pin and slot connection so
that for several positions of the thumb disc the
same position of the selecting disc is obtained. 50
The selecting disc may be sprung into position ‘
by means of a locating spring or the like.
A further feature of the invention consists in
basing the operation of the apparatus on cor
rect timing. As is, well-known the time for 55
2
2,134,626
transmitting each impulse is one tenth of a sec
number of impulses, the thumb disc is connected
to its associated selecting disc by a pin 44 engag
ing in a slot :35 cut in the selecting disc. The
slot is of such a length that whichever of the
three letters is showing in the viewing window
the selecting disc is moved to such a position
that the spring 23 can force the locating disc and
thus the selecting disc into the correct position
ond. According to this feature an impulse send
er, such as an impulsing cam, is operated con
tinuously after the calling lever or button is op
erated and the impulsing circuit is completed,
short-circuited or a short-circuit is broken at
certain times in accordance with the number to
be called.
'
In order that the invention may be more clearly
10 understood, reference will be made to the accom
panying drawings, which show by way of exam- .
ple various embodiments of the invention, and
in which:
Fig. 1 shows a plan view, partly in section, of
one form of the invention.
Fig. 2 shows a section along the line A—A in
Fig. 1.
.
Fig. 3 shows a plan view partly in section of
a modi?ed form of the arrangement shown in
20 Fig. 1.
'
Fig. 4 shows a section along the line B—B of
Fig. 3.
Fig. 5 shows a section along the line 0-0 of
Fig. 3 with part of a supporting plate cut away to
ing members in the form of teeth a, b, c, d, e, f,
g, h, i, 7', the ?rst of which corresponds to a time
period of one impulse, the second being slightly 15
longer and corresponding to a time period of two
impulses, and so on up to 9', which corresponds
to a time period of ten impulses. Thus the ten
teeth have different dimensions corresponding
to the ten numerals 0 to 9 from which each digit 20
of the numbers to be transmitted may be se
lected. Each selecting disc with its ten impulse
show the mechanism.
Fig. 6 shows a section through a selecting disc
along the line. D——D of Fig. 3.
pulses at all transmitted, as will be hereinafter
i
1
Fig. 8 shows a side view of a selecting disc as
used in the arrangement illustrated in Fig. 7.
Fig. 9 shows a plan view of a modi?cation of
the arrangement shown in Fig. 7.
‘
Fig. 10 shows a section along the line E—E in
Fig. 9.
Referring to Figs. 1 and 2 of the drawings, the
device has eight setting-up members, comprising
explained.
Mounted parallel with the shaft 9 is a spindle
24 which is rotatably supported in the walls Ill 80
and H of the casing and carries the wipers 25
to 32 which cooperate with the impulse control
ling devices or selecting discs M to 2! respec
tively. One end of the shaft 24 passes through
the wall H and is connected through gearing to 85
a clockwork driving mechanism 33. The clock
work mechanism may be of any suitable type and
thumb discs 1 to 8 respectively, all rotatably
is arranged to start and effect one complete rev
mounted on a shaft 9 carried in the walls it,
olution of the spindle 24 when the starting handle
ii of the casing. The frontperipheries of the
thumb discs project through slots l2 in the front
wall of the casing, so that they can be adjusted
by hand, and each disc carries letters or numer
als corresponding to the digits to be called. The
45 actual digit set up at any time is ascertained by
viewing it through the viewing window I3.
In the device illustrated, the ?rst thumb disc
I is for setting up special calls, such as for dial
ling 0, or it could be used for making calls in
50 conjunction with a house system. The remain
ing seven thumb discs are for setting up the seven
digits of a seven-digit calling system. In the ex
ample shown, the ?rst three digits are letters
55
. Each selecting disc is made of insulating ma
terial and is provided with ten impulses control
controlling members constitutes an impulse con
trolling device. In addition there is a blank
space It on the surface of the wheel, so that if 25
desired this canbe set in position and no im
Fig. '7 shows a plan View of another form of
the invention.
30
for transmitting the corresponding number of
impulses.
10
34 is depressed.
Conveniently, the clockwork
mechanism may be of the type in which the driv
40
ing spring is normally wound, the act of depress
ing the lever 34 causing the spring to be further
.wound and simultaneously to release a retaining
catch.
On the mechanism rotating the lever 34
is raised by the spring which unwinds by the 45
amount which it had been wound, the retaining
stop ?nally moving in the position to stop‘ the
mechanism when one revolution of the spindle
24 has been made. Also geared to the clockwork
mechanism is the impulsing cam 35 of known 50
construction which passes between and periodi
cally opens the impulsing contacts 36 to e?ect
and the remaining four are numerals.
Connected and rotatable with each of the
thumb discs is a selecting disc, numbered M to
the production of a series of impulses each time
the mechanism is operated. The clockwork
25 respectively, and a locating disc, all numbered
22 in the drawings. The selecting disc and its
associated locating disc are rigidly connected to
gether. The locating disc has indentations
formed around its periphery (see Fig. 2), With
which the end of leaf spring 23, rigidly secured
to the casing of the mechanism, cooperates to
speed that an impulse is produced every tenth
of a second, and the required total number of
impulses are produced during one revolution of
the spindle 24. The time taken for a revolution
60
ensure that the selecting discs must be set accu
65 rately in position to correctly dial the desired
number of impulses. If the selecting disc is not
quite accurately set, the pressure of the spring
on the side of one of the indentations of the
locating disc moves this disc, and thus the select
70 ing disc, into the correct position.
The thumb discs l, 5, 6, “l and 8 are rigidly con
nected to their associated selecting discs and lo
cating discs, but in the case of thumb discs 2, 3 and
it which bear the alphabetical letters and in most
75 cases have three letters which give the same
mechanism drives the impulsing cam at such a 55
of spindle 24 allows for transmitting ten im
pulses in respect of each of seven digits plus
the minimum interdigital time periods between
the consecutive impulsegroups which are neces
sary to allow the exchange apparatus to func
65
tion between the transmission of the successive
impulse groups.
The wipers 25 to 32 each comprises two spring
members bearing contact points which normally
engage together. Each of the springs is spaced
70
from its associated spring on the spindle by
means of an insulating washer 37, and in order
to complete the insulation, the metal spindle 24
is enclosed in a tube of insulating material 38
(see'Fig. 2). The adjacent springs of two dif 75
3
2,134,626
hand spring of wiper 26 throughthe metallic
In Fig. 2 the'spindle 24 has been shown in a
position corresponding to that which it will' as
sume during rotation. Normally, of course, the
wiper 25 will just be above the top of a tooth
spacing collar 39 andso on for the other wipers.
The extreme end springs of wipers 25 and 32 are
of its associated selecting wheel so that this
wiper is the ?rst one to be operated when the
ferent wipers are, however, electrically connected
together, that is to say, the right hand spring
of wiper 25 is electrically connected to the left
electrically connected to the contacting discs 40,
4| respectively, with which brushes 42, 43 re
spectively contact.
It will be understood from ~ through the wiper arm circuit and impulsing cam
10 the above that normally the circuit is completed
from the brush 42 through the contacting, ring
and the exchange line.
collar 39, left hand spring of wiper 26 and so on
rangement shown inFigs. 1 and 2 provide an
arrangement in which the mechanism is more 15
compact. As in the arrangement shown in Fig.
1, this modi?cation comprises the thumb discs 2
to B of metal (the thumb disc I and its asso
ciated setting-up mechanism are omitted in this
modi?cation), which are rotatably mounted on 20
the outer periphery of supporting discs 58 car
ried on supporting rods 5! mounted between the
frames 19 and ll. The supporting discs are
spaced from one another by spacing collars 52.
The outer peripheries of the supporting discs 5% 25
slide in grooves cut in the thumb discs, the
notched portion 53 of the thumb disc, in the
case of discs 5, 6, l and 8, closing the groove to
that normally the circuit is completed from brush‘
42 to 43. By separating any two contact springs
of one wiper, however, the circuit is broken, and
- this separating is effected by the insulating se
20 lecting disc'in the following manner.
As will be seen from the drawings, the wipers
are arranged spirally around the spindle 24 so
that only one wiper is in position at a time to
engage with a selecting disc. Each wiper is of
'25 such a length that it can only. engage with the.
tooth of its associated selecting disc and as the
wiper shaft and impulse cam are geared together,
the length of the tooth positioned to engage with
the wiper as shown in Fig. 2 will determine the
30 number of revolutions which the impulsing cam
will make whilstthe wiper springs are separated
when moving over the tooth and thus the number
of impulses transmitted. Care must be taken
correctly to shape the tooth and wiper so that
35 the break and make of the circuit is made quickly
and decisively, and no undesired impulses are
sent. Normally the impulsing contacts 36 are
short-circuited through the wiper spindle, that is,
the two contacts of 36 are connected to the
40 brushes 42 and 43 respectively so that unless
one set of wiper springs is separated no impulses
willbe transmitted. This opening of a'pair of
. wiper springs by the insulating selecting discs,
however, removes the short-circuit and allows
45 the impulses to be sent over, the telephone line.
The wipers and selecting discs are so designed
that even if consecutive wipers engage the long
est teeth of the associated selecting discs, there
is an interval between the disengagement of one
wiper from its tooth and the engagement of the
next wiper with its tooth equal to the minimum
interdigital period allowable. If wipers engage
shorter teeth of the discs the interdigital periods
are prolonged.
55
contacts'in parallel, both of which are con 10
nected in series with the telephone instrument
44,‘ left hand spring of wiper 25 through the wiper
contact and right hand vspring of wiper 25, metal
15 to the contacting ring 4i and the brush 43 so
50
calling lever 34 is depressed.
The speech circuit is normally connected
,
From the above description it will be under
stood that each wiper engages in turn with its
corresponding selecting disc and will open the
circuit along the wiper shaft for a time corre
sponding to the setting of the selecting discso
that the impulses of the number which has been
set up are transmitted in correct sequence.
For special calls, such as for calling the oper
ator by dialling 0, the extra thumb disc I is
provided which is a special services disc. When
65 this disc is in position ten impulses are sent be
fore any of the other digits set up become oper
ative, thus calling the operator irrespective of the
setting of the other thumb disc. Normally, of
course, this special services thumb disc would
70 be arranged in such a position that it causes no
impulses to be transmitted, that is, so that no
tooth of the selecting disc I4 is arranged in the
path of the wiper 25. However, the extra disc is
unnecessary as all calls can be made with the
75 normal number of setting-up devices.
1
3~to 5 show a modi?cation of the ar
keep the supporting discs in position.
In the
case of thumb discs 2, 3 and 4 the supporting 80
discs are kept in position by a separate ring 54
fastened to the thumb disc, the purpose of which
will be more fully explained hereinafter.
To the opposite edge of the thumb discs are
attached ‘the toothed selecting discs iii to 2! 85
which have inwardly directed teeth around their
inner peripheries. The selecting discs are made
of metal and in the particular example have ten
teeth the length of the ?rst of Which corresponds
too. time period of one impulse, the second cor
responds to a time period of two impulses and so
on to the last which corresponds to a time period
of ten impulses. A blank space is also provided
as was the case with the arrangement disclosed
in Figs. 1 and 2.
45
The outer periphery of each of the selecting
discs is scalloped to form locating scallops 55.
With these scallops a leaf spring 56 cooperates
to ensurethat the selecting‘ disc is set accurately
in position.
a
'
The centres of the supporting discs 55) are open
50
and allow a spindle 51 to pass therethrough.
This spindle is jo-urnalled in the casing H] and '
wall H and carries seven pairs of spring wipers
58 to 64 which cooperate with the selecting discs 55
It to 2! respectively. One end of the shaft 51
passes through the wall IE and is connected
through gearing to a clockwork driving mech
anism 65. The clockwork mechanism may be
similar to that described in connection with Fig. 60
1, the action of depressing the lever 34 serving to
wind the clockwork spring arranged in the drum
(55. When the lever 34 reaches its fully depressed
position it moves a cam 61 to move a spring
pressed pawl t8 out of engagement with a notch
in the stopping wheel 69 (see Fig. 5). The motor
then rotates and the end of the handle 34 moves
to release the cam 6'! so that when the spindle
5'! has made one complete rotation the paWlEB
again engages with the notch in the stopping
wheel [iii to stop the mechanism. Also geared to
the clockwork mechanism is the impulsing cam
‘ii! the teeth of which operate a spring set ii to
open and close contacts for the transmission of
the impulses. The speed of the mechanism may
4
2,134,626
be controlled by the governor 72. The‘ mecha
nism drives the impulsing cam at a speed to
produce an impulse for one tenth of a second or
otherwise according to the particular system in
which the apparatus is to be used and it- is so
to the spindle 5'! that su?icient impulses
are produced during one revolution of the spindle
5"! to allow for transmitting ten impulses in re
spect of each group of impulses and to allow for
10 short time intervals between the transmission of
two successive impulse groups.
The contacts of each pair of spring wipers 58
to ‘36 are insulated from one another along the
spindle 5? in the same manner as the wipers in
15 Fig. 1.
Normally the pairs of springs contact
together to short circuit the impulsing circuit but
are opened when an insulating member carried
by each wiper and shown at Ma and Bla in
Figure 3 engages with a tooth of the selecting
20 discs 65 to 2! . The arrangement thus works sim
ilar to the arrangement described with reference
to Figs. 1 and 2.
As in the case of Fig. l the thumb discs 2, 3 and
Q bear the alphabetical letters and have three
25 letters which give the same number of impulses.
In order to attain this end, the notched discs 530.
(which also carry the rings on which the alpha
betical letters are marked) of thumb discs 2, 3
and 4- are rotatably mounted in another groove
cut in the outside of the thumb discs 2, 3 and 4
and are given a limited movement by a projec
tion ‘i3 formed in the groove engaging in a slot
l4 cut in the notched disc 53a (Fig. 6). This ar
rangement corresponds to the pin and slot con—
35 nection shown in Fig. 1 and the slot is of such
a length that whichever of the three letters is
showing in the viewing window the selecting disc
is moved to such a position that the spring 56
can force the locating discs and thus the select—
ing disc into the correct position for transmit
ting the corresponding number of impulses.
The apparatus is driven by a clockwork mech
anism 33. On depressing the lever 34 the clock
work mechanism operates substantially as de
scribed with reference to Fig. 1. The clockwork
mechanism causes the spindle 82 to make seven
complete rotations before it is stopped again.
Also geared to the clockwork mechanism is a
commutator 81 and brush 88 which is geared
down 7 to 1, with reference to the shaft 82. This
commutator has seven contacts each of which is 10
engaged by the brush 88 for one complete revo
lution of the shaft 82., The commutator con
tacts are connected to seven spring sets 84 so
that each of the spring sets is connected in se
quence in the line circuit and controls the trans 15
mission of the impulses in accordance with the
setting of its associated selecting disc.
Also geared to the clockwork mechanism is an
impulse generating device (not shown), the im
pulses from which are controlled by the opening 20
and closing of the contacts of the spring sets.
When the spindle 82 rotates, the thumb discs,
the sectors and the locating discs also rotate, the
spring contact sets 84 opening and closing on
each rotation and controlling in sequence the 25
impulses sent out in accordance with which
spring set is connected to the line circuit through
the commutator 81 and the setting of its asso~
ciated selecting disc.
By making the teeth square out it is possible 30
for the correct number of impulses to be trans
mited even if the sector is not absolutely accu
rately positioned, and provided that it reaches
to or does not project beyond the tooth in ques—
tion there will be no fear of incorrect impulses 35
being transmitted.
.
To effect a call with the apparatus described
the. thumb discs are set so that the letters or
numbers corresponding to the station to be
called appear in the viewing windows.
For eX
40
ample if one of the numbers is 8 the thumb disc
Figs. 7 and 8 show another embodiment of the is moved around until 8 appears in the viewing
invention. In this arrangement the thumb discs 1 window in which position two of the teeth of the
2 to 8 control the operation of sectors 80 over corresponding selecting disc are blocked out and
eight impulses are sent when the mechanism is
45 the surfaces of impulse controlling or selecting
45
discs 8| each having ten or more teeth according operated.
to the number of impulses to be sent in each
With the apparatus described in Figs. 7 and 8
group. These teeth are arranged around ap
seven complete turns of the spindle and spring
proximately half the periphery of the selecting
50 disc.
All the selecting discs are mounted on the
spindle 82 which is journalled in the wall I!) and
plate H. The sectors are also approximately
semicircular in shape and are carried by sleeves
33 surrounding the shaft 82 so that by moving
55 the thumb disc the sectors may be moved to
cut out one or more of the teeth.
Rigidly con
nected to each sector is a locating disc 85 which
cooperates with a leaf spring 86 in a manner
similar to the spring 23 shown in Fig. 1 to locate
60 the sector in the various positions. Each of the
springs 85 is carried from a member rigidly se
cured to the shaft 82.
Engaging with the periphery of each selecting
disc is a set of spring contacts 84 which are vi
66 brated to control the impulsing circuit when
moved over the teeth. The spring sets are se
to
cured to the casing of the mechanism.
In order to compensate for the three positions
corresponding to the same number of impulses
for the alphabetical thumb discs 2, 3 and 4 these
thumb discs are themselves rotatably mounted
on their associated sleeves 83 and connected to
the locating discs 85, which are rigidly connected
to the sectors, by means of a pin and slot con
76 nection as explained above.
sets are necessary to e?ect a call, and in order
to reduce the time, the teeth of consecutive se
lecting discs may be arranged on opposite por 50
tions of their peripheries so that the time which
would be wasted with the arrangement illus
trated in Figs. 7 and 8 in moving the spring sets
over the blank portions of the discs until the
next set of teeth are engaged is eliminated. In 55
this way the time in making the call is halved
and only four complete revolutions of the spindle
are necessary.
By arranging the teeth to occupy slightly less 60
than a quarter of the periphery of a disc and
using the other quarter to enclose the selecting
sector, it is possible to make a single disc do
the Work of two, thereby requiring only four
spring contact sets for sending seven or eight
groups of impulses. The selecting sectors can
be arranged adjacent the opposite surfaces of the
selecting disc.
The number of selecting discs and spring sets
can be further reduced by arranging all the 70
teeth on the periphery of one disc and providing
it with all the selecting sectors in which case
only one spring set is necessary and the commu
tator may be entirely dispensed with. Such an
arrangement is shown in Figs. 9 and 10 in which 75
5
2,134,626
the single impulse selecting disc 90 has its pe
riphery divided up into fourteen sections alter
nately provided with teeth and plain sections
The plain portions are preferably
slightly larger than the toothed portions to allow
for the interdigital period between the sending
of the di?erent groups of impulses. Arranged
' (see Fig. 10).
to be moved from a plain portion over its asso
ciated adjacent toothed portion are seven select
10 ing sectors 9! to 91 each rotatable about the
having to turn ‘it right back again through eight
positions.
The impulsing apparatus according to the in
vention may be mounted in a separate casing
or, alternatively, may be mounted in or on a
telephone .instrument in a manner similar to that
in which the usual dial is a?ixed to the instru
ment. Further, it might be associated with a
preset impulser; that is an impulser which has
several complete numbers or series of groups. set 10
spindle 98 to which the selecting disc is ?xed.
up, any one of which may be selected for trans
Each of the sectors is mounted on a sleeve the
mission.
?rst sleeve 99’ surrounding the shaft 98, the
second sleeve lil? surrounding the sleeve 99 and
so on.
The free ends of the sleeves are provided
with thumb discs 2_ to 8 for setting purposes.
Stop-s llll may be provided on the selecting disc
for preventing the sectors from being moved
over toothed portions with which they are not
20 intended to cooperate.
.
The sectors are located in position by the
locating discs I02 which. cooperate with leaf
springs I03 as in the arrangementipreviously de
scribed. To compensate for the three positions
25 for sending the same impulses on the alphabeti-.
cal discs 2, 3 and 4 these are connected to the
locating discs through'a pin and slot connection.
The spring set H14 is ?xed to the spindle I05
of the clockwork mechanism 65, which is sub
30 stantially the same as that illustrated in Fig. 3
and is arranged to make'one complete rotation
when the operating lever 34 is depressed. When
the clockwork mechanismis operated the spring
set moves around the periphery of the selecting
35 disc and eitherallows the impulses generated by
the impulse generator to be transmitted over
‘the exchange line or short-circuits them in ac
cordance , withv the setting of the sectors.
Further in all the arrangements described ad
40 justing means may be provided for a ?nal ad
justment of the relationship between the select
ing discs and the wipers. For example, in the
arrangement shown in Fig. 1 the wiper spindle
may have an adjustment relative to the clock
45 work mechanism or for adjusting the distance
between the teeth of the selecting discs and the
axis of the wiper spindle.
'
It will be understood that with the arrange
ment according to the invention no impulses are
50 sent out over the transmission line to which the
device‘ is connected, even though the receiver
be lifted, until the calling lever is depressed.
Thus it is possible to preselect a call even whilst
the exchange line be engaged with an existing
call.
.
By providing a normal position in which no
impulses are sent it is possible so to adjust the
setting-up members that a part code, such as
“TOL” or “TRU” may be sent without interfer
60 ence from any‘ other impulse groups. More
over, it is possible‘to transmit impulses from.
any group for testing or other purposes.
Further, by arranging the setting-up devices,
such as thevthumb discs, so that they ‘can be
65 completely rotated in either direction from any
one setting to any other setting, the advantage
is obtained that the re-adjusting of the device
from one setting to another setting may be made
in the minimum of time. For example, if one
of the thumb discs indicates ?gure 9 and the next
number to'be called on that disc is 1 it is only
necessary to move the disc through three posi
tions, that is through 0 and the normal position
75 to readjust the device to indicate 1 instead of
I claim:
‘
‘
. 1. An impulse transmitter for transmitting a
plurality of groups of impulses, each group cor 15
responding to a digit of the number to be trans- '
mitted, comprising'a plurality of setting-up de
vices, one for each digit of the number to be
transmitted, means for visibly indicating the digit
set up by each setting-up device, an impulse 20
generating means adapted to operate continu
ously each time the mechanism is operated, an
impulse controlling device individual to each set
ting-up device, and means for adjusting the po
sition of each impulse controlling device in ac~ 25
cordance with the setting of its associated set
ting-up device, said impulse controlling devices
successively cooperating with the impulse gen
erating means to permit the transmission of
groups of impulses corresponding to the digits 30
set-up on the setting-up devices.
2.'An impulse, transmitter for transmitting a
plurality of groups of impulses, each group cor-'
responding to a digit of the number to be trans
mitted, comprising a plurality of setting-up de 35
vices, one for each digit. of the number to be
transmitted, means for visibly indicating the
number set up, an impulse generating means
. adapted to operate continuously each time the
mechanism is operated, a selecting device indi 40
vidual to each setting-up device, means for ad
> justing the position of each selecting device in
accordance with the setting of its associated set
ting-up device, a plurality of impulse controlling
members on each selecting device having differ
ent dimensions corresponding to the different
45
numerals, a plurality of contact devices one for
each selecting device and means for moving said
contact devices relatively to the selecting devices
so that the same cooperate in turn with one 50
impulse controlling member of each selecting de
vice to permit, in association with the impulse
generating means, the transmission of each
group of impulses and to control the number
of impulses transmitted to each group in ac
cordance with the time the contact devices con
55
tact with the impulse controlling members‘.
3. An impulse transmitter for transmitting
a plurality of groups of impulses, each group
corresponding to a digit of the number ,to be 60
transmitted,
comprising
impulse
generating
means adapted to operate continuously each time
the mechanism is operated, a plurality of select
ing discs one for each group of impulses to be
transmitted and each comprising a plurality of 65
impulse controlling members of different lengths
corresponding to different time periods, a set
ting-up device for rotating each selecting disc to
bring a particular impulse controlling member
into operative position, a plurality of contact de 70
vices one for each selecting disc, each contact
device being adapted to cooperate with the im-v
pulse controlling member that is in the operative
position, and means for moving the contact de
vices relatively to the selecting discs to permit 75
6
2,184,626
the transmission of each group of impulses and
control the number of impulses transmitted in
each group in accordance with the time that said
contact devices cooperate with the impulse con
trolling members that are in the operative posi
tion.
4. An impulse transmitter for transmitting a
plurality of groups of impulses one for each digit
of the number to be transmitted, comprising im
10 pulse generating means adapted to operate con
tinuously each time the mechanism is operated,
a plurality of selecting devices one for each group
of impulses, ten impulse controlling members car
ried by each of said selecting devices, means for
adjusting the position of said selecting devices
plurality of groups of impulses, each group cor
responding to a digit of the number to be trans
mitted, comprising a plurality of setting-up de—
vices, one for each digit of the number to be
transmitted, means for visibly indicating the CI
number set up, impulse generating means adapt
ed to operate continuously each time the mecha
nism is operated, a plurality of selecting devices,
one for each group of impulses and each com
prising an annular disc and impulse controlling 10
members arranged on the internal periphery of
said disc, said impulse controlling members be
ing of di?erent lengths and corresponding to dif
ferent time periods, a rotatable spindle arranged
within said discs, and a plurality of contact mem
to move any one of the impulse controlling mem
bers into the operative position, a rotatable mem
bers, one for each impulse group, carried by said
spindle and means for rotating the spindle to
ber, a plurality of contact devices carried by said
rotatable member, one for each selecting device,
and means for rotating said rotatable members
with respect to said selecting devices, each con
tact device being adapted to cooperate with an
impulse controlling member on the correspond
cause the contact members to cooperate with one
of the impulse controlling members on each disc,
and thereby permit a group of impulses to be 20
transmitted during a time period corresponding
ing selecting device to permit the transmission
of each group of impulses and to control the num
ber of impulses transmitted in each group.
5. An impulse transmitter for transmitting a
plurality of groups of impulses, each group cor
responding to a digit of the number to be trans
30. mitted, comprising a plurality of setting up de
vices, one for each digit of the number to be
to the impulse controlling member.
7. In an impulse transmitter comprising a plu
rality of impulse controlling selecting devices, cor
responding setting-up devices and means for in
dicating the number set-up; a lost motion ‘con
nection between said selecting devices and said
corresponding setting~up devices, and locating
means associated with each of said selecting de
vices for holding it in one position whilst the
corresponding setting-up device may be moved
transmitted, means for visibly indicating the
number set up, impulse generating means adapt
to any one of several positions.
8. An impulse transmitter comprising a plu
ed to operate continuously each time the mech
rality of setting-up devices, means for visibly in
35 anism is operated, a selecting device individual
dicating the number ‘set-up, a series of impulse w
to each setting-up device, a rotatable spindle,
means for rotating said spindle, and a plurality
of contact members arranged in spiral staggered
relation on said spindle and arranged to cooperate
40 with said selecting devices in turn during a single
rotation of said spindle and thereby permit the
transmission in sequence of each group of im
controlling selecting devices connected with said
pulses.
6. An impulse transmitter for transmitting a
setting-up devices, and adapted to be brought into
predetermined operative positions, said setting
up devices each comprising a rotatable member
rotatable through a complete circle which can be
rotated in either direction from any one set
ting to any other setting,
EDWARD SHIPTON.
OSCAR DOUGLAS KENNEDY.
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