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Патент USA US2134805

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-Nov. 1, 1938.
E‘ o. SESSIONS
2,134,805
ELECTRIC TRAY-v
Filed Jan. 5, L937
,
HIGH HEAT
I47
/
MIN/W
Low HEAT
INVENTOR.
EDSON O. Sass/0N5
BY
ATTORNEY.
Patented Nov. 1, 1938
2,134,805
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,134,805
ELECTRIC TRAY
Edson 0. Sessions, Chicago, 111.
Application January 5, 1937, SeriaiNo. 119,129
5 Claims.
(01. 219-19)
My invention consists of a tray adapted for
use in serving light lunches and similar purposes
where it is desired to have heating facilities for
different articles to be served. By my invention
5 I provide a tray with a heating element or. ele
ments and one or more electric outlet sockets
connected by suitable wiring in the body' portion
of the tray, so that the said electrical devices
may be supplied with current by an electric cord
10 and connecting plug constituting a part of the
tray assembly. The tray is‘ also provided with
switching devices for selectively connecting de
sired ones of the electric devices in the circuit,
and in this connection I ?nd it desirable to ar
range the switching devices so that ithe maxi
mum electric load will not exceed the capacity of
the fuses ordinarily employed in house lighting
circuits.
'
7
The tray may be constructed of metal and orna
20 mented as desired, either by the use of sheet
metal, or cast metal, or if preferred, material of
any suitable kind may be employed. My inven
tion also includes electrically heated devices to be
used with the electric tray and adapted for con
25 nection therewith and assembly thereon without
the use of connecting wiring of any kind between
said devices and the tray.
My invention will be best understood by refer
ence to the accompanying drawing illustrating a
30 preferred embodiment thereof in which
Fig. 1 illustrates my tray in plan view,
,
Fig. 2 is a vertical, sectional view through th
tray, taken longitudinally thereof along the line
2-2 in Fig. 1,
Fig. 3 is a vertical, sectional view through the
tray shown in Fig. 1, taken along the line 3-3,
Fig. 4 is a vertical, sectional view to an en
larged scale of a part of the construction shown
in Fig. 3, taken along the line 4-4,
1
40
Fig. 5 is a vertical, central, sectional view
through the lower part of an electrically heated
container, adapted to be used with the tray shown
in Fig. 1,
Fig. 6 shows in front elevation and diagram
45 matically, a form of electric toaster adapted for
use with the tray shown in Fig. 1, a part of the
construction being shown in central, vertical, sec
tional view to better illustrate the electrical con
necting devices, and
50
Fig. 7 is a diagrammatic circuit drawing of the
electric connections employed in the tray illus
trated in Fig. 1.
_
Similar numerals refer tosimilar parts through
out the several views.
As shown in Fig. 1, my electric tray consists
55
_ .
of a body portion l0 made of any suitable mate
rial to impart the requisite strength and stability
to the device, the material illustrated in the draw
ing being sheet metal, although it will be under
stood that the tray may be made of any other
suitable material that is preferred in any case.
The tray Ill is provided with-an edge rim ll ex
tending somewhat above the horizontal support
ing surface of the- tray, and is also provided with
feet I! to support it above any surface on which
it may be placed. The tray in is provided with
an-electrical heating element l3 having two heat
ing coils l4 and IS, the coil 14 preferably develop;
ing a relatively large or high amount of heat,
while the coil l5 preferably develops a relatively 15
small or low amount of heat. The heating ele
{ment I3 has disposed above it, a metal grill or
grating IE to support above the heating element,
any desired article or utensil to be heated, the
upper surface of the grill being preferably sub 20
stantially in the supporting surface of the tray Ill.
The tray Ill, is also provided as shown in Fig. 1,
with two electrical and cylindrical outlet sockets
l1 and I8 supported above the surface of the
tray ill by annular ?anges l9 and 20 surrounding 25
them. The‘front portion of the tray has mount
ed thereon two electric switches 2| and 22 by
which the flow of electric current to the heating
coils l4 and I5 and to the sockets l1 and I8, may
be controlled as desired. .
'
As shown in Fig. 2 the bottom of the tray con
sists of a removable plate 23 of sheet metal or
other suitable material which fits a recessed por
tion Illa of the tray structure, being held in place
by screws 24 so that the wiring of the tray may
be effected, there being su?icientspace between
the bottom plate 23 and the top portion of the
tray to permit this to be done. The upper por
tion of the tray at the location of the heating~
element I3, is provided with a downwardly ex
tending annular portion lllb provided with ver
tically displaced shoulders, the lower one of which
supports the heating element I3, and the upper
one of which supports the grill it so that its
upper surface. is substantially inthe plane of the
supporting surface of the tray. To guard against
an undue amount of heat being communicated
from the heating element [3 to the bottom plate
23 of the tray, I prefer to mount under the heat
ing element and above the said bottom wall, a
screen or shield 25 of metal or other suitable ma
terial, so that there is a first air space ‘between
the shield and the heating element l3, and a sec
ond air space between the shield and the bottom
wall 23, through which spaces air may freely cir
30
2
culate. Where the heat developed by the heating
element I3 is considerable, I find it desirable to
provide perforations 23a through the bottom
plate 23, under the shield‘ 25 to admit cooling air
to the interior of the tray.
In Fig. 3, the relation of the ?anges l8 and
20 to the upper portion of the tray I8 is more
clearly shown, as well as the relation of the out
let sockets I‘! and I8 to said ?anges. As shown
10 in this ?gure, the top wall of the tray has secured
In using the utensil shown in Fig. 5 with either
of the sockets I1 and I8, the position of the aper
tures in the socket is noted and the utensil is
turned until the plugs 34 are in alignment with
the socket apertures, and the utensil is then
pressed downwardly, moving the plugs into elec
trical contact with theinternal contacts of the
selected socket,,until the base 3| rests on the
upper surface of the tray, after which if the
angular position of the utensil is not convenient, 10
thereto downwardly extending annular ?anges 25
it may be turned to a position that is more con
and 21 in line with the ?anges l8 and 20, to re:
venient, depending upon the kind of utensil being
used and whether the tray is being used from its
side or its end.
In Fig. 6 I illustrate diagrammatically at 31, 15
ceive the lower end portions of the outlet sockets
I1 and I8 with a free fit, the ?anges 26 and 21
15 being in-turned at their lower edges to support
the outlet sockets l1 and I8 against vertical
thrusts downwardly that may be exerted upon
them in electrically connecting with them, desired
' electrical devices.
The sockets I‘! and I8 have
20 extending into them, through corresponding
annular slots in the ?anges 26 and 21, pins 28 and
29, which pins prevent movement upwardly of the
sockets relatively to said ?anges, and at the same
time permit a limited amount of angular mo
25 tion of each socket relative to its supporting
?anges, which feature of construction is more
clearly illustrated for the socket IT in Fig. 4,
it being understood that the sockets l1 and I8
are similarly constructed and held in place in the
30 tray. As shown in Fig. 4, the pin 28 extends
through an annular slot 28a through the ?ange
26, said slot having an angular extent of the
an electric toaster adapted for use with the tray
shown in Fig. 1, which toaster is provided with a
heating element 38 connected with plugs 38
mounted in a recess 40 in the base portion of the
toaster, in which recess said plugs are held in
vertical position by a block 4| of insulating ma
terial supported by and secured to the upper end
of the wall of the recess 4|] as indicated. The
recess 40 provides that the plugs 39 may be en
tirely contained above the bottom plane of the 25
‘toaster 31, so as not to interfere in any way with
supporting the toaster on a plane surface, the
plugs 33 being adapted for connection with either
of the sockets I‘! and I8 in the manner described
above for the utensil shown in Fig. 5, the toaster 30
being angularly adjustable as desired around the
vertical axis of the connected socket, to suit the
amount which it is desired to permit the socket convenience of the user of the tray.
IT to move in using the tray, the amount of angu
In Fig. '7, I illustrate diagrammatically the cir
35 lar movement which I ?nd convenient in prac
cuit connections which, with the embodiment 35
tice, being from 1A to 1/3 of the circumference of ~ shown in Fig. 1, are made in the interior of the
the ?ange. The pin 28 is a free ?t in the slot 280, ~ tray between the electric cord 42, the heating coils
so that the socket I‘! may be turned freely in its
I4 and I5, the outlet sockets I1 and .I8 and the
supporting flanges‘, to adapt the socket to the switches 2| and 22, as follows:
particular angular position of the device used with
45
50
55
60
Assuming that the plug 43 attached to the cord 40
ample, of any ordinary house lighting system,
the socket, that is found most convenient in one
use or another of the tray.
42, is connected with suitable line wires, for ex
As shown in Fig. 5, I illustrate at 30 the lower
part of a utensil adapted to be heated by electric
connection with the tray, for example a coffee pot,
the lower end of the part 30 being recessed and
internally threaded, to receive corresponding ex
ternal threads on a base portion 3|, which base
portion is recessed at its upper end to receive and
support a suitable electrical heating element 32.
Below the heating element 32, the base 3| is pro
vided with a second and smaller recess, containing
a plate 33 of insulating material affording rigid
support for the electrical plugs 34 contained in
a recess 35 below the plate 33 and in the lower
part of the base 3|, which recess 35 is open at its
lower end and is of su?icient size to pass freely
over the ?anges I9 and 20 above described, so
that the plugs 34 may enter the openings in either
of the sockets I1 and I8 and make electrical con
line wire 44 is connected by wires 45 and 46 with
one terminal of each of the plugs I1 and I8 re
spectively, and by a wire 41 with one terminal of 45
each of the heating coils | 4 and I5. The other
terminal of the socket I1 is connected by a wire
48 with a contact 49 of the switch 2|, and the
other terminal of the socket I8 is connected by a
wire 5|! with a second contact 5| of said switch.
The other terminal of the high heat coil I4 is
connected by a wire 52 with a third contact 53 of
the switch 2|, and the other terminal of the low
heat coil I5 is connected by a wire 54 with a
contact 55 of the switch 22, the blade portions of 55
the switches 2| and 22 being connected together
and with the other line wire 56. By controlling
the sockets I‘! and I8 and the high heat coil |4
selectively by the switch 2|, it will be observed
that it is impossible to connect more than one of
nection therewith with the bottom surface of the - said devices in circuit between the line wires 44
base 3| resting on the upper surface of the tray.
The plugs 34 are connected by wires 36 with the
heating element 32. By having the upper ends
65 of the sockets I1 and I8 in raised position above
the upper surface of the tray I0 as above de
scribed, the plugs 34 may terminate above~ the
bottom surface of the base
of the utensil illus
and 56 at the same time, so that if, for example,
the electric devices intended for use with the
outlet sockets I1 and I8 require not over 1,200
watts each to operate them, and the heating coil 65
|4 requires not over 1,200 watts to operate it, as
far as the switch 2| is concerned, it is impossible
to connect a load of more than 1,200 watts with
trated in Fig. 5, so that the said plugs will not
70 interfere in any way with resting the utensil on
any flat surface. Another advantage resulting
from the raised position of the sockets I‘! and I8,
is that crumbs on the tray are prevented from
the line wires 44 and 56, thus insuring that the
fuses used in house wiring for electrical utensils 70
in common use, will not be overloaded. The low
heat coil I5 is intended to use a relatively small
entering said sockets and creating electrical dis
75 turbances.
resistance, for example, about 100 watts, and the
switch 22 provides that the low heat coil |5 may 75
amount of power as a result of its relatively high
3.
2,184,805
be used at the same time as the high heat coil I 4
or as either of the outlet sockets l1 and it, if
desired, or it may be used alone when, for ex
nected with either of said sockets may be tinned
ample, it is desired to keep any articles or utensil
bodyportion, an electrical heating element sup
warm. In this manner, the load on the line wires
44 and 56 may be controlled so as‘ito ‘not appre
ported by said body portion, electrical outlet
sockets supported by said body portion for con
nection with separate electrically heated utensils,
two electrical supply conductors, an electrical
ciably exceed the amount commonly required for
a single electric toaster, a single electric ?at iron,
or other electrically heated device in common
10
a limited amount on the tray.
3. In an electric tray, the combination of a
switch having spaced active contacts, ?rst elec
tric wires selectively connecting said active con 10
It will be understood that I do not limit myself “ tacts with one terminal of each of said sockets
to thearrangement of electrical devices illustrated andoi said heating element, and second electric
with the tray, or to any particular utensils or wires ‘connecting the other terminals of said
appliances constructed to cooperate with the out— sockets and of said heating element with a ?rst
15 let sockets of the tray, the construction shown in one of supply conductors and also connecting the 15
the drawing being illustrative of an embodiment other of said supply conductors with said switch,
of my invention which may be employed to meet whereby said switch can select and operatively
general requirements. I do not, therefore, limit connect but one of said sockets and heating ele
myself ‘to the particular construction described.
20 as I may employ equivalents thereof without de
parting \from the scope of the appended claims.
What I claim is:
1. In an electric tray, the combination of a
body . apportion, an electrical heating element
25 mounted in said body portion, electrical utensil
outlet sockets spaced from each other and from
said heating element and mounted in said body
portion, said body portion being hollow, an elec
trical, connection cord extending from said tray,
30 selective switching mechanism carried by said
tray, and electrical conductors in said body por
tion andconnecting said sockets and said heating
element with said cord and with said switching
mechanism, whereby said sockets and said heat
35 ing element may be selectively connected with
said cord\by said switching mechanism, said heat
ing element including a low heat portion for con
nectionijwith said cord independently of said
selective connection.
-
ment at any time.
4. In an electric tray, the combination of a
body portion, an electrical heating element sup
ported by said body portion, electrical outlet
sockets supported by said body portion, two elec
trical supply conductors, a ?rst electrical switch
having spaced active contacts, ?rst electric wires 25
selectively connecting said active contacts with
one terminal or each of said sockets and of said
heating element, second electric wires connecting
the other terminals of said sockets and'of said
heating element with a first one of supply con 30
ductors and also connecting the other of said
supply conductors with said switch, whereby said
switch can select and operatively connect but
one of said sockets and heating element at any
time, said heating element including a high heat
portion connected with said ?rst switch and also
a low heat portion, a second electrical switch, and
third electric wires connecting said low heat por
tion and said second switch with said supply con
2. In
electric tray, the combination of a ductors, thereby controlling the operation of said
body portion, an electrical heating element‘ low heat portion by said second switch.
mounted in said body portion, electrical utensil
outlet ‘sockets spaced from each other and from
said heating element and mounted in said body
portion, said body portion being hollow, an elec
trical connection cord extending from said tray,
selective switching mechanism carried by said
tray, and electrical conductors in said body por
tion and connecting said sockets and said heating
element with said cord and with said
mechanism, whereby said sockets and said heat
‘ ing element may be selectively connected with
said cord. by said switching mechanism, said
sockets having limited angular movement rela
ls tively
body portion, whereby a utensil con
5. In an electric tray. the combination of a
body portion, an electrical outlet socket carried
by said body portion and opening upwardly, and
an electrically heated utensil having vertically
disposed connection plugs in its lower portion for
connection with said socket by downward move
ment of said utensil over said socket to rest upon
said body portion, said socket having angular
movement relatively to said body portion, whereby
with said utensil on said body portion with its
plugs in said socket, said utensil may have angular
movement around the axis of said socket.
EDBON O. SESSIONS.
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