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Патент USA US2134987

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‘Nov. 1, 1938.
N. N. SHORB
2,134,987
METHOD OF AERIAL ADVERTISING
Filed vApril 6, 1936
2 Sheets-Sheet 1
A TTORNE Y.
N. N. SHORE
2,134,987
METHOD OF AERIAL ADVERTISING
Filed April 6, 1936
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
41
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INVENTOR,
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ATTORNE Y.
2,134,987
Patented Nov. 1, 1938
UNITED. STATES
\
PATENT OFFICE
2,134,987
METHOD OF AERIAL ADVERTISING
Norbert N. Shorb, San Francisco, Calif.
Application April 6, 1936, Serial No. 72,843
6 Claims. (Cl. 40-127)’
This invention relates to aerial advertising and whereby the recovered parachute and aerial sign
are again released; and,
particularly to apnovel method for effectively dis
Fig. 6 is a fragmentary part of the same device,
playing an aerial sign.
'
_
showing the position of the hooks after being
An object of my invention is to provide a novel
method of effectively displaying an aerial sign,
5
which consists in the successive releasing and re
covering in mid-air of an aerial sign suspended
from a parachute.
‘
Another object of my invention is to provide
improved apparatusior releasing a parachute
having an aerial sign suspended therefrom, and
for recovering it in mid-air and again releasing it.
10
released.
'
nates the spaced flexible letters, characters or
?gures of an aerial sign which are suitably posi
tioned with respect to one another and‘ are se
cured to a number of cords 2 in the usual man
ner. The letters or characters of the sign are
arranged preferably in vertical order with trans
Other and further objects of my invention will
be pointed out hereinafter, indicated in the ap
15 pended claims, or obvious to one skilled in the
art upon an understanding of the present dis
closure. For the purposes of this application I
have elected to show herein certain forms: and
details of apparatus for use in thesuccessive re
covering and dropping in mid-air of a parachute
having an aerial sign suspended therefrom; it is
verse rigid members 3 being secured to the cords
2 at certain intervals so as to prevent the folding
understood, however, that the embodiment of
uppermost of the weight members 4, the said
cord serving to support the greater part of the
my invention herein shown and described is for
purposes of illustration only; and that ‘therefore
it is not to be regardedas exhaustive of the varia
tions of the invention, nor is’it to be given any
interpretation such as might have the effect of
limiting the claims, short of the true and most
comprehensive scope of the invention in the art.
30
. In the accompanying drawings:
Fig. 1 is a plan view of a parachute having a'
sign connected thereto,‘ laid out on the ground
before the take-oil; showing the relative position
of the apparatus used to release and recover the
35 parachute and the sign in mid-air; '
Fig. 2 is a side elevation of the aerial sign sus
pended in mid-air, showing the recovering appae
ratus in position for a pick up;
'
Fig. 2A is a. side elevation of ‘the parachute in
40 an open position and suspended‘ in mid-air, ‘show
ing also the means forv allowing the’ parachute
to be turned inside out upon its being picked up
in mid-air;
"
_
Fig. 3 is a vertical longitudinal section of ‘a
4a part of the device used to release and recover
the parachute and aerial sign in mid-air, show
ing‘ the hooks withdrawn and the jaws'of the
cable holding tongs in closed positions;
Fig. 4 is a similar viewof the entire device
50 showing the hooks extended and in position for
the pick up of the parachute and aerial sign ;'
Fig. 5 is a fragmentary part of the same de
vice, showing the position of certain parts thereof
after the hooks havev been moved to a position
a;
‘
Referring to the drawings the numeral I desig- I
or creasing of the letters.
If it is so desired an 18
object or group of objects may constitute the
advertising matter to be displayed instead of the
aerial sign. Suspended from the lower end of
the sign are a pair of spaced weight members
4 which are joined together by a cord 5. A 20
laterally disposed cord 6, secured to: and extend
ing the length of the sign, is fastened to the
sign’s-weight. The cords 3 and 6 are secured at 25
their upper ends to a ring 1 which in turn is
suspended from a line 8 that extends through a
circular member 9, a block ill, a globular object
it and the top ring’ R2 of a parachute l3. The
line B-is secured rigidly to the block ill, but slid 30
ably extends through 9, II and I2. The upper
end of the line 8 is fastened to a securing ring
14 whichis normally grasped by the tongs E5
of a parachute releasing and recovering device It.
If it is so desired the aerial sign may be pro
vided with one or more laterally disposed pen
35
nants ll which is held in an unfurled position by
any suitable means such as by a rigid bar l8 and
one or more cords IS. The parachute I3 is pro
vided with the usual shroud lines 20 which are 460
secured to the globular object I]. The globular
object ll isv connected to the circular member 9
by a plurality of resilient cords 2| which slidably
‘ extend through the block Ill and are sufficiently
?exible to permit the said object to move for a 45
considerable distance away from the said block
after the circularmember is pulled into engage
ment with the latter. If it is so desired a suitable
structure 22 having ?exible members 23 may
be interposed between the parachute’s top‘ ring 50
12 and the securing ring M for the purposes of
taking up the shock incident to the take off.
The upper end of the parachute releasing and
recovering device. i6 is secured to a towing cable
24 which is fastened to a rotarydrum 25 mounted
2
2,134,987
on an airplane used by an aviator practicing the
aerial advertising method of my invention.
upon the said sleeve strikes against a slidabl'e
The aerial sign, the parachute from which it
is suspended and other parts of the apparatus
Pivotally secured to the collar 44 are one or more
are ordinarily laid on the ground prior to the
take o?, in positions adapted to avoid entangle
ments which might occur either before or after
they are carried by an airplane into mid-air.
After the parachute, the aerial sign and the other
10 associated parts of the apparatus have been car
ried to a suitable altitude and it is desired that
collar 44 mounted on the tubular member 34.
links 45 which are also pivotally connected to hell
cranks 46, the latter. being pivotally secured 5
between their ends to a ring 41 or other means
welded to the tubular member 34. The free end
of each of the bell cranks normally engages with
an inwardly disposed projection 48 on the eas
ingr38 (as shown in Fig. 3) thereby maintaining 10
the said casing in a position whereby the tongs
airplane releases a sleeve 26. The sleeve 26 nor- ' l 5 are closed by their being engaged by the lower
mally encircles the cable 24 and is attached to a end of the casing, and the hooks 36 are held in
15 tapered sock or air cone 26’ which by reason of retracted positions. A spiral spring 49 engaging
the resistance it offers to the air, carries the said with the ring 41 and the collar 44 normally holds
sleeve down the cable24 and into engagement the collar in a position whereby the free ends of
7 with releasing mechanism embodied in the device the bell cranks 46 engage with the projections
Hi. The sleeve 26 is provided with two or more 48. The impact of the sleeve 26 against the collar
axially aligned composite members 21 which are 44 causes the latter to be carried to a position
the release be e?ected, the operator in the towing
beveled at their ends and are fastened to out
wardly disposed pins 28 that enter recessed pro
jections 29 on the said sleeve. Each pin 28 is in
engagement with a. spring 36 which permits the
members 27 to be moved outwardly upon their
engaging with the tapered end of an axially dis
posed elongated b-ar 3i constituting the core or
central part of the device l6. One end of the
bar 3! is secured to the towing cable 24 while
30 its opposite end is’ secured as by a bolt 32 to an
extension 33 on which is'pivotally mounted the
tongs i 5. The bolt 32 also rigidly secures the bar
3| and its extension 33 to an elongated tubular
35
member 34, within which they are both posi
tioned.
_
Pivotally mounted intermediate, their ends on
a spider 35 or other suitable structure rigidly se
' cured to the tubular member 34are a plurality of
spaced hooks 36, the outwardly disposed ends- of
40 which are adapted to project through slots 31
provided in a movable elongated casing 38. The
casing 38 is preferably provided at its ends with
axial openings of a size capable of accommodat
ing the tubular member 34. The end of the cas
45 ing nearest the tongs i5, is provided with an in
wardly protruding annular ?ange 39 which slid
ably engages with the tubular member 34. Also
slidably engaging with the tubular member is a
web structure 46 which is secured to and extends
56 inwardly from the wall of the casing and is lo
cated between the hub of the spider 35 and a ring
4! secured to the tubular member 34 by the bolt
32. A spiral spring 42 encircling the tubular
member 34 and having its ends engaging with the
55 stationary ring 4i and the web structure“ of
the casing 38, normally exerts an upward pres
sure upon the casing, su?icient, when the latter
is released, to move the same upwardly, whereby
the outwardly disposed ends of the hooks 36 may
60 be released from retracted positions inside the
casing, as illustrated in Fig. 3. Slidably mounted
on the tubular member 34 is a ring 42a which
is in engagement with an inwardly disposed ex
whereby the bell cranks 46 are moved out of en~
gagement with the projections 48 on the casing
38, thereby allowing the spiral spring 42 to move
the casing upwardly with respect to the tubular
member 34 and the spider 35 so that the hooks
36 are free to move outwardly through the slots 25
31. As the casing is moved upwardly the lower
end thereof is disengaged from the tongs l5, and
by the action of an internally disposed spring or
other suitable means (not shown on the draw
ings) the said tongs are, automatically opened. 30
The opening of the tongs l5 releases the ring l4
secured at the top side of the parachute, thereby
allowing the latter, together with the aerial sign,
to drop downwardly. The parachute automati
cally opens and slowly descends with the aerial 35
sign effectively displayed in a position beneath it.
After the parachute and aerial sign have
dropped to what the airplane operator considers
a proper height for the pick up or recovery, he
deploys his airplane into a position whereby the
releasing and recovering device It is carried into
engagement with the cord 5 positioned between
the weight members 4 which are suspended from
the aerial sign. The sock .26’, connected through
the sleeve 26 to the device l6, assists in a material
way the controlling of the said device during the
recovery of the sign and parachute in mid-air.
After one or more of the hooks 36 of the device
"5 engage with the cord 5, the parachute I 3 is
carried by the towing airplane into a position (
whereby it offers considerable resistance to the
forward movement of said airplane. The re
sistance offered by the surrounding air to the
forward movement of the then towed parachute
is so great that it turns inside out.
As it com
mences to turn inside outthe shroud lines 26
and the globular object II are carried rearwardly.
The circular member 9 being connected by the
resilient cords 2| to the globular object H is
carried into engagement with the block Ill. The 60
resiliency of the cords 2| and the stretching
thereof permits the globular object to slide even
tension 36' on each of the hooks 36, and a spiral - farther to the rear over the line 8,’ thereby allow
65 spring 43 having its ends bearing against the ing the parachute to turn completely inside out,
stationary hub of the spider 35 and the said ring thereby assuming a position in whichgit oifers
but a minimum amount
7 42a exerts su?icient pressure upon the latter to
cause the hooks to move about their pivots in
such a manner that their outwardly disposed ends
70 project through the slots 3? when the'casing 38
is moved to a position whereby the said hooks
are released, as illustrated in Fig. 4. The sleeve
26, after being released by the operator, moves
downwardlyover the cable 24 and‘ enters the axial
75 opening in the upper end of the casing 38, where
of resistance to the for- '
ward movement of the airplane. After the aerial
sign and the parachute have again been towed
to a proper height for the dropping thereof, the
operator releases a second and smaller sleeve 70
50 to which is connected a tapered sock or air cone
5|, the said sock 5| thereupon carrying the sleeve
56 down the towing cable 24 to the device I6.
The sleeve 56 enters the larger sleeve 26, (Fig. 5)‘
and isguided by the beveledends of the members
2,184,987
3
21 into a position whereby it readily, and without
losing any appreciable amount of its momentum,
holding the block in position whereby the hooks
are maintained in upwardly inclined positions.
moves into a position encircling the bar 3 I. Slid
ably mounted on the upper end of the bar 3|,
inside the tubular member 34, is a tube 52 having
its lower end provided with a beveled surface
The second and ?nal pick up in mid~air may
take place in the same manner as heretofore de
which normally engages with a plurality of ta
pered spring pressed pins 53 projecting inwardly
through holes in the said tubular member. The
10 pins 53 and their associated springs, are posi
tioned in an annular block 54 which is slidably
mounted on the tubular member 34. The pins 53
extending through the holes in the tubular mem
ber normally hold the block ‘54 in a position
15 whereby it engages with the inwardly disposed
extensions 36' of the hooks 35, thereby prevent
ing them from being moved out of their upwardly
inclined positions when the cord 5 is engaged
during the pick up. When the small sleeve 50
strikes against the tube 52 the latter is actuated
in a downward direction to a position where its
beveled end forces the pins 53 outwardly. The
continued outward movement of the pins is ef
fected by their tapered end portions engaging
25 with the edges of the holes in the tubular member
34 through which they normally project. Upon
the said pins 53 assuming positions in which their
ends are entirely free of the holes in the tubular
member 34, the block 54 is free to be moved in
30 an upward direction by the pressure then being
exerted against it by the extensions 36' of the
hooks 35. The spring 43 pressing the ring 42a
upwardly causes the latter to engage with the
block 54 and also assist in its upward movement.
35 As the block 54 is thus moved in an upward di
rection, the hooks 36 being pulled downwardly
by the weight of the aerial sign and parachute
then being towed, turn about their pivots and
assume downwardly inclined positions, as illus--‘
40 trated in Fig. 6.
The positioning of the hooks
in downwardly inclined positions permits the
cord 5 to slide from the particular hook or hooks
then holding it, thereby allowing the parachute
to open and slowly descend with the aerial sign
45 preceding it, as before. The weight of the globu
lar object I l, and certain other parts of the appa
ratus exerting a downward pull on the shroud
lines 20, readily cause the parachute to assume
an open, supporting position, as'shown in Fig. 2.
As soon as the block 54 is moved upwardly by
50
the pressure exerted against it by the hooks, a
spring pressed catch member 55 attached to the
tubular member 34 is engaged and pressed in
wardly to a point whereby it is freed from a slid
55 able ring 55 mounted on the said tubular member.
.The slidable ring 55 engages with one end of a
normally compressed strong. spiral spring 51
which encircles the tubular member 34 and is
positioned with its opposite end in engagement
60 with a collar 58 ?xed to the said tubular member.
When the slidable ring 55 is no longer held up
scribed. After the airplaine has been flown into
a position near the landing ?eld, following the
second and ?nal pick up of the parachute and
aerial sign, the drum 25 is rotated so as to unreel
and ?nally detach the cable 24 before the air
10
plane makes its landing.
Having described my invention, what I claim is:
l. A method of aerial advertising comprising
carrying a parachute having advertising material
suspended therefrom to a point well above the
earth’s surface, releasing the parachute to per 15
mit the advertising material to be displayed in
midnair while the parachute descends, and re
covering the parachute and advertising material
in mid-air before they reach the earth’s surface.
2. A method‘ of aerial advertising comprising
carrying a parachute having advertising matter
suspended therefrom to a point well above the
earth’s surface, releasing the parachute to per
mit the advertising matter to be displayed in
mid-air while the parachute descends, recover 25
ing by means of an airplane the parachute, and
advertising matter in mid-air before they reach
the earth’s surface, again carrying the parachute
and the advertising matter to a point higher than
they were when recovered, and again releasing 30
the parachute to permit the advertising matter
to be displayed in mid-air While the parachute
descends.
3. A method of aerial advertising comprising
carrying a parachute having advertising matter 35
and weights suspended therefrom to a point well
above the earth’s surface, releasing the parachute
to permit the advertising matter to be displayed
in mid-air while the parachute descends, recover
ing the parachute, advertising matter and weights 40
in mid-air before they reach the earth’s surface,
again carrying the parachute, the advertising
matter and the weights to a point higher than
they were when recovered, again releasing the
parachute to permit the advertising matter to be 45
displayed in mid-air while the parachute de
scends, and again recovering the parachute, ad
vertising matter and weights in mid-air before
they reach the earth’ssurface. '
4. In the method of aerial advertising, the
steps which include dropping from a point well
above the earth’s surface an aerial sign or object
having means associated therewith for retarding
its descent, and recovering the said sign or object
in mid-air before it reaches the earth’s surface. 55
5. In the method of aerial advertising, the
steps which include dropping from a point well
above the earth’s surface an aerial sign or object
having means associated therewith for retarding
its descent, and recovering the said sign or object 60
in mid-air before it has reached the earth’s sur
face, carrying the sign or object to a point higher
wardly by the catch member 55 engaging there
with, the spiral spring 51 forces the same down , than it was when recovered; and again dropping
wardly into engagement with‘ the block 54, there
said sign or object to permit its free descent.
6. In the method of aerial advertising, the 65
65 by causing the latter to also be moved down
wardly into engagement with the extensions 35’ steps including towing to an altitude well above
of the hooks 36. The hooks are thereupon moved the earth’s surface a folded parachute having
about their pivots to upwardly inclined positions an aerial sign suspended therefrom, releasing the
in which they may again engage with the cord 5 parachute and aerial sign to permit the opening
of the parachute and the slow descent of the
70 during the second recovery or pick up of the para
chute and aerial sign. The movement of the aerial sign, and recovering the parachute and
block 54 in a downward direction by the spring aerial sign in mid-air before it has reached the
51 brings the pins 53 again into-registry with earth’s surface.
NORBERT N. SHORB.
their holes in the tubular member 34, thereby
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