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Патент USA US2135266

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Nov. 1, 1938.
>
G. w. WARDWELL, JR
IRONING PRESS
`
'
2,135,255
-
Original Filed Oct. 30, 1954
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His Attovneg.
Nov. 1, 1938.
`
G. w. WARDWELL, JR
n
2,135,266
IRONING PRESS
.l Original Filed 00h50., 1934
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
` ITD/evd) O1-J :
Geol頶e W Wuwdwell, J1".
His Attovneg.
n -2,135,266
Patented Nov. l, 1938 _
i
PATENT`
OFFICE
2,135,266-
UNITED ~ STATES
moNxNG PBEss
'l Gwrge w. wardweu, n., Nichols, oonn.,ass1-
or to General Electric Company, a corporation
of New York
Application October 30, 1934, Serial No. 750,820
I
Renewed June 1, 1938
32 Claims.
(Cl. 38-25)
y.
.
the vertical. The cylinder 9 forms the outer cas
My vinvention relates to ironing presses of the
type in which ironing is effected by the pressure A ing and stationary member of a power-operated
device for moving the buck and shoe into press
� between a buck and a heated shoe.
ing engagement. A piston Il which' forms the '
The object of my invention> is to provide an im
proved arrangement and control ?in an ironing movable member of the ypower-operated device ,f
press of this type, and for a consideration of what ' is slidably carried within the cylinder 9, as shown
I believe to be novel and my invention, attention in Fig. 6. On the upper side of -the piston i`s a
is directed to theV accompanying description and motor casing I2,v and on the _upper end of' the
motor casing is a bearing housing I3. The pis
the claims appended thereto.
l0
In the accompanying drawings, Fig. 1 is an end ton, motor casing, and healing housing are se
elevation partly in section of. an ironing press cured together by through bolts I4 so that all
embodying my invention; Fig. 2 is a plan view of
the shoe and carriage; Fig. 3 is a fragmentary
plan view partly- broken away of the buck; Fig. 4
l5 is a sectional view taken on line 4-4 of Fig. 3;
Fig. 5 is a sectional view taken on line 5--5 oi'
Fig. 2; Fig. 5a is an enlarged portion of Fig. 5;
Fig. 6 is a sectional view taken on line 6-6 of
Fig. 1; Fig. 7 is a sectional view taken on line 'I-l
20 of Fig. 1; Fig. 8 is a plan view' of the bearing
housing at the upper end of the piston which.
' moves the buck into pressing engagement with
the shoe; Fig. 9 is a perspective view of the spacer
which prevents rearward tilting of the buck. dur籰
25 ing pressing; Fig. l0 is a sectional view partly
broken away taken on line I0-I� of Fig. 6; Fig".
il is a diagrammatic view of the control for the
ironing press; and Fig. i?? is a bottom plan View
ci the center or the bacia casting.
3G
?
Referring to the drawings, the ironing machine
is shown carried on a table having e. table top
three move as a unit.
A guiding flange I5 on the
upper end of. the motor casing assists in guiding
the movement of the piston in the cylinder.
'
The cylinder is filled with a suitable iluid, such
>as oil, and the piston is moved upward inrlthe
cylinder bypressure between the lower end of the
cylinder and the piston. This pressure is created
by an lmpeller 22 driven by an electric motor
carried in the upper end of the motor casing I2. ?
fi?he stationary member I6 of the electric motor
is pressed into the upper end of the motor casing.
The rotating member Il of the electric motor is
provided with a shaft I8 which is rotatably car
ried in a bearing I9 in the bearing housing I3 '
and in c. bearing 20 in a bearing housing 2|. The
bearing housing 2i is integral with the motor cas
ing and provides a partition which prevents the
leakage of oil from the cylinder into the space
around the motor. At the lower end of the motor
shaft isisecured the impeller 22. The impeller
and the rotating'member of the motor are sup
ported by a spring-pressed ball 23 arranged in a
i and supporting legs il. The tabletop is re�
intorced by a channel d secured to the under recess d4 in a piston head 25. 'I'he piston head
side. An apron d, secured to the rear edge et
secured to the lower endof the piston Il by 35
35 the table top, prevents the surplus of the ma� -is
studs 26. The piston head is spaced from the
terial being ironed from falling over the rear
end of the piston and provides a chamber
edge of, the table. At the front edge of the table lower
in
lwhich
the impeller 2a rotates.y A piston ring
top is a leaf d which is rotatably carried on the
25* lies in a groove between piston head 25 and
front edge of the table top by apin 6. A brace 'I ~ piston i I. Rotation oi' the impeller by the motor
4o supports the leaf in the position shown in Fig. l.
The brace projects through a slot in the front causes oil to be drawn from the upper side of `
edge of the table top and is provided with a notch
8 which engages the lower side of the slot. When
the ironing machine is not in use, the free end
45 of the brace l is lifted so that it can slide
through the slot in the table top, and the leaf is
swung downwardly about the. pin 6. Similar
leaves may be provided at either end of. the
table.
50
.
The table top ispprovided with a central open-_
'ing through which the lower end of a cylinder 9
projects. The cylinder is supported on the table
piston il through inlet opening 21 in the `piston
and to be forced outward through the space be
tween the piston head 25 and the lower side ofY
the piston. From here the oil flows `through 45
openings 28 in the pistonv head and creates a
pressure between the cylinder and the lower side
of the piston head which moves the piston up
ward in the cyl-inder.l The oil which iiows
through the inlet opening 21 enters from the 50
cylinder through openings 29 in the lower ,end
of the motor casing and iiows between a baille
top by a flange I0 integral with the cylinder and _ plate 30 and the upper side of the piston II to
the inlet opening.. Vanes 3| are provided on the
suitably secured to the table top. The axis'of the
55 ?cylinder-is inclined downward and rearward from
upper side of the piston which guide the oil-to the 55
2
2,185,266
inlet opening 21 and prevent swirling of the oil at
the inlet opening. The baille plate 30 rests on
of the bearing housing bias the buck casting
downward toward the bearing housing I3 so that
the upper side of the vanes 3I and is held in
the ribs 38 on the buck casting are resiliently
held in engagement with the shoulders 39 on
place by peaning projections 32 on the upper side
of the piston over the edge of the baffle plate.
the bearing housing. The studs 4I are arranged
The rotation of. the impeller tends to create a
on the longitudinal axis of the buck on either
pressure between the under side of the impeller
side of the center so that the buck is free to
and the upper side of the piston head which
tends to lift the impeller away from the upper
tilt in all directions in order to maintain an
even pressure over the surface of the buck dur
10 side of the piston head. This thrust is resisted
by a thrust pin 33 which is adjustably threaded
into the upper end of the bearing housing I3 and
which bears a dise 33a of bearing material on
the upper end of the shaft I8 oi the electric
motor. The disc 33a provides a surface which
will not wear sufficiently during the normal liie
of the ironer to destroy the end thrust adjust
ment. Holes 34 are provided in the impeller
which tend to relieve the pressure on the under
side of the impeller.
In the operation of the power-operated device,
supplying current to the electric motor starts
the rotation of the impeller, thereby causing oil
to be pumped from the upper to the lower side
25 of the piston and building up a pressure between
the cylinder and the lower side of the piston
which causes the piston to be raised in the cyl
inder. Due to the time necessary for accelerat
ing the electric motor, there is some time lag in
the building up of pressure by the'impeller. This
time lag causes the movement of the piston in
the cylinder to be started smoothly. The up
ward movement of the piston continues until
the resistance offered to the upward movement
35 of the piston balances the pressure created by
the impeller between the cylinder and piston.
When this condition is reached, there is no
further upward travel of the piston, and the
piston remains in this position as long as the
40 electric motor is energized.
When the motor
is deenergized, the impeller stops rotating and
oil flows from the space between the lower end
of the piston and the cylinder through openings
28 and inlet opening 21 to the upper side of
45 the piston, and the piston returns to the posi
tion illustrated in Fig. 6 under the action of
gravity. The piston and cylinder cooperate to
ing pressing.
In order to restrain rearward
tilting of the buck, for reasons which will appear
hereinafter, a spacer 43 is placed across ribs 44
on the rear upper side of the bearing housing
I3.
The spacer is held in place by projec
tions 45 which engage notches 4S in the bearing
housing.
'I?he spacer engages a pair of trans
verse ribs 46B, which extend downwardly from
the buck casting and thereby restrains rearward
tilting of the buck. The spacer 43 does not re
strain rearward tilting of the buck suniciently 20
to destroy the flexibility of the buck mounting.
The forward tilting of the buck is limited by
the engagement of the front end of the ribs 46B
with the upper edge of the bearing housing I3.
The buck mounting is such that there is less re
sistance to forward than to rearward tilting of
the buck. The buck casting 36 is hollow and is
provided with spaced ribs 41 (Fig. 3) which ex
tend upwardly from the upper surface of the
casing and have their upper edges in line with
a shoulder 48 provided along the inner edge of
the casting. Across the ribs 41 and the shoul
der 48 is placed a wire mesh screen 49. The
wire mesh screen supports pads 50 of textile
material which are held in place on the screen
by a pad cover 5I. The pad cover 5I is held
in place by cords 52 which are laced across the
under surface of the buck casting.
During ironing, the moisture in the clothing
is transformed into steam which passes through
the pads 50 and the wire mesh screen 45 into
the interior of the buck casting. When first
starting to iron, the bottom walls of the buck
casting are cold and the steam which passes
through the padding is immediately condensed 45
on these walls. The condensed steam is led
fromv the buck through an opening 53 in the
lower wall of the buck casting and through a
drain tube 54 secured in place in this opening.
cushion the return movement. An opening 35 is
provided in the flange I5 on the motor casing
through which air may flow to the upper Sur
face of the oil in the cylinder. 'I'his prevents the
From the drain tube 54 the condensed moisture
ilows through an opening 55 in a bracket 56
creation oi a suction by the reciprocating move
- secured to the side of the cylinder 9 and through
>ment of the piston in the cylinder.
The buck is mounted on the upper side of
55 the bearing housing I3 and is reciprocated by
the piston. The buck comprises a hollow cast
ing 36 which is provided with a circular depend
ing iiange?31 which fits over the upper end of
the cylinder 9. IThe buck casting is also pro
vided with a pair of depending longitudinal
ribs 38 which rest on shoulders 39 on the upper
side of the bearing housing I3. These ribs and
shoulders provide a tiltable support for the buck.
The ribs 38 support the buck so that the upper
surface of the buck is inclined upwardly from
the front and so that the axis of the cylinder
9 inclines downwardly and rearwardly from the
center line of the buck. It is easier for the
operator to arrange clothes on the inclined sur
70 face of the buck. The buck is held in place on
the upper side of the bearing housing by studs
4i which pass through openings 42 in the bear
ing housing and are threaded into the lower side
of the buck casting 3S. Coil springs 4�-arranged
between the heads of studs 4I and the lower side
a drain tube 51 secured in opening 55 to a drain
trap 58. The drain trap 58 is preferably avglass
jar so that the amount of moisture contained 55
therein will be visible from the outside. ?Ijhe
drain trap is removably held in place on the
bracket 56 by a clip 59. A Vent 6D is provided
in the bracket above the drain trap. The lower
end of drain tube 51 extends near the bottom of
the drain trap 58 so that by the time the bot
tom walls of the buck casting have become heated
by the steam so that all the steam is not
densed therein, the lower end of the drain
51 is submerged. Since steam from the
must now pass through the relatively low
con
tube
buck
tem
perature condensate in the drain trap, escape
of steam from the buck is prevented. The
space between the drain tube 54 and the bracket
56 is sealed by a vresilient washer BI held in
place in the upper end of the bracket by a
retaining Washer 62. The washer 6I permits
tilting movement of the buck and also permits
sliding movement of the buck relative to the
cylinder without destroying the seal.
2,185,266
A U-shaped carriage 83 for supportingL the
shoe is pivotally carried at the lower end oi the
cylinder in ears 64 which depend from the cylin
der.
3 ,
the shoe. The> heating ele韓ent 8l may be con
trolled by suitable thermostats (not shown) `so as
to maintain the shoe at proper temperature. The
The carriage is keyed to a pin 65 which is- ' heating element 88, which is preferably chosen to.
rotatably mounted in the ears il. The pin i5 is
centered on the axis oi the cylinder. With. this`
arrangement, the thrust on the carriage during
a the ironing is not transferred to the table top.
Also, since the pin 65 is located on the axis of the
cylinder, there is no tendency for the cylinder to
tilt on the table top during pressing. With this
construction it is not necessary to make the table
top strong enough to withstand the pressing
forces.
'
'
The carriage comprises a U-shaped channel 88
having a reinforcing web 81 secured between the
flanges of the channel. In order to limit the rear
ward pivotal movement of the carriage, a toggle
comprising links 68 and 69 is provided. The tog
20 gle links are pivotally connected together by pin
10. Link B9 is pivotally connected to a bracket?1l
mounted on lthe reinforcing web 61 of the car
riage. Link 88 is pivotally connected to a bracket
12 secured to the rear side of the cylinder. A coil
spring 13, arranged between the end of the car
take the same power as the electric motor oi the
power operated device, is controlled by?switch 8|.
The switch 8| maintains the heating element 88 in
an energized condition when the carriage is moved \
to a position in which the buck and shoe are out
of register. vWhen the buck and shoe are moved 10
into register,vthe switch 8l deenergizes the heat
ing element 86 and closes the circuit to the elec- `
tric motor. By- this� arrangement, the electric
motor and the- heating element ,88 are never si
multaneously energized and for this reason the
power demand of the ironing press is decreased.
This provides practically constant power input to
the ironing machine and eliminates peak loads
while the motor is running. 'I?his is important
since the power demand of the> ironing press
should not exceed the capacity of the usual out
let found in homes. yA cover 82* is provided to
enclose -the upper surface of the shoe. Guards
When the carriage is moved to the position shownv
82b are provided on the frontedge of the shoe.
The shoe is moved into and out of register with
the buck by a handle connected to the upper sur
face'of the shoe between the shoe and cover 82..
The handle comprises cross bars 81 and 81*
which are connected between two bars 88 and 89.
The bar 89'is -pivotally connected to the shoeby a stud 90, vand a stud 9| extending through
an opening 92 in bar 89 allows a >limited pivotal
movement of the bar 89 around stud 90. Studs
inv dotted lines in Fig. 1, the force of the spring
13 prevents the straightening of the toggle and
bar 88 hold the bar 88 in place on the upper sur
riage and a washer 1l on the pin 1n, urges the
adjacent ends of the links 68 and 68 toward the
lower end of the carriage. When the `carriage
is in the position shown in full lines in Fig. 1, the
force of the spring 13 tends to pivot the carriage
rearward and partially overcomes the eilect of
gravity which holds the carriage in this position.
also cushions the rearward pivotal movementof
the carriage.
�
`
To further cushion the pivotal movement of the
carriage, a coil spring 15 is provided around the
40 pin 65. One end of the spring 15 nts within an
opening 18 in one of the ears 84, and the other end
of the spring is secured to the upper side of reen
forcing web S1 by a clamp 11. The spring 15 is ar
ranged so that there is noterision on the spring
it; when the center ci gravity of the carriage is ver
93 extending through enlarged openings 94 in
face 'of the shoe and also permit pivotal move
ment of the handle about the stud 80.. This ar
rangement provides a lost motion connection beu'
tween the shoe andthe handle. ?The lost motion
movement of the handle is used to control the cir 40
cuit to the motor through a switch t4 having a
stationary contact 9h and a movable contact 88.
A spring 81 biases the contact @t toward contact
$5. When the handle t1 is pushed in a direction
to move the carriage rearward, the handle is
pivoted'about the stud @3, and a tone de at the
ticaily above the pin 65. Movement oi.' the car
riage on either side of this position causes the . end of the bar 88 engages a hntton t9 ci insu?
spring "it to be tensioned. The tensioning of the lating material on the switch and moves the conn
spring 15 stili further assists in balancing the tact 96 out of engagement with contact d5. Since
the circuit to the eieotric motor is closed through 5@
50 force of gravity on the carriage and assists in these contacts, the opening oi" the contacts' de=
obtaining easy movement of the carriage. _
Forward movement of the carriage is limited venergises the motor and causes the release ci
by an adjustable stop 18 which is secured to the pressure between the buck and the shoe. As
bracket 'i2 and which is engaged by a projection long as the handle is maintained in this position.
the motor cannot be energized. When the handle 55
55 19 on the bracket lli. The projection 19 also is released, the spring 91 may he strong enough to
.engages the plunger 80 of a control switch 8l
close the contacts 95 and 9&5 and> return the
which is also secured to bracket 12.A
_
handle to the position shown in Fig. 2. This is
A shoe 82 which is made oi aluminum or other
not necessary since the handle will be returned
suitable metal, is rigidly secured to the upper arm to
the position shown in Fig. 2 by a lforce on the 60
83
of
the
carriage.
The
shoe
is
placed
so
that
60
handle'in
the direction to move the shoe into
when the carriage is moved to the full line posi
tion of?Fig. 1, the shoe is in register with the register with the buck. This provides a conven
control for the ironing machine since the
buck _and in spaced relation thereto. Since the ient
pivot point of the carriage is below and to the movement of the handle necessary to control the
pressure between the buck and the shoe is the 65
65 rear of the center line of the buck, that is, a line same as that required to move the shoe into and
perpendicular to the top face of the buck passing out of register with the buck. `Il? the operator'
through the center of the buck, the shoe tends to
wishes for any reason to release the pressure, it is
swing downwardly toward the buck as the car
riage is pivoted forward and less clearance is re . yonly necessary to push lthe handle in the direction
70
to move the shoe out of register with the buck.
70 quired between the buck and shoe. The location
At
the
right
hand
end
of
the
shoe
is
provided
of the pivot point of the carriage provides a more
compact construction. The shoe is heated by a a pui� iron of the type disclosed and claimed in
heating element 84 which is heldin a groove in the application Serial No. 741,091, illed August 23,
upper surface of the Aslice by clamps 85 and by a 1934, and assigned to the assignee of this inven 75
tion. The pu�' iron is slidably carried in a.
� heating element 86 similarly secured in place on
4
2,135,266
groove in the upper surface or" the shoe below the
cover. When not in use, the puff iron is carried
within the edges of the shoe in the position shown
in Fig. 2. When the pun iron is in use, the work
ing surface |00 oi the iron is moved by a handle
lill to a position projecting beyond the edge of
the shoe. The portion |02 of the puff iron which
is to the rear oi the working surface |00 re
mains within the edges of the shoe and conducts
heat from the shoe to the working surface |00 of
the pui� iron. A spring |03 supported from the
shoe by a bracket |04 engages raised portions
|05 on the puff iron and holds the puff iron in
駌m contact with the upper surface of the shoe
of the motor, the circuit extends through con
ductor |20, contact |2|, switch blade |22 and
contact |23 of switch 8|, conductor |24, and con
ductor H1 to the other side of the line. The cir
cuit to the motor is energized when the carriage
is moved to the position in which the shoe and
buck are in register and when contacts 95 and
96 are in the closed position. When the shoe is
in register with the buck, projection 19 on
bracket 1| secured to the carriage engages
plunger 80 of the switch 8| and moves the switch
blade |22 of the switch 80 into engagement with
contacts |2| and |23. Contacts 95 and 96 are
maintained in the closed position by spring 91
when the shoe is in the extended and the re
when a force is exerted on the handle 81 in the
tracted positions. Between these positions, the
direction to move the shoe into register with the
buck. It is, therefore, apparent that as soon as
the shoe is moved into register with the buck,
the electric motor is energized and starts to move
spring |83 is out of contact with the upper sur
face of the puff iron so that the puff iron may be
freely moved.
In the use of the puif iron, the shoe is moved
20
to the position shown in full lines in Fig. l,
and the puff iron is moved to the extended posi
tion by pulling on the handle |0I. After the puff
iron is moved to the extended position, the handle
l鹟 may be swung to one side to uncover the
working surface of the puil� iron#
As explained above, moving the shoe to the
position shown in full lines in Fig. 1 closes the
circuit to the electric motor through switches 8|
80 and 94 so that the buck is immediately raised into
the buck into pressing engagement with the shoe. 20
To release the pressure between the buck and the
shoe, it is necessary to open contacts 95 and 96
by exerting a force on the handle 81 in the di
rection to move the shoe out of register with the
buck. This may be accomplished by pushing on
the handle 81 or by moving the puff iron to the
extended position.
When the shoe is out of register with the
pressing engagement with the shoe. Since the
buck, the projection 19 is moved away from the
plunger 80 of the switch 8|, and spring |25 30
forces the switch blade |22 into engagement
pui� iron may be used for a considerable time, it
is undesirable that the buck and shoe be main
with contacts |26 and |21, thus completing a
circuit through heating `element 86. This cir
tained in pressing engagement during this time.
An arrangement is, therefore, provided which will
open the circuit to the motor and prevent energiz
ing of the motor when the puff iron is moved to
the extended position. This arrangement com
prises a rod |06, one end of which is pivotally
40 connected to the bar 88 of the handle for moving
the carriage. The other end of the rod |06
slidably extends through a hole in a bracket |01
secured to the upper surface of the puff iron.
When the puff iron is moved, rod |06 is pivoted
? about the bar S8. As the puff iron nears the
extended position, the rod engages a boss |08
on the upper surface of the shoe and moves the
tongue 88 of the bar 88 against the button 99
and thereby moves Contact 96 out of engagement
with contact 65. This opens the circuit to the
motor and prevents pressing engagementY of the
buck and the shoe while the puff iron is in the
extended position. During the movement of the
puff iron, the rod i106 slides through the bracket
|01.
A diagrammatic view of the control for the
ironing press is shown in Fig. 11. In this diagram
the current is :ted from a suitable source of elec
cuit may be traced from one side of the line
through contact H3, conductor H4 conductor
H5, heating element 86, conductor |28, contact
|26, switch blade |22, contact |21, conductor |24,
and conductor H1, to Contact H2 and the other
side of the line. The circuit to heating element
86 is closed whenever the buck and shoe are out
of register.
In the use of the ironing machine, assume that
the parts are in the position shown in dotted
lines in Fig. 1. In this position, the shoe is out
of register with the buck, and the material to be 45
ironed may be arranged over the upper surface
thereof.
To effect the ironing of the material
arranged on the buck, the shoe is moved into
register with the buck by pulling on handle 81.
The force exerted on the handle causes the han 50
dle to pivot about stud 90 thereby moving the
tongue?98 of the bar 88 away from the button
99' on switch 94 and permitting contacts 95 and
96 to be moved into engagement by spring 91.
Contacts 95 and v96 remain in this position until
a rearward force is exerted on the handle. As
soon as the shoe reaches a position in register
with the buck, projection 19 on bracket 1| at
tricity from conductors |09 and H0 through line - tached to the carriage engages plunger 80 of the
switch 8| and moves switch blade |22 into en� 60
switch lli to contacts H2 and H3. The circuit to
heating element 84 on the shoe extends from con
tact H3 through conductor H4 and conductor
||5 to heating element 84 and from heating ele
ment 84 through conductor H6 and conductor
65 |41 to contact i i2. The circuit to heating ele
ment 84 is maintained as long as the line switch
l | l is closed.
When the parts are in the position illustrated
in Fig. ll, the circuit to the motor is closed and
the buclr is moved into pressing engagement with
the shoe. ri?he circuit to the motor extends from
one side of the line through contact H3, con
ductor lid, conductor H8, contact 95 and con
tact 86 or? switch �, conductor H9, to one
terminal ofthe motor. From the other?terminal
gagement with contacts |23 and |2|, complet
ing the circuit to the electric motor. Energiz
ing of the electric motor causes rotation of the
impeller 22 attached to the lower end of the
motor shaft I8. The rotation of the impeller 65
22 draws oil through the inlet opening 21 in the
upper side of the piston H and forces the oil
through openings 28 in the piston head 25 to the
lower side of the piston, thereby building up
pressure between the piston and the lower end of 70
the cylinder 9 and causing the piston to be moved
upward. Due to the time required by accelerat
ing the motor, the building up of pressure be
tween the lower end of the cylinder and the
piston is gradual, and the upward movement
5
of the piston is started without shock. The up
on the handle necessary to open contacts 95 and
Ward'movement of the piston continues until the . 96 is slight. When the motor is deenergized, oil
buck is brought into pressing engagement with
the shoe, and the resistance offered by the shoe
to further movementl of the buck balances the
pressure created by the impeller. The pressure
continues as long as the motor is energized.
駉ws from the lower side of the piston through
openings l28 and 2'| to the upper side of the
piston. During this movement, the piston co
operates withl the cylinder to .cushion the down
ward movement of the piston. The piston moves
downwardly until the buck casting contacts. the
Since the shoe is centered above the a-xis of the
cylinder and the carriage is pivoted on the lower upper edge of the cylinder 9, as shown in Fig. 6.'
'
10 end of the cylinder at the axis of the cylinder, When the shoe is moved out of register with the
the pressing force is not transmitted to the table buck, the projection 19 on the bracket 1| is moved
,top and there is no tendency for the cylinder to_ away from plunger 80 of switch 8|, and spring
tilt.. The table top is therefore subjected to no |25 moves switch blade |22 out of engagement
additional strain during pressing and need only with contacts | 2| and |23 and into engagement籦e strong enough to support the weight of the with contacts |26 and |21. Moving the switch 15
cylinder and carriage. During pressing, the ribs blade |22 out of engagement with contacts v|2|
38> on the buck rock-on shoulders 39 on bearing and |23 opens the circuit to the?motor.- The
Amovement of switch blade |22 into ?engagement
.housing I3 and allow the buck to align its sur
face with the shoe to maintain an even pressure*V with. contacts. |26 and- |21 closes the"circuit
20 over the surface of the buck.
through heating element 86. With this arrange 20'l v
I Since the vcenter line of the buck passes
through a pointin front of-the pivot point of
the carriage, the ironing force is not applied per
pendicularly to the surface of the shoe. 'I'he
25 ironing force on the shoe comprises a component.
perpendicular to the surface of the shoe anda
component acting along the surface of the shoe in
the direction to pivot the carriage forward. >'I'he
component of force along the surfaceof the shoe
30 is equal to the product of the perpendicular com
ment, the electric motor vand heating element 86 籝
can never be simultaneously energized, and the
power demand of the press is'accordingly de
creased. Wh'ile the buck and shoe are out of
register, heating'element 86 provides additional
25
power which is available to maintain the shoe at _
-the desired temperature.
'
-
No claim is made in this application to the buck
construction, this'being claimed in my application, `
Serial No. 744,793, filed Sept. 20, 1934. The com 30
ponent� of force by the coefl靋ient `of friction be
bination of an inclined b'uck with a pivotal car
tween the surface of the 'shoe and the material
riage for moving the shoe toward and away from
~ on the upper surface of the buck.
During nor
mal operation of the ironing machine, the torque
35 on the carriage about ypin 65 due to the com
ponent of the ironing force acting along the sur
face of the shoe is equaljto -or greater than thel
torque on the carriage due tothe component
of the ironing force perpendicular to the surface
40 of the shoe.
The carriage is therefore normally ,
held against stop ?i8 and there is no slippage
between the shoe and the upper surface Mof -the
buck. When ironing very dry material at vhigh
temperatures of the shoe, the padding onthe
the buck is being claimed more broadly in my' ?
above- application.
_
?
y
i
'I'he arrangement for receiving the pressing 35
forces independently of the table top by connect
ing the shoe supporting carriage to the cylinder of
the hydraulic operator is being claimed broadly in`
application, Serial No. 43,937, 駆ed Oct. '7, 1935. ,
What I claim as newr and desire to secure by
Letters Patent of the United States,is,
.x 1. An ironingpress comprising a buck, a shoe,
an electric heating element for heating the press,
electricallyoperated means for power operation
of the press, and means decreasing the power 45
face of the?buck or?the material placed on the
face of the buck sometimes become sufliciently ` taken by said electric heating element while said
smooth and slippery so that there is no longer electrically operated means is? energized for de
sufficient friction to prevent slippage between the creasing the power demand of the press.
buck and the shoe. Under these circumstances N 2. An ironing press comprising a buck, a. shoe,
the torque due to the force perpendicular to the an electric heating element for heating the press,
surface of the shoe- tends ~vto pivot the carriage . electrically operated means adapted when ener
gizedfto cause pressing engagement of said buck
rearward. This tendency to rearward move
ment of the carriage is prevented by spacer 43 and said shoe and when deenergized to release
which restrains rearward ?tilting of the buck. the pressure between said buck and said shoe, and
56 Unless the buck can tilt rearward, the carriage means decreasing the power taken by said electric
cannot move rearward during pressing, and slip 5 heatingelement while said electrically 'operated
page between the buck and shoe is accordingly means is energized for decreasing the power de
' .
?_
.
prevented. This arrangement makes it possible mand of the press.
3. An ironing press comprising a buck, a shoe,
to pivot the carriage below and to the rear of the
electrically operated means for power operation
center line of the buck without making any pro
vision for locking the carriage in the position in of the press, a plurality of electric heating elements for heating the press, and means deener
which the buck and shoe are in register. For
ward movement of the carriage during pressing gizing one of said heating elements while said
electrically operated means is lenergized for. de
is prevented by stop 'I8 so that there is no slip
creasing the power demand of the press.
ping between the buck and shoe during press
ing.
To release the pressure between the buck and
f
55
y
60
.
65
? 4. An ironing press comprising a buck, a shoe,
a carriage for said shoe, a plurality of electric
the shoe', a rearward pressure is exerted on the
heating elements for heating the press, electrical- '
handle _81 causing the handle topivotvabout the
ly operated-means for power operation of the
press, and a switch operated by said carriage for 70
70 stud 90 and thereby causing tongue 98 to press
against button 99 and move contact 96 out of
engagement with contact 95. Due tol the lost
alternatively energizing said electrically operated
means and one of saidheating elements.
5. An ironing press comprising a buck, a shoe,
motion connection of the handle to the shoe `
which is provided by the clearance between studs means for relatively moving said buck and shoe
75 9| and 93 and openings 92- and 94, the pressure ' into and out of register, electrically operated
6
2,135,266
a handle for relatively moving said buck and said
shoe into and out of register, electrically-operated
means adapted when energized to cause pressing
engagement of said buck and said shoe and when
means for relatively moving said buck and shoe
into pressing engagement, an electric heating ele
ment for heating said press, and means dependent
vupon said buck and shoe being in register for
energizing said electrically operated means and
for decreasing the power taken by said heating
deenergized to release the pressure between said ~
buck and said shoe, means actuated by movement
into and out of register, electrically operated
of said buck and said shoe into register for ener
gizing said electrically-operated means, and a
switch controlled by pressure on said handle in
the direction to move said buck and shoe into and
means for relatively moving said buck and shoe
into> pressing engagement, an electric heating ele
out of register for respectively energizing and
deenergizing said electrically-operated means.
ment for heating said press, and means including
12. An ironing press comprising a buck, a shoe,
a handle having a lost motion connection with
element.
6. An ironing press comprising a buck, a shoe,
means for relatively moving said buck and shoe
a switch for energizing said electrically operated
means and decreasing the power taken by said
said shoe for relatively moving said shoe into reg 15
ister with and in spaced relation to said buck and
for moving said shoe out of register with said
buck, electrically-operated means adapted when
energized to cause said buck to be raised into
pressing engagement with sai?d shoe and when de
' heating element when said buck and shoe are in
register and for deenergizing said electrically op
erated means and increasing the power taken by
said heating element when said buck and shoe are
20 out of register.
'7. An ironing press adapted for use with,an
energized to cause the buck to be lowered, means
actuated by movement of said shoe into register
with said buck for energizing said electrically
operated means, and a switch controlled by the
electric outlet of limited capacity comprising a
buck, a shoe, an electric heating elementsfor
heating the press, electrically operated means for
lost motion movement ofY said handle for con
25 power operation of the press, and means decreas
ing the power taken by said electric heating ele
ment While said electrically operated means is
energized for increasing the effective heating ca
trolling the energizing of said electrically-oper
pacity of the heating element without exceeding
tiltably mounted buck carried by the support, a
carriage pivoted on the support below said buck
and pivotally movable forward and rearward with
ated means.
13. An ironing press comprising a support, a
30 the capacity of the outlet.
8. An ironing press comprising a. buck, a shoe,
power operated means for effecting pressing en
gagement of the buck and the shoe, a handle for
respect to said buck, a shoe carried by said car
riage and movable to a position above and in reg
ister with said buck, means for relatively moving
causing relative movement between said buck and
35 said shoe whereby said buck and said shoe are
moved into and out oi' register, means effective
upon relative movement of the buck and the shoe
said buck and shoe into pressing engagement, and
means restraining rearward tilting of said buck
for preventing rearward movement of said car
by the handle to the in-register position with
out additional movement of the handle ior con
riage during pressing.
and means controlled by pressure on said handle
in the, direction to move said buck and said shoe
press movable to an operative and an inoper
`
14. An ironing press comprising a buck, a shoe,
40 trolling said power operated means to effect , meansv for moving said buck and said shoe into
pressing engagement of the buck and the shoe, pressing engagement, a pui! iron carried by said
ative position, means dependent upon said pull
iron being moved from the inoperative position
for preventing pressing engagement of said buck
out of register for controlling said power operated
45 means to release the pressure between said buck
and said shoe.
and said shoe.
'
9. An ironing press comprising a buck, a shoe,
a handle for moving said shoe into and out oi
register with said buck, electrically-operated
50 means adapted when energized to cause pressing
engagement of said buck and said shoe and when
deenergized to release the pressure between said
buck and said shoe, a switch controlled by said
handle for controlling said electrically-operated
55 means, means for moving said switch to the ener
gized position in response to the force on the
handle required to move the shoe into register
with the buck, and means for moving said switch
to the deenergized position in response to pressure
on said handle in the direction to move said shoe
�
15. An ironing press comprising a buck, a shoe,
power-operated means for moving said buck and
said shoe into` pressing engagement, a puff iron
carried by said shoe having a working surface
movable to a position projecting beyond said shoe,
and means dependent upon the working surface
of said pui! iron being moved beyond said shoe for
controlling said power-operated means to prevent
pressing engagement of _said buck and said shoe.
16. An ironing press comprising a buck, a shoe,
means for relatively moving said buck and shoe
into and out of register, power-operated means for
causing pressing engagement of said buck and
,said shoe, means dependent upon said buck and '
shoe being in register for controlling said power
operated means to cause pressing engagement of
ysaid buck and said shoe, a pui! iron carried by
shoe into and out of register, power-operated said press movable to an operative and an inoper
means for causing pressing engagement of said ative position, and means dependent upon said
buck and said shoe, means actuated by movement pui iron being moved from the inoperative posi- _
tion for controlling said power-operated means
of said buck and said shoe into register for con
trolling said power-operated means ~to, cause to prevent pressing engagement of said buck and
_
"
'
pressing engagement of said buck and said shoe, said shoe.
17. An ironing press comprising a buck, a shoe, 70
70 and means controlled by pressure on said` handle
in the direction to move said shoe and said buck Va handle for moving said buck and said shoe into - '
out of register.
.
10. An ironing press comprising a buck, a shoe,
a handle for relatively moving said buck and said
' out of register for controlling said power-operat - and out of register, electrically-operated means
for controlling the pressing engagement of said
ed means 'to release the pressure between said
shoe and said- buck.
75
11. An ironing press comprising a buck, a shoe,l
buck and said shoe, a switch controlled by pres
sure of said handle in the direction to move said
2,135,266
tilting of the buck for preventing rearward move
ment of the carriage during pressing.
25. An ironing press comprising a table having
an opening therein, a cylinder carried by the
table in said opening, a piston in said cylinder, a
buck and shoe into and out of register for con
trolling said electrically-operated means to
respectively cause pressing engagement and re
lease of pressure between said buckand said shoe,
a puff iron carried by'said shoe movable to an
operative and an inoperative position, and means
dependent upon said pull iron being moved from
the inoperative position for controlling said
buck on said piston, a carriage, a shoe carried
by said carriage and movable to a position in
register with said buck, means including said
piston'forlmoving said buck into pressing engage
ment with said shoe, and means on said cylinder 10
engaging said carriage for transmitting the press
ing forces irom said cylinder to said carriage.
switch to prevent pressing engagement of said
10
buck and said shoe.
-
?
18. An ironing press comprising ?a support,- a
-buck having its surface inclined upwardly lfrom
the front, a shoe, means for moving said shoe to
26. An ironing press comprising a pair of
cooperating pressing members, means for monnt- "
a position in register with said buck, and means
ing one of` said members for movement trans
15 for moving said buck into pressing .engagement
of register therewith, a handle connected to said
movable pressing member so as to have lost
motion in the direction of movement of the press
ing member, poweroperated means for edecting 20
pressing engagement of said pressing members,
and means controlled by the. lost motion move
ment of said handle for controlling said power
operated means, said means being actuated to
20 a buck on said piston, a carriage pivoted on said
cylinder below said buck, a shoe carried by said
carriage and movable'to a position in register
with said bucle, and means including said'piston
for moving said bnclr into pressing engagement
?
15
versely to the other pressing member into and out
with said shoe.
19. An ironing press comprising a table having
an opening therein, a cylinder carried by the
table in said opening, a pistonv in said cylinder,
25 with said shoe.
7
' control the power operated means to cause press
20. .an ironing press comprising a buck having
its surface inclined upwardly from the front, a
ing engagement of said pressing members by the
pressure on the handle required to move the
cylinder having its axis inclined downward and
pressing members into\register and being actu
der below and to the rear oi the center line of the
buclr, a shoe carried by said carriage movable to
a seal and prevent the discharge oi� steam from
the conduit.
rearward of the center line of the buck, a piston ' ated to control the power operated means to re 30
lease the pressure between the pressing members
30 in said> cylinder, a .carriage pivoted on said cyl
by pressure in the direction to move said pressing
Y inder below and to the rear of the centerline of
members out-of register.
the buck, a shoe carried by the carriage and mov
27. In an ironing press, a hollow buck. having
able to a position in register with said buck, and
means including said piston for moving said buch an upper wall provided with openings for the 35
passage of steam, a pad on said upperwall, a
' into pressingv engagement with said shoe.
2l. An ironing press comprising a buck having conduit leading from said buck to drain the con
_its surface inclined upwardly from the front, a densate from the interior of the buclr, and a re
cylinder having its axis inclined downward and ceptacle lor receiving the condensate from said
rearward of the� center line of the buck, a piston conduit, said receptacle being provided with a
in said cylinder, said buck being tlltably mounted wallI closely adjacent the end or said conduit 40
on said piston, a carriage pivoted on said cylin .whereby the liquid in the receptacle will serve as
a position in register with said buck, means in
si籩n cluding said piston ier moving said buck, into
pressing engagement with said shoe, and means>
restraining rearward tilting of said back for pre- .
2d. in an ironing press, a hollow bucle havingr '
an upper wall provided with openings for the pas
d5
sage'oi? steam, a pad on said ?opper wall, a con- _
duit leading from said buck to drain the con
venting rearward movement or said carriage dnr- l, densate lirons. the interior of the buck, and a trap
arranged to be nlled with the condensate for pre-l
i venting escape oi steam from said conduit.'
50
29. .an ironing press comprising a bucle having
ried by said support, av carriage pivoted on said
support below said buck, said carriage having> an its surface inclined upwardly from the iront, sup
arm extending above said buck, a shoe carried porting means for said buck, a carriage supported
by said arm, a toggle including a pair of links by said supporting means below and to the rear
oi the center line or? the buck so as to have piv
355 connected to each other and respectively con-� otal movement with respect to said bucle, a shoe
nected to said support and said carriage ior lim
iting the pivotal movement of said carriageyand carried by said carriage and movable thereby to
a .position above and in register with said buck,
a spring connected to said support for prevent
and means for moving said buch: into pressing
ing straightening of said toggle and for cushion
1 engagement with said shoe.'
ing
`the
pivotal
movement
of
said
carriage.
60
3G. .an ironing press comprising a table having
23. An ironing press comprising a buck, a car
.a
top
provided with an opening, a structure sup
riage pivoted below and to the rear oi the center
line oi the buck, a shoe carried by said carriage ported from the table top and extending through
movable to a lposition in register with said buck, said opening, a carriage pivoted on said structure
below said table top, said carriage having an arm
65 and means moving said buck into pressing en
gagement with said shoe along an axis passing movable to a position above said table top, a buck
above said table top, a. shoe carried by said arm
through thel pivot point of the carriage.
24. An ironing press comprising a tiltably and movable to a position above said buck, and
mounted buck, a carriage pivoted below and to a pressure developing mechanism carried by said
structure and arranged to develop pressure be 70
.70 the rear oi the center lineo! the buck. a shoe tween said carriage and said buck whereby
carried by said carriage movable to a position
in register with said buck, means moving saidv pressing engagement between saidlbuck and said
buck into pressing engagement with said shoe shoe is ei飁cted.
31. An ironing press comprising a buck, a car
along an axis passing through the pivot point of
riage pivoted below and to the rear of the center
75 the carriage, and means restraining rearward
ing pressing.
.
,
22. En an ironing press, a support, a buck ear
8
2,185,268
line of the buck, a shoe carried by said carriage
and movable to a position above and in register
with said buck, and means for ei頴ct韓g pressing
handle for controlling said electrically operated
engagement between said buck and said shoe by
dle required to ei飁ct the movement of the press
relative movement of said buck and said shoe
along an axis inclined downward and rearward
of the center line of the buck.
32. An ironing press comprising a buck, means
for tiltably supporting said buck, a carriage piv
oted below and to the rear of the center line of
the buck, a shoe carried by said carriage and
movable to a position above and in register with
said buck, means for effecting pressing engage
ment of said buck and said shoe by relative
15 movement of said buck and said shoe along an
axis inclined downward and rearward of the cen
ter line of the buck, and means restraining rear
ward tilting of said buck for preventing rear
ward movement of said carriage during pressing.
20
33. In an ironing press comprising a pair of
co-operating pressing members, means for
mounting one of said members for movement
transversely to the other pressing members into
and out of register therewith, a handle connect
25 ed to said movable pressing member, power oper
ated means for the press, means actuated by
movement of said movable pressing member into
register with the other pressing member for con
trolling said power means to ei頴ct pressing en
30 gagement of the pressing members, and> means
responsive to pressure on said handle in the direc
tion to move the movable pressing member to the
out-of-register position for controlling said power
means to release the pressure between the press
ing members.
34. In an ironing press comprising a pair of
means, means for moving said switch to the ener
gized position in response to the force on the han
ing members to the in-register position, and
means for moving said switch to the deener
gized position in response to pressure on the han
dle in the direction to e馿ct movement of said
members out of register.
35. In an ironing press comprising a pair of 10
co-operating pressing members, a handle for
effecting relative movement of said members into
and out of register, power operated means for
ei頴cting pressing engagement of said members,
means actuated by movement of said members 15
into register for controlling said power operated
means to effect pressing engagement oi said
members, and means controlled by pressure on
said handle in the direction to move said mem
bers out of register for controlling said power 20
operated means to release the pressure between
said members.
36. An ironing press comprising a pair of co
operating members, means for moving said press
ing members into pressing engagement, a pui� 25
iron carried by said press movable to an oper
ative and an inoperative position, means depend
ent upon said pui� iron being moved from the
inoperative position for preventing pressing en
gagement of said pressing members.
30
3'7. An ironing press comprising a pressing
member, a shoe, power-operated means for mov
ing said pressing member and said shoe into
pressing engagement, a pun iron carried by said
shoe having a working surface movable to a 35
position projecting beyond said shoe, and means
dependent upon the working surface of- said puff
co-operating pressing members, a handle for
effecting relative movement of the pressing mem v iron being moved beyond said shoe for controlling
bers into and out of register with each other, elec
said power-operated means to prevent pressing
40 trically operated means adapted when energized
to eii'ect pressing engagement of said members
and when deenergized to release the pressure be
tween said members, a switch controlled by said
engagement of said pressing member and said 40
shoe.
GEORGE W. WARDWEIL, Jn.
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