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Патент USA US2135367

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Nov. 1, 1938.
A. B. TRENcAvl-:L
2,135,367
HOT WATER HEATING DEVICE
Filed Feb. 12, 1957
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INVENTOR.
alberi «9. Jrencavel
BY
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Í/-S ATTORNEY.
N0V- 1, 1938.
A„ B. TRENCAVEL ,
2,135,367
HOT WATER HEATING DEVICE
' Filed Feb. 12, 1957
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INVENTOR,
alberi-QB. faïence-‘rel
BY
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,m ATTORNEY.
Patented Nov. 1, 1938
2,135,367"`
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE2,1 35,367
HOT WATER HEATING DEVICE
AlbertY B. Trencavel, New York, N. Y., assignor, by
direct and mesne assignments, to American Hot
Water Systems, Inc., a corporation of Dela
Waffe
Application February 12, 1937, Serial No. 125,396
1 Claim. (Cl. 122-367)
This invention relates to a system of utilizing
the deflected waste heat from sources such as
stoves, coffee urns, broilers and ovens of various
types.
Broadly, it is an object of this invention to
5
provide a device for the heating of water and to
create a more rapid circulation of the heated
water so that .a greater amount of hot Water can
be stored in a tank during a given period.
More specifically, it is an object of this inven
10
tion to provide for a type of heating device which
will ñt within the average known stove, range,
oven, broiler, coife urn and the like, so that no
material variation need be made to such article
15 in order to make an installation of the heating
'
device.
Another object of this invention is to cause a
progressive and continuous movement of water in
tthe process of being heated by utilizing the de
20 flected and refracted heat in stoves, ovens, ranges
and the like.
Another object of this invention is to produce
sufficient hot water, virtually without cost, by
a portion of the gas range, along line 2-2 of
Figure 1.
Figure 3 is a top view of the circular housing
of the water coil.
Figure 4 is a top view of the water coil which
is incased within the circular housing.
Figures 5 and 6 are cross sections taken
through the circular housing, along lines 5_5,
6_6, respectively of Figure 3.
Figure 7 is a greatly enlarged cross section 10
taken through the circular housing, along line
'I-‘I of Figure 3.
Figure 8 is a detail of a portion of the circu
lar housing.
Referring to the drawings, Ill represents the `j
gas range frame, I I the gas burner in said frame,
I2 represents the refractory brick foundation
around the gas burner and underneath the cir
cular housing I3. The gas range top I4 is sup
ported by the gas range frame Il) above the 20
circular housing and the gas burners at sufij
cient distance to get the maximum benefit from
the name of the gas burner II.
The gas range frame I0, surrounds the air
chamber I5 in which combustible gases accumu 25
utilizing the waste heat of stoves, ovens, ranges
2 Ul and the like.
Another object of this invention is to increase
the heat absorbing surface of the device in order
to increase the temperature of the water in the
process of being heated and aiding such water to
30 travel faster along heat pressure lines in order
to more rapidly ñll a rstorage tank.
Another object of this invention is to provide
When the burner il is in operation, a column
of air enters the air chamber I 5 through air pas
sage I6 in the gas range frame I0 and thence
through the air passages Il of the gas burner
a device having an inlet and outlet along tan
gential lines so that the cold water ñowing in and
II, the heated combustible gases collecting in
the air chamber I5 .and passing thence into the
35 the hot water leaving the device for the storage
tank will not be retarded by any abrupt angles
in the water pipe and Will move in the direc
tion of the tangent created by the water pipe and
the coil thus reducing any resistance in the
40 flow.
This invention comprises a novel construction,
a combination of elements and an arrangement
of parts and the device possesses characteristics,
features, properties and relation of elements all
4
of which will be exemplified in the following
detailed description. For a fuller understanding
of the nature and objects of this invention, ref
erence is had to the following detailed descrip
50 tion in connection with the ,accompanying draw
ings, in which:
Figure 1 is a top view, partly in section, of a
Igas range containing the heating device used
'in connection with the invention.
Figure 2 is a vertical section taken through
55
late, said air chamber lying between the refrac
tory brick foundation I2 and the gas range top
I4.
30.
lateral flues I8, thence through the apertures 35
I9 in the said lateral flues I8 and thence pass
ing through the vertical ñues 20 in the regular
manner well known in the manufacture of
stoves, gas ranges and the like.
Within the combustion chamber I5 in which 40
the combustible gases accumulate, the circular
housing I3 rests upon but is not attached to the
_refractory brick foundation I2, said housing I3
being supported by the -water coil 23 which is
connected to piping 25 and 26 coming from and 45
leading to a water tank, said piping _25 and 26
being connected to the terminals of the water
coil 23 by streamlined couplings 2| an-d 22, as
shown in Fig. 1. The housing may be oval,
square or any other suitable shape.
The water 50
coil 23 is solidly incased and embedded within
the housing I3, which completely surrounds the
gas burner II and lies above the said burner
-II and within the combustion chamber I5 so
that when the gas burner II is in operation the 55
2,135,367
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The heat which is’deflected from the bottom Y
heat of the flame from the saidlgas burner will
of the gas range top I4 is gathered by the fm
Vlike ridges 24 which are directly in the pathboth
of the deflected and the refracted heat. The col
be deilected from the bottom of thegas range
top Hand'be deflected toward the circular hous
ing I3 and the refractory ‘brick Vfoundation I2
lected heat creeps along the ñn-like ridges'ZlIk
in a circrular'manner and toward the core of the
upon which, it rests so that the deflected heat
, will be absorbed by the concentric, circular and
housing and gathers in thermal or heat zones,
Vsuch heat zones being formed atthe depressions
between the iin-like ridges 24. The thermal
continuous ñnflike ridges V2_4 radiating from the
circular housing I3, not onlyv directly but also
YindirectlyY from the refraoted heaty of the _re
vcreep producedV by the concentrated'heat along Y10
The circular housing I3 may be cast from 'ai the thermal Zone at the depressions of the fin
10 fractory brick foundation I2. ,
highly heated absorbing metal such as aluminum,
Y
15V
'Ílike ridges 24 is now carried throughthe metal » Y
coppen, nickel, antimony or alloys comr'arising.V structure of the helicoidal housing I3 and thencerrr `
such metals or compositions of such metals.` 'Theï carried tothe inner surface of the -water coil -23,
producing a continuous thermal heat Zone which l5
Water coil 23, which is firmly andcompletely in
cased within the said circular housing I3 is
is a replicaV of that produced by the concentric
formed of a suitable'non-corrosivenmetal, sucfhi' fin-like ridgesrrof the housing I3. This ~continu
as, copper, or the like; the coils Yof said water
coillbeingrwoun‘d one above the other in a »Ver-r
V20
tical
Y Thehelicoidal
Vinlet of the
manner.
helicoidal water
y Y coil23, is be
low and the outlet is above, since the water is hot
" when it leaves the Water coil'23; hot water having
a tendency to rise thus furtheringV the accelera
25 tion of the water flow. The inlet and the outlet
_ of the Water coil are purposely placed in a tan-->
-gent tothe path> of the ihelicoidal water coil in
ous heat zone forms a thermal path around theV "
inner surface of the water coil 23..
The heat which is retracted from the refrac
tory brick foundation is of a lesser intensity-due
kto heat loss by absorption of the brick Yfounda
tion. The action of this refracted heat upon Vthe
lower part of the iin-like ridges 24, produces' the Y
vsame thermal creep but of lesser intensity. How 25
ever, the refracted heat bing oflesser intensity
than the deflected heat from the bottom of the>
l order to reduce the resistanceto a minimum of
top of the’gas range I4 it follows that the ther-'V
the inñowing cold Water and the' outflowing >hot
v30 water so as tov eliminate any movementV against
mal path'around the inner surface of therwater
coil Y23 will'have a greater temperatureat the
Y
upper part than at the lowerpart. This differá
any angular pipe joining.
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A preferred means Yof solidlyandlfirmly incas- > ence of temperaturebetween the 'upper and lower '
ing the helicoidal'water coil'23 would beto place
part of the thermal path,Y produces `a thermal
the said water coil Within'the casting mould so
thrust Vor stress in the vmetallic structureV along
that it will act as a core and the metal which
the
forms the circular housing I3 is cast around the
water coil 23jso that rthe hardenedY casting will
Íhave within the center thereof, the rwater coil 23
firmly and solidly embedded as'shown in Fig
40
ure
3.1
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The circular helicoidal housing I3 has radiat
ing therefrom continuous, concentric circular ñn
like ridges running parallel` and circular tor the
circular helicoidal housing I3. Such concentric,
45 continuous fin-like ridges `around helicoidal hous
heated
path.
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The iatent heat reiea‘seçiby the change interfi-V
perature' of the water creates‘a'statefof turbu-v u
len'ce in the waterY causing acceleration of flow
of the heatin'the water of the water coil and
thence transmitted to the water inthe storage 40
tank.
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claim:
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' In aV hot water heating’unit, a helical/coilof
pipe,`a cast metal housing vembedding said coil,
said coil havingan inlet and an outlet'leading `
ing I3 present an enlarged surface'for the col
lection of Íthe deflected and refracted waste heat
tangentially'to and from same, and ñn-like ridges
so that a maximum of heat will'be collected and
housing.V `
transmitted toward the core of the'housing >I 3 and
consequently to the embedded water coil 23.
projectin'g‘radially around the perimeter >of saidv Y ¿ A
ALBERT B.y TRENCAVEL. f ,5
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