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Патент USA US2135676

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Nov. 8, 1938.
C. ROBERTS‘
MANUFACTURE OF SHOES AND SHOE BOTTOL‘I.1.
Filed July 27, 1936
2,135,676
Patented Nov. 8,1938 .
2,135,676
UNITED STATES‘ PATENT OFFICE
2,135,676
MANUFACTURE or snoas AND snon no'r
TOM UNITS.
Clifford Roberts, Winchester, Hum, alsig'nor to
United Shoe Machinery Corporation, Paterson,
N. 1., a corporation of New Jersey
Application July :1, 1m,
‘No. 92,790
6 Claims. (01. 12-142)
This invention relates to improvements in
shoes and shoe bottom units and to improvements
in methods of making shoes.
I
.
1
In United States Letters Patent No. 2,065,463,
5 granted December 22, 1936, upon application of
John M. Whelton, there is disclosed a shoe bottom
, unit comprising an insole, a heel and shank rein
forcing piece which is secured to the lower or
lasting side of the insole and which entirely
10 covers the heel and shank portions thereof, and a
shank stiffener which is interposed between the
reinforcing piece and the insole. The reinforc
ing pieces for such insole units are commonly
made of ?berboard or similar sti? material of
15 laminated formation and in the manufacture of
a shoe embodying such an insole unit it is a com
mon practice to secure the margin of the upper in
overlasted position upon the ?ber reinforcing
piece by means of cement. While a su?iciently
20 ?rm attachment of the upper to the outermost
layer of the ?berboard is established in most
cases, it sometimes happens that one or more of
the ?berboard layers become separated from the
rest of the reinforcing piece as a result of the
25 strains to which the bottom of the shoe is sub
jected while it is being worn and in such cases the
.attachment of the insole unit to the upper be
portlon of the reinforcing piece are cut substan
tially perpendicular to the surfaces of the piece so
as to constitute ‘upstanding lasting shoulders for
deflecting upwardly the surplus lasting allowance
of the upper and thus to facilitate subsequent 5
trimming of the latter.
_ In making a shoe embodying my improved
reinforced insole unit the upper, after being as
sembled with an insole unit on a last, is lasted
over the exposed insole surface in the shank por- 10
tion of the unit and secured in overlasted posi
tion thereon preferably by means of cement with
the surplus portions of its lasting allowance up
standing beside the opposite edges of the rein
forcing piece, the upstanding portions of the 15
upper are trimmed substantially ?ush with the
exposed surface of the reinforcing piece and
with the outer surfaces of the rest of the over
lasted upper, and an outsoie is laid and its shank
portion secured by means of cement to the over- 20
lasted portions of the upper including the
trimmed edges of the latter. Thus, not only is
the upper secured to the insole unit in such a way
that its attachment is not liable to be subse
quently weakened, but a substantially continuous 25
surface is provided in the shank portion of the
shoe bottom for the reception of an outsole and
comes unduly weakened.
' .
a secure bond of adhesion is established between
For the purpose of avoiding such an undesir
the outsole and the shoe bottom.
.
30 able condition the reinforced insole unit herein
Invention is also to be recognized as residing 30
illustrated is of improved construction having a _in certain improved features of shoe construction
reinforcing piece of ?berboard or similar mate
resulting from the practice of the above-described
, ‘rial at the lower or lasting side of its shank por
method.
_ tion which is substantially narrower than the
The invention will now be explained with ref
' 35 shank portion of the insole and is arranged to . erence to the accompanying drawing, in which- 35
expose marginal surfaces of substantial width at
Fig. 1 is a perspective view of my improved
opposite sides of the reinforcing piece for the insole unit;
reception of lasting cement thereby enabling the
Fig. 2 isv a sectional view thereof taken along
shoe ‘upper to be cement-lasted directly to the
40 shank portion of the‘ insole itself. Thus, by em
'
the line II-II of Fig. l;
r
'
Fig. 3 is a cross-sectional view of the shank 40
ploying an insole vof leather or other material
which is not of laminated formation (or which, if
laminated, has its component layers so ?rmly s'e
portion of the insole unit; ,
cured together that there is little if any tendency
having embodied therein my improved insole
unit;
45
Fig. 5 is a view similar to Fig. 4 but illustrating
a further stage in the manufacture of a shoe; and
Fig. 61s a fragmentary cross-sectional view of
45 for them to become separated) any inherent
weakness‘ in the attachment of the upper to the
insole unit is positively insured against. Prefer
ably, and as herein shown, the reinforcing piece,
while narrower than the shank portion of the in
50 sole, is nevertheless su?iciently wide to provide
for a sufficient width of bonding area between the
reinforcing piece and the insole to insure that the
desired transverse curvature of the shank por-.-~
tion of the unit shall be maintained. Moreover,
55 as illustrated,_the opposite edges of the narrow
Fig. '4 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view of
a shoe in the course of construction, the shoe
the completed'shoe.
-
Referring to the drawing, my improved insole 5d 7
unit comprises a full-length insole ll preferably
of leather or other non-laminated material to
‘which lasting cement will readily adhere, a heel
and shank reinforcing piece I! which may be
composed of ?berboard or similar stiff material 55
2, 135,676
2
the shank portion of} the shoe bottom the surplus
and which is secured by means of cement to the
insole, and a metallic shank sti?ener strip ll
which is interposed between the reinforcing piece
and the insole. As shown, the shank stiffener H
has the usual longitudinal curvature and the
shank portions of the reinforcing piece I! and
lasting allowance of. the upper will be de?ected
upwardly while being wiped inwardly against the
lasting shoulders 22 and thus caused to assume
an upstanding position as indicated at 32 in
Fig. 4. To assist in establishing this condition
the tacks 30, as shown, are driven close to the
lasting shoulders 22. After the lasting cement
has set su?lciently to hold the upper securely in
place the lasting tacks are withdrawn, and the
the insole iii are curved longitudinally to corre
spond to the longitudinal curvature of the shank
stiffener M of the last with which the unit is to be
10 used and, in addition, the shank portions of the
surplus lasting allowance is trimmed.
reinforcing piece and the insole are curved trans
In the‘
shank portion of the shoe the trimming of the
upper is greatly facilitated by the fact that the _
surplus portions of the upper material are up- "
standing, as already described. Moreover, the 15'
versely to correspond to the transverse curvature
of the bottom of the last. The shank stiffener H
has a burr or spur It struck up from its rear por
15 tion and embedded within the material of the re
upper is trimmed in the shank portion of the
shoe so that its trimmed edges N are located
closely adjacent to the edges of the reinforcing
inforcing piece I! to assist in holding the shank
stiffener in place and the forward portion of‘ the
shank sti?ener is received within an opening in
piece i2 and substantially flush with the outer
surface of. the latter and with the outer surface
of the adjacent overlasted portions of the upper.
Thus, the presence of the lasting shoulders 22
the form of an open notch il in the forward por
20 tion of the reinforcing piece so that it is posi
tively maintained against lateral edgewise dis
placement.
As shown, the heel portion of the reinforcing
piece l2 has substantially the same lateral edge:
25 contour as the heel portion of the insole but the
shank portion of the reinforcing piece is sub-‘
stantially narrower than the shank portion of
the‘lnsole'so that marginal surfaces 20 of sub
stantial width are exposed at the lower or last
80 ing side of theinsole for the reception of lasting
cement in the process of cement lasting a shoe
upper to the insole unit. The reduced or nar
rowed shank portion of the reinforcing piece l2,
however, is substantially wider than the shank
35 stiffener i4 and is so arranged that after cement
attachment of the reinforcing piece to the insole
the attached portions will be of sufficient width
at opposite sides of. the shank stiffener effectively
to‘ maintain the desired transverse curvature of
40 the shank portion of the insole unit. Moreover,
as shown, the opposite edges of the relatively
narrow shank portion of the reinforcing piece are
substantially perpendicular to its upper and
lower surfaces so as to constitute substantially
insures that, as a result of the lasting‘ and trim
ming operations, a smooth bottom surface is pro
vided to receive the outsole and one which is
practically continuous from one lateral ‘edge of
the insole to the otherin the shank portion of
the shoe bottom.
After the upper has been trimmed it is only
necessary to roughen the outer surface of the 80
overlasted margins of the upper and coat them
with cement in the‘ usual way to prepare for the
cement attachment of an outsole, such as the
outsole 36, the margins at the attaching side of
which have ‘also been roughed and coated with
cement. In accordance with the usual practice
the cement coatings are applied to a quantity of
outsoles and shoe bottoms before any of the out~
soles are attached and a suitable. solvent is em
ployed to soften the cement just prior to the 40
attachment of a particular outsole to a particular
shoe. After the outsoles have been laid in place
upon the shoe bottoms the attaching pressure
is supplied by the use 01'. a suitable sole-attach
45
“
Inasmuch as the reinforcing piece l2 has been
allowance of the upper and thereby facilitating made narrow enough in its shank portion to ex
the trimming of the latter. The reinforcing piece pose su?iciently wide areas of the insole surface
is beveled to a thin edge at its forward extremity ' at opposite sides of the reinforcing piece in. the
which is located approximately at the break line shank portion of the shoe bottom, the upper will
of the insole. Forwardly and upwardly sloping be secured by cement directly to the leather in
sole itself in that portion as well as in the fore
beveled surfaces 23 are formed upon the heel por
tion of the reinforcing piece at opposite sidesof part of the shoe and there will be no danger that
the relatively narrow shank portion thereof to the attachment in the shank portion will subse
quently become weakened as might happen if the
55 prevent the formation of. any objectionable ridges upper were cement attached to a reinforcing piece
in the over-lasted upper between those portions
which are secured directly to the insole in the of the customary laminated formation. Further
more, the shank portion of the outsole will con
shank portion of the shoe and those which over
lie the reinforcing piece at theheel of the shoe. form accurately to the transverse curvature of
The edges of the insole are shown as being beveled the last bottom, due to the facts that the outer 60
somewhat along its shank portion-and around surface of the overlasted upper in that portion of
the shoe is substantially flush with the outer sur
its heel end and the lateral edge of the heel por
tion of the reinforcing piece is beveled to blend face of the shank reinforcing piece and there are
45 perpendicular lasting shoulders 22 for de?ecting
ing press in a well-known manner.
into upstanding positions the surplus lasting
with the bevel on the insole.
65
-
In making a shoe embodying the above-de
scribed insole unlt, as shown in Fig. 4, the insole
unit is assembled with a shoe upper 24 upon a
last 26, the insole unit being tacked to the last
bottom and the upper being worked over the
70 last and having its margin secured in overlasted
position upon the insole unit by means of cement.
- In Fig. 4 the lasting cement is indicated at 28.
no spaces or cavities present between those sur
faces.
Having described my invention, what I claim as
new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the
United States is:
> 1. A reinforced shoe bottom unit comprising an
insole having integral forepart, shank and heel
portions, said shank portion being transverse
ly curved to correspond to the transverse
To hold the overlasted upper margins in place
curvature of the bottom of a last, a heel
while the cement is setting tacks may be em
and shank reinforcing piece located at the
75 ployed such as the lasting tacks II. Fig. 4. In
lower or lasting side of the insole, and a narrow 75
2,185,676
3
shank stiffener strip interposed between said curvature of the shank portion of the insole, the
parts, said reinforcing piece having its heel por
tion of substantially the same lateral edge con
tour as the heel portion (of the insole and having
its shank portion substantially narrower than
the shank portion of the insole and said shank
portion having perpendicular edge faces extend
ing throughout its entire length to constitute
lasting shoulders, said reinforcing piece being
10 secured by means of adhesive to the insole at both
sides of the shank stiffener throughout areas of
substantial width su?icient to maintain the trans
verse curvature of the insole, and said insole hav
ing marginal portions of its lower surface left
bare throughout areas of substantial width at
opposite sides of the reinforcing piece for the re
ception of lasting cement.
2. A reinforced insole unit comprising an insole,
a reinforcing piece secured to the shank portion
20 of the insole and having an opening in its forward
, portion, and a narrow shank stiffener strip inter
posed between said parts and having a forward
portion retained against lateral edgewise displace
ment by engagement within said opening, said re
25
inforcing piece being shaped to expose marginal
insole surfaces of substantial width extending
substantially throughout the length of the shank
portion of the insole for the reception of lasting
fastenings and having opposite edge faces perpen
30 dicular to its upper and lower surfaces providing
lasting shoulders perpendicular to said exposed
insole surfaces ‘and extending substantially
throughout the full length of the shank portion
of the insole.
35
3. A shoe comprising, in combination, a rela
tively ?exible insole, a relatively hard and stiff
heel and shank reinforcing piece secured to the
lasting side of the insole, and a shank stiffener
interposed between said parts, said reinforcing
40 piece covering the heel seat of the insole and ex
tending forwardly to the ball portion thereof but
having its shank portion substantially narrower
than the shank portion of the insole and of uni
form thickness throughout its width, an upper
45 having marginal portions secured in overlasted
positions upon the insole at opposite sides of the
.narrow shank portion of the reinforcing piece
with their outer surfaces substantially ?ush with
the outer surface of said reinforcing piece, and
50 an outsole cement-attached to said surfaces of
the overlasted upper.
4. A shoe comprising, in combination, an insole
composed of relatively soft material to which
55
lasting cement will readily adhere‘ and having
a transversely curved shank portion, a relative
ly hard and stiff heel and shank reinforcing piece
secured to the lasting side of the insole and con
forming in its shank portion to the transverse
reinforcing piece covering the heel seat of the in
sole and extending forwardly to the ball portion
but being substantially narrower than the insole
along the shank portion of the latter and having
Cr
perpendicular edge faces along said narrower por
tion and an opening in its forward end portion, a
narrow shank stiffener interposed between the in
sole and said reinforcing piece and having a por
tion received in said opening, an upper cement 10
lasted to the margins of the insole at opposite
sides of the narrow shank portion of said rein
forcing piece and having its inner extremities
abutting the perpendicular edge faces of said re
inforcing piece, and an outsole cement-attached
to the overlasted margins of the upper.
‘ 5. A shoe comprising, in combination, an insole
composed of relatively soft material to which
lasting cement will readily adhere, a relatively
hard and stiff heel and shank reinforcing piece
secured to the lasting side of the insole, the re?l
forcing piece covering the heel seat of the insole
and extending forwardly to the ball portion there
of but being substantially narrower than the in
sole along the shank portion of the latter, a 25
narrow shank stiffener interposed between the
insole and the reinforcing piece, an upperhav~
ing marginal portions secured in overlasted posi
tions upon the insole at opposite sides of the
narrow shank portion of the reinforcing piece, 30
the outer surface of said overlasted upper portions
being substantially ?ush with the outer surface
of said reinforcing piece, and said overlasted up
per portions having trimmed edges lying closely
adjacent to the edges of said reinforcing piece and 35
substantially flush with the outer surface of the
latter, and an outsole cement-attached to said
outer surface and to said trimmed edges.
6. That improvement in methods of making
shoes which consists in assembling with an upper
on a last an insole unit comprising an insole hav
ing exposed marginal lasting surfaces of sub
stantial width in its shank portion and a shank
reinforcing piece the opposite lateral edges of
which constitute substantial perpendicular last 46
ing shoulders extending along the inner bound
aries of said insole lasting surfaces, lasting the
upper over said insole lasting surfaces and against
said shoulders and securing it in overlasted po
sition upon the insole with surplus portions of its
lasting allowance upstanding beside said shoul
ders, trimming said surplus lasting allowance
substantially flush with the exposed surface of
said reinforcing piece, and laying an outsole and
securing it by means of cement to said overlasted
portions of the upper including said trimmed
edges thereof.
CLIFFORD ROBERTS.
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