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Патент USA US2135956

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Nov. 8, 1938.
J. H. wooDALL
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2,135,956 f‘
PAcxING’cUsHIoN, ETC
Filedl June 29, 1937
411
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2,135,956
Patented Nov. 8, 1938
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
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2,135,956
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PACKING CUSHION, Ero. ’ '
John H. Wuoaau, Woodland, Ga.>
Application June 29, 1937, Serial No. 150,911
4 claims. » (o1. 217-124)
This invention relates to» closures for baskets
used for packing produce such as peaches, apples,
or other fruit or vegetables. Ordinarily the bas
kets are referred to as “fruit baskets,” since their
major use is in the paokínggof fruit. In some re
spects the present invention is an improvement
on my prior invention disclosed in application
Serial No. 43,464, ñled October 4, 1935.
In packing fruit in baskets it is customary to
10 ñll the basket heaping full and then force the
cover down to compress the mass of fruit, thereby
preventing the fruit from shifting about during
shipment. As explained in my application Serial
No, 43,464, a cushion is inserted between the
1 Ul closure and the fruit. The insertion of a suitable
cushion in this manner has proved effective in
preventing bruising of fruit. However, the cush
ions used heretofore have hampered the chilling
of the fruit for transport in refrigeration cars
2
and the like, though considerable improvement in
this respect was effected by my prior invention
referred to above.
After the fruit has been packed the baskets
are stacked in a refrigerator car and “pre-cooled”
by supplying cold air to the interior of the car
from an outside source. After the fruit has been
suinciently chilled the cars are iced and closed for
transportation. The cooling off of the entire con
tents of the fruit baskets is necessarily a some
30 what slow process; and the train must be held
at the station until it is completed. Thus it is
desirable to expedite the “pre-cooling” as much
as is feasible.
.
The chief object of the present invention is to
3
provide a cushion which will interfere as little
as possible with the chilling of the fruit, while
providing adequate protection for the fruit.
Another and important object of the invention
is to provide such a cushion which can be rapidly
40 and economically manufactured on a quantity
production basis.
Various specific objects will be apparent to
those skilled in the art from the disclosure herein.
45
In attaining these desirable objects the cushion
is made with a relatively large central aperture,
which permits the warm air in the center of the
basket to flow upwardly and be replaced by cold
air flowing down the sides. Preferably apertures
50 are also provided in the periphery of the cushion
for the downward entry of cold air adjacent to the
inner wall of the basket.
One suitable form of construction is illustrated
by way of example, in the accompanying draw
ing, wherein:
Fig. lis a side elevation, partly in section, of
a packed basket with a cushion of the present
invention incorporated therein;
Fig. 2 is a top view of the cushion per se.
Fig. 3 is a bottom view of the cushion per se.
Cà
Fig. 4 is a vertical section through the cushion
and basket cover inthe ñrst stage of the closure
operation.
i
'
Fig. 5 is a fragmentary vertical section, on an
enlarged scale, of the cushion and basket cover in
final position.
The basket I shown in the drawing is of con
ventional form, having a reinforced rim 2. The
cover 3 is formed of wooden slats, and has a de
pending rim 4 which aids in positioning the 15
cushion 5 and serves to restrict the extent to
which the cover can be forced down onto the fruit.
The cushion 5 comprises a disc 6 of light card
board, heavy paper, or like material. To the top
of disc 6 there is secured a disc 'I of light weight
paper which has its margin la folded under and
glued to the top of the disc 6 to form an en
velope, within which is arranged a mass of cush
ioning material 8. At the center the sheets 6
and 'I' are also glued together, so that the en 25
velope is of annular form; and the glued central
parts of the sheets are perforated to form one
large aperture I0. In some instances I surround
the aperture I0 with a number of smaller aper
tures I I, which are also located in the glued cen 30
tral parts of sheets 6 and l. In other instances
I omit the apertures II. The cushioning mate
rial should have considerable resiliency and one
of the mostk suitable materials for the purpose
is excelsior.
As shown, the disc '6 has a margin projecting
beyond the edge of the basket; and this margin
acts to prevent rim cuts, as explained in my
prior application referred to previously. If de
sired, the periphery of sheet 6 may be serrated, 40
as indicated in the drawing, for decorative ef
fect. This margin is provided with apertures
I2, through which cold air can descend adjacent
to the interior wall of the basket.
The cover 3 being formed of slats, has ample
spaces for the flow of air to the peripheral aper
tures I2 and from the central apertures I0 and
Il, thus permitting thermal flow of air through
the fruit, as indicated by the arrows in Fig. l,
when the warm basket is subjected to a cold 50
atmosphere.
Also there is usually Ventilating
space in the side wall of the basket, and often
through the center of the bottom of the basket.
Preferably, the cushioning‘envelope is made of
a diameter sufficient toy extend well beyond the 55
2
2,135,956
crowns of the outermost fruit as shown in Figs.
4 and 5.
It is obvious that various modifications may
be made in the construction shown in the draw
ing and .above particularly described, within
the principle and scope of my invention as de
fined in the appended claims. However, the
best form in which I have contemplated apply
ing my invention has been disclosed.
I claim:
also along an annular zone inside of said series 10
1. A basket cushion comprising: a disc of
of apertures; and a mass of cushioning mate
heavy paper material; a disc of light paper ma
terial superimposed upon the heavy disc, the
peripherial and center portions of the light disc
15 being secured to the heavy disc, and there being
a relatively large aperture through the center
portions of the two discs; and an annular mass
of cushioning material positioned between the
two discs.
20
3. A basket cushion comprising: a disc of
heavy paper material having a relatively large
central aperture and also having a series of aper
tures adjacent to its periphery; a disc o'f light
paper superimposed upon the heavy disc, the
light disc having a large central aperture reg
istering with the central aperture of the heavy
disc, and the two discs being adhesively se
cured together at their central portions, and
. „
2. A basket cushion comprising: an annular
envelope; and an annular mass of cushioning
material within the envelope, the envelope being
formed by two discs adhesively secured together
tt their peripherial and central portions, one of
25 the discs having a perforated rim projecting out
wardly from the envelope, and there being a
Ventilating opening through the adhesively se
cured central portions of the discs.
Y
rial trapped between the two discs.
4. A basket cushion comprising: a disc of
heavy paper material having a relatively large
central aperture and also having a series of
apertures adjacent to its periphery; a disc of
light paper superimposed upon the heavy disc,
the light disc having a large central aperture
registering with Vthe central aperture of the
heavy disc, and the two discs being adhesively 20
secured together at their central portions, the
periphery of the lightdisc being folded inwardly Y
and adhesively secured to the heavy disc along
an annular zone inside of said series of aper
tures; and a mass of cushioning material trapped
between the two discs.
JOHN H. WOODALL.
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