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Патент USA US2136884

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Nov. 15, 1938.
2,136,884
B. MARCELLUS
WARPER CLOCK
4 Sheets-Sheet 1
Filed Nov. 2, 1935
J4
3
@
.275
0
INVENTOR
Brae/(5' Marcel/us
BY
$34401”?
"ATTOREEYS 44-66114
Nov. 15, 1938.
B. MARCELLUS
2,136,884
WARPER CLOCK
Filed Nov. v 2, 1955
4 Sheets-Sheet 2
M
Nov. 15, 1938.
B, MARCELLUS
2,136,884
WARPER CLOCK
Filed Nov. 2, 1935
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4 Sheets-Sheet 3
‘ Brooks
Marcel/us
$444M?" ' Whig“!
‘
ATTORN Y5
Nov. 15, 1938.
B. MARCELLUS
2,136,384
WARPER CLOCK
Filed NOV. 2, 1935
4 Sheets-Sheet 4
65
INVENTOR
Brae/(s Marce/lus
WWQM W YMM
ATTORNEYS
2,136,884
Patented Nov. 15, 1938
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,186,884
WABPER CLOCK
Brooks Marcellus, Rockford, Ill., assignor to Bar
her-Colman Company, Rockford, 11]., a corpo
ration of Illinois
Application November 2, 1935, Serial No. 47,919
“Claims. (Cl. 235—132)
For an understanding of the environment in
which warper clocks are used and the practical
conditions which theymust IuI?Lreference is made
to the Peterson Patent No. 1,747,734 and particu
5 larly to page 1, lines 1-22, and page 3, lines 44-77.
The primary function of a warper Models to
eifect stoppage of the warper when a predeter
mined length of yarn has been wound upon the
warp beam or “log.” The latter is rotated
10 through frictional contact of the yarn mass on
the beam or log with the periphery of the driving
drum of the warper. The clock is driven, not di
rectly by the yarn which it purports to measure,
but through a positive gear connection with the
15 drum. The “measuring” of the yarn therefore
actually consists in registering the number of
revolutions of the drum in terms of yardage of
yarn.
In the manufacture of warpers, slight variations
in the diameter of the drums is inevitable. Even
a slight diiference between the diameters of the
drums of two warpers would make an appreciable
difference in the length of yarn on the beams
wound on the respective warpers, since the beams
usually contain many thousands of yards of yarn.
In the construction disclosed in the above-men
Figure 1 is a fragmental perspective view oi.’ a
beam warper equipped with a clock embodying
the features of my invention.
Fig. 2 is a front elevation of the clock, with
broken away, the clock pointer having made ap
proximately a third of a revolution from the
starting position.
Fig. 3 is a detail perspective view of a certain
three-armed element comprised in the clock.
Fig. 4 is a vertical sectional view on dotted line 10
4-4 of Fig. 2.
Fig. 5 is a vertical sectional view in the plane
of dotted line 5-5 of Fig 2.
Fig. 6 is a fragmental front elevation, the
switch having closed.
15
Fig. 7 is a fragmental top plan view.
Fig. 8 is a fragmental rear view.
Fig. 9 is a fragmental front view of a warper
clock embodying the present invention and modi
?ed for use on a ball warper.
'20
Fig. 10 is a section on line 10—10 of Fig. 9.
Fig. 11 is a view similar to Fig. 10, but showing
the parts in another position.
Fig. 12 illustrates the electric circuits.
Describing ?rst the beam warper clock shown 25
in Figs. 1 to 8:
In Fig. l the friction driving drum is indicated
tioned Peterson patent, the clock unit comprised
a change gear train by means of which the speed at A and the clock at B. The clock is driven from
the drum through a change gear train housed in
of the clock could be adjusted to register the revo
30 lutions of the warper drum in terms 01’ yards of a gear casing C, power being transmitted from the 30
yarn on the beam. If the clock were moved from gear train to the clock through a vertical shaft D.
one warper to another, the gear train had to be‘ The change gear train in the casing C may be
adjusted to compensate for the difference in drum adjusted in such manner that the angular ve
locity of the take-off or driven shaft D bears a.
diameters. To obviate the necessity for such re
35 adjustment I omit the change gear train from the predetermined ?xed relation to the peripheral
clock unit and place the change gear train on the speed of the drum A. This predetermined rela
warper so that any clock may be placed on any tion is made standard for all machines using the
clocks of the type herein disclosed so that these
warper without loss of accuracy in the measure
clocks may be transferred from one machine to
ment of yarn.
A further improvement in the present clock another without affecting their accuracy of regis
40
over the one shown in said Peterson patent resides tration despite variations in drum diameter. As
in the fact that it is totally enclosed and need a consequence, the warper clocks are interchange
not be opened when resetting is required, thus able between diiferent machines and without th
'
preventing the entrance of lint. Moreover, the necessity of individual adjustment.
present clock is more compact and more easily
The arrangement described above by means of
handled and can be placed in such position on which it is possible to use a warper clock of the
the warper that it can be more easily read by the type herein contemplated interchangeably on dif
operator during the ?lling of a beam.
ferent machines and without the necessity of in
The clock effects stoppage of the warper by dividual adjustment constitutes no part of the
closing an electric circuit. It is desirable that the present invention but is described and claimed 50
switch shall be closed by a rapid movement; and in my copending divisional application Serial No.
such rapid movement I obtain from a slowly 200,617 ?led April 7, 1938.
moving part through the use of permanent mag
The mechanism of the clock is enclosed within
nets as hereinafter described.
55
In the accompanying drawings,
a case I having a front cover plate 2. The case
I may be mounted upon the warper in any pre
55
2
2,186,884
ferred way, as by means of a dowel 3 and a
screw 4.
A vertical drive shaft I (Fig. 5) is rotatably
mounted in the case I and is adapted at its
As before indicated, the gear wheel II and
the dial 23 carry with them in their rotation
an arm 29 for closing an electric circuit to stop
the warper upon the completion of the beam,
lower end for detachable connection with the ‘ said arm being adjustably connected to the gear
shaft D. Herein the upper end of the shaft D
is shown as transversely slotted or notched at
D’ to receive a transverse pin 5' in the lower
end of the shaft 5. To the upper end of the
10 shaft 5 is fixed a spur gear 8 arranged to mesh
with a similar gear 1 on a shaft 8. The latter
shaft is rotatably mounted in a bracket 9 (Figs.
5 and '7) which is pivoted upon the shaft 5. To
the lower end of the shaft 8 is ?xed a worm I0
15 arranged to mesh with a spiral gear wheel I I
rigidly fixed to a shaft I2 that is journaled in
the case I.
Said gear wheel serves to rotate an
adjustable device for closing an electric circuit
when the gear wheel has been rotated in a
20 counterclockwise direction through a predeter
mined portion of one revolution. In order that
the gear wheel iI may be manually rotated to
zero position when starting a new beam, the
shaft 8 is supported in the pivoted bracket 9 so
25 that the worm I0 may be disengaged from the
teeth of the gear wheel. A spring I3 (Fig. 7)
anchored to the rear wall of the case I and
connected to the bracket 9 at I4 normally holds
the worm I 0 in mesh with the gear wheel II.
30 A stop screw I5 on the bracket limits the action
of the spring.
A graduated dial I6 non-rotatably connected
cally opposite pointer 30 lying in front of
the dial 23. The arm 29 and the pointer 30 are
rigid with a pointer 3I arranged to move past
the graduations on a stationary annular dial
32 forming part of the cover plate 2. The zero
mark on the stationary dial 32 registers with 15
the circuit-closing position of the arm 29, as
shown in Figure 6. .As shown in Fig. 2, the au
nular dial 32 surrounds the dial 23, said dials
and the pointers 30 and 3I being visible through
a glass 33 that is held in position by a gasket
34 and a bezel ring 35 (Fig. 5).
Referring now to Fig. 4, the circuit-closing
arm 29 and the. pointers 30 and 3I are rigidly
attached to a spindle 36 which is mounted in an
axial bore in the shaft I2. Said parts 29, 30 and
3| are adjustably connected to the dial 23 by
means of a pin 31 on the arm 29, said pin being
adapted to lie in any one of a peripheral series
of notches 38 (Fig. 2) in the dial 23. The spac
ing of the notches 38 corresponds to units of 500 "
yards. The spindle 36 is axially slidable, as in
dicated in dotted lines in Fig. 4, to disengage
the pin 31 from the notch 38 with which it has
been in engagement. For this purpose a knob
to coact with the zero line on the dial I6.
spring 40 interposed between the end of the
shaft I2 and an internal shoulder in the knob
39 normally holds the pin 31 in engagement with
the selected notch 38. To prevent accidental
disengagement of the pin and the notch, a latch 40
In
order that the relation between the dial I6 and
‘I, for turning the dial, and for pushing the
bracket 9 against the tension of the spring I3.
To disengage the worm I 0 from the spiral gear
wheel
II, the operator pushes horizontally
against the knob 2| to swing the bracket 9 coun
tel-clockwise on the axis of the shaft 5, as viewed
in Fig. '7. As shown in full lines in Fig. 5 and
in
dotted lines in Fig. '7, the opening 22 in the
60
top wall of the casing I through which the hub
I8 extends is enlarged to permit the bracket 9
to be swung on the shaft 5.
65
depending upon the yardage to be wound on
the beam. The arm 29 is rigid with a diametri
with the shaft 8 makes one revolution for each
500 yards wound on the warp beam. IT is a zero
line or marker on the top wall of the casing I
the gear wheel II may be adjusted, the shaft
3 is carried by the pivoted bracket 9 as described.
40 In order that the dial I6 may be manually ad
justed to its zero position or to some position
representing a fraction of 500 yards, the gear ‘I
is made disengageable from the gear 6, as shown
in Fig. 5, where it will be seen that the gear ‘I
has a hub I8 which is rigidly secured to the hub
of the dial I6, and that the latter is slidably but
non-rotatably connected to the shaft 8 by means
of a spline I9. A spring 20 interposed between
a nut on the shaft 8 and an internal shoulder
in the dial I6 normally holds the gear ‘I in mesh
with the gear 6. A knurled knob 2I on the dial
affords means for lifting the dial and the gear
55
wheel I I and the dial 23 so that it shall move a
greater or less distance before closing the circuit,
Rigidly secured to the gear wheel II is a dial
23 which is graduated to represent, in this in
stance, a maximum registration of 42,000 yards.
The starting position of the dial 23 is determined
by contact of a pin 24 (Fig. 2) on the gear wheel
II with the upper end of a stop member 25.
For a reason to appear hereinafter, the stop
member 25 in yieldably mounted, being pivoted
on a frame plate 26 on the axis 26BL and yielding
,ly held in normal position by a spring 21. A
'lug 28 on the stop member normally bears against
75 the edge of the plate 26.
39 is ?xed on the rear end of the spindle.
A ,
4I pivoted on the back wall of the case I is ar
ranged to lie between the knob 39 and a collar
42 on the shaft I2.
As shown in Fig. 2, the graduations on the
dials 23 and 32 increase in value in the clockwise
direction. The pointer 30 is set on the dial 23
according to the number of yards of yarn to be
wound on the beam. In the winding of yarn on
the beam, the dial 23 rotates in the counter
clockwise direction, thus carrying the pointer
3I past the graduations on the annular dial 32 '
in the same direction, i. e. toward the zero point
on the dial 32. Thus it will be seen that the
pointer 3| indicates at any given time during the
winding of yarn on the beam the yardage that
must be wound on the beam to bring the yarn
mass on the beam to the size determined by the
setting of the pointer 30.
The before-mentioned electric switch which is
closed by the arm 29 is constructed, in the pres— 60
ent instance, as follows: An element 43 (Fig. 3)
pivotally supported on the plate 26 on the axis
26*‘ comprises an arm 44 carrying a lug 45 that
is arranged to be engaged by a lug 46 on the arm
29 for the purpose of moving the element 43 in a (i5
counterclockwise direction to close a circuit to
ground and thus stop the warper. The element
43 also comprises an arm 41 carrying a. contact
48 adapted to engage a contact 49. The latter
contact is mounted on a spring member 50 which
is supported by, but insulated from, the case I.
Electric current is supplied to the attaching por
tion of the spring member 50 by means of a
plunger 5|, a spring 52 and a plate 53. The
plunger 5| is adapted to engage an electric con
2,186,884
00-02. If the new beam is to contain the same
amount of yarn as the last one, the dial 2.4, arm
tact (not shown) on the warper framework when
the clock is attached to the warper by means of
the dowel 3 and the screw 4.
The arm 41, which is of magnetic material, ex
tends between two permanent magnets 54 and II.
The lower magnet 54 acts in conjunction with
20 and pointer II are reset to starting position
by ?rst pressing laterally against the knob 2| to
gravity to hold the switch open until the lug 40,
the knob 30 (Fig. 4) until the pin 24 stops against
disengage the worm ill from the spiral gear ll,
then turning the spiral gear clockwise by means of
acting on the lug 45, has raised the arm 41 to a
the upper end of the stop 25, and then releasing
point slightly beyond midposition between the
the knob 2i. If the position of the dial l0 has
been disturbed in these operations, it should be 10
10 magnets, whereupon the upper magnet 55 causes
the arm 41 to move quickly upward and close the
switch. Sudden closing of the switch by the slow
ly moving lug 40 is thus effected at the desired
moment. The magnet 55 also serves to hold the
15 switch closed until the clock is reset for the wind
ing of the next beam of yarn.
Closed condition of the switch v‘48-40 is vis
ually indicated to the operator by an arm 56
forming part of the element 43, a portion of said
20 arm being visible through a recess 51 in the edge
of the annular dial 32 (see Fig. 6) when the switch
is closed. The operator is thus informed that the
stoppage of the warper was due to completion of
the beam.
25
3
In order that it shall not be possible to disen
gage the worm i0 from the spiral gear H while
the warper is running without causing stoppage
of the warper, there is attached to the pivoted
bracket 9 a spring ?nger 58 (Figs. 2 and 5) car
returned to zero position before the worm I0 is
placed in mesh with the gear ll.
If the new beam is to contain a different num
ber of yards from that of the last preceding beam,
the latch 4| is raised, the knob 30 pushed inward
ly to disengage the pin 31 from the notch 33
with which it is in engagement, and the knob 39
turned to place the pointer 30 at the desired
graduation on the dial 23, the knob being then
released to place the pin 31 in the corresponding 20
notch, and the latch 4| returned to its effective
position. The length of the are through which
the lug 46 must move before it can engage the lug
45 is thus altered to correspond with the yard
age to be wound on the beam.
25
If the clock is to be set for the winding of a
yardage which is not a multiple of 500 yards, say,
tact 59 on the base portion of the spring member
50 (and thus close a circuit to ground) before
the worm i0 is entirely out of mesh with the
21,200 yards, the pointer 30 is set at 21,500 on the
dial 23 by engaging the pin 31 with the notch 30
that corresponds to such a setting (the pointer 30 30
being then half-way between the graduations for
21,000 and 22,000), the worm I0 is demeshed from
the spiral gear, the dial 23 and the spiral gear II
spiral gear.
The warper is preferably provided with a piv
oted beam guard (not shown) which, when in its
lower position, prevents inadvertent contact of
are turned by means of the knob 30 to bring the
pin 24 against the stop 25, the worm i0 is re 35
turned into mesh with the gear II, the gear ‘I is
demeshed from the gear 5, the dial it turned
30 rying a contact that is arranged to engage a con
the operator with the swiftly revolving beam, and
counterclockwise to place the 300 yard graduation
which must be raised to an ine?ective out-of-the
way position before thebeam can be removed and
another substituted. In order to prevent the
on said dial into register with the zero line H and
the gear ‘I reengaged with the gear 6. Such 40
turning movement of the dial it produces coun
warper from being started while the beam guard
45 guard when the latter is raised. Said switch com
prises a spring contact ?nger 60 (Fig. 2) support
ed in the clock case by an insulating block 6i
and connected by a wire Gla to the baseyportion
of the spring member 50. A plunger '62 slid’
terclockwise movement of the gear I l, the dial 23,
the arm 20 and the pointer 31 to place the latter
at a point corresponding to 21,200 on the dial 32.
When the gear wheel II is turned clockwise to
place the pin 24 against the stop 25, the pin 55
engages the lug 45 and forces the three-arm ele
ment 43 into the open-switch position shown in
Fig. 2. As shown in Fig. 4, the pins 24 and 65 are
ably mounted in the clock case is adapted to en
in alinement; they are on opposite faces of the
gage the contact ?nger 60, but is normally held
gear wheel i I. When the pin 24 is arrested by the
stop 25, the circuit-opening pin 65 engages the
lug 45. The dotted representation of the pin 24
in Fig. 2 is merely intended to show that said pin
will strike the end of the stop 25 when the wheel
is up, I provide a switch to close a circuit to
ground, said switch being closed by the beam
out of such engagement by a spring 63. A cam
shaped ferrule 64 on the outer end of the plunger
02 is adapted to be engaged by a part carried by
55 the beam guard when the latter is raised and
thereby close the switch 60-42.
A pin 65 (Fig. 4) on the spiral gear II is ar
ranged to engage the lug 45 (Figs. 2 and 3) and
thus restore the switch 48—49 to open position
60 when the gear i l, the dial 23, the arm 29 and the
pointer 3| are reset to starting position.
Fig. 2 may be assumed to show the clock as be
ing driven by the warper. The clock has been
set to wind 21,000 yards on the beam, and about
65 5,250 yards remain to be wound. The dial IS, the
dial 23, the arm 29 and the pointer 3| are re
volving counterclockwise.
When the lug 46
reaches and moves the lug 45 the switch 40-49
will be closed, thus stopping the warper, with the
pointer 3| at zero on the annular dial 32 and the
zero line on the dial it at the zero line I‘! (Fig. '1) .
The beam guard is then raised by the operator,
thus closing the switch 60—52, and an empty
beam is substituted for the ?lled beam. The beam
75 guard is then lowered, thus opening the switch
i i is turned clockwise. It may be noted that the
pin 65 engages the rounded side of the lug 45,
the side at the left in Fig. 2 and the upper side in
Fig. 5. The circuit-closing lug 46 engages the op
posite side of the lug 45, as shown in Fig. 6‘. From 60
Figs. 4 and 5 it will be understood that the stop
25 is located in position to be engaged by the pin
24, and that the lug 45 is so located as to be en
gaged alternately by the circuit-closing lug 46 and
the circuit-opening pin 65.
After a new beam has been put in the warper,
and before the clock is reset, the beam is some
times run empty while the operator holds a piece
of sandpaper against the inside of the beam head
to remove any burrs or splinters which may be 70
on it. If the preceding beam contained so much
yarn that the dial 23 had made nearly a complete
revolution, the additional movement caused by
such rotation of the new beam may bring the pin
24 into engagement with the stop 25. In that 75
4
event the stop 25 will yield to allow the pin 24
gear ?xed on the drive shaft, a gear splined on
to pass in the counter-clockwise direction, and
thus avoid breakage.
The embodiment shown in Figs. 1 to 8 is espe
the second shaft and adapted to be moved into
cially adapted for use upon beam warpers. When
a clock embodying the present invention is to be
used upon a ball warper, it is desirable to provide
a gear train between the warper and the clock
which shall drive the worm if! at the rate of one
10 revolution of the worm to two hundred and ?fty
yards of yarn.
In the operation of a ball warper it is necessary
to stop the warper at relatively frequent inter
vals in order that lease strings may be inserted
15 in the sheet of yarn.
To enable the hereinbefore
described warper clock to stop a ball warper at
predetermined intervals, the following additional
features are incorporated in the clock.
Referring to Figs. 9, 10 and 11: The spiral gear
lla is provided with screw-threaded holes to re
ceive studs 10, the holes being spaced apart at a
distance equivalent to ?ve hundred yards of yarn
wound on the beam or “log". The conical inner
ends of the studs 10 are arranged to engage an
25 arm ‘H which is pivoted in the clock case to swing
on the vertical axis 12.
An expansive spring 13
holds the arm ‘H in a contact with the rear side
of the spiral gear I l8 and the succession of studs
10. On the arm ‘II at the opposite side of its
30 axis '12 is a spring contact arm ‘ll carrying two
contact points 75 and 16. Rigidly attached to the
hub of the dial it3 is a cam 11 that is engaged
by a cam follower 18 that is pivoted on the verti
cal axis 19. Fastened to the cam follower ‘i8 is
an insulated plate 80 carrying two contacts 88“
and 80“ adapted to engage the contact points 15
and 16, respectively. Mounted on an insulating
block 8| in the clock case are two leaf springs 82
and 83 that bear against the contacts on the plate
40 80, and hold the cam follower T8 in contact with
the cam 11. The spring 83 is connected by means
of an insulated wire 84 to the base portion of the
spring contact 59 (Fig. 2), so that when the con
tact 15 is engaged by the contact 80“ on the plate
and out of mesh with the ?rst-mentioned gear, a
dial ?xed to the second gear, a gear wheel having
a gear connection with the second shaft which
may be broken by pivotal movement of said frame,
a second dial ?xed coaxially to said gear wheel, a
spindle arranged coaxially of said gear wheel and
second dial, an arm ?xed on said spindle, a driv
ing connection between said arm and said dial 10
which is disengageable through axial movement
of said spindle to permit angular adjustment of
the arm with relation to the second dial, a point
er ?xed to said arm to coact with the second dial,
a stationary annular dial concentric with the 15
second dial, the graduations on the second dial
increasing in value in one direction and the grad
uations on the stationary dial increasing in value
in the same direction, a second pointer ?xed to
said spindle to coact with the stationary dial, a 20
pin on the gear wheel, a stop for engagement by
said pin to de?ne the starting position of the gear
wheel, and a device arranged to be operated in
the travel of said arm as the second pointer
reaches the zero position on the stationary dial.
25
2. A warper clock having, in combination, a
drive shaft, a frame pivoted on the axis of said
shaft, a second shaft mounted in said frame, a
gear ?xed on the drive shaft, a gear splined on
the second shaft and adapted to be moved into
and out of mesh with the ?rst-mentioned gear,
a dial ?xed to the second gear, a gear wheel hav
ing a gear connection with the second shaft which
may be broken by pivotal movement of said frame,
a second dial ?xed coaxially to said gear wheel,
an arm angularly adjustable with relation to the
second dial, a driving connection between said
arm and said second dial, a pin on the gear wheel,
a stop for engagement by said pin to de?ne the
starting position of the gear wheel, and a device 40
arranged to be operated in the travel of said arm.
3. A warper clock having, in combination, a
drive shaft, a gear wheel having a gear connec
warper. The spring 82 is in circuit with a signal
light 85 so that when the warper is stopped
through the conjoint action of a stud ‘l8 and the
cam 11, a visual signal is given to the operator
50 to put a lease string in the warp.
tion with the drive shaft, a rotary dial ?xed co
axially to said gear wheel, a spindle arranged co
axially of said gear wheel and dial, an arm ?xed
on said spindle, a driving connection between said
arm and said dial which is disengageable through
axial movement of said spindle to permit angular
adjustment of the arm with relation to the dial,
When the arm H is in contact with the rear
a pointer ?xed to said arm to coact with the
side of the spiral gear II“, the reoiprocations im
parted to the contacts 80a and 80*’ on the plate
80 by the cam ‘H and the springs 82 and 83 are
55 insu?icient to bring said contacts into engage
ment with the contacts 15 and 16, but when the
dial, a stationary annular dial concentric with
the rotary dial, the graduations on the rotary dial
45 80 a circuit will be closed to ground to stop the
arm ‘H rides up on the conical end of a stud 10
the contacts 15 and 16 are placed in such posi
tion that they will be engaged by the contacts 80'1
60 and 80b on the plate 80 when the latter is moved
toward the contacts 15 and 16 by the springs 82
and 83 under the control of the cam 'l‘l. Thus the
slowly moving gear ii8 and the more rapidly ro
tating cam 11 coact to produce closing of the
65 stop circuit at intervals determined by the spac
ing of the studs 10.
While I have described the present construc
tion in considerable detail, it should be under
stood that the invention is not limited to such de
70 tails, except to the extent indicated in the ap
pended claims.
I claim as my invention:
1. A warper clock having, in combination, a
drive shaft, a frame pivoted on the axis of said
75 shaft, a second shaft mounted in said frame, a
increasing in value in one direction and the
graduations on the stationary dial increasing in
value in the same direction, a second pointer ?xed
to said spindle to coact with the stationary dial,
means to de?ne the starting position of the gear
wheel, and a device arranged to be operated in
the travel of said arm as the second pointer 60
reaches the zero position on the stationary dial.
4. A warper clock having, in combination, a
drive shaft, a frame pivoted on the axis of said
shaft, a second shaft mounted in said frame, a
gear ?xed on the drive shaft, a gear splined on 65
the second shaft and adapted to mesh with the
?rst-mentioned gear, a dial ?xed to the second
gear, a gear wheel having a gear connection with
the second shaft which may be broken by pivotal
movement of said frame, and a dial mechanism
actuated by the gear wheel to register in multiples
of the units registered by the ?rst dial.
5. A warper clock having, in combination, a
drive shaft, a gear wheel having a gear connection
with the drive shaft, a rotary dial ?xed coaxially
areas“
to said gear wheel, an arm arranged coaxially
of said gear wheel and rotary dial and angularly
adjustable with relation to the rotary dial, means
to ?x the arm in adjusted position with relation
to the rotary dial and forming a driving connec
tion therebetween, a pointer ?xed to said arm to
coact with the rotary dial, a stationary dial con
centric with the rotary dial, the graduations on
the rotary dial increasing in value in one direc
10 tion and the graduations on the stationary dial
increasing in value in the same direction, a sec
ond pointer ?xed to the arm to coact with the
stationary dial, and a device arranged to be oper
ated in the travel of said arm as the second
15 pointer reaches the zero position on the station
ary dial.
6. A warper clock having, in combination, two
rotary dials, one to indicate in multiples of the
‘units registered by the other, and a gear connec
20 tion between said dials to rotate the registering
dial a plurality of times in each revolution of the
indicating dial, said connection being severable to
allow relative adjustment of the smaller-amount
25
dial with relation to the other.
7. A warper clock having, in combination, a
rotary driven dial, a stationary dial concentric
with the rotary dial, two diametrically opposite
pointers, each to coact with one of the dials, an
arm with which the pointers are rigidly con
30 nected, means for effecting rotation of said point
ers and said arm, and a device arranged to be
operated by said arm as the pointer for the sta
, tionary dial reaches the zero position.
8. A warper clock having, in combination, a
35 rotary driven dial having a tubular shaft, a sta
tionary dial concentric with the rotary dial, two
diametrically opposite pointers, each to coact with
one of the dials, an arm with which the pointers
are rigidly connected, a spindle to which said
40 pointers and arm are ?xed, said spindle being
slidable in said tubular shaft and having a handle
5
tively movable dials, and a device arranged to be
operated by said am in the course 01 relative
movement between said am and one of the dials.
12. A warper clock having, in combination, a
registering mechanism, a switch actuating mem
ber, means for driving said registering mecha
nism and said member in synchronism, an elec
tric switch comprising a member movable in the
direction to operate the switch by said actuating
member, and means to impart a sudden move
ment to the switch member to complete the
operating movement of the switch initiated by
said actuating member.
13. A warper clock, having, in combination, a
registering mechanism, a switch actuating mem 15
ber, means for driving said registering mecha
nism and said member in synchronism, an elec
tric switch comprising a member movable in the
direction to operate the switch by said actuating
member, and a magnet arranged to attract said 20
switch member to impart a sudden movement to
the switch member to complete the operating
movement of the switch initiated by said actuat
ing member.
14. A warper clock having, in combination, a 25
registering mechanism including rotary means
driven in one direction and arranged to be reset
by movement in the opposite direction, an elec
tric switch comprising a member movable in the
switch-closing direction by said rotary means 30
when the latter moves in one direction, and mov
able in the switch-opening direction by said ro
tary means when the latter moves in the resetting
direction, and magnets at opposite sides of said
switch member, each adapted to impart a sud 35
den movement to the switch member to complete
a movement of the latter initiated by said rotary
means.
15. A warper clock having, in combination, a
rotary part having a series of studs, a cam, means 40
for rotating said cam with relation to said part
portion, a driving connection between said spindle
and the rotary dial which can be broken by end
wise movement of the spindle, means normally
at a speed de?nitely related to but higher than
that of said part, and an electric switch arranged
to be closed by the conjoint action of one of the
holding the spindle against such movement, and
studs and said cam.
a device arranged to be operated by said arm as
the pointer for the stationary dial reaches the
zero position.
_
9. A warper clock having, in combination, a
50 rotary driven dial, a stationary dial concentric
with the rotary dial, two pointers, each to coact
with one of the dials, means to operatively con
nect the pointers to the rotary dial in the desired
angular relation for rotation therewith, an arm
fol Cr with which the pointers are rigidly connected for
rotation therewith, and a device arranged to be
operated by said arm as the pointer for the sta
tionary dial reaches the zero position.
10. A warper clock having, in combination, a
60 rotary driven dial, a stationary dial concentric
with the rotary dial, two diametrically opposite
pointers, each to coact with one of the dials, said
pointers being operatively connected to rotate
with the rotary dial, an arm with which the
pointers are rigidly connected for rotation there
with, and a device arranged to be operated by
said arm as the pointer for the stationary dial
reaches the zero position.
11. A warper clock having, in combination, a
rotary driven dial, a stationary dial concentric
with the rotary dial, two diametrically opposite
45
16. A warper clock having, in combination, two
concentric dials, one being stationary, and the
other being mounted for rotation, the gradua
tions of both dials increasing in value in the same
direction, a setting pointer for the rotary dial, an 50
indicating pointer for the stationary dial, both
pointers being rigidly connected together and
adjustably connected to the rotary dial, a drive
wheel rigid with and concentric with the rotary
dial for rotating said rotary dial and said 55
pointers in the direction contrary to the ?rst
mentioned direction to the zero position on the
stationary dial, a stop adjacent to said zero posi
tion, a setting pin on the wheel to coact with said
stop in initially setting the rotary dial, a control 60
device adjacent to said zero position, a lug adja
cent to and moving with the indicating pointer
for actuating the control device, and a pin on the
drive wheel adjacent to the setting pin for re
setting the control device.
65
17. A warper clock having, in combination,
two concentric dials, one being stationary, and
the other being mounted for rotation, the gradu
ations of both dials increasing in value in the
same direction, a setting pointer for the rotary 70
dial, an indicating pointer for the stationary dial,
~ pointers, each to coact with one of the dials, an
arm with which the pointers are rigidly con
both pointers being rigidly connected together
and adjustably connected to the rotary dial,
nected, said pointers and arm in operation being
means for rotating the rotary dial and said
stationary with relation to one of said rela
pointers in the direction contrary to the ?rst 75
6
mentioned direction to the zero position on the
stationary dial, a stop adjacent to said zero posi
tion, a setting pin connected to the rotary dial
to coact with said stop in initially setting the
rotary dial, a control device adjacent to said zero
position, a lug adjacent to and moving with the
indicating pointer for actuating the control de
vice, and a pin connected to the rotary dial ad
jacent to the setting pin for resetting the control
10 device.
18. A warper clock having, in combination, two
concentric dials oi’ different diameters, the
larger dial being stationary, and the smaller dial
being mounted for rotation, the ‘graduations 01’
15 both dials increasing in value in the same direc
tion, a setting pointer for the smaller dial, an
indicating pointer for the larger dial, both point
ers being rigidly connected together and adjust
ably connected to the smaller dial, and means for
20 rotating the smaller dial and said pointers in the
direction contary to the first-mentioned direction
to the zero position on the stationary dial.
19. A warper clock having, in combination, two
concentric dials of different diameters, one dial
25
mounted in said shaft for rotation and endwise
movement and having a handle portion, said
rotary dial having a circular series of notches,
a stud attached to said unit and adapted to be 10
engaged and disengaged with any of said notches
by endwise movement of the spindle, and means
normally holding the spindle against such move
ment.
23. A warper clock having, in combination, a 15
rotary driven dial having a tubular shaft, a sta
tionary dial concentric with the rotary dial, two
pointers, one for each dial, a spindle to which
the pointers are rigidly connected, said spindle
being mounted in said shaft for rotation and 20
having a handle portion, and an adjustable con
nection between said spindle and the rotary dial.
24. A warper clock having, in combination, a
rotary driven dial, a stationary dial 0! larger
diameter concentric with the rotary dial, and two 25
pointers, one for each dial, said pointers being
creasing in value in the same direction, a set
ting pointer for the rotary dial, an indicating
rigidly connected together and rotatably adjusta
ing rigidly connected together and adjustably
connected to the rotary dial, and means for ro
tating the rotary dial and said pointers in the
direction contrary to the first-mentioned direc
tion to the zero position on the stationary dial.
20. A warper clock having, in combination, two
35
dials, one being stationary, and the other being
mounted for rotation, the graduations of both
dials increasing in value in the same direction,
a setting pointer for the rotary dial, an indi
40
ior each dial, and a spindle to which the point
ers are rigidly connected, said spindle being
being stationary, and‘the other being mounted
for rotation, the graduations of both dials in
pointer for the stationary dial, both pointers be
30
22. A warper clock having, in combination, a
rotary driven dial having a tubular shalt, a sta
tionary dial of larger diameter concentric with
the rotary dial, a unit forming two pointers, one
cating pointer for the stationary dial, both point
ers being connected together for synchronous
movement and being adjustable with relation to
the rotary dial, and means for rotating the rotary
dial in the direction contrary to the ?rst-men
tioned direction to move the indicating pointer to
the zero position on the stationary dial.
21. A warper clock having, in combination, a
rotary driven dial having a tubular shaft, a sta
tionary dial of larger diameter concentric with
the rotary dial, two pointers, one for each dial, a
50 ‘spindle to which the pointers are rigidly con
nected, said spindle being mounted in said shaft
for rotation and endwise movement and having a
handle portion, a connection between said spindle
and the rotary dial which can be broken by end
55 wise movement of the spindle, and means nor
mally holding the spindle against such movement.
ble with reference to the rotary dial.
25. A warper clock having, in combination, a
rotary driven dial, a stationary dial concentric 30
with the rotary dial, two pointers each to coact
with one oi‘ the dials, and means to connect the
pointers to the rotary dial in the desired angular
relation.
26. A warper clock having, in combination, two 35
dial mechanisms, one having a rotary dial and a
stationary zero marker, and the other having a
stationary dial and a revoluble pointer‘arranged
to register in multiples of the units registered by
the ?rst dial mechanism, said pointer being
driven with the rotary dial and being adjustable
in relation to the rotary dial.
27. A warper clock having, in combination, two
dial mechanisms, one having a rotary dial and
a stationary zero marker, and the other having a
stationary dial and a revoluble pointer arranged
to register in multiples of the units registered by
the first dial mechanism, said pointer being _
driven with the rotary dial and being adjustable
in relation to the rotary dial, means to drive the
rotary dial, said rotary dial being disengageable
from the driving means to permit setting of the
rotary dial with reference to its zero marker to
represent a fraction oi’ such a multiple.
BROOKS MARCELLUS.
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