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Патент USA US2137697

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Nov. 22, 1938. w
‘R. c. PIERCE
‘2,137,697
MANUFACTURE OF WEATHER STRIP ELEMENTS
Filed March so, 1935
4 Sheets-Sheet 1
INVENTOR.
ROBERT C P/ERcE
BY
7,2 C,"
~
ATTORNEY.
Nov. 22, 1938.
R. c. PIERCE
2,137,697
MANUFACTURE OF WEATHER STRIP ELEMENTS
Filed March so, 1935
4 Sheets-Sheet 2
INVENTOR.
ROBERT C. PIERCE
BY
7726M ‘8 5011a .
'
ATTORNEY.
Nov. 22, 1938..
R. c. PIERCE
2,137,697
MANUFACTURE OF WEATHER STRIP ELEMENTS
Filed March 30, 1935v
4 Sheets-Sheet 3
INVENTOR.
ATTORNEY.
'
Nov. 22, 1938.
R. c. PIERCE
I
_ 2,137,697
MANUFACTURE OF WEATHER STRIP ELEMENTS
Filed March 30, 1935
/o
.
4 Sheets-Sheet 4
A:
@@
27
AA A
INVENTOR.
BY
ROBERT C. PIERCE
‘
ATTORNEY:
Patented Nov. 22, i938
’ “ 2,137,697
VUNlTED STATES PATENT orrlca
MANUFACTURE OF’ WEATHER-STRIP
ELEMENTS
Robert 0. Pierce, Niles, Mich, assignor to Na
tional Standard Gompany, Niles, Mich, a cor
poration of Michigan
Application March 30, 1935, Serial No. 13,979
(Cl. 154-1)
26 Claims.
spring back when it leaves the machine. These
rollers in themselves embody certain features of
This invention relates to the manufacture of
weather strips, especially those used for automo
novelty, further described below.
bile doors, and will be described as carried out
with a novel machine which is adapted to op
5 erate continuously and automatically as long as
Ii desired,'the core element so made may next
be advanced to a novel mechanism which opens 5
up a slitted tubular cover, preferably of rubber,
and then closes it about the core with the ?at
supplied with the materials used.
An object of the invention is to improve the
weather strip by embodying therein a novel and
inexpensive but effective resilient means for
1a yieldingly holding the weather strip in sealing
wire loops projecting through the slltted side of
the cover.
The fabric cover may be secured about the i0
weather strip-by a sewing machine of any de
sired construction, not necessary to be described
engagement with its door. I prefer to use re
silient wire, which can be wound rapidly and
accurately about a suitable core‘ (of twisted tarred
herein, as standard commercial sewing machines
are adapted to perform this operation.
The above and other objects and features of 15
the invention, including various novel construc
paper or other material) in such a manner as
15 to form a_ series of fiat resilient loops approxi
mately in the same plane at one side of the
- tlons and operative steps and sequences, and va
core.
An element of this type preferably has mount
ed thereon a slitted tubular cover (of rubber or
‘.29 the like) which embraces and incloses the core,
~ with the‘ flat ‘resilient wire loops projecting
through the slitted side of the cover. Usually
the entire weather-strip is'then'provided with
a fabric cover, sewed or otherwise secured in
rious important speci?c arrangements and rela
tionships, will be apparent from the following
description of the disclosure in the accompanye 20
ing drawings, in which:
Figure .1_ is a top plan view of that part of the
machine which applies the wire to the advancing
core;
Figure 2 is a side elevation thereof, looking 25
in the direction of the arrows 2-2 in Figure 1;
loops to form a resilient ?ange by means of which
Figure 3 is a partial section on the line 3--3
the weather strip is attached to the door frame of Figure 1, showing the drive means for the
25 place, and which cooperates with the ?at wire
or other support.
-
Various features of the invention relate to the
30 structure of the described weather strip, and to
the method of making it which has been de
scribed above in general terms and which is
hereinafter explained in detail;
Other important features of the invention re
35-late to a novel machine for manufacturing the
above-described weather-strip elements. In the
preferred construction, the core is red length
wis'e through an annular power-rotated member
loop-compressing rollers;
.
-
Figure 4 is a perspective view or the principal 30
operative parts of the machine;
’
I
Figure 5 is a partial section on the line 5-5
of Figure 1, showing the means for tensioning
the advancing core;
'
-
Figure 6 is ‘an elevation of an alternative con- 35
struction of wire-compressing - rollers;
Figure 7 is a vperspective view of the iefthand
rollers of Figure 6;
' Figure 8 is an elevation of an alternative form
which carries a supply of wire, and which winds
40 the wire (under tension) continuously about the
advancing core, and about a presser‘ foot or the
like which is advanced at the same speed as the
core in a path paralleling but spaced from the
core, thus forming the enlarged loops described
40
of the rollers shown in Figure 7;
Figure 9 is a side elevation of the core element
as it would look when held by the rollers of
45 above. The presser foot may periodically, and
preferably at a very much higher speed, be shifted
machine;
toward the core to disengage itfrom the wire
and then returned to its starting point.
The core with the wire so wound thereon then
50 advances to means, such as a novel series of
rollers, for compressing the wire about the core
' and ?attening the loops into substantially thev
same plane.- I prefer to stretch the wire about
the core so tightly that it is stretched beyond
58 its elastic limit, so that-‘there is no tendency to'
Figure 8,v before being released from those rollers;
Figure 10 is a side elevation of the complete
. ‘
45
Figure 11 is a‘ diagram showing‘the successive
addition to the core of the wire, the rubber
cover, and the fabric cover;
Figure 12 is a section through the ?nished
weather strip, on the line l2-l2 of Figure 11; 50
Figure 13 is a partial section of a part of a
door and its frame, with the door closed and
sealed by the weather strip;
_
-Figure 14 is a partial section thereof just be
fore the door closes; and
55
2,137,097
Figure 15 is a sectional view of a slitting means
for operating on the rubber tubing.
'
Referring ?rst to Figures 11 to 14, the novel
weather strip comprises a continuous elongated
cordlike element or a ?exible core I8, of twisted
l‘“
by relieving the pressure on the shoe 58. The
upper cam.82 is removed in Figure 1, to avoid
obscuring the parts below it, but is shown in
detail in Figure 2. A suitable stop 'mecharusm
of flat resilient loops I8 all approximately in the
same plane.
of any usual and desired type may be provided
to stop the motor 12 if eitherlthe core I8 or the
wire I2 should break.
‘ The rotating ring 52 winds the wire around
the advancing core I8 and around a presser foot
84 or the like which is adjustably mounted on a 10
reciprocating slide 88 actuated by'a double cam
A slitted tubular cover I8, of rubber or the
like, encloses the core I8 and parts I4 of the
cam 88 by a heavy ,tensioned coil spring 88.
slitted side. A fabric cover 28-encloses the whole
rier 82, best shown in Figure 4, which is mounted 15
tarred paper or the like, having formed thereon
a resilient wire l2 parts I4 of which are com
pressed (and' preferably stretched beyond the
elastic limit ‘of the wire so they will not spring
10 back), and other parts of which are in the form
15 wire, with the loops I8 projecting through its
88. The slide 86 is held yieldably against the_
The slide 88 reciprocates as a plunger in a car
weather-strip. It has a seam 22 quite close to at its lower end on a pivot 84 and which has
the rubber cover I8, and may if desired have. a cam roller 88 engaging a double edge cam 88
driven in synchronism with ‘the cam 88.
. one or more other seams where it projects out
20 wardly on opposite sides of the ?at loops I8,
thus forming with said loops a resilient attach
ing ?ange for the weather strip.
' _
A weather strip, made as described, may have
its attaching ?ange tacked or otherwise secured
25 to the frame 24 of a door 28, ha manner well
The cams 88 and 88 are both driven from a
shaft I88 (Figure 4) operated by a sprocket gear 20
I82 driven by a sprocket chain I84 connecting
it to another sprocket gear on the shaft 66, Thus
the cams 88 and 88 ‘are driven in synchronism‘
with the wire carrier ring 52.
The cycle of the presser foot 84 is: (1) it is 25
moved forward by cam 88 in a path paralleling
but spaced from the advancing core I8 and] at
known with weather strips of this type. It has
the advantage over most weather strips, how
ever, that the attaching ?ange resiliently urges
the enlarged edge portion of the weather strip the same speed; > (2) it is moved by a suitable
30 into sealing engagement with the door. and there ‘spring (not shown) which holds roller 88 against
the cam 88 a short distance toward the core I8,
is no tendency to spring away from the door.
to disengage it from the wire looped around it
Referring now to Figures 1-5, the core I8 is by
the carrier 52, this being permitted by the
fed (from any desired'source such as the reel shape of cam 88; (3) it is moved at a very much
2'! shown in Figure 10) lengthwise, pastsuitable higher speed to the left in Figure 4, and then
86 guides 28 and 88, under a tensioning shoe 82 piv
oted on a horizontal lever 84 urged by an ad
justable spring 88 in a direction to grip the core
frictionally against the guide 28. It is drawn
under tension from this friction drag by rollers
88 and 48 further described below.
.
Between the shoe 82 and the rollers 88 is ar
ranged a spool" carrying the wire I2, which
passes from the spool through a guide 44 and
over a guide roller 48 and thence one or more
times around a tensioning roller 48 held by a
friction shoe 88, which guides the wire as it is
wound around the core‘ I 8.
’
back a short distance away from core I8, to its ~
initial position, ready to have the next loop of
wire wound around it by the carrier 52.
_ If desired, cam 88 may be formed to move the
presser foot 84 slightly away from the core I8
at the right-hand end of its stroke, to stretch
the wire looped around it and the core. With
su?lcient tension on the wire from shoe 88, this
stretching movement is not usually necessary.
As pointed out above, on the return stroke of
the presser foot 84 the tension on the wire may 45
be relieved by cams 82.
_
The primary purpose‘ of cams 82 is to relieve
the tension on the wire I2 when wire is fed
most rapidly from the spool 42 and the tension
The spool 42, the guide 44, the roller 48,. the
tensioning roller 48, and the shoe I8, are all
mounted on a rotatable annular member or ring roller 48. This occurs during the 180° of revo-'
82 (Figure 2) arranged with the moving core I8 lution of the rotating» ring 82 in which roller 48
at its axis. 'I‘hering 82 has enlarged sides or' ' moves
on a path below a horizontal line through
annular shoulders 84 rotatably seated on and the core I 8. During this portion of'the cycle a ‘
supported by three sets of anti-friction rolls 88 length of wire approximately equal to the length
55 supported on the machine frame 88. The cen
of one of loops I8 is fed from the roller 48. The 55
release of tension on roller 48 prevents break
age of the wire but su?lcient tension is main
talned by a friction shoe‘l88 on spool 42 to pre
horizontal drive shaft 88 driven by a belt pulley ' vent overrunning or withdrawal of the wire. No
88 or other suitable means. vAs‘shown in Fig
breakage can occur under this tension because.‘ 60
ure 10, the pulley" may be connected by a belt the
greater length of free wire is more resilient.
drive .78 to an electric motor ‘I2 controlled by
Two cams 82 arranged successively are shown.
a switch or the like ‘I4. '
‘
"
tral part of member 82 is formed with gear teeth
88 drivably meshing with a sprocket chain 82
driven bya sprocket gear 84 (Figure 2) on a
‘The shoe 88 is carried by one arm of a three
arm bell-crank lever 18 pivoted on the rotating
' ring 82., Av second arm
of lever _'I8 is connected
to a coil spring ‘I8, which is under substantial
tension and which urges the-shoe downwardly.
This constructiomgives a momentary tightening
of wire I2 during the above-described half revo->
lution of ring 52 su?lcient to take up any slack 65
but not sumcient to cause breakage of the wire
I 2. If desired these two cams may be replaced
byv a single longer cam, thus relieving the ten
The third arm of ‘lever, 18 carries a cam roller
on the wire I2 over approximately the whole
88 which, at certain points in the machine cycle ‘ sion
period of rapid feed.
(e. g.,during the withdrawal stroke of the presser
I prefer to provide the spool 42 with a fric
- foot described below,- and during such time as tion shoe or drag I88 held by a spring I 88. If
wire is "withdrawn most rapidly from the spool spring I 88 is light enough,-'\it will.not be neces
42) successivelyengages cams 82. shown as ad- _' sary to relieve the pressure on shoe I88 at any
75 Justably mounted on the machine frame, there
time in the cycle;_ however, lever II8_ carrying 78
2,187,697
the shoe I06 is shown with a third arm so that
gears ‘I38 and connected to the shaft. 68 by suit
it may if desired carry a cam roller to engage
a second stationary cam 82 (arranged in a dif
ferent plane from the .cam 82 which controls
shoe 50, so that each of shoes 50 and I00 is con
trolled by its own cam only.
The core, with the loops of wire formed around,
it, nextpasses to the rollers 38, which have reg
istering grooves receiving and embracing and‘
10 compressing the core, and which crimp the loops
able shaft-andfgearing connections I40.
It will be seen without further description that
the advancing core I0 ?rst has a series of wire ~
loops formed about it' and the vpresser foot 84,
that these loops are crimped about the core by
rollers 38, the loops are then ?attened by the
rolls 40, and the cover I8 is next applied by
rolls I30 and I34. The fabric cover 20, as
tightly aboutthe core, stretching it preferably
beyond its elastic limit so there will be little
tendency to spring back.
Referringto Figure 1 is will be seen that the
15 apex of each successive loop I6 is held by the
presser foot 84 until said loop is completely
through the rollers 38, before said presser foot
returns to pick up the next loop already formed
about its rearward portion.
previously noted, is secured in place by standard
sewing machinery.
.
‘
If desired, a knife I50 (Figure 15) or the like,
shown as heated by means indicated diagram
matically as ‘an electric heating coil I52, may be
mounted on the frame 58, with its point seated
in a recess in a bullet-shaped guide I54 carried
by a suitable bracket 456 secured to frame 58,
the knife and the guide cooperating to slit the
rubber tubing as‘ it passes from the reel I32 to
I
Figures 6 and 7 show an alternative form of
the spherically-surfaced roller I30.
roller made in two partsgfor manufacturing pur
posesonly. Parts II! have the necessary regis
tering grooves for the core, immediately beside
which are crimping rolls I“ having intermeshing
scribed in detail, it is not my intention to limit
the scope of the-invention to that particular ma
chine, or otherwise than by the appended claims.
I claim:
wedge-shaped projections'and depressions, form
ing' in effect peculiarly shaped gear teeth for the
purpose of catching and'holding each half of a
20
While one illustrative machine has been de
_
25
_1. A machine for making weather strips or the
like comprising ‘means for making a core having
loop~ IS in the proper'equi-angular relation with
laterally-extending resilient means, ‘means for
supplying a non-metallic tubular cover, means
_ >
.
for progressively slitting said ‘cover along one 30
.In the casecf wire so highly tempered that it ‘side, means for progressively opening the tube
does tend t6 sprin'g'back' as mentioned above,- I after it is slit, and means for applying said opened
may substitute for rollers 38 the rollers shown in tube progressively to the side of the core opposite
Figure 8. These rollers are similar to those said means and progressively closing said tube
shown in Figures 6 and ‘7 with the exception that about the core with said core arranged insidethe 35
the arcuate surfaces II5 are not coaxial with tube and said resilient means projecting through
the roller itself. This enables the rolls to crimp
slitted side of the tube. V
the wire above the core I0, past the desired final the
. 2. A machine for making weather strips or the
the axis of core I0.
30
position, as shown in Figures 8 and 9, so that
when it does spring back slightly after leaving
the
crimping rolls the wire loops will be substan
40
tiallyin the same plane.
After leaving the crimping rolls 38, the wired
core passes between rolls 40.
These rolls 40 also.
have registering grooves embracing and. com
pressing the core. At the side of these grooves
45 (the right side in Figure 2) these rolls 40 have
approximately cylindrical portions which ?atten
out the wire loops into substantially a single
plane. Iv prefer to make these portions very
slightly conical, so that the rolls are slightly
closer together at the apexes of the loops than
adjacent the core I0, for example about .0015 inch
closer. This is too small a dimension to appear
in a patent drawing, but it does insure that the
apexes of the wire loops are properly ?attened
, out.
The rollers 38 have intermeshing pinions I2it
(Figure 3) one of which is driven by .a shaft I22
having a worm wheel I24 driven by a worm gear
I25 on the shaft 66. An idler I2I meshing with
one of the pinions l20 drives somewhat larger
pinions I26 operating the rolls 40.
The core I0, so provided with a series of flat
resilient wire loops along one side, may then pass
6 5 through a guide I28 which twists-it into a vertical
plane, and thence over a spherically-surfaced
like comprising means for feeding a core, means
for applying a resilient wire thereto with portions 40
encircling said core and securing the wire thereto
and. other portions projecting laterally in loops
arranged approximately in the same plane, and
means for assembling a tubular cover on said core
45
with said loops projecting outside said cover.
3. A machine for making weather strips or the
like comprising means for feeding a core, and
means for applying a resilient wire thereto with
portions encircling said core and securing the wire
thereto and other portions projecting laterally 50
in loops arranged approximately in the same
plane.
_
'
4. A machine for covering cores having lat
erally-extending resilient means comprising a
feed roller having a curved surface and- arranged 55
to open up a slitted tubular cover, and rollers for
closing said cover up again with the core inside
and the resilient means projecting through the
slitted side of the cover.
I
5. A machine for‘covering cores having later
ally-extending resilient ‘means comprising means
constructed and arranged to open up a slitted
tubular cover, and other means for closing said
cover up again with the‘ core inside and the
resilient means projecting through the slitted side 65
of the cover.
6. A method of making‘ a weather strip core
roller I30 which opens up and feeds to it, from - member or the like comprising feeding a ?exible
a reel I32 (Figure 10) or other suitable source, . core lengthwise under tension, feeding a presser
the slitted tubular rubber'covering I8 previously
Il described.- The, cover I8 is closed again about
the corev I 0, with the wire loops projecting through
the slitted side of the cover, by two grooved fold
ing rollers I34. ‘Rollers I 34 may be mounted on
vertical shafts I35 having intermeshing drive
foot in a path paralleling but spaced from said 70
core, looping‘ a continuous resilient wire about
said core and presser foot, and. compressing the
wire loops at the core ends about said core leaving
the other ends of said loops] projecting laterally
from the core ‘in approximately the same ‘plane.
4
1 " 2,131,697
7. A method of making a weather strip ?'core
member or the like comprising'feedingfa'?exible ‘ ment,‘ and means ‘for compressing the-wireabout
core lengthwise intermittentlyfeeding-a presser said core with the portionsof the wire which
foot in 'a pathv paralleling but spaced from said~ I encircled said element projecting at oneside of
core and periodically
thecore_
shifting the presser foot -
toward the core and returning» it to its starting
point, loopinga continuous resilient wire about
said core and presser foot, and compressing the
wire loops at the core ends about said core leaving
the other ends of said loops projecting laterally
from the core in approximately the same plane.
8. A method of making a weather strip core
member or ‘the like comprising feeding a ?exible
core lengthwise under tension, feeding a presser
foot in a path paralleling but spaced from said
core, looping a continuous resilient wire about
said core and presser foot, and ‘compressing the
‘ wire loops at the core ends about said core in a
I
..
.
>
"
I
..
-
14. A machine‘ for making weather strip‘ ele
ments or the like'comprising» means forvfeeding a
core lengthwise, means for winding a- wire about
the advancing core in loops much larger than the
diameter of the cor , and means for compressing
the‘ wire about said core with portions projecting
in ?at loops at one side of the core.‘
15. A machine for making Weatherstrip ele- '
ments or the like comprising means for feeding a
core lengthwise, means for winding a wire about
the advancing core in loops much larger than the
diameter of the core, and means for compressing
the wire about said core with portions projecting
in ?at loops at one side of the core, said ,means
including rollers having registering grooves em
the core, and leaving the other ends of said loops
projecting laterally from the ' core in approxi
mately the same plane.
;
9. That method of making a weather strip ele
ment which comprises winding a continuous wire
about a moving core in a manner forming a series
of loops much larger than the diameter of said
core, and compressing said‘loops about the core
leaving the excess wire projecting ‘in ?attened
bracingand compressing the core with the en 20
circling wire and also having approximately cylin
drical portions atone side of the grooves to ?atten
said projecting loops. _
'
-
16. A machine for making weather strip ele
ments or the like comprising means for feeding a 25
core lengthwise, means for winding a wire about
the advancing'core in loops much larger than the
diameter of the core, and means for compressing
loops at one side of the core.
the wire about said core with portions'projecting
10. That method of makingv a weather strip
which comprises winding a continuous wire about
comprising two pairs of ‘rollers arranged in series,
a moving core in a manner forming a series of
loops much larger than the diameter of said core,
compressing said loops about the core leaving the
excess wire projecting in, ?attened loops at one
side of the core, placing a tubular covering about
in ?at loops at one side of the core, said means 30
each pair having registering grooves embracing
and compressing the core with the encircling, por
tions of the wire.
'
‘
17. A machine for making weather strip ele 35
ments or the like comprising means for feeding
a core lengthwise, means for winding a wire about
therethrough, and securing a fabric cover over . the advancing core in loops much larger than the
said core with ' said ?attened loops projecting
the tubular covering and over said ?attened loops.
11. A machine for making weather strip ele
ments or the like comprising an annular power
rotated member carrying a supply of resilient
diameter of the core, and means for compressing
the wire about said core with portions projecting
in ?at loops at one side of- the core, said means
‘ of rollers arranged in series,
45
45
a path generally paralleling but spaced from said
core and periodically shifted toward said core and
then returned to its starting point at a speed
much greater than its speed when advancing with
the core, means whereby the rotation of said
annular member winds wire from said source
50
about said core and presser foot, and means for _
compressing the wire closely about said core with
the portions which encircled said presser foot
projecting laterally from the core.
12. A machine for making weather strip ele
in approximately the same plane.
-
‘19. A machine for making weather strip ele
ments or the like comprising rollers having regis
. ments or the like comprising an annular power
rotated member carrying‘ a supply of resilient
wire, means for feeding a core lengthwise through
said member, a presser foot intermittently ad--v
vanced in a path generally paralleling but spaced
,
70
from said core and
.60
periodically shifted toward
said core and then returned to its starting point,
means whereby the rotation of said annular mem
ber winds wire from said source about said core
and presser foot, and means for compressing the
wire closely about said ' core with the portions
which encircled said presser foot projecting later-‘
ally from the/core.
}
-
r
05
.
- 13. A machine vfor making weather strip ele-‘
ments or the like comprising means for feeding a
‘core lengthwise, an element advanced in a path
paralleling but spaced from said core, means for
winding a wire about the advancingcore and ele
.70
said other rollers having the
approximately cylindrical portions formed on a '
slight taper so that they are closer together at
the ‘side opposite said core.
.>
-
75
5
2,187,697
21. Means for compressing about a core a wire
wound thereon in loops which are much larger
than the diameter of the core, comprising rollers
portions projecting laterally from the element.
24. A'machine of the class described compris
ing means for feeding a cordlike element length» '
having intermeshing wedge-shaped projections
wise, a part spaced iromsaid element as it is fed,
and recesses formed to force one side of each loop
of wire past the other side, to stretch the wire
about said core, with the remaining portions of
the loops projecting at one side of the core.
22. A machine for covering cores having later
10 ally-extending resilient means comprising means
constructed and arranged to open up a slitted
tubular cover, and other means for closing said
loops about and at the side of said element and
said part, and means to compress said loops to
form ?at portions lying substantially in the same
means for winding 8- wire in a series of connected
plane.
.
25. A method of making the article described
which comprises feeding lengthwise a cordlike
element, looping a continuous wire about said
element and another element spaced from’ the
cover up again with the core inside and the re- 1 ?rst element and compressing said loops to form
silient means projecting through the slitted side
15 of the cover, together with cutting means ahead
of the opening means arranged to slit the tubular
' cover lengthwise along one side.
23. A machine of the class described compris
ing means for feeding lengthwise a continuous
element, means for supplying wire, and, means
for securing wire - supplied by said supplying
means about and at one side .of said element in a
series of loops larger than the element and which
includes means to compress the loops to form ?at
15,
?at portions substantially in the same plane.
26. A method of making the article described
which comprises 'feeding lengthwise a cordlike
element, and looping va continuous wire about
and at one side of said element in a connected
series of flat loops and compressing saidloops to
form ?at-"portions projecting laterally from the
' element.
ROBERT C. PIERCE.
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