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Патент USA US2137927

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Patented Nov. 22, 1938
2,137,927
UNITED STATES ‘PATENT OFFICE
2,137,927
PROCESS‘ FOR OBTAINING METAL COM
POUNDS OF WATER-SOLUBLE KERATIN
SPLITTING PRODUCTS
Ernst Sturm and Richard Fleischmann, Berlin,
Germany, assignors to Chemische Fabrik
Johann A. Wul?ng, Berlin, Germany
No Drawing. Application January 28, 1936, Se
rial No. 61,256.
1935
In
1'7 Claims.
The present invention relates to the produc
tion of therapeutically active metal derivatives of
keratin products.
It is known by German patents to convert
Cl chemo-therapeutically active metal salts with
sulphur-rich sulphhydryl albumen splitting prod
Germany February 16,
(Cl. 260-413)
acid (acid to litmus and neutral to Congo red).
If the solution of a gold salt is added to the
aqueous solutions of the keratin splitting prod
ucts then a bright product precipitates out which,
however, at ?rst usually goes into solution again
on stirring. On further addition of gold salt
Thus, according to German Patent No.
a precipitation then occurs in greater or smaller
551,871 gold is bound to sulphhydryl albumoses,
and according to German Patent No. 578,828
zinc, bismuth, lead, mercury, silver, gold and
amount which no longer goes into solution. If,
however, the acid reaction mixture is neutralized
ucts.
copper, and according to German Patent No.
588,710 bismuth, arsenic and antimony, are bound
to sulphhydryl keratinates or sulphhydryl kera
tinic acids. In German Patent No. 605,074 metal
sulphhy‘dryl compounds are also obtained, since
in the interaction of keratinates and similar deg
radation products with arsenobenzenes conden
sation products of arsine oxides with sulphhydryl
compounds are formed.
In contradistinction to these known processes,
according to the present invention unreduced
water-soluble keratin splitting products are al
ways used. The process provided by the pres
ent invention for obtaining metal compounds
from water-soluble keratin degradation products
consists in subjecting keratin material to a non
reducing hydrolysis by treatment with acid to the
point of partial dissolution at least, removing the
with caustic soda, then the precipitate in all 10
cases goes into solution again, usually already be
fore the neutralization point. On stirring the
solutions into an organic solvent the sodium salts
of the gold compounds precipitate out. The so
dium salts of the gold compounds obtained thus 15
are brightly'coloured products which readily dis
solve in water with neutral reaction and are very
stable.
If sulphur dioxide is conducted into the aque
ous solution of the keratin splitting products up 20
to the point of saturation before the addition of
the inorganic gold salt, and gold salt, e. g. AuCls,
only then added, with good stirring and in small
portions, then a precipitation occurs which for
the most part rapidly goes into solution again, , i
and solutions are obtained which even on long
standing separate out no, or only a little, metal
lic gold. This is surprising inasmuch as, general
acid hydrolyzing agent, reducing the hydrolysate
ly speaking, metallic gold is separated out from
to dryness, treating the residue in the presence
of water with a soluble salt of one of the metals
all solutions containing gold in the presence of 30
sulphur dioxide, on which fact, as is well known,
gold, silver, mercury, lead, bismuth, antimony, - an analytical test for gold is based. Up to now
and isolating the metal keratin compound formed, it was only known that the gold is not to be
brought to the point of separation from organic
. sufficient metal salt being added for the resulting
‘gold sulphhydryl compounds by leading in sul 35
" compound to contain- metal to an extent equiva
phur dioxide. In the presence of sulphur dioxide
lent to at least 5% of silver.
The production of the water-soluble keratin generally the more gold is taken up by the keratin
splitting products by hydrolysis of keratins with splitting products the greater their sulphur con
acids up to more or less complete solution is
carried out in the known manner. The reduction
of the hydrolysate to dryness is effected by evap
oration of the solution in vacuum at low tem
perature, in the case of hydrolysis with sulphuric
acid or phosphoric acid after previous neutraliza
45 tion with barium carbonate or hydroxide. The
acid hydrolysate can also be dialyze'd before
evaporation, if necessary after previous neutrali
zation with alkali. However, the products ob
tained by acid dialysis have proved to be par
ticularly suitable. They are characterized by a
high sulphur content which extends up to 7%.
In general the keratin splitting products are
the more suitable for the production of the metal
compounds the higher is their sulphur content.
They are all water-soluble and react weakly
tent.
The silver and mercury salts react with the 40
aqueous solutions of the keratin splitting prod
ucts just like the gold salts.
If the aqueous solution of the keratin splitting
products is treated with a soluble silver salt
or mercury salt, then a bright voluminous pre 45
cipitation occurs, which on stirring at ?rst goes
into solution again. On further addition of
metal salt the precipitate becomes a permanent
one, however, and can be brought into solution
again only by addition of caustic soda up to 50
neutral or Weakly alkaline reaction.
From such ‘
solutions, which are fairly stable and separate
out no, or only a very little, metal, products can
be precipitated ‘out by means of alcohol which
are soluble in water with neutral reaction and
e
2
2,137,927
somewhat bright colour and are extraordinarily
stable. This discovery is surprising inasmuch
as up to now sulphur-poor protein splitting
products have always been used in the prepara
tion of silver protein compounds as well as of
other heavy metal compounds, and the sulphur
content of the proteins has always been felt to
be harmful in the production of silver compounds
or other heavy metal compounds. The readily
On further
addition of AuCls, however, it does not disappear
again. The mixture is now treated with caustic
soda up to a weak alkaline reaction, as a result
tion no precipitate with sodium chloride, on the
of which the precipitate already goes into solu
tion before the neutralization point. It is ?ltered,
stirred into the tenfold quantity of alcohol and
the product precipitated out thereby ?ltered off
at the pump, washed with alcohol and dried in
vacuum. The resulting product dissolves in water 10
with yellow colour and neutral reaction.
Example 2.-—A solution of 1.7 gm. of AuCla
in 12 com. of water is added in portions and whilst
contrary the solutions remain perfectly clear.
If the aqueous solution of the keratin splitting
stirring to a solution in 25 com. of water of 5
gm. of a keratin hydrolysate which has been ob 15
soluble and fairly bright products obtained are
characterized in addition by a special insensi
tivity towards light. They yield in aqueous solu
15
goes into solution again on stirring.
products is treated with a solution of lead ace~
tained by the hydrolysis of hairs with 25% hy
tate, then a precipitation takes place to only a
drochloric acid on to the water bath up to the
very small extent. The precipitation can here
be completed by addition of alcohol. If neu
20 tralization is effected before the addition of al
point of complete dissolution, neutralization with
caustic soda, dialysis and evaporation to dry
ness of the solution obtained.
By addition of 20
c'ohol then solutions are obtained which, when
‘stirring into alcohol, deposit the water-soluble
caustic soda up to the point of weakly alkaline
reaction the precipitate formed is redissolved and
sodium salts of the lead compounds.
If a ‘water-soluble bismuth compound is added
25 to‘ the aqueous solutions‘of the keratin splitting
products, such as ‘for example bismuth ammonium
citrate, then a precipitation of the bright bis
muth compound is obtained directly, which can
be completed by‘addition of acetic acid.
30
On the other hand, sodium antimonyl tartrate
the solution further treated as in Example 1. The
dissolves in the aqueous solution of the keratin,
splitting products without any separation, or
with'only a very triflng separation. Such solu
tions'can be neutralized with alkali without the
formation of a precipitate taking place, whilst an
aqueous solution of sodium antimonyl tartrate
‘cannot be neutralized with alkali without pre
cipitation. If the neutralized solutions of the
antimony keratin splitting ‘products which are
40 obtained’are stirred‘into alcohol, then a. product
of great stability is obtained which is readily
soluble in water.
_
‘By the method'of the present invention metal
compounds ‘of ‘water-soluble keratin splitting
45 products are obtained containing at least 5%
‘of‘ silver 'or the equivalent quantity of other
heavy ‘metal.
The
new
compounds
exhibit
chemo-therapeutic activity, and the gold com
pounds, which moreparticularly have been in
50 vestigated in this respect, are, for recurrent or
relapsing i‘nfection‘in white mice, per 20 gm. of
animal already active in an average dose of 175000
g. with a tolerant dose of 1A0—-1/20 g., so that the
calculated ‘therapeutic index is 1:100 to 1:200.
55 Certain of, the‘ new gold compounds are even ef
fective with doses up to 14000 g., i. e. show an in
dex'of 1:400. ‘Even in the case of streptococci in
‘fection of white mice with Aronson stock, which
hitherto could scarcely be therapeutically in?u
60 enced, ‘somenof the new gold compounds were
'found to exert a pronounced healing action, so
that up to 100% of the infected mice are kept
alive. Some of the new gold compounds also
65
very satisfactorily influence
vtion.
Example 1.—Ten‘ grams of
which has been obtained by
with 25% hydrochloric acid
pneumococci infec
keratin hydrolysate
hydrolysis of hairs
on the water bath
until only a small residue remains undissolved,
70 ‘subsequent acid dialysis and evaporation of the
,res'ultingsolution up to dryness, are dissolved in
50 cc. of water.
I
_
To the solution 3.6} g. of AuCls dissolved in 18
ccmgoi' water are added little by little and with
stirring. "A precipitation appears, which at ?rst
product obtained is readily soluble in water with
‘weak alkaline reaction.
25
_ Example 3.—Ten grams of keratin hydrolysate
which has been obtained by hydrolysis with sul
phuric acid up to the point of dissolution, neutral
ization with barium carbonate and evaporation of
the resulting solution down to dryness, are dis 30
solved in 50 com. of water and a solution of 4
gms. of AuCla in 20 com. of water is added there
to in portions and whilst stirring. A yellow pre
cipitate appears which at ?rst goes into solution
again, but after further addition of the gold salt 35
a ?ne slimy precipitate remains which can be
brought into solution again only by addition of
caustic soda. Caustic soda is added up to a weak
1y alkaline reaction. The precipitate, however,
has already dissolved again before the neutral 40
point is reached. The solution is further treated
as in Example 1. The product obtained is very
soluble in water giving a solution with neutral re
action.
Example 4.—Into a solution of 5 gms. of ker
45
atin hydrolysate, which has been obtained by by
drolysis of wool with sulphuric acid not quite up
to complete'dissolution, neutralization with bar
ium carbonate and evaporation of the resulting
solution down to dryness, 1.7 gm. of AuCls dis 50
solved in 8.5 ccm. of water are stirred in in por
tions and the reaction mixture worked up as in the
preceding'example. The product is very readily
soluble in water with neutral reaction.
‘Example 5.—Five grams of keratin hydrolysate, ,
which has been obtained by hydrolysis with sul
phuric acid, neutralization with caustic soda, fol
lowed by dialysis and evaporation of the resulting
solution, are dissolved in 25 com. of water and to
the solution 1.9 gm. of AuCls in 12 cc. of water are 60
vadded. The precipitation resulting hereby which
at ?rst cannot be brought into solution again, is
dissolved by addition of caustic soda up to the
point of weak alkaline reaction and the solution
further treated as in Example 1. The product is 65
readily soluble in water and reacts neutral.
Example 6.—Into a strongly acid reacting s0
lution of 5 gms. of keratin hydrolysate hydro
chloride, which has been obtained by hydrolysis of
hairs with 25% hydrochloric acid on the water 70
bath up to the point of not quite complete dis
solution, decolourization with active charcoal and
subsequent evaporation in vacuo at low tempera
ture, dissolved in 25 ,cc. of water a solution of 0.7
gm. of Alicia in 3.5 ccmqor“ water is stirred. Only 75
2,137,927
rapidly disappears again. The turbid solution is
hydrochloric acid on the water bath up to not
quite complete dissolution and acid dialysis, are
dissolved in 50 com. of water and into the solu
immediately neutralized with caustic soda, ?l
teredi off from the very little separated gold and
tion a solution of 5 gins. of bismuth ammonium
citrate in 20 com. of water are introduced. A
the now clear solution worked up as in the other
permanent bright precipitation occurs directly,
which gradually settles. The precipitation is
completed by addition of 2 to 4 com. of acetic
acid and dilution with water, and the precipitate
after the gold chloride solution has been nearly
completely added does a precipitate appear which
examples.
The bright product obtained dis~
solved readily in water with a yellow colour and
neutral reaction.
‘
Example 7.—Into the solution in 50 com. of
water of 10 g. of keratin hydrolysate which has
been obtained by hydrolysis of hairs with 25%
hydrochloric acid on the water bath until only a
small residue remains undissolved, acid dialysis
and evaporation down to dryness of the solution
obtained, sulphur dioxide is introduced up to the
point of saturation. To this solution, a solution
of 3.4 gms. of AuCla in 17 com. of water is cau
tiously added in small portions whereby a yellow
20 ish precipitate is formed which‘for the most part
re-enters solution on stirring. The solution is
left standing over night, whereby only, a very
tri?ing gold separation occurs. The bright brown
coloured solution is ?ltered and neutralized with
25 caustic soda whilst being well cooled. The weakly
alkaline reacting solution is stirred into alcohol,
whereby a yellowish product precipitates out
which is ?ltered off at the pump, washed with
alcohol and dried in vacuum. It is very readily
soluble in water with a bright colour and weakly
alkaline reaction.
.
.
Example 8.—Five grams of keratin hydrolysate,
prepared by hydrolysis of hairs with 25% hydro
chloric acid on the water bath up to incomplete
35 dissolution and acid dialysis, are dissolved ‘in
25 com. of water and a solution of 1 gm. of silver
nitrate in 5 com. of water is added thereto in
portions and whilst stirring. A white precipitate
‘ appears which at ?rst goes up into solution again.
4.0
3
?ltered off at the pump after some time, washed 10
with water and dried in vacuum. The product
obtained is insoluble in water, but on the other
hand is readily soluble in dilute ammonia and in
dilute caustic soda.
Example 11.-—Five grams of keratin hydroly .15
sate, which have been obtained by hydrolysis of
hairs with 25% hydrochloric acid on the water
bath just up to solution, neutralization with caus
tic soda, dialysis and evaporation of the solution
obtained, are dissolved in 50 com. of water and 20
2 gm. of sodium antimonyl tartrate'are added
thereto. The antimonyl tartrate goes up into
solution with separation of a tri?ing amount of
brown precipitate. The solution is ?ltered, neu
tralized with NaOH, whereby no precipitation 25
occurs, and the clear neutral, or weakly alkaline,
reacting solution is stirred into the multifold
quantity of alcohol. The solid bright product
hereby precipitated out is ?ltered o?f at the pump,
washed with alcohol and dried in a vacuum. The 130
yellowish product is readily soluble in water and
very stable.
What we claim is:
1. A process for obtaining metal compounds
from water-soluble keratin degradation products 35
consisting in subjecting keratin material to a
non-reducing hydrolysis by treatment with acid
to the point of partial solution at least, removing
the acid hydrolyzing agent, reducing the hydroly
however, it remains undissolved as a ?ne slimy
deposit which goes up into solution again on
addition of caustic soda up to weakly alkaline
reaction. The solution is ?ltered and stirred into
sate to dryness, treating the residue in the pres 40
ence of water with a water-soluble inorganic salt
of a metal selected from the following group of
metals: gold, silver, mercury, lead, bismuth and
antimony, and isolating the metal keratin com
‘the multifold quantity of alcohol, whereby the
pound formed, sufficient metal salt being added .45
On further addition of the silver nitrate solution,
45 silvercompound precipitates out as a bright prod
uct which is washed with alcohol and dried in
vacuum. I The very stable product is very readily
soluble in water with a bright colour and neutral
reaction. An aqueous solution of the compound
50 yields no precipitate with common salt.
Example 9.—‘Five grams of keratin hydrolysate,
which have been obtained byihydrolysis of hairs
with 20% hydrochloric acid on the water bath
up to the point of complete dissolution, neutrali
55 zation with caustic soda, dialysis and evaporation
for the resulting compound to contain metal to
an extent equivalent to at least 5% of silver.
2. A process for obtaining metal compounds
from water-soluble keratin degradation products
consisting in subjecting keratin material to a 50
non-reducing hydrolysis by treatment with vola
tile acid to the point of partial solution at least,
evaporating the hydrolysate to dryness in vacuo
at low temperature, treating the residue in the
presence of water with a water-soluble inorganic .
'salt of a metal selected from the following group
of the resulting solution to dryness, are dissolved
of metals: gold, silver, mercury, lead, bismuth
in 25 com. of water and 1 gm. of lead acetate in
5 com. of water is added thereto. At ?rst a pre
and antimony, and isolating the metal keratin
compound formed, suf?cient metal salt being
added for the resulting compound to contain .60
metal to an extent equivalent to at least 5% of
silver.
3. A process for obtaining metal compounds
cipitate appears which, however, dissolves again,
and at the endof the reaction there is only a
very tri?ing precipitate present. The precipita
tion is completed by addition of alcohol whereby
it settles as a solid bright product which is ?ltered
65 off at the pump, washed with alcohol and dried
in a vacuum.
‘i '
However, the acid reaction mixture can also be
neutralized with caustic soda and the resulting
weakly alkaline reacting solution immediately
70 stirred into the multifold quantity‘ of alcohol,
whereby the sodium salt of the lead compound
is obtained as a bright brown product. It is
soluble in water with weakly alkaline reaction.
Example 10.—Ten grams of keratin hydroly
75 sate, prepared by hydrolysis of hair with 25%
from water-soluble keratin degradation products
consisting in subjecting keratin material to a 65
non-reducing hydrolysis by treatment with acid
to the point of partial solution at least, removing
the acid hydrolyzing agent from the hydrolysate
by precipitation, reducing the hydrolysate to dry
ness, treating the ‘residue in the presence of water
with a water-soluble inorganic salt of a metal
selected from the following group of metals: gold,
silver, mercury, lead, bismuth and antimony, and
isolating the metal keratin. compound formed,
su?‘icient metal salt being added for the resulting
4
2,137,927
compound to contain metal to ;an extent equiv
alent to at least 5% of silver.
4. A process for obtaining metal ‘compounds
.from‘water-soluble keratin degradation products
consisting in, subjecting keratin material to a
non-reducing hydrolysis by treatment with hy
drochloric ‘acid to the point of partial solution
‘at vleast, evaporating the hydrolysate to dryness
in vacuo at ‘low temperature, treating the residue
10 ‘in the presence of Water with a water-soluble
inorganic salt of ‘a metal selected from the fol—
lowing ‘group vof metals: gold, silver, mercury,
lead, bismuth and antimony, and isolating the
metal keratin compound formed, sui?cient ‘metal
515 salt being added for the resulting compound to
contain ‘metal to an extent equivalent to at least
5% :of silver.
5. A process ‘for obtaining metal compounds
from water-soluble'keratin degradation products
consisting in subjecting keratin material to a
non-reducing hydrolysis by treatment with sul
phuric acid to the point of partial solution at
least, precipitating and removing the acid hydro
lyzing'agent by addition ofa basic barium com
pound, evaporating the hydrolysate to dryness,
treating 'the residue in the presence of water
with a ‘water-soluble inorganic salt of 'a metal
selected 'from the following group of metals:
gold, silver, mercury, lead, bismuth and antimony,
and isolating the metal keratin compound
‘formed, suiiicient metal salt being added forthe
resulting compound to contain metal to an extent
equivalent to at least 5% of silver.
6. A "process for obtaining 'metal ‘compounds
from water-soluble keratin degradation products
consisting in subjecting keratin material to a
‘non-reducing hydrolysis by treatment with‘ acid
'toi'the'point of partial solution at least, dialyzing
the'mixture, removing the acid hydrolyzing agent
from (the hydrolysate, reducing the hydrolysate
to‘drynessytreating the residue in the presence
‘of ‘water'with a water-soluble'inorganic'salt of
a metal selected from the following group of
metals: :gold, silverymercury, lead, bismuth and
antimony, and isolating the metal ‘keratin com
pound formed, suiiicient metal salt ‘being added
for'the‘resulting compound to contain‘metal to
an extent equivalent to at‘ least 5% ofsilver.
'7. "A process for obtaining metal compounds
from vwater-soluble keratin degradation products
consisting in subjecting keratin material to a
non-reducing hydrolysis by treatment with vola
tile acid to the point of partial solution at least,
dialyzing the mixture, ‘evaporating the hydrol
ysate
to‘ dryness, treating the‘ residue in the‘ pres
55
ence of‘ water with a water-soluble inorganic salt
of‘a metal selected from the following group of
metals: gold, silver, mercury, lead, bismuth
‘and antimony, and isolating the metal keratin
compound formed, su?icient metal ‘salt being
added for the resulting compound to contain
metal an extent equivalent to at least 5% of
‘silver. '
8. A process for obtaining metal compounds
from water-soluble keratin degradation products
consisting in subjecting keratin material to a
"non-reducing hydrolysis by treatment with acid
to the'point of partial solution" at least,‘ remov
ing the ‘acid hydrolyzing agent from the hydrol
70 ysate by ‘precipitation, dialyzing the ‘mixture,
reducing the’hydrolysate to dryness, treating the
residue in- the presence of water with a ‘water
‘soluble inorganic salt of a metal selected from
the following group of metals: gold, silver, mer
75 'oury, lead, bismuth-andantimony, and isolating
‘the metal keratin compound formed, .su?lcient
metal :salt vvbeing added for the resulting com
pound to contain metal to an extentequivalent
to at least'5% of silver.
.9. :A process for obtaining metal compounds
:from water-soluble keratin degradation products
consisting in subjecting keratin .material to a
non-‘reducing hydrolysis by treatment with sul
phuric acid to the point of partial .solution .at
least,tprecipitating and removing the acid hydro
10
lyzingagent byaddition of abasic barium com
pound, dialyzing the mixture, evaporating ‘the
hydrolysate to dryness, treating the residue in
the presence of water with a water-soluble in
organic salt .of azmetal selected from the follow
ing-group of metals: gold, silver, mercury, lead,
bismuth and antimony, and isolating the metal
keratin compound formed, sufficient metal .salt
being added ‘for the resulting compound to con
tain metal to an extent equivalent'to at least 5% 20
ofsilver.
l
10. A process for obtaining metal compounds
from water-soluble keratin degradation products
consisting in subjecting keratin material to a
non-reducing hydrolysis .treatment with acid to
the point of partial solution at least,'removing the
acid hydrolyzing agent, reducing the hydrolysate
to dryness, treating the residue in the presence
of water with a water-soluble inorganic salt of
a metal selected from the group: gold, silver,‘
mercury and antimony, neutralizing the'mixture
with alkali, precipitating :the mixture with al
cohol, and ?ltering off the precipitate of metal
keratin compound, sufficient metal salt being
added to the said residue for the metal content of
the resulting metal keratin compound tobe equiv
alent to at least 5% .of silver.
11. A process for obtaining a gold compound
from-water-soluble keratin degradation products
consisting in subjecting keratin material to a
non-reducing hydrolysisby treatment with acid
to the‘point of partial'solution at least, removing
the acid'hydrolyzing agent, reducing the hydrol
‘ysate to dryness 'by evaporation at low tem
perature in vacuo, dissolving the residue in,
water, saturating the solution with sulphur diox- "
ide, adding a Water-soluble inorganic gold
salt to the solution, neutralizing the mixture with
alkali, precipitating the mixture with alcohol,
and ?ltering off the precipitate of metal keratin
compound, su?icient metal salt being added to
the said-residue of the metal content'of the re
suiting-metal keratin compound to be equivalent
to’ at least 5% of silver.
12. ‘A process for obtaining a gold compound.
from water-soluble keratin degradation products '
consisting‘in subjecting keratin material to a
non-reducing hydrolysis by treatment with acid
to'the point of partial solution at least, remov
ing the acid hydrolyzing agent, reducing the hy
drolysate to dryness by evaporation at low tem
perature in vacuo, dissolving the residue in
waterysaturating the solution with sulphur diox
ide,¢a'dding a water-solubleinorganic gold salt
to the solution, and-isolating the gold keratin
compound formed, suf?cient gold salt‘ being add
60
ed for the resulting compound to contain gold
to an extent equivalent to at least 5% of silver.
13. A process for obtaining metal compounds
from water-soluble keratin. degradation products
consisting in subjecting keratin material to a
non-reducing hydrolysis by treatment with acid
to the point of partial solution at least, removing
the acid hydrolyzing agent, reducing the hydrol~
ysate to dryness, by evaporation at low tem- 75
5
2,137,927
perature in vacuo, treating the residue in the
presence of water with a water-soluble inorganic
salt of a metal selected from the following group
of metals: gold, silver, mercury, lead, bismuth
and antimony, and isolating the metal keratin
compound formed, su?icient metal salt being
added for the resulting compound to contain
10
reaction, ?ltering the whole and stirring the ?l
trate into an excess of alcohol, and ?ltering off
the precipitated gold keratin compound.
16. A process for obtaining a gold compound
from water-soluble keratin degradation products
consisting in subjecting keratin material to va non
reducing hydrolysis by treatment with sulphuric
metal to an extent equivalent to at least 5% of
acid to the point of complete dissolution, neu
silver.
tralizing the mixture with barium carbonate,
evaporating the resulting solution to dryness, 10
_
‘
14. A process for obtaining metal compounds
from water-soluble keratin degradation products,
consisting in subjecting keratin material to a
non-reducing hydrolysis by treatment with vola
tile acid to the point of partial solution at least,
decolourizing the hydrolysate by means of active
charcoal, evaporating the hydrolysate to dryness
in vacuo at low temperature, treating the residue
in the presence of water with a water-soluble in—
organic salt of a metal selected from the follow
ing group of metals: gold, silver, mercury, lead,
bismuth and antimony, and isolating the metal
keratin compound formed, sufficient metal salt
being added for the resulting compound to con
tain metal to an extent equivalent to at least
5% of silver.
15. A process for obtaining a gold compound
dissolving 10 gms. of the residue in 50 com. of
water, adding to the solution little by little and
whilst-stirring a solution of 4 gms. of auric chlo
ride in 20 com. of water, adding caustic soda until
the mixture has a weakly alkaline reaction, ?l»
tering the whole and stirring the ?ltrate into
an excess of alcohol, and ?ltering off the pre
- cipitated gold keratin compound.
1'7. A process -for obtaining a gold compound 7
from water-soluble keratin degradation products 20
consisting in subjecting hairs to a non-reducing
hydrolysis by treatment with 25% hydrochloric
acid at a temperature not exceeding 100° 0.,
dialyzing the mixture, evaporating the solution
to dryness, dissolving 10 gms. of the residue in 50 25
cc. of water, saturating the solution with sul
from Water-soluble keratin degradation products
phur dioxide, adding little by little and Whilst
consisting in subjecting hairs to a non-reducing
stirring a solution of 3.4 gms. of auric chloride
in 17 com. of water, allowing the mixture to
hydrolysis by treatment with 25% hydrochloric
acid at a temperature not exceeding 100° C.,
stand. overnight, ?ltering the mixture and add
dialyzing the mixture, evaporating the solution
to dryness, dissolving 10 gms. of the residue in
ing caustic soda until the mixture has a weakly
alkaline reaction, stirring the ?ltrate into an
50 cc. of water, adding to the solution a solution
of 3.6 gms. of auric chloride in 18 com. of water
excess of alcohol, and ?ltering off the precipitated ’
little by little and with stirring, adding caustic
soda until the mixture has a weakly alkaline
30
gold keratin compound.
ERNST STURM.
RICHARD FLEISCHMANN.
35
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