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Патент USA US2138027

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Nov. 29, 1938.
J. L‘ DOLL ET AL
2,138,027
INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE
Filed July 6, 1937
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John
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Clifford NRO ZI‘J
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Nov. 29, 1938.
.1. L. DOLL ET AL
2,138,027
INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE
Filed July/5, 1.957
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Patented Nov. 29, 1938
2,138,027
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,138,027
INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE
John L. Doll and Clifford w. Roger's, Detroit,
Mich., assignors to Syncro Devices, Incorpo
rated, Detroit, Mich., a corporation of Michi
gan
Application July 6, 1937, Serial No. 152,036‘
8 Claims. (Cl. 123-195)
This invention relates to internal combustion
In these views, the reference character I des
ignates a cylinder, integrally headed at its upper
An object of the invention is to provide a end and exteriorly formed on its upper portion
very light, compact and inexpensive engine, de
with numerous, heat-dissipating, spaced, annular
signed to operate at quite high speeds, and es- , ?ns 2. Set into the head of such cylinder, is a
engines and particularly two-cycle engines.
pecially suited to serve as a power plant for
model aeroplanes and other miniature vehicles.
Another object of the invention is to attach the
fuel tank of an internal combustion engine to
10 the crank case thereof, in a simple, novel, and
convenient manner. .
I
A further object is to so assemble the crank
shaft of an internal combustion engine, a head
in which such shaft is journaled, and a make
15 and-break device for the ignition circuit, that the
assembly may be conveniently attached to and
detached from an engine as a unit.
A further object is to provide an improved and
highly simpli?ed make-and-break device for the
20 ignition circuit, and to so mount and position
such device as to safeguard it from dirt, grease
and oil.
A further object is to arrange the cylinder of
an internal combustion engine within a jacket
25
comprising members embracing opposite halves
of the cylinder, one thereof having inlet and ex
haust ports and the other a by-pass for deliv
ering a charge from the crank case to the com
bustion chamber.
A further object is to employ a common means
30
35
spark plug 3, having its spark gap disposed in
the combustion chamber formed by the upper
portion of the cylinder.
A piston 4, reciprocatory in the cylinder, has
its connecting rod 5 extending into a crank-case 10
6 whereon the cylinder is mounted by screws 1,
and within the crank-case said rod engages the
crank-pin 8 of a crank disk 9 fast on a crank
shaft III. The latter is journaled in a bearing I I,
pressed into a circular head l2 closing one end 15
of the crank-case and secured to the latter by
screws l3. To the other end of the crank-case,
is attached an approximately conical fuel tank
I4, having its wall flush with that of the crank
case at their juncture, its diameter being progres
sively reduced toward its free end. The screws
vl3 extend freely through bored ribs Ma exteriorly
formed on the crank-case, and are tapped into
registering external ribs IS on the fuel tank, thus
serving to connect both the head I2 and fuel tank 25
to the crank case.
The latter is formed with a
partition [6, fully separating its crank chamber
I‘! from a fuel space with which the tank l4 has
open communication.
It is preferred to extend
the head I2 some distance into the crank case 30
for interconnecting said jacket members and at
to suitably reduce the volume of the crank cham
taching an exhaust ?tting to one thereof.
These and various other objects are attained
ber for fuel compression purposes. A pair of
ribs. l8, oppositely laterally ‘projecting fro_m\the
by the construction hereinafter described and
crank-case, serve to mount the engine on any de
illustrated in the accompanying drawings, where
sired support.
The head I2 is formed axially with a tubular
n:
‘
inFig. 1 is a top plan view of the improved en
8
c.
Fig. 2 is a side elevational view of the same, in
4 O partial section.
0/" '
Fig. 3 is a front end view.
Fig. 4 is a vertical cross sectional'view, taken
on the line 4-4 of Fig. 2.
Fig. 5 is a horizontal cross section taken on the
45 line 5-5 of Fig. 4.
Fig. 6 is an enlarged, fragmentary, longitudi
nal, vertical, sectional view, taken on the line
6-6 of Fig. 1.
'
- Fig. 7 is a cross section taken upon the line
50 .'l_-1 of Fig. 6.
‘
8 is a cross section taken on line 8--8 of
.Fig-
-
i
-
Fig. 9 is a cross sectional view of the carburet
‘ing duct showing the outlet thereto of the fuel
feed pipe.
outward extension l9, interiorly accommodating
the outer portion of the bearing H and exteriorly
carrying a collar 20, which mounts the ignition
circuit make-and-break device. Said collar is
split (preferably at its bottom), as indicated at
2|, adapting it to be clamped on the extension I9
so ‘as to maintain a desired rotative position.
Said collar is su?iciently free, however, to afford
it a rotative adjustment for spark advancement 45.
or retardation, as more fully hereafter explained.
Perioherally opening in said collar, diametrically
opposite .to the split 2|, is a rectangular pocket 22,
into which is set a ?bre or other insulating sup
port 23 having a reduced upward extension carry 50
ing a contact point 24. This support is securely
clamped .in the pocket by a screw 25 and is su?i
ciently spaced from the bottom and a circumfer
ential wall of the pocket to accommodate a_ bell‘
crank lever 26, 21 and afford the latter a slight 55
2
2,188,027
rocking movement, as best appears in Fig. 6.
The arm 26 projects upwardly between the sup
port 23 and said circumferential wall and carries
a contact point 28 positioned to engage the point
24. The arm 21 extends between the support 23
and the bottom of said pocket, being terminally
downwardly bent to ride on a cam 29 ?xed on
the crank shaft. A flat spring 30 secured to the
outer end of the support 23 is stressed against
10 said circumferential wall of the pocket to urge
the bell crank arm 26 toward its contact-making
position and the arm 21 into engagement with
the cam 29, the latter being fashioned to estab
lish and maintain contact during the required
15 cycle interval. The pocket walls engaged by the
screw 25 are preferably adapted for such slight
flexure as will permit clamping of the support 23
between such Walls. By rotatively adjusting the
collar 20, the make-and-break device is angu
larly shifted with respect to the cam 29, to ad
vance or retard the spark.
Embracing the lower portion of the cylinder
when the piston is lowered and simultaneously
exhausting products of a preceding combustion,
and compressing the charge during, and ?ring
it at completion of the following up-stroke.
Attaching the fuel tank, as described, to the
rear end of the crank case establishes the former
in a convenient and compact unitary relation to
the engine and promotes a maximum simplicity
in the fuel feed provision.
The engine is designed throughout to simplify 10
its manufacture and assembly, and permit of low
cost quantity production. In miniature sizes,
productive of one half horse power, or less, the
larger parts may be accurately and inexpen
sively formed as die castings, preferably from
an aluminum alloy.
The invention is presented as including all
such modi?cations and changes as come within
the scope of the following claims.
What we claim is:
1. An internal combustion engine comprising
20
a crank shaft, a crank case, a fuel tank, a crank
I is a jacket comprising semi-cylindrical mem- . , shaft bearing, a head carrying such bearing, and
bers 3| and 32, which preferably substantially
meet in a plane axial to the cylinder, being in
terconnected and. clamped in place by screws
33, serving further to attach to the member 3|
an exhaust ?tting 34. Preferably the ends of
said screws are tapped into said ?tting, thus con
30 cealing such ends and eliminating necessity for
nuts. The member 3| is also integrally formed
with a carbureting duct 35 extending above the
fuel tank in a tangential relation to the cylin
der and terminally open for the admission of air.
35 A fuel feed pipe 36 passes vertically through said
duct and has a restricted outlet 31- into same, said
pipe extending downwardly into the fuel tank
and having a terminal inlet adjacent to the tank
bottom. A needle valve 38 controlling the outlet
31 is threaded into the top portion of the pipe
36 and is elongated upwardly su?iciently to pro
vide for its convenient manipulation.
An opening 39 in the jacket member 3| estab
lishes communication between the ?tting 34 and
45 an exhaust port 40 in the cylinder, and the car
bureting duct communicates with an inlet port
4| of the cylinder, spaced predeterminedly be
neath the exhaust port.
'
The jacket member 32 has its inner face re
50 cessed to form a, by-pass 42, maintaining com
munication between upper and lower by-pass
ports 43 of the cylinder, the piston being ported
at 44 for registration with the lowermost by-pass
port.
55
a common means for securing the fuel tank and
head to the crank case.
2. An internal combustion engine comprising
a crank shaft, a crank case, a fuel tank, a crank
shaft bearing, a head carrying such bearing, and
means for securing the fuel tank and head to
opposite ends of the crank case.
30
3. An internal combustion engine as set forth
in claim 2, said head forming a closure for the
crank case.
4. An internal combustion engine comprising
a crank shaft, a crank case, a fuel tank, a crank
shaft bearing, a head carrying such bearing,
said fuel tank and head engaging opposite ends
of the crank case, and a common means for se
curing the fuel tank and head to the crank case.
5. An internal combustion engine comprising 40
a crank shaft, a crank case having a partition, a
crank chamber at one side of the partition and
a fuel space at the other side of the partition,
and a fuel tank secured to the crank case in
communication with the fuel space.
6. In an internal combustion engine, a crank
case of substantially cylindrical form, and a fuel
tank of approximately conical form, secured to
the crank-case with its axis substantially aligned
with that of the crank-case.
7. In an internal combustion engine, a crank
case of substantially cylindrical form, and mem
bers of substantially circular cross section car
ried by said crank-case, at opposite sides there
The disclosed engine may have a variety of of, said members having their axes substan
uses, but is particularly suited, by reason of its ‘ tially aligned with that of the crank-case, and '
light weight and compact form, for driving the
propeller of a model aeroplane. Thus, there is
shown a’ propeller 45 clamped on the forward
60 portion of the shaft I0 between collars 46, a nut
41 being threaded on the shaft extremity for
applying the clamping pressure. It is preferred,
in employing such collars, to form the cam 29
integrally with one thereof, as best appears in
65 Fig. 6, the collar 20 being recessed to accommo
date the cam.
The described engine operates on the usual
two-cycle principle, drawing a charge into the
crank chamber II when the piston is raised, by
70 passing such charge to the combustion chamber
being exteriorly stream-lined to progressively re
duce their diameter toward their ends remote
from the crank-case.
8. An internal combustion engine comprising
a crank-case, a head ?tted into one end of the
crank-case to form a wall of the crank-case, and
comprising a bearing for the crank shaft, pro
jecting from such wall, and a fuel tank attached
to the opposite end of the crank-case, a wall
isolating the fuel tank from the crank-case, be
ing formed by one or the other thereof.
JOHN L. DOLL.
CLIFFORD W. ROGERS.
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