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Патент USA US2403499

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July 9, 1946.
‘w. F. CARLSON
'
2,403,499
CROSS WING AIRPLANE CONSTRUCTION
Filed April 4, 1944
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5 Sheets-Sheet l
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Inventor
M7729” F Car/Son,
MFVM
July 9, 1946.
2,403,499
W. F. CARLSON
‘Cxoss WING; AIRPLANE CONSTRUCTION
Filed April v4, 1944
3 Sheets-Sheet 2
‘ M79187;
'By
M14’
[id/"2507a,
W-W E
Attorneys
{My 9, 1945-
_. w. E. CARLSON
2,40355199
WING AIRPLANE CONSTRUCTION
Filed April 4, 1944
s Sheets-sheet 3'
MM}
Patented July 9, 1946
2,403,499
UNITED
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T STATES
{112,403,499
PATENT~
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’ OFFICE
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CROSS WINGIAIIIRPLANEICONSTRUCTION
' v ' Warren F. Carlson; New Windsor, ~Ill.
,
. Application April 4, 1944. Serial No. 529,475
1
5 Claims. (01. 244-45)
My invention relates to airplanes provided with
crossed Wings both for small and large aircraft.
In order to distinguish my design of airplane
from monoplanes as well as from bi-planes, it
might be named “triple plane” since three wings
are provided on each side of the fuselage.
The construction is applicable tosingle fuselage
as Well as. twin fuselage airplanes. In the
former case there are three vwings on each side
of the fuselage, of which the front and rear slant
upwardly outwards and the middle one slants
downwards; while in the twin fuselage construc
,
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2
pitch for landing. At H is shown a glass covered
roof overthe. pilot’s pit and the usual rudder
l2 and elevatorslS are at the tail end.
_
-
Midway between the ends are shown thetriple
wings consistingof apairof upwardly slanting
front'wings l5 securedat the lowerpart vof ‘the
fuselage side as at. [6; a pair of similarly posi
tioned rear wings l1; and a pair of downwardly
slanting middle wings I8 secured to the top por
tion of the fuselage at H) and ?lling the space
between the front andrear Wings I5, l1.
.
At the points of crossing the front, middle
tion, there are preferably two upward slanting
and
rear wings are united by a half tubular bar
wings and two downward slanting wings situated
or beam 20, which ?ts the upper surfaces of the
between the two fuselages, but the outside wings 15 wings
l5, l1 and I8, running the entire combined
are the same as with the single fuselage.
width,
front and rear of .the wings, this in order
As an advantage of this construction may be
to. stiffen the construction. In this manner a
mentioned the considerable reduction in material
cradle is formed for the fuselage by means of the
and weight, and increase in strength over the
conventional wings. Steadying of the plane is‘ 20 upwardly directed four wing sections l5 and‘ I‘!
which eliminates stabilizers and ailerons.
gained by the cradle formation of the upward
slanting, front and wings, which make sta
bilizers and ailerons unneccessary.
Another advantage of this construction is the
provision of a small steadying wheel at the ex- »
treme outer bottom edge of each down slanting
wing, which is situated at about the middle cross
line of the plane, while a larger front wheel and
The landing gear in this case consists of four
wheels, instead of the usual three, which how
ever actually provides a two-point landing ‘in
stead of the usual three-point landing. It con
sists of a large front wheel 22 on an elastic
mounting well forward under the fuselage and a
smaller trailer wheel 23 similarly mounted under
the’rear end of the fuselage ill. -As these two
a small trailing wheel make up the complete
landing gear.
>
7
30 wheels do not provide any transverse support for
loading and balancing the airplane on the ground,
With a straight descent this will make a two
a pair of small auxiliary wheels 24, are'mount
point landing instead of the regular three-point
ed at the bottom edge of each middle wing sec
landing, the two side wheels ‘providing steadying
tion I8, see Figures 2 and 3. As best seen in Fig
members for balancing after the airplane comes
to rest.
'
35 ure 3, the air plane ‘balances on the front and
Other advantages and objects of the invention
rear landing wheels 22 and 23. Should however
will appear from the subjoined description and
the plane tilt over to one side or the other, one
accompanying drawings, in which
of the auxiliary wheels 24 comes into action to
Figure 1 shows a top plan view of a single
support the plane on that side. Figure 3 shows
fuselage airplane having three pairs of wings.
clearly that the auxiliary landing wheels 24 are
Figure 2 is a side elevation of Figure 1 with
placed at a higher level from the ground than
the plane on the ground.
the ‘main landing gear wheels 22 and 23,- so
Figure'3 is a front end elevation of the single
that all four wheels could not touch the ground
fuselage plane, '
'
at the same time unless the plane happens to
Figure 4 is a top plan view of a twin fuselage
land upon very uneven ground.
airplane; and
,
Figure 5 is a front end elevation of Figure 4.
'
At the nose of the airplane a propeller 26 is
indicated, which is actuated by an engine located
In the drawings like reference characters de
close by in the fuselage l0, and controlled by the
note the same parts.
pilot, as is also the steering gear I2, I 3.
Referring ?rst to Figures 1, 2 and 3 the fuse 50 The needed gas and lubricating oil are stored
lage is denoted by numeral l0 and may be of any
within the wings in convenient position for the
engine.
'
suitable construction, but is preferably, as seen
in the ?gures, of square shaped cross section and
The above description relates to airplanes for
tapering at both ends. By this construction is
light loads shown in Figures 1, 2 and 3. This
gained a reduced landing speed,- requiring more
wing arrangement provides however for greater
2,403,499
3
4
bination a plurality of sustaining surfaces along
the sides of the fuselage, consisting of pairs of
?at wing sections arranged successively in up
wardly and downwardly alternating slanting di
load per square foot with its much smaller wing
spread than with conventionally built planes.
Referring now to the modi?cation shown in
Figures 4 and 5, this relates to airplanes intended
rections from the sides of the fuselage and said
wing sections having ?xed securing means, re
for heavier loads and is here presented as a. twin
fuselage airplane. The main structure is how
ever the same as that of a single fuselage plane
in Figures 1 to 3.
The contour of each of the two fuselages 30, 3!
spectively, at the top and bottom of the fuselage,
two adjacent pairs of wing sections making an
X-formation and fixtures consisting of half tubu
atthe point of intersection of such ad
is the same as-in‘Figure 2, but the size may vary. 10 larjbar's
J'acent pairs of wing sections, positioned about
The outer wings l5 and I1 are identical, so are
midway between the side edges of the wing sec
the landing gears 22, 23 and 24 with tubular bar
tions.
20, as well as propeller 26, one for each fuselage,
3. In an airplane having a fuselage with the
and the steering gears I2, IS.
usual
propelling and steering device; in combina
15
The difference consists of the connection means
tion a plurality of sustaining surfaces along the
between the two fuselages, which however is also
sides of the fuselage, consisting of pairs of flat
similar to the outer wings. Here is provided two . . Wing sections arranged successively in upwardly
upwardly slanting wing sections
32 from left to .
and downwardly alternating slanting directions
right, Figure 5, secured at the bottom as at 33 '
to the left fuselage 30 and alternating with sim
20
from the sides of the fuselage and said wing sec
tions having ?xed securing means, respectively,
at the top» and bottom of the fuselage, two ad
right to left and secured as atv 3'5 at the bottom of
jacent pairs of wing sections making an X-forma
the right-hand’ fuselage 3|. At their outer ends
tion and ?xtures at the points of intersection of
the wing sections 34 are secured at the top of the
such adjacent, pairs of wing sections, and fore
left fuselage 30 as at 36, while the other wing sec 25 and aft ground contacting two-point landing
tions 32lare secured as at 31 at the top of the
gear in the middle plane of the underside of the
right hand fuselagev 3 l . In this manner the‘right
fuselage, and a, tilting support at the extreme
and left fuselages 30, 3i have a semi-?exible con
outer points of the downwardly slanting wing
ilarly upwardly slanting wing sections 34 from
nection between them.
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It should be noted that in this twin construc 30 section.
4. In an airplane having a pair of fuselages
tion the small central or auxiliary wheels 24 are
side by ‘side with a space provided between them
unnecessary for the landing gear. Accordingly,
each having propelling and steering devices; in
in a normal landing a four point landing would
combination a plurality of sustaining surfaces
occur on the two'pairs of fore and aft wheels 22, 23,
35 along the outer sides of each fuselage, consisting
and the aircraft would remain upright resting on
those ‘four wheels after landing.
In some cases it may be advantageous to place
cross or X-wings overhead or below the fuselage
of ordinary biplane. This would still further in
crease its‘ capacity. There is hardly a limit to the
size of the airplane and this. design, therefore,
might bethe answer to the large airplane question
of pairs of flat wing sections arranged successively
in upwardly and downwardly alternating slanting
directions from the sides of the fuselage and said
wing sections having ?xed securing means, re
spectively, at the top andbottom of each fuselage,
two adjacent pairs of wing sections making an
X-formation and ?xtures at the points of inter
section of such- adjacent pairs of wing sections,
future. ,
,
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and interconnecting bearing means between said
It is to be understood that the invention as here
fuselages consisting of similarly slanting, ?at wing
disclosed is not limited to the details here de 45
sections.
scribed and shown but that the same maybe
of the
varied widely without departing from the spirit
of the invention as de?ned by the subjoined
5,. In an airplane having a pair of fuselages
side by side with a space provided between them
each having propelling and steering devices; in
Having described the invention, what is claimed 50 combination a plurality of sustaining surfaces
claims.
.
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along the outer sides of each fuselage, consist
ing of pairs of flat wing sections arranged succes
sively in upwardly and downwardly alternating
usual propelling and steering device; in combina
slanting directions from the sides of the fuselage
tion a plurality of sustaining surfaces along the
sides of the fuselage, consisting of pairs of flat 55 and said wing sections having ?xed securing
means, respectively, at the top and bottom of each
wing sections arranged successively in'upwardly
fuselage, two adjacent pairs of wing sections mak
and downwardly alternating slanting directions
ing an X-formation and fixtures at the points of
from the sides of the fuselage and said wing sec
intersection of such adjacent pairs of wing sec
tions having ?xed securing means, respectively, at
tions, interconnecting bearing means between
the top and bottom of the fuselage, two adjacent
said fuselag'es consisting of similarly slanting, flat
pairs of wing sections making an X-forrnation and
wing sections, and a fore and aft ground con
?xtures at the points of intersection of suchad
tacting two-point landing gear for each fuselage
jacent pairs of wing sections.
in the middle plane of the underside thereof.v
2. In an‘airpl'ane having a fuselagev with the
WARREN F. CARLSON.
usual propelling and steering devices; in com
as new is:
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1. In an airplane having‘ a fuselage with the
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