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Патент USA US2403613

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Patented July 9, 1946
2,403,613
UNITED STAT E S PATENT OFFICE
2,403,813
PROCESS
FOR REMOVING GREASY DE
POSITS FROM CONCRETE. WOOD, AND
TILE SURFACES
Robert L. Reynolds, Washington, D. 0., and
Harlan M. Rice, Syracuse, N. Y., assignors to
The Solvay Processcoinpany, New York, N. Y..
' a corporation of New York
No drawing. Application May a, 1942.
‘a
Serial No. 441,995
8 Claims. (Cl. 252-461)
I
2
This invention relates to a process for removing
deposits of an 01b’, greasy, waxy or asphaltic na
ture, hereinafter referred to generically as "greasy
process for effectively removing greasy deposits
from surfaces soiled therewith.
It is a more specific object of this invention to
provide an effective garage ?oor cleaner capable
deposits." from surfaces soiled therewith, more
particularly to a process for removing grease and 5 of cutting greasy deposits on concrete garage
dirt from concrete garage doors.
?oors and of removing the deposits thus treated
from the ?oors by flushing with Water.
‘
As is well known, concrete, wood and tile sur
faces frequently become soiled with greasy de
We have made the surprising discovery that
posits. This problem is particularly acute in the
greasy deposits on surfaces soiled therewith may
case of concrete garage ?oors, especially those
be e?ectively removed by contacting the deposits
of large commercial garages, which quickly be
with a composition comprising o-dichlorbenzene
come coated with deposits of grease and oil with
containing dissolved therein a. substantially salt
which are intermixed considerable quantities of
free sulfonated detergent obtained by reacting ‘the
dirt. These deposits, because of the compara
addition product of an ole?n or mixture of ole
tively rough and porous nature of the concrete
?ns containing between 10 and 30 carbon atoms
surfaces. adhere tenaciously to the floors and are
and nitrosyl chloride or nitrosyl bromide with
a reagent capable of replacing the halogen pres
exceedingly difficult to remove; however, it is
ent in the addition product by a radical compris
highly undesirable to permit their; to remain on
ing a water-solubilizing group, and then flushing
the floors since they tend to accunfulate and thus
render the garage floors extremely slippery and 20 the deposits from the surfaces with water. We
unsightly in appearance. Hence. for some time
have found that our novel compositions out the
greasy deposits easily without excessive scrubbing.
there has been a demand for an effective garage
thereby quickly disengaging the grease and dirt
floor cleaner.
A satisfactory garage ?oor cleaner must be
from the soiled surfaces, in spite of the tenacious
capable of cutting the greasy deposit on the floor as adherence normally displayed by such deposits:
soas to loosen the grease and remove the deposit.
furthermore, our compositions are readily emulsi
together with the dirt incorporated therewith.
?able in water so that they may be washed from
the surfaces by merely flushing with water. The
from the concrete surface: furthermore, a satis
compositions of our invention are readily ?uid
factory cleaner should be such that, after appli
cation thereof to the garage ?oor, removal there 30 and may be applied to the greasy deposits by
spraying in undiluted form or emulsi?ed in from
of together with the grease and dirt may be ac
complished by simply flushing the floor with
one to ten times their weight in water: if a
water. The cleaner should also be chemically in
particularly heavy greasy deposit is to be removed.
we prefer to use our compositions in substantially
ert toward the concrete. To our knowledge no
material satisfying these requirements has as yet 35 undiluted form. Our compositions are not in
been provided. The use of alkaline detergents
flammable, so that no ?re hazard is presented
by their use. They are, therefore, preeminentiy
such as soap. soda and the like has proved unsatis
suited for removing greasy deposits from surfaces
factory since excessive scrubbing is required be
soiled therewith and are particularly adapted for
fore they effectively cut the greasy deposit. 0r_
ganic solvents capable of dissolving the grease also 40 removing such deposits from concrete garage
?oors.
do not ?ll the above requirements since they are
Our novel compositions may be prepared by
almost universally insoluble in water, so that they
dissolving in o-dichlorbenzcne a substantially
cannot be successfully removed from the floor by
salt-free sulfonate detergent obtained by reacting
flushing with water, and since they generally are
in?ammable and, hence, present a certain fire 45 an ole?n or a mixture of ole?ns containing be
tween 10 and 30 carbon atoms, preferably between
hazard on use.
14 and 24 carbon atoms, and obtained. for ex
The above discussion also applies to the removal
ample, by dehydration of fatty alcohols, destruc
of greasy deposits from surfaces such as wood and
tive distillation of waxes, cracking of petroleum.
tile which may become soiled therewith since such l0 dehydrohalogenation of halogenated hydrocar
deposits frequently adhere tenaciously to the
bons or polymerization of low molecular weight
soiled surfaces and cannot be satisfactorily re
oleflns, with nitrosyl chloride or nitrosyl bromide
moved with alkaline detergents or organic sol.
and treating the halogenated addition product
vents for reasons above mentioned.
thus formed with an aqueous solution of a sul?te
It is an object of this invention to provide a ll of an alkali metal or ammonium, or of an organic
,
~
4
3
basesuchasbutyiaminatoconvertthehaiocen
oftheaddition productintoasulfogrouml-nd
with nitrosyl chloride and treating the addition
product with sodium sulnte. was sprayed on a
separating the bulk of the inorganic salts from
greasy garage ?oor and permitted to remain in
the'organic sulfonates in any suitable manner
contact therewith for five minutes; at the end of
such as, for example, extracting the mito 5 this time the floor was flushed with water,
nates with an alcohol so as to produce a
whereby the grease was substantially completely
substantialhr salt-free detergent: preferably,
an ole?n mixture derived from a petroleum
source is employed to form these detergent
removed.
From the above description it will be evident
that our invention provides an eil‘lcient and
compositims. The desired detergent may also 10 practical method of removing greasy deposits
be formed by reacting the halogentated addition
from surfaces soiled therewith. particularly from
product with water-soluble salts of oxygen-con
taining polybaaic inorganic acids other than
sulfitea capable of reacting with an aliphatic com
concrete surfaces such as garage ?oors. In view
of the ease with which our invention may be
carried out and in view of the economic nature
pound containing an easily replaceable chlorine 15 of our compositions, our invention will be of
atom to replace the chlorine with the residue of
value to those concerned with the removal of
the acid, e. g. alkali metal thlosulfates. The
such greasy materials.
products obtained are solids and are soluble in
Since certain changes in carrying out the
o-dichlorbensene to the extent of about 25%.
above process and certain modifications in the
Preparation of products of the above type is dis
compositions which embody the invention may be
closed and claimed in United States patent 2,265,
made without departing from its scope, it is
093, issued to Beckham December 18, 1941: refer
‘ intended that all matter contained in the above
ence to this patent will show that the products
description shall be interpreted as illustrative and
described therein comprise alkyl compounds con
not in a limiting sense.
taining nitrogen and alkyl compounds containing 25 We claim:
keto carbon atoms.
The amoimt of the sulfonated detergent dis
solved in the o-dichlorbenzene may vary
1. A process for removing greasy deposits from
concrete garage ?oors which comprises applying
thereto a composition comprising o-dichlorben
considerably since solutions containing between
acne containing dissolved therein between about
about 1% and about 25% of the detergent have 30 1% and about 25% of a substantially inorganic
been found suitable; preferably, the compositions
salt-free sulfonated detergent obtained by
used in accordance with our invention contain
reacting the addition product of a mixture of
approximately 10% of the sulfonated detergent.
cleilns containing between 14 and 24 carbon
As hereinabove pointed out, the compositions may
atoms and derived from a petroleum source and
be applied to the greasy deposits to be removed 35 a nitrosyl halide selected from the group
in substantially undiluted form. particularly
consisting of nltrosyl chloride and nitrosyl
when exceedingly heavy crew deposits are to
bromide, said addition product containing a re
placeable halogen, with sodium sul?te and
be removed. However. since we have found
emulsions of the above compositions are also
removing ihorganic salts, and then ?ushing the
eil'ective in removing greasy deposits from soiled
greasy deposits from the ?oors with water.
surfaces, these compositions may be applied in
2. A process for removing greasy deposits from
the form of emulsions containing one to ten
concrete garage ?oors which comprises applying
times their weight of water.
thereto an aqueous emulsion of a composition
Application of the compositions of our inven
comprising o-dichlorbenzene containing ‘dis
tion to the greasy deposits to be removed may
solved therein between about 1% and about 25%
be accomplished in any suitable manner, such
of a substantially inorganic-salt-free suifonated
as, for example. by spraying. These composi
detergent obtained ‘by res ‘.ting the addition
tions are permitted to remain in contact with the
greasy deposits for a time sufllcient to cut the
product of nitrosyl chloride and a mixture of
oleilns containing between 14 and 24 carbon
grease and thereby disengage it. tosether with
atoms and derived from a petroleum source.
the
said addition product containing a replaceable
halogen, with sodium sul?te and removing
inorganic salts, and then flushing the greasy
deposits from the floors with water.
3. A composition for removing greasy deposits
from concrete surfaces comprising between about
75% and about 99% o-dichlorbenzene and, dis
solved therein, between about 1% and about 25%
dirt
accumulated ' therewith,
from
the
surface; ordinarily between about one and about
ten minutes of contact are suitable to effect this
disengagement. At the end of this time the
cleaner may be removed from the surface,
together with the greasy deposits, by merely
?ushing the surface with water by means of a
hose or in any other suitable manner. since the
cleaner emulsifies the grease and dirt in the
water and thereby permits substantially com
plete removal thereof. A preferred embodiment
of this invention involves the use of our compo
sitions for the removal of greasy deposits from
concrete garage ?oors since the properties of our
compositions, set forth above. are such that such
deposits may be removed with particular facility,
of a substantially inorganic-salt-free sulfonated
detergent obtained by reacting the addition
product of nitrosyl chloride and a mixture of
ole?ns containing between 14 and 24 carbon
atoms and derived from a petroleum source, said
addition product containing a replaceable
halogen, with sodium sul?te and removing
inorganic salts.
thus satisfying the demand for an effective
4. A process for removing greasy deposits from
cleaner for this purpose.
a surface soiled therewith selected from the
The following example is illustrative of our
group consisting of concrete, wood and tile
invention:
70 surfaces. which comprises applying thereto a
A composition containing 90% o-dichlorben
composition comprising o-dichlorbenzene con
acne and 10% of a substantially salt-free sulfo
taining dissolved therein between about 1% and
about 25% of a product comprising a substan
nated detergent obtained by reacting a mixture
tially inorganic salt-free mixture of alkyl com
of ole?ns containing between 14 and 24 carbon
pounds containing a sulfonate radical, said
atoms and obtained from a cracked petroleum
2,408,613
5
compounds including alkyl compounds con
taining nitrogen and alkyl compounds containing
keto carbon atoms, and said product being
obtainable by the process comprising treating the
addition product of an ole?n containing between
10 and 30 carbon atoms and a nitrosyl halide
selected from the group consisting of nitrosyl
chloride and nitrosyl bromide, said addition
product containing a replaceable halogen, to re
place the halogen with a sulfonate radical and
removing inorganic salts, and then ?ushing the
greasy deposits from the surface with water.
5. A process for removing greasy deposits from
6
source and nitrosyl chloride, said addition
product containing replaceable chlorine, to re
place the chlorine with a suii’onate radical and
removing inorganic salts, and then ?ushing the
greasy deposits from the surface with water.
6. A composition for removing greasy deposits
from a surface soiled therewith selected from
the group consisting of concrete, wood and tile
surfaces comprising between about 75% and
about 99% o-dichlorbenzene and, dissolved
therein, between about 1% and about 25% or a
product comprising a substantially inorganic
salt-free mixture of alkyl compounds containing
a surface soiled therewith selected from the group
a sulfonate radical, said compounds including
consisting oi’ concrete, wood and tile surfaces, 15 alkyl compounds containing nitrogen and alkyl
which comprises applying thereto a composition
compounds containing keto carbon atoms, and
comprising o-dichlorbenzene containing dis
said product being obtainable by the process
solved therein between about 1% and about 25%
comprising treating the addition product of an
of a product comprising a substantially inor
olefin containing between 10 and 30 carbon
ganic salt-free mixture oi’ alkyl compounds con
atoms and a nltrosyl halide selected from the
taining a suli'onate radical, said compounds
group consisting of nitrosyl chloride and nitrosyl
including alkyl compounds containing nitrogen
bromide, said addition compound containing a
and, alkyl compounds containing keto carbon
replaceable halogen, to replace the halogen with
atoms, and said product being obtainable by the
a suli'onate radical and removing inorganic salts.
process comprising treating the addition product
of a mixture oi oleiins'containing between 10
and 30 carbon atoms derived from a petroleum
ROBERT L. REYNOLDS.
HARLAN M. RICE.
Certi?cate of Correction
Patent No. 2,403,613.
July 9, 1946.
ROBERT L. REYNOLDS ET AL.
It is hereby certi?ed that error appears in the rinted speci?cation of the above
numbered patent requiring correction as follows: olumn 4, line 24, after the word
and period “sense." insert the following paragraph—
The expression “on! onate radical”
in the claims is used in its conventional sense to
denote both the unneutrolg.zed and neutralized
sulfonic acid group.
and that the said Letters Patent should be read with this correction therein that the
same may conform to the record of the case in the Patent Oi?ce.
Signed and sealed this 15th day of October, A. D. 1946.
[m]
LESLIE FRAZER,
First Assistant Commissioner of Patents.
2,408,613
5
compounds including alkyl compounds con
taining nitrogen and alkyl compounds containing
keto carbon atoms, and said product being
obtainable by the process comprising treating the
addition product of an ole?n containing between
10 and 30 carbon atoms and a nitrosyl halide
selected from the group consisting of nitrosyl
chloride and nitrosyl bromide, said addition
product containing a replaceable halogen, to re
place the halogen with a sulfonate radical and
removing inorganic salts, and then ?ushing the
greasy deposits from the surface with water.
5. A process for removing greasy deposits from
6
source and nitrosyl chloride, said addition
product containing replaceable chlorine, to re
place the chlorine with a suii’onate radical and
removing inorganic salts, and then ?ushing the
greasy deposits from the surface with water.
6. A composition for removing greasy deposits
from a surface soiled therewith selected from
the group consisting of concrete, wood and tile
surfaces comprising between about 75% and
about 99% o-dichlorbenzene and, dissolved
therein, between about 1% and about 25% or a
product comprising a substantially inorganic
salt-free mixture of alkyl compounds containing
a surface soiled therewith selected from the group
a sulfonate radical, said compounds including
consisting oi’ concrete, wood and tile surfaces, 15 alkyl compounds containing nitrogen and alkyl
which comprises applying thereto a composition
compounds containing keto carbon atoms, and
comprising o-dichlorbenzene containing dis
said product being obtainable by the process
solved therein between about 1% and about 25%
comprising treating the addition product of an
of a product comprising a substantially inor
olefin containing between 10 and 30 carbon
ganic salt-free mixture oi’ alkyl compounds con
atoms and a nltrosyl halide selected from the
taining a suli'onate radical, said compounds
group consisting of nitrosyl chloride and nitrosyl
including alkyl compounds containing nitrogen
bromide, said addition compound containing a
and, alkyl compounds containing keto carbon
replaceable halogen, to replace the halogen with
atoms, and said product being obtainable by the
a suli'onate radical and removing inorganic salts.
process comprising treating the addition product
of a mixture oi oleiins'containing between 10
and 30 carbon atoms derived from a petroleum
ROBERT L. REYNOLDS.
HARLAN M. RICE.
Certi?cate of Correction
Patent No. 2,403,613.
July 9, 1946.
ROBERT L. REYNOLDS ET AL.
It is hereby certi?ed that error appears in the rinted speci?cation of the above
numbered patent requiring correction as follows: olumn 4, line 24, after the word
and period “sense." insert the following paragraph—
The expression “on! onate radical”
in the claims is used in its conventional sense to
denote both the unneutrolg.zed and neutralized
sulfonic acid group.
and that the said Letters Patent should be read with this correction therein that the
same may conform to the record of the case in the Patent Oi?ce.
Signed and sealed this 15th day of October, A. D. 1946.
[m]
LESLIE FRAZER,
First Assistant Commissioner of Patents.
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