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Патент USA US2403738

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i
356-18
July 9, 1946.
J. MlHALYl
2,403,733? , 1
RANGE FINDER CONSTRUCTION
Filed Oct. 10, 1942
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July 9, 1946.
J. MIHALYI
2,403,738
RANGE FINDER CONSTRUCTION
Filed Oct. 10, 1942
3 Sheets-Sheet 3
Th]...
_
JOSEPH MIHA LYI
INVEM'OR
W
yéf'imnz
7
ATTORNEYS
JCCHMH “Hui
Patented July 9, 1946
2,403,738
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,403,738
RANGE FINDER CONSTRUCTION
Joseph Mihalyi, Rochester, N. Y., assignor to East
man Kodak Company, Rochester, N. Y., a cor
poration of New Jersey
Application October 10, 1942, Serial No. 461,585
17 Claims.
1
(Cl. 88—-2.7)
This invention relates to range ?nders and
more particularly to a range ?nder construction
which is simple, relatively inexpensive and ac
curate, and which construction permits a range
?nder to be held by hand by means of a pair of
handles adjacent which various adjusting mem
bers are located. One object of my invention is
to provide a range finder construction in which
an operator may support a range ?nder for use
solely by hand. Another object of my invention 10
2
Fig. 5 is a wiring diagram of electrical equip
ment used in the range ?nder shown in Fig. 1;
Fig. 6 is an elongated fragmentary section
through a portion of the range ?nder shown in
Fig. 1 on a somewhat enlarged scale; ‘
Fig. 7 is a fragmentary sectional view through
the remainder of the range ?nder shown in Fig. 1
showing on an enlarged scale details of the range
?nder mechanism;
Fig. 8 is an enlarged fragmentary detail section
is to provide handles for carrying the range ?nder
taken on line 8-8 of Fig. 9;
body so constructed that there is only a mini
Fig. 9 is a fragmentary sectional view on an
mum chance that undue forces applied to the
enlarged scale similar to Fig. 6 but taken at right
handle will distort the range ?nder body. An
angles thereto;
other object of my invention is to provide a hand 15
Fig. 10 is an enlarged fragmentary detail simi
held range ?nder so arranged that the operating
lar to Fig. 7 but taken at right angles thereto;
members for the range ?nder can readily be
Fig. 11 is an enlarged fragmentary section
moved by the hands of an operator supporting
taken on line ll—|l of Fig. 10; and
the range ?nder by its handles. Other objects
Fig. 12 is a fragmentary sectional view on an
will appear from the following speci?cation, the 20 enlarged scale taken on line |2--I2 of Fig. 9.
novel features being particularly pointed out in
the claims at the end thereof.
My invention consists broadly in providing an
extremely light and portable range ?nder con
In the past one of the difficulties in providing
struction in which the parts are so arranged that
a satisfactory and extremely accurate range ?nd
an operator can readily support a range ?nder
er has been that, if the range ?nder is made suf 25 at eye level by two handles. These handles are
?ciently heavy to prevent distortion, it is difficult
on a ?exible type of support which permits lim
to operate by holding manually so that in most
ited movement of the handles Without applying
instances range ?nders are mounted on tripods.
any torque to the body of the range ?nder itself
Another di?iculty with most range ?nders is that,
and the various controlling adjustment members
if they are provided with handles for supporting 30 are arranged adjacent the handles so that they
the range ?nder and if they are made sufficiently
can be readily operated.
light for convenient use, it has generally been
As indicated in Fig. 1, the range ?nder may
possible to distort the body of the range ?nder
consist of a casing l, which in this instance is
by undue pressure upon the supporting handles,
preferably made of light metal tubing, having
such as can readily take place when the user of 35 end caps 3 and 4 and including an eyepiece 5
the range ?nder is under ?re. Another di?iculty
through which images may be made to coincide
with known types of range ?nders is that the
when the parts are brought into adjustment for
many adjusting members are sometimes di?icult
a particular focal distance.
tooperate unless the range ?nder is ?rmly sup
The elongated casing I may be supported by a
ported as by a tripod. My present invention is 40 pair of handles 6 and 1, these handles being car
directed particularly to overcoming these dif?
ried by a bracket 8 of special construction. This
cultles.
bracket is made of flexible material, such as
Coming now to the drawings wherein like ref
springy metal, and is preferably U-shaped or
channel-shaped in cross-section as indicated in
erence characters denote like parts throughout:
Fig. l is a top plan view of a typical range 45 Fig. 12 which shows the point of connection be
tween the bracket 8 and the elongated casing I.
?nder constructed in accordancevwith and em
In this instance it is attached to the casing by
bodying my invention;
means of a pair of screws 9 which are arranged
Fig. 2 is a fragmentary rear elevation of a por
substantially midway between the ends i0 and
tion of the range ?nder shown in Fig. 1;
50 II of the bracket which support the handles 6
Fig. 3 is a fragmentary detail section of a por
and ‘I. In addition, as indicated in Fig. 10, the
tion of an adjusting mechanism and taken on
major portion of the bracket 8 is spaced away
line 3-3 of Fig. 2;
from the tubular casing I and is only in contact
Fig. 4 is a fragmentary section through a por
therewith at substantially the central portion
tion of one handle taken on line 4-4 of Fig. 2; 55 thereof as indicated at Fig. 12. Thus, from Figs.
3
2,408,788
4
9 and 10, it will be noticed that the handles 8
which it may be readily turned by the thumb to an
and ‘I, which are carried by the ends I0 and II
operator’s hand holding this handle or, if desired,
of the bracket, are spaced from the tubular cas
by the fore?nger of his hand. Thus, the knob
ing and while this bracket does not extend
may be readily operated while holding the
straight along the lower portion of the casing I, 5 handle 6.
since it has an offset portion I2 extending about
The mirror bracket I8 which supports the semi
the adjusting support I3. it nevertheless is so ar
transparent mirror I9 normally holds this mir
ranged that movement of the handles 8 and ‘I will
ror in a relatively ?xed position. However, tem
distort only the spring bracket 8 and not the tu
perature changes, distortion of the instrument or
bular body I of the range ?nder when unusual 10 other factors may move the mirror I9 from its
pressure is applied to these handles. As can
true position, so that I have provided a means
readily be understood, when an operator is under
for moving this mirror to compensate for any dis
?re he is liable to grasp the handles with consid
tortion or improper position of the mirror. For
erable force and, with the construction above
full details of this adjustment reference may be
described, since the bracket 8 is attached to the 15 had to my copending application Serial No.
casing I only by the two screws 9 and since it is
461,584, ?led October 10, 1942, Mount for optical
spaced from the casing I throughout the remain_
element. As shown in this application the mirror
der of its length, slight movement of the handles
I9 is carried by the frame I8 which is pivotally
will not tend to distort the casing I.
mounted by the pivots 36 which are carried by
As is well known by those skilled in the art, 20 the U-shaped member 31 pivotally attached at
extremely little force is sometimes all that is re
38 to the support 39 which forms part of a ring
quired to distort an optical instrument of this
48. This ring carries a tube 4I supporting the
type in which a few thousandths of an inch dis
objective 28 and is attached at 42 to the tubular
tortion would spoil the accuracy of the instru
casing I. The ring 48 likewise carries the sup
ment.
25 port 43 for the cam I29 and the shaft I28 and
In the instrument described there are prefer
the supporting member 44 for the prisms 2.2 and
ably a pair of windows I4 and I5, best shown in
23. The optical systems used in the range ?nder
Figs. 6 and 7, through which light rays pass in
illustrated herein may be similar to the optical
measuring distances with this instrument. The
system of my copending cases Range ?nder, case
spaced windows are centered on the axes A and 30 B, Serial No. 472,832, ?led January 19, 1943;
B as shown in these ?gures. Light entering
Range ?nder, case F, Serial No. 479,096, ?led
through the window I4 along the axis A may be
March 13, 1943; Range ?nder, case G, Serial No.
re?ected by a totally re?ecting mirror I8 so as
479,097, ?led March 13, 1943.
to pass down through the length of the cylindrical
The frame I8 is carried by an arm 45, this arm
casing I and so as to pass through the window 35 extending part way through the casing and, as
I‘! in the mirror frame I8 as shown in Fig. 10.
best shown in Fig. 3, terminating in two walls
The mirror frame l8 supports a semi-transpar
48 arranged at right angles to each other, each
ent mirror I9, which not only passes light rays
wall having an accurately formed pad 41 con
from the mirror I6, but also re?ects light enter
tacting with the ends 48 of a pair of adjusting
ing along the axis B through the window I5, so 40 screws 49 and 59 which are arranged at right an
that an objective 28, shown in Fig. 10, may form
gles to each other and which have a threaded
an image of the two light beams at 2| after the
connection with a support I3. A sleeve 5I and
light rays have been re?ected by the prisms 22
52 extends part way around the knurled surfaces
and 23, these prisms re?ecting the light rays in
53 and 54 on these screws and these sleeves are
such a manner that the image will appear up
provided with openings 55 and 58 through which
right at the plane 2I.- This aerial image may
the adjusting screws can be operated. A spring
then be viewed through the eyepiece 5 which con
51 attached to an ear 58 on the arm 25 and to a
tains suitable lenses to magnify the image.
cap member 59 holds the arm against these two
In order to bring the two images into coinci
screws. Thus, if the aerial images formed by the
dence the mirror I6 may be moved by an arm 25 50 objective 2!! in the plane 2I of the eyepiece 5
which extends through the casing and which is
should- be offset vertically with respect to the
pivotally attached at 26 to a hinged member 21,
instrument at eye level, the adjusting screw 53
best shown in Fig. 9, carrying a mirror bracket
can be turned swinging the mirror I9 about the
28 which supports the mirror I6, this bracket be
pivot 38 correcting this mirror position until the
ing in turn pivoted to a U-shaped member 29 on
images meet. If the images do not properly coin
the pivots 38 and 3|. Member 29 is pivoted at 32
cide at a given distance and are offset longitu
to the ring support 33 carried in the end of the
dinally of the instrument, the screw 54 may be
range ?nder casing I and in setting up the in
turned until this is corrected. Since these ad
strument the screw 34 and the tubular screw 35
justments need not often be made, the adjust
can be adjusted to move the bracket until an 80 ment screws 53 and 54 are well protected, but
image of the collimated light coming through the
window I4'is properly positioned. The arm 25
extends through the casing I and, as shown in
Fig. 10, may be supported on ball bearings I26
they may nevertheless be turned by a thumb or _
fore?nger of an operator's hand while still hold
ing the handle ‘I.
'
It should be particularly noticed that the knobs
which permit the arm to swing the mirror I6 65 55 and 56 are adjacent the handle ‘I and can read
about the pivots 38 and 3|.
This swinging movement is accomplished by a
ily be reached therefrom.
In the present instrument, which is particular
knob I21 which is mounted on a shaft I28 to
ly useful for spotting planes and for measuring
which a cam I29 is attached, this cam contacting
their distance from the operator, I prefer to pro
with an end I38 on an adjusting screw I3I carried 70 vide a means for giving a wide angle view for
on the end I32 of the lever 25. Thus, when the
picking up the plane after which a much smaller
knob I21 is turned, the cam will adjust the long
angle of view is included during the operation of
lever 25 and with it the mirror I6.
the range ?nder. Such mechanism may consist
It should be especially noted that the knob I21
of the parts shown best in Figs. 9 and 6. From
is' positioned adjacent handle 6 in a position in 75 these ?gures it will be noticed that I have pro
LDEHYCH “Gill?
5
2,408,738
vided a negative lens 60 in a mount Bl in the
wall of the casing I so that light rays may enter
along the axis C and, when a mirror 62 is in the
operative position shown. this mirror may re
?ect the light rays so that the lens 63, together
with the objective 20, may form an image on
the plane 2| giving a wide angle.
The mirror 62 and the lens 63 are mounted
6.
The aerial image formed by the lens 20 on
the plane 2| may be viewed through the eyepiece
5 and there is also located at this plane a sheet
of transparent material. such as glass 01' plastic,
95 bearing a reticle which may be marked or
engraved with crosshairs or other means for cen
tering the images. This material iscarried by a
bracket 96 which also supports a pivot 91. carry
ing a ?lter 98 which may be moved to and from
carried by the casing I, there being a spring 68 10 an operative position in front of the eyepiece as
always tending to move the bracket from a po
shown in Fig. 11 by means of a lever 99 which
sition in which the arm 69 is located by the
lies beneath the eyepiece 5 and also adjacent the
stop 10 as indicated in Fig. 6. A wire 1| leads
handle 6, so that it may be operated therefrom.
from the bracket 65 to a lever 12. I preferably
A spring I00 may be attached to a pin Hll car
provide a spring Ila between the brackets 65 and 15 ried by the ?lter 98 so as to swing past a dead
the lever 12 to take up for lost motion. The lever
center with respect to the pivot 91 to hold the
12 is carried by an arm 13 which passes through
?lter in either an operative or an inoperative
position.
the tubular casing l and terminates in an arm
14 having a roughened operating surface 15.
I have provided a means for mounting the
This arm with its roughened surface 15, as indi 20 range ?nder on a tripod if this should be desired.
cated in Fig. 2, lies adjacent the handle ‘I and
This means, as indicated in Figs. 2 and 12, con
can readily be operated therefrom. In the po
sists of a disk member I05 attached to the spring
sition shown in Figs. 6 and 9 an operator would
channel member 8, the disk member being pro
observe the wide angle view through the eye
vided with a thread I06 which can be attached
piece 5. As soon as a plane is sighted and brought
to a tripod screw. However, this equipment is
primarily intended for use while supported by
to the center of this wide angle view, the op
hand.
erator then releases the arm 15 permitting the
spring 68 to swing the bracket 65 from its op
It should also be noticed that all of the mem
bers which must be operated to operate or adjust
erative position to an inoperative position in
the range ?nder are located either on or adja
which the stop 16 contacts with a stop 11 and
cent to the handles 6 and 1 so that all of these
in which the mirror 62 and lens 63 are swung
members can be operated without removing the
out of the path of light rays passing into the
casing along the axis A through the window l4
hands from the two handles. It is therefore a
simple matter for an operator to hold the range
and reflected by the mirror 16. The operator
then turns the knob I21 until the two images are 35 ?nder casing at eye level while looking through
brought into registration at which time the dis
the eyepiece 5. In order to more readily pick
tance of the object can be read through the eye
up a plane, he may desire to press the handle
piece 5 in the following manner.
15 which throws the wide angle viewing device
into its operative position shown in Fig. 6. After
The shaft I 28 (Fig. 11) carries a light trans
mitting disk 80 which may be illuminated by a 40 centering the image the handle ‘I5 may be released
so that a narrow angle view of the plane will
light from a lamp 8| re?ected upwardly by a mir
appear in two images which he can readily reg
ror 82 so that graduations on the transparent
ister by turning the thumb screw 21 to adjust
or translucent disk 80 may be read, since these
graduations are re?ected by the prisms 83 and
the angle of the mirror 16 relative to that of
84, the latter of which provides an image of the 45 the semi-transparent mirror l9 so that the two
graduations in front of the eyepiece 5.
images may be made to register or coincide on
the plane 2|. When the images so register, the
The lamp 8| is mounted in a suitable socket
operator will then press the switch 9| carried by
85 and is connected to the wires 86 and 81 which
pass through an arcuate slot 89 in the ring-like
handle 6 causing the lamp ill to illuminate the
member 49 and out through an opening into the 50 disk 80 so that the distance may be directly read
on a bracket 65 pivoted at 66 to a bracket 61
channel-shaped spring handle support 8. These
wires are connected to batteries 99 and 90 car
ried in the hollow handles 6 and ‘I and Fig, 5
indicates a diagram of the wiring system in which
the batteries 89 and 90 are connected in series
from this disk while still looking through the
eyepiece 5. Thus the lamp is only used momen
tarily for reading the range.
The other adjusting members, such as the ad
justing screws 49 and 59, the ?lter handle 99
and the rheostat 92 can also be moved when nec
essary without releasing the handles 6 and 1.
However, after the adjusting screws 49 and 50
with the wires 86 and 81, there being a switch
member 9| for energizing the lamp 8|. As best
shown in Fig. 2 this switch member 9| is also
are once set and the rheostat 92 is adjusted to
readily accessible from the handle 6 and is in the
present instance mounted on the handle. A rheo 60 give a desired lamp brilliance, it is not necessary
to use these adjustments except at infrequent in
stat 92 is mounted on the handle 1 so that the
tervals. The ?lter handle 99 may be used some
brilliance of the lamp 8| can be determined by
turning the rheostat 92, this operation being
what more often, but even this handle is not op
erated as frequently as are the main adjusting
readily accomplished while holding the handle 1.
From the above description it will be noted that 65 members, that is the wide angle view handle 15,
the focusing knob 21, and the light switch 9| for
the entire range ?nder casing I may be man
reading the focal setting of the instrument.
ually supported by the handles 6 and 1, these
From the above description it will be noticed
handles being carried on the extreme ends of a
that the construction of my range ?nder is such
spring bracket 8 which is attached to the range
that it may be made of light material and there
?nder casing I only at a point intermediate the
will be but little chance of accidentally distort
handles so that, if the handles should be moved
ing the casing a suf?cient distance to interfere
a slight distance toward or from each other in
with the accuracy of the optical element con
holding the instrument, only the bracket 8 will
tained therein.
spring and there will be no tendency to distort
What I claim is:
75
the light tubular casing l\.
1. In a range ?nder, the combination with an
aeoavss
'
7
8
some are adjustable for range ?nding, of handles
for supporting the casing and means for resil
for connecting the handles to the tubular casing,
batteries in the hollow handles and wires leading
from said handles and batteries to the lamp, and
elongated casing including optical parts of which
iently attaching the handles to the casing where
by pressure applied to the handles may be at
least partially absorbed by the resilient attaching
means and the tendency to distort said elon
gated casing may be reduced to a minimum.
2. In a range ?nder,_the combination with an
a switch carried by one handle positioned for op
eration while supporting the range ?nder by the
handles, the means for connecting the handles
to the tubular casing including a ?exible channel
member also carrying and substantially enclosing
said wires, the channel member extending longi
elongated casing including optical parts of which 10 tudinally of the tubular casing and being at
some are adjustable for range ?nding, of handles
tached thereto at one point only.
for supporting the casing and means for resili
9. In a range ?nder of the type including a
ently attaching the handles to the casing com
tubular casing containing optical elements for
prising a spring bracket, a handle attached to
range ?nding and a lamp, a, pair of spaced hollow
each end of the bracket, said bracket including 15 handles for supporting the casing, ?exible means
means for attaching said bracket to the elon
for connecting the handles to the tubular casing,
gated casing spaced away from said handles.
batteries in the hollow handles and wires leading
3. In a range ?nder, the combination with an
from said handles and batteries to the lamp, and
elongated casing including optical parts of which
a switch carried by one handle positioned for
some are adjustable for range ?nding, of handles 20 operation while supporting the range ?nder by
for supporting the casing and means for resili
the handles, the means for connecting the han
ently attaching the handles to the casing com
dles to the tubular casing including a ?exible
prising a spring bracket carrying the handles at
channel member also carrying and substantially
each end thereof, and means at substantially the
enclosing said wires, the ?exible channel member
center of the bracket for attaching the bracket 25 being of a shape to be normally spaced from the
to the elongated casing, whereby the handles may
tubular casing except at the point where it is fas
be moved relative to the casing.
tened thereto.
4. In a range ?nder, the combination with an
elongated casing including optical parts of which
10. In a range ?nder of the type including a
tubular casing containing optical range ?nding
some are adjustable for range ?nding, of handles
for supporting the casing and means for resili
ently attaching the handles to the casing com
elements one of which is movable, the combina
tion with a pair of spaced handles for manually
supporting the range ?nder tubular casing, means
prising a spring bracket attached to the casing
for de?ecting the movable range ?nding element
midway between the handles, the bracket being
including a shaft extending through the tubular
spaced throughout the greater part of its length 35 casing, and means on the shaft for turning the
from the casing and being free to ?ex from the
shaft positioned adjacent the handle to be oper
fastening toward the ends thereof.
5. In a range ?nder of the type including a
tubular casing containing optical elements for
range ?nding and a lamp, a pair of spaced hollow
handles for supporting the casing, ?exible means
for connecting the handles to the tubular casing,
batteries in the hollow handles and wires leading
from said handles and batteries to the lamp, and
a. switch carried by one handle positioned for op
eration while supporting the range ?nder by the
handles.
6. In a range ?nder of the type including a
tubular casing containing optical elements for
range ?nding and a lamp, a pair of spaced hollow
handles for supporting the casing, ?exible means
for connecting the handles to the tubular casing,
batteries in the hollow handles and wires leading
from said handles and batteries to the lamp, a
rheostat carried by one handle, and a switch car
ried by the other handle, both the rheostat and
switch being in a circuit including said wires and
lamp inside the tubular casing.
7. In a range ?nder of the type including a
tubular casing containing optical elements for
range finding and a lamp, a pair of spaced hollow
handles for. supporting the casing, ?exible means
for connecting the handles to the tubular casing,
batteries in the hollow handles and wires leading
from said handles and batteries to the lamp, and
a switch carried by one handle positioned for op
eration while supporting the range ?nder by the
handles, the means ‘for connecting the handles
to the tubular casing including a ?exible channel
ated by. an operator holding said handle, and
means between the handle and the tubular body
whereby said handle may move relatively there
to and relatively to the means for turning the
shaft.
11. In a range ?nder of the type including a
tubular casing containing optical range ?nding
elements one of which is movable, the combina
tion with a pair of spaced handles for manually
supporting the range ?nder tubular casing, means
for de?ecting the movable range ?nding element
including a, pair of shafts angularly arranged and
extending through the tubular casing and posi
tioned adjacent a handle, each shaft including a
knob operable from the handle for adjusting the
movable range ?nding element.
12. In a range ?nder of the type including a
tubular casing containing optical range ?nding
elements one of which is movable, the combina
tion with a pair of spaced handles for manually
supporting the range ?nder tubular casing, means
for de?ecting the movable range ?nding element
including a pair of shafts angularly arranged and
extending through the tubular casing and posi
tioned adjacent a handle, each shaft including
a knob operable from the handle for adjusting
the movable range ?nding element, and guards
partially enclosing said knobs to protect said
knobs against accidental displacement, each
guard including an opening for operating the
knob from the handle.
13. In a range ?nder of the type including an
elongated casing containing optical range ?nding
member also carrying and substantially enclosing 70 elements and including a light tubular member,
>
said wires.
8. In a range ?nder of the type including a
tubular casing containing optical elements for
range ?nding and a lamp, a pair of spaced hollow
handles for supporting the casing, ?exible means
handles for manually supporting said tubular
member, a, bracket carrying both handles, said
bracket being attached to the tubular member
solely by a fastening member substantially equally
spaced ‘between the handles, said bracket com
9
2,403,738
prising a. ?exible metal strip normally lying ad
jacent to but spaced from the tubular member
throughout the greater part of its length.
14. In a range ?nder of the type including an
elongated casing containing optical range ?nding
elements and including a light tubular member,
handles for manually supporting said tubular
member, a bracket carrying both handles, said
bracket being attached to the tubular member
solely by a fastening member substantially equally
?nder may be simultaneously held and operated
by said handle and adjacent lever.
16. A range ?nder of the type including a cas
ing having a plurality of range ?nder elements
including a plurality of movably mounted ele
ments mounted therein, a pair of spaced handles
resiliently carried by the casing for supporting
the range ?nder, a plurality of range ?nder ele
ment controls for moving the movable range
?nder elements, said controls extending from
spaced between the handles, said bracket com 10 the inside to the outside of the casing where they
prising a ?exible metal strip normally lying ad
are located adjacent said handles in position to be
jacent to but spaced from the tubular member
operated by the hands of an operator holding
throughout the greater part of its length, said
said handles.
fastening member for holding the bracket on the
17. A range ?nder of the type including a cas
tubular member including a, threaded opening for 15 ing having a plurality oi’ range ?nder elements
supporting the tubular member from a suitable
including a plurality of movably mounted ele
tripod attached thereto.
ments mounted therein, a pair of spaced handles
15. A range ?nder of the type including a cas
resiliently carried by the casing for supporting
ing containing range ?nder elements, a supple
the range ?nder, a plurality of range finder ele
mentary view ?nder adapted to cooperate with
ment controls for moving the movable range
certain range ?nder elements, a hinged mirror
?nder elements, said controls extending from the
forming a part of the view ?nder, a spring nor
inside to the outside of the casing and terminat
mally holding the mirror in an inoperative posi
ing in movable members, said movable members
tion, a pair oir spaced handles supported by the
being located to move through ?xed paths ad
casing, a lever adjacent one 01’ the handles on 25 jacent said resiliently mounted handles and posi
the outside oi’ the casing, a shaft passing through
tioned to be moved by the hands of an operator
the casing and means connecting the shaft and
grasping said handles'whereby a minimum tend
mirror for moving the mirror to an operative
ency to distort the casing may occur from stress
position against the pressure of its spring, said
applied to the handles by an operator.
80
lever being adjacent one of the handles and
accessible from the handle, whereby the range
JOSEPH MIHALYI.
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