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Патент USA US2403766

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July 9,1946‘
‘
'H. N. SMITH mp
.
2,403,766
MEANS FOR THE PRODUCTION‘ OF KNITTING
Filed June 13, 1942
'
17 SheetS-Sheeil
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‘July 9, 19461
'
H. N. SMITH ETAL
'
v2,403,766
MEANS FOR’ THE PRODUCTION OF KNITTING
Filed Juné 13, 1942,
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H. N. SMITH ETAL
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MEANS FOR THEVPRODUCTION OF KNITTING
Filed June 13, 1942
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MEANS FOR THE PRODUCTION’OF KNITTING
.. Filed June 15, ‘1942
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INVENTORS
’
BY
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‘2,403,766 '
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66441
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‘July 9, 1946.
2,403,766
H. N. SMITH ETAL
' MEANS FOR THE PRODUCTION‘OF KNITTING
F'iied June 15, 1942
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17 Sheets-Shqe‘t 5
July 9,1946.
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Filed June 15, 1942
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July 9, 1946.
2,403,766
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Filed June 13. 1942
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17 Sheets-Sheet 8
July 9, 1946-
I’ . H. N. SMITH ET AL
2,403,766
MEANS FOR THE PRODUCTION_ OF KNITTING
Filed June 13, 1942
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‘ MEANSv FOR THE PRODUCTION OF KNITTING
Filed June 13, 1942
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H. N. SMITH ET AL
MEANS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF KNITTING
Filed Jun-e 13, I942
17 Sheets-‘Sheet ll
July 9, 1946.
H. N. SMITH ETAL
. 2,403,766.
MEANS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF KNITTING
Filed ‘June '13, .1942
17 Sheéts-Sheet 12
#51! UEKT NIEL SMITH
8y ELIZABETH ET/IFL SHIT/l
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July 9’, 1946.
‘H. N.‘ SMITH ETAL
2,403;766 '
MEANS FOR THE PRODUCTION‘OF KNITTING
Filed June 13/1942
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MEANS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF KNITTING
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H. N. SMlTH ETAL
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-MEANS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF KNITTING
Filed June 13, 1942
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July 9,’ 146,
2,403,766
H. N. SMITH ET AL
MEANS FOR .THE PRODUCTION OF KNITTING
Filed June 13, 1942
17 Sheets-Sheet 16
July 9, 1946-
,
H. N. SMITH ETAL
2,403,766
MEANS FOR THE rnonucwzon OF KNITTING
Filed June 15, 1942
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17 Sheets-Sheet 17
Patented July 9, 1946
V
2,403,766
.7: 1. J
UNITED ‘STATES PATENT " ‘OFFICE’
MEANS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF,
7‘ KNITTING
'
- Herbert Noel Smith and Elizabeth Ethel. Smith,
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Daventry, England
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Application June 13, 1942, Serial No. {146,912
In Great Britain May 10, 1941 I
61 Claims. (01:66-41)
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The present invention relates to improvements
in knitting machines.
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We have described in ourprior Patent applica
tion Serial No. 351,622, ?led August 6, 1940, now
Patent No. 2,353,197, a new method and form of
machine in which the usual beard and latch
needles are not employed, the new method of
knitting’ being to engage the yarn and form the ‘
new loop through an already formed stitch whilst
this is held ‘open and guarded from the looping l0
or stitch-forming means.
' /
In accordance withthe present invention the ‘
machine comprises a looping or stitch-forming
~ means constructed and arranged to engage the
on pull on the ‘stitch-‘in a predetermined direcf
_tion.
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g The new loop is preferably accepted by a differ: _
ent member from the guard member carrying
‘the stitch through which it was formed, although
it may be accepted by such guard member. 7
We may provide a series of guard members and
a series of accepting members moving progres
sively towards a stitch former, the guard mem
bers coming successively with a previously. formed a
stitch into knitting relation with the stitch former
and ‘the’ accepting members successively moving
forward to accept anew loop. Accordingjto other
forms ,of the invention the stitch former or
thread and form a new loop through a. previously 15 formers travel and co-operate successively with
different guard and accepting members.‘
7
c
formed stitch while this is .held open around a
The guard and accepting members may each
guard member, such means so'co~operating.suc
be constructed and arranged to serve» atonetime
cessively with a series ,of such. members and the
in thecycle of operations as a guard and at an
stitches thereabout. The machine ispreferablyv
so constructed and arranged to, operate that the 20 other time as anaccepting member.‘ This is ad- I
vantageous, e. g., where as'will be hereinafter
looping means can form a. loop selectively in
described, travelling stitch conveying members
either direction through a previously formed
stitch.
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aregused and there are two knitting stations, or
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where the flow of knitting is periodically reversed,
We would have it understood that we make no
claim to machines in which the thread is car 25 or where ‘the conveying members travel asasingle
ried through the previously formed stitches by
a needle having a permanently closed eye‘through
endless series.’ Inother forms of’ the invention,
e. g., where there are two separateseries of trav
elling conveying members and one knitting sta
which the threadis threaded and we regard it
tion and one station where the stitches are ,trans
as essential that the stitch-forming means should
be so constructed and arranged as to form each 30 ferred from one series’ back to the other, onev
of successive, stitches by ?rst engaging the thread
series of such members may serve only as guards
and then carrying the loop of the new stitch
and the other series'only as accepting members.
through the old stitch while the latter ‘is‘about
u The machine is preferably adapted to' knit
its guard.
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The guard members and a stitch former or
formers may be relatively. displaceable so that the
or each stitch-former co-operates with succesi
sive members, e. g., the members may travel'to
wards the stitch-former or formers, or the stitch
plain and 'purl'stitches selectively and it may
be adapted'td‘knit in reverse directions for ?at
knitting or continuously in one direction fortu
bularor circular knitting and in some cases‘the
same machine may be arranged to knit flat or
tubular fabric. Where the machine is required
former or formers may travel from one member s40 to knit ?at only the conveying members may
merely travel to and fro. When it is to knit tu
to another.
.
bular or circular fabric the continuous travel of
The guard members are preferably channelled
the conveying members may be achieved by an
where the stitch is held as this greatly contributes ,
‘endless system or systems of such members. For
to ensuring that the thread-engaging portion of
the stitch-former and this. is preferably anjopen 45 ‘example there maybe one endless series and" the
Stitch-forming member constructed and: arranged
hook,'shall pass safely through the old stitch
to co-operate ‘successively for: knitting with two
without catching the thread thereof and prefer
ably the hook is directed towards the bottom of 1 ,of such members'which are separated from each
other'by others of the series, e. g., the endless
the'channel. Other forms of guard which will
hold open the stitch through which the stitch 50 ‘system may comprise twoparallel reaches and
the stitch former, arranged to knit across from
formerris to pass. will serve,.,such ‘as a slotted
one reach to the other. Alternatively there may
form, or a, ?at blade or'the like, will serveif the
be two. endless systems and each new stitch car
but the channel or like forms are preferred by ' » ried through a stitch on a member of one system
which the stitch is kept open without relying up- _55 ‘and; accepted by a member of the other series.
stitchthereabout is suitably ‘held and tensioned
2,403,766
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The travel of the endless systems may be period
ically reversed for flat knitting.
The stitch-forming member may be arranged
to work between co-operating upright guard
and accepting members, 6. g., by arranging the
latter so that the channel of the guard member
which is for the time being operative faces the
channel in the member which is to accept the‘
may be under the control of interchangeable in
termittent mechanisms.
The thread layer also may be under the Jac
quard or other stitch-determining control so as
to be capable of co-operating with the looper for
knitting either plain or purl stitches in which
ever direction the knitting is progressing.
The casting off of the stitch on the guard
member may be facilitated by causing the guard
In certain forms of the invention the guard
member may be displaceable to elongate the new
loop while the latter is held by the looper, the
accepting member accepting the new loop while
to recede out of the stitch, e. g., by a sliding or
it‘ is held elongated and particularly in this form
new stitch.
rocking motion, and the accepting member may
receive a movement into the new loop, e. g., may
be mounted to slide or rock, or, alternatively, the
stitch-former may be so constructed and ar
ranged to operate as to cast off theold stitch
from the guard and/or deposit the new stitch
it is advantageous to move the guard members
progressively step-by-step inwards as they ap
proach the knitting station and the accepting
members outwards as they recede from the knit
ting station. The guard members preferably
on the accepting member without the aid of any
rock away from the stitch former in elongating
the loop and slide transversely in receding out of
such movement of recession and entry of the =
the old stitch when the new loop has been ac
guard and accepting members.
.
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Preferably the machine will have two knittin
stations, and the knitting stations‘ may in some
forms, be movable to vary the number of convey
ing members effective for knitting. More than L
cepted. The accepting member also» preferably
slides transversely inwards in order to pass
through the new loop. The guard members may
in this form each have a guard channel or slot
thrust‘ one another along the course. Alter
natively they ‘may be carried by-an endless con
which opens upwards and the looper arranged to
oscillate about a ?xed axis thereabove and the
accepting members may ‘be given a chisel shaped
edge chamfered to a point which is arranged to
move in close juxtaposition to the hook in pene
trating the new loop supported by the hook.
These last features are hereinafter illustrated
by way of example in a form of apparatus in
which there are two endless systems of conveying
members each system being in the form of
veyor', e. g., achain conveyor, or- by two such con- "
spaced-chain conveyors having transverse guides
veyors whereheéessary.
for the guard and accepting members and in an
other form in which the looper travels in lieu of
two may be provided by appropriately varying
the course of the conveying members, each deal
ing successively with stitches which are awaiting
a new loop.
'
The'conveying members ‘may be constructed ,
and arranged to form internal gear teeth which
engage for drive with toothed driving wheels and
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Thestitch'former may comprise a curved arm
the guard and accepting members.
connected'to a‘ medial axle or bearing about
In order that the invention may be the more
which such arm oscillates. This oscillatory mo
tion is very- convenient for ?rst engaging the 40 readily understood reference is hereinafter made
to the accompanying drawing-s which illustrate
thread and then drawing the loop and it may
various forms of construction.
also assist in landing the new loop and in subse
Fig. 1 is a front elevation of one of such forms,
quently-permitting the stitch-former to disen
Fig. 2 being an end elevation in the direction
gage itself from the loop, ' The stitch-former (looper)- axis may be dis 45 of the arrow 2 of Fig. 1. Fig. 3 is a view from the
same direction but with the end bracket C Fig. 2
placeableespecially when the looper is required
removed and showing only the lower part of the
to cast off the 01d stitch and/or to deposit the
machine. Fig. 4 is a sectional end elevation look
new‘loop and this axis may be movable up and
ing in the direction of arrow 4, Fig. 1, and Fig. 5
down once to enable the new loop to be formed
‘and the old stitch to be cast off- and again to ' is a detailed front elevation on the’ line 5--5
of Fig. 4 of the looper mechanism. Figs. 6, 7 and
enable the new stitch to be landed and released
8 are end, front and back elevations of one of the
from the looper and. a further displacement of
conveying members and Fig. 9 is a fragmentary
the looper axis across the machine may be pro- ’
detailed view showing the way these members are
vided for the purpose of taking the new loop to
driven by the sprockets. Figs. 9a to 910 show var
the accepting part.
‘ '
ious positions of the parts while the looper is
The direction in which the oscillatable looper
forming a new loop and landing it on the» accept
enters the old stitch may be controlled by cams
ing member. and releasing the old loop from the
which are interchangeable automatically under
guard member and Fig. 91 shows diagrammati
the control of Jacquard or other stitch deter
mining mechanism. The looper may be given an 60 cally in plan the introduction of a second knit
ting station instead of causing the loops to travel
initial angular displacement about its axis- ’? os
cillation in either direction so as to relat»... it for
round one end of the system as in Fig. 9b.
knitting in either direction of ?ow of the knitting
, Fig. 10 is a half front elevation of a modified
i-ng members, or of the looper when this travels,
fragmentary longitudinal vie-w of the cams shown
the machine, Fig. 11 is a half plan view
and similarly controlled interchangeable cams 65 form‘of
of this machine, Fig. 12 is a part longitudinal
may be provided for this purpose. Four inter
sectional view, Fig. 13 is a part end sectional view
changeable cams, may be used so that the looper
and Fig. 14. a part end sectional view showing cer
can draw the new loop selectively in either direc
tain parts of the looper mechanism. Fig. 15 is an
tion through the old stitchv in either direction of
end view of Fig. 14 showing one ‘of the cams
flow; of knitting. The direction in which the 70 therein illustrated whilst Fig. 16 is a fragmentary
looper axis is taken across the machine may also
end view looking at the looper. Figs. 17, 18 and
be reversible in accordance with the direction, of
19. arev face views of the other three cams shown
flow of the knitting by means. of; cams which are
in Fig. 14. Fig. 20 is- another fragmentary end
interchangeable. The movement of the convey
view looking at the’looper. Fig. 21 is another
112,403,763
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bers are brought forward successively.
?ed apparatus a loop may at any time be formed
fro across the machine.
automatically in the reversed-irection through an
cularpe. g., C-shaped, member the two ends ll,
l2>of such member being hooked outwards,- the
hook'for? [the time being in operation moving
through the guard portion of the conveying mem
"
Figs." 25:34 show diagrammatically 'a further
modi?ed form of machine in which the convey
conveyor to those on theother; Fig. 2-5 being a
longitudinal elevation thereof, Fig. 26am end sec
tional'elevationand Fig‘. 27 a further ‘end sec
tional‘elevation. Fig. 28-vis ‘a detail view show;
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The vlooper may take the form of a part cir
old stitch, employing the other looper hook to the
ing members are carried ‘by two endless conveyors‘
and‘ the looper knits from the membersonone
r
II! which is arranged parallel to the two oppo
site reaches of the system of conveying members
7 and this spindle is movable up and down and to
anism, partly in section and Fig. 24 a plan view
thereof.’ Figs. 24a to 24]‘ show how by this modi
7‘
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"The looper is fast with an oscillatable spindle
mechanism, Fig. 23 is anvend view of such mcch- .
oneoperation in Figs; 9a, etc.
6
the members of the opposite reach as such mem
in Fig. 14 and Figs. 15-19. Fig. 2211s a'longiitul
dinal sectional elevation of the thread layer
ber- and through» the old 'stitch- thereabout to
engage ‘the thread and moving ‘back through the
15 guard ‘to draw the new loop through the old
stitch and thence across the machine to carry
this loop onto the accepting point of'a convey
the loop formation and" Fig. 29 a plan of one knit
ting end; Fig. 30 is another plan of the means
fOr displacing the guard members progressively
‘inwards and the accepting members progressively
outwards to and from the knitting station. Fig.
31 is a plan view of a part of one of the chains
of they conveyors and Fig. 32' is a front view there
of; Fig. 33 is a longitudinal elevation and Fig.
34 an end view of one of thev guide members which
bridge the two chains of a conveyor and serve
ing member‘ of the opposite reach. The old'stitch
is cast off the guard member by the looper as
it‘ draws over the‘new loop and another guard
member moves forward.v 'That- accepting member
' which has taken the previously formed new
stitch is moved on and by the'time the new loop
has been brought across the endless system the
next acceptingmember has moved forward to
accept‘ the new loop. The looper then returns
across the machine. The looper not only rocks
about‘ its axis for engaging the thread and car
to receive the conveying members‘;
. rying the new loop through the old stitch, but
Figs. 35 to 40 show diagrammatically'a further
form‘. of‘ machine with two endless systems, Figs. 30 itrmoves upwards for drawing the new loop and
drawingofi the old stitch from the guard and
35' to 37 showing fragmentarily' the way the
loop'ei' co-operates with the conveying -memhers V across the machine and downwards for deposit
ing- the new stitch on the accepting point.
r
for. the time being at the knitting station and
The 'looper spindle [0 has a'bevel wheel 13
Figs. 38 and 39 the way the conveying members
are related for displacement by the sprockets,
Fig. 40 being a detail-view of‘ the channeled por
tion of one of the conveying members.
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Fig; 41 is a diagrammatic end elevation show
ing a variant form of machine in which the 'looper
travels in lieu of the guard and accepting mem
bers; Figs. 42 and 43 are details views of the
looper and thread-layer of this machine ‘and Figs.
44 and 45 are detail views of a means for reversing
the looper'icarriage. J 11
which meshes with a bevel wheel M at right an
gles to it‘ on a vertical-shaft or spindle l5 car
rying a helical gear ‘l8 driven by a helical gear
if for oscillating’ spindle ID. The bearing I8
‘for thelooper spindle H) has upstanding rods 18a
which ‘are vertically slidable in a slide block I9
which is movable across the machine guided by
?xed rod l?a and by a rod 2!! which moves with
the'block and is slidable in the frame 2|.
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‘1. The slide block W is normally urged 'in one
Figs. 46 to 48 show ‘how the operation of the
direction'racross the machine by‘iahelical spring
machine shown in: Fig. 41Qmay be modi?ed so that
the loops are accepted by the same guardmem
bers as carried the stitches through which they
the'machine against-thisspring by a lever 23'
pivoted on the machine frame at 24‘and rocked
were formed."
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In the. form of machine illustrated in Figs. lie-9,7
the stitch guard members are constituted by
stitch-conveying members I and are in the form
of a series of uprights each having a channelled
guard portion 2'and' being pointed at 3. They
are arranged side-by-side as an endless series and s
are advanced intermittently along an endless
Hand, is moved in the reverse direction across
by a follower 25 of a cam 26 on a-vertically
slidable bar 21.
'
' ‘ The main shaft 23 of the machine is arranged
to' be'rotated and it carries the large spur wheel
29 which gears with a spur wheel 30 ‘on the long
shaft 3| and a spur wheel 32 on a second long
shaft 33. vOn these shafts 3i and 33 are eccen
trics 34, 35 which operate sleeves 36, 31, the
‘former being connected by rods 38' to the ver
A convenientmethod of moving the conveying
tically guided cam bar 21 and the latter through
to shape the conveying members atl, 8 (seeFigs.
6-9) so that the series of members passing round
the curved ends of the system form what are in
‘pini 4| which rocks in a slot 42 in av lever 43
rods 39 to the vertically guided cam bar 40 so
members round the endle'sstrack is to provide, at
each end’ of the endless system two‘ co-axial 60 ‘that the bars are given a vertical reciprocatory
motion by the eccentrics. Thebar 49 carries a
sprocket wheels 5, 6 at different levels and locally
effect internally toothed gears co-operating with
the sprockets.
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The upright members of one reach of the end
less system are situated with their longitudinal
channels facing the channels of the members of
the opposite reach. In combin'ation‘with such‘
members we use a stitohef-orming' means or looper
'9 which passes directly through the; channel ‘of
each member (and the stitch 'thereabout) as the
members are brought ‘successively'into knitting
pivoted’. at“ to the machine frame and ar
ranged at its free .end 45 to engage and rock
a cam having two cam surfaces 46; 46a and
'mounted on‘ a. shaft 41 carrying a large bevel
wheel ‘48 engaging a'bevel'rwheel 49 on shaft‘iiil
which mounts the helical gear H. The gear I‘!
*is slid-able along a key-way 5| in shaft 59. vThe
spindle i5 is slidable with reference to helical
wheel [3 by akey-way'connection am, the wheel
‘ I6 being axially ?xed.
On the shaft 41. carry-r
ing the large bevel wheel, there is a cam 52 which
depresses a slide 53, which is guided by the‘rods
position and the new stitch is' accepted by one of ‘ 75 54 in'a v?xed part of theframe, against arspring
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