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Патент USA US2403798

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juiy Q, 1946.
_'
G. l. HOLMES
SUMMER-WINTER CONTROL
2,403,798
INSTRUMENT
Filed May- 4, 1942
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INVENTOR.
Gi?oka. I; Holmcbs’
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Afforneyn
Patented July 9, 1946
~ 2,403,798
UNITED STATES2,403,793PATENT OFFICE
SUMMER-WINTER CONTROL INSTRUMENT
Gi?’ord I. Holmes,‘ 'Minneapolis, Minn, assignor to
Minneapolis-Honeywell Regulator ‘Company,
Minneapolis, Minn., a ‘corporation of Delaware
Application May 4, 1942, Serial No. 441,648
13 Claims.
.
1
(01. 257_3) .
2
.
Thisapplication is a continuation in part of
my copending application Serial No. 301,900 ?led
October 30,‘ 1939, as to all matter common to the
two applications. The subject matter of these
related applications and‘ common-to both, in~¢
volves improvements in‘ thermostatic devices.
‘ conceivable that the occupants of the dwelling
might adjust the heating means below ‘the
cooling means with the result that both would be.
in operation simultaneously.
Another feature. that has been found highly
desirable in heating and cooling systems is that
Application Serial, No. 301,900 has become‘
Patent No. 2,309,193, dated Jan. 26, 1943.,
feature known as delayed heating. or cooling, ‘
anticipation. This ‘type of function‘ in‘ a ‘system,
The present invention relates to summer
consider heating for example, .is' that after the
winter control instruments and more particularly 10 thermostat has called for-heat‘ and a slight rise‘l
to such instruments and the circuitstherefor
embodying novel means for obtaining automatic
' in temperature occursin the‘ space, the operation
of, the thermostat will be' accelerated to ‘thereby
changeiover ‘from heating to cooling and vice
open the control contacts to terminate operation
of the burner. ‘Such operation will anticipate the‘
In heating and coolingvcontrol it is conven 15 delivery of heat to the space prior to the actual
tional practice to make use of a plurality of
delivery thereof. With such a system over-,
versa.
.
I.
g
V
.
controlling instruments together with‘rnanual
means for changing control from one to the other
thereof ‘at different seasons of the year. Such
systems therefore comprise some duplication of
parts. A further disadvantage of present systems
resides in this need for manual change-over. In
shooting in the space is prevented.
. '
Upon operating on.thecooling cycle it is 'de-.
sirable when the space, begins to cool to speedup
20 oraccelerate the operation ofthe' thermostat to
the spring and fall of the year in some sections
cause .the cooling means to be deenergized and
thus anticipate the cooling in thespace to thereby
prevent over-shooting.
'
'
of the country, both heating and cooling may be
Another desirable feature in av thermostat of v
needed in the same day, or from‘ day to day. 25 the naturesetout aboveis'in automatic change
Hence, the householder must operate the change
over from heating to cooling, and vice versa;
With. this automatic change-over during, the
over means a great number of times inorder to
obtain the desired operation of the heating and
spring and fall of the year, when heating and
cooling means.
cooling may ‘be needed from day to day or at
In the prior art it has become more and more 3 O different times during the same day, the cooling
common to supply both heating and cooling in
devices will automatically energize either ‘the
buildings and in dwellings. In these heating and
cooling or the heating means as indicated by'the
cooling systems it has become a conventional
temperature a?ecting the bimetallic element.
practice to equip the systems with a plurality of
It is, therefore, an object of the present inven
controls. These controllers take the form of 35 tion to provide a'heating and cooling system hav
thermostats. The first of the controllers may
ing automatic change-over control means.
control the cooling system and the second con
A further object of the present invention is to
troller would control vthe heating system. In the
provide an automatic change-over control means
event that it is desired to change from heating
to cooling, it is necessary to give manual atten
utilizing snap action switch means for energizing
either the cooling or the heating means.
Another object 'of'the present invention is to
provide .an automatic change-over switch with
heating anticipation when the device is operating
tion ‘to the system to either place one or the
other of the controllers into control. Because
of the complicated nature of some of these sys
tems it has been found necessary to give skilled
on the heating cycle and cooling anticipation
‘attention to the control systems. For this reason 45 when the deviceis operating on the cooling cycle.
the systems have not met with ready approval
under many circumstances.
An example of the undesirability of heating
and cooling systems needingimanual change
over is in the domestic ‘air conditioning ?eld.‘
A further object is to provide a novel type of
cooling anticipation to a system forcontrolling
a’ cooling ‘means. '
_
‘Another object is to provide an automatic
change-overI-switch with heating meansv whereby
Here the controller is placed within the dwelling
space in the building and the occupants thereof
usually adjust the control means from time to
temperature differential.
time to the desired setting. If two controls Were
in the accompanying speci?cation and claims. I
employed for a manual change-over switch, it is 55
the device will have a very small change-over
_
The aboveand other objects will be apparent
In the drawings,
"
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2,403,798
3
4
At the lower left-hand end of the bimetal strip
Figure 1, is a diagrammatical view of one em
bodiment of my invention.
Figure 2 is a diagrammatical view of a modi?
cation thereof.
And Figure 3 is a diagrammatical view similar
to Figure 1, but of a modi?cation thereof.
Referring ?rst to Figure 1, a heating means I8
and a cooling means II are controlled by relays
58 are a pair of movable cooling control contacts
18 and 1|. The contact 1| is mounted at the
lower end of a resilient strip 12 so that contact
1I may be pushed back when engaging its sta
tionary contact to permit engagement of contact
18 with its stationary contact. The contact 1|
cooperates with a stationary contact 13 carried
upon a bracket 14 which is in turn mounted to
I2 and I3, respectively. The heating relay I2
a movable insulating panel 15. The movable con
10
comprises a winding I4 which when energized
tact 18 cooperates with a stationary contact 16
through circuits to be hereinafter traced pulls
which is secured to a ‘bracket 11 also carried by
in relay arms I5, I6 and I1. These relay arms
the panel 15.
cooperate ‘with stationary contacts I8, I9 and 28,
A pair of adjustable abuttable contacts 88 and
respectively. Suitable biasing means are pro
BI are suitably mounted on posts 82 and 83, re
vided for return of the said relay arms to the 15
spectively, which are secured to the movable in
position shown in Figure 1 upon‘ the deenergi
sulating member 15. The contacts 88 and 8| may
zation of the winding I4. The contacts I6 and
be bridged by a conducting plate 85 which is
I9 are in control of the heating means I8 and
mounted by means of insulation 86 upon the
a circuit therefor may be traced as follows: from
left-hand end of the bimetal strip 58. The
the line wire 25 through conductor 26, relay arm 20 lower
contacts ‘88 and 8| when bridged are adapted
I6, contact I9, conductor 21, the heating means
to complete circuits used in connection with the
I8 and the conductor 28 back to the other line
heating contacts mounted on the lower right
wire 29. It is seen therefore that when the relay
hand end of the strip 58. These contacts may
winding I4 is energized a circuit for placing the
also be adjusted to vary the relative spacing of
25
heating means in operation is closed.
the
heating and cooling contacts, to thus vary the
The relay I3 comprises a winding 38 which
changeover temperature di?erential. The pur
when energized moves movable contacts 3|, 32,
pose of ‘these various contacts will be more fully
33, 34, and 35 toward the left. These contacts
described hereinafter.
cooperate with stationary contacts 38, 31, 38, 39,
A pair of abuttable cooling control contacts 98
48, and 4|, respectively. Suitable biasing means 30 and
9| are suitably mounted upon posts 92 and
are provided for return of the said relay arms
9-3, respectively. The contacts 98 and 9| are
or movable contacts to the position shown in Fig
adapted to be bridged by a conducting plate 94
ure 1 upon the deenergization of the winding I4.
which
is mounted upon an insulating piece 95
The movable contact arm 35 and the stationary
contact 4| control the operation of the cooling 35 carried by the lower right-hand end of the ther
mal strip 58. The contacts 98 and 3| when
means II. When contact 4| is engaged by the
bridged are adapted to cooperate with circuits
arm 35 a circuit for the cooling means II may
controlled by the cooling contacts carried by the
be traced as follows: from the line wire 25
lower left-hand end of the‘bimetal strip 58. The
through conductor 45, relay arm 35, contact 4|,
operation of this portion of the controller will
conductor 46, cooling means II, and conductor
be hereinafter more fully described.
41 back to the other line wire 29. From tracing
The insulating panel 15 is adapted to be moved
the foregoing circuit it is seen that when the
either to the right or to the left by its mounting
relay winding 38 is energized that a circuit for
the cooling means is completed so that the cool
ing means II will be placed into operation.
arm I88 which is pivoted on the post 51. The
45 purpose of moving the arm I88 to thereby move
the insulating panel carrying the stationary con
tacts as well as the abuttable contacts is so that
an adjustment-for the device may be obtained.
58-comprises a primary winding 5| and a low 50 The upper endof arm I88 is bifurcated to form a
pair of ?ngers I8I and I82. The ?nger I82 is
voltage secondary winding 52. Also in control of
biased to the left by a spring I83 which at its
these relays is a control device generally indi
other end is secured to an upturned ear I94 on
cated by the reference character 55.
the base 56. The spring I83 normally biases
The control device 55 comprises a base 56 hav
the ?nger I8| into engagement with a day ad
ing a pivot post 51 secured thereto. Upon the
post 51 a bimetallic member 58 is freely mount 55 justment cam I85. The cam I85 is non-rotatably
?xed upon a post 386 which in turn may be ro
ed by a bracket 59. The bimetallic member 58
tated by an adjustment dial I81 carrying tem
is arranged so that upon a temperature decrease
perature indicia I88. The indicia I88 cooperates
the ends of the bimetal member 58 will tend to
with a pointer I89 to indicate the position of the
move apart and upon an increase in temperature
these ends will move closer to each other. Upon 60 day adjustment cam I85. As the adjustment dial
£8? is rotated, the cam I85 will be rotated to a
the lower right-hand end of the bimetallic strip
similar degree to thereby vary the position of
58 are carried a plurality of movable heating con
the finger I8| and hence the position of the arm
trol contacts 68 and 6|, respectively. The con
tact 6| is mounted upon a resilient strip 52 so 65 I88. When the adjustment dial I81 is moved in
a counter-clockwise direction the ?nger IIJI will
that the contact 6| may be pushed back to per
move to the left. Movement to the left of the
mit engagement of the contact 68 with its sta
?nger I8I will cause the arm I88 to be moved
tionary contact for a purpose to be hereinafter
toward the right. With such adjustment it is
more fully pointed out. The contact 6| cooper
seen that the bimetal strip 58 will have to heat
ates with a stationary contact 63 which is mount
ed upon a conducting bracket 64 which may ex 70 up before it will actuate any of the contacts car
' Energy for actuating the relays I2 and I3 is
supplied ‘from a transformer generally indicated
by the reference character 58. The transformer
tend out from the rear of the base 56. The mov
able contact 68 cooperates with a stationary con
tact 65 which is carried upon a conducting brack
ried by its lower left-hand end. Hence, it is seen
that an adjustment to increase the control set
ting of the device is obtained. Moving the dial
I81 in the opposite direction conversely lowers
et 66 which likewise may extend upwardly from -1 or
the control point.
the rear of the base 56.
>
2,403,798
5.
A night adjustment cam H0 is suitably se
cured to a night adjustment dial I I I carrying in
dicia similar. to the’ dial; I01. The ?nger I02 co
operates with thecam III! to determine the po
sition to’ which the thermostatic strip 58 is moved
6.
adjustment-ici- the thermostat'55. Upon moving
the spring arm [30 to. the left in the. manner
above described, the contacts I3! and I32 will
be unbridgecl. The purpose of this action is to
prevent operation of the cooling means when
for shut-down operation during certain. portions
shutting down: the temperature at'night. A sec"
of the day, usually atv night time.
I > .
ond' purpose for vun‘bricl‘ging the contacts I3Iw and
A spring operated time motor for shifting the
i321; is to: give. night shut down- when the device
device over from day tonight operation is gen
is operating on. its. cooling cycle so that the cool
erally indicated by the reference character, I I5. 10 in“: means maybe placed out’ of operationduring
The: timing motor comprises a suitable spring
a; desired portion of the day.
'
operated clockwork, not. shown, which rotates a
Agsrnall spring I,3.5 is connected to the right
cam member I IS. The cam is adapted to move a
hand leg of‘ the bimetal strip 53Iand to the ad-'
cam follower II‘! to one, of two positions. The
~lusting: arm IIIBIL. The spring I35 exerts suf?cient.
cam follower, II‘! is shown in a drop-off portion
force upon the bimetal strip-58v so as to tend to
1 i8. which is the normal position for the follower‘
turn the. same on the pivot 51in a: clockwise di
during the’ day time. When the cam III; is ro
rection causing the abutting contacts 80, BI. or
tated to the right by turning a winding knob I I9,
the contacts 20’ and GI to be engagedwith su?i
the camfollower II ‘I will ride up a surface I29
cient: pressure to. give. good: electrical contact;
whereupon a drop-01f piece IZI which is biased 20 However; the spring I351 does not- eXert su?icient
into the position shownin the drawings will be
force to substantially vary the operation of the
pushed back until the cam follower I I1 passes
bimetallic strip 58. A heater Mil is arranged so
the riser portion I20.
'
.
Thetime motor I 15 is designed so that it may
as to ant-feet the: bimetallic strip 58 by means of
local heating under certain circumstances. In
be set by turning a manual knob I25 at the time
actual‘ construction of the device the heater Mil
of setting so that the hour of the day registers
might take the form‘ of a plug mounted upon the
with a Window in they case indicated in broken
pivot .51 to affect equally'bcth sides of the bimetal
lines at IZE. After this adjustment is made, the
58. However for purposes of illustration, the
winding. knob H9 is rotated in a clockwise direc
heater I49: is shown diagrammatically as" being
tion so that the cam follower II‘! will drop into 30 arranged adjacent only the right-hand side of
the drop-off portion H8 at a second, predeter
the bimetalstrip 58-.
,
mined time. vFor. example, it might be assumed
Heating
operation
that it is twelveo’clock in the evening at the po
sition of the parts shown in the drawings. Now
They operation of the device‘upon controlling
, assume it is desired for the morning pickup pe- <
the heating means; I-il» will now be described.
riod for the thermostat 58to begin at six o’clock
When the ambient temperature- aifecting' the
, in the morning. The winding knob H9 would
thermostatic strip 58 decreases the ends thereof
merely be turned around until the numeral 6 car
will tend. to spread apart. Spreading apart- of
ried on a dial I21 appeared in the window I26. ,
the ends. of the thermostatic strip‘ 58 causes the
With such adjustment of the clock mechanism
abutta-ble contacts ailandal to be-bridged by the
H5 it would take six hours before the cam fol
lower II'I would drop into the lower detent por
tion H8.
The cam follower II ‘I carriesa resilient arm
I30. When the spring arm I3!) is in the position
shown it is adapted to permit the spring I 03 con
nected to the adjustment ?nger I02 to move the
adjustment ?nger IoI into engagement with a
day adjustment cam I35. Hence, when the cam
follower II‘! is in the position shown, the ther
mostat 53 will control under the day setting de
termined by the adjustment of the cam IIl'I.
When the arm I33 is: in the position shown, a
pair of contacts I31 and I32 are bridged by a por
tion thereof. It will be understood that the con
tacts could be bridged by some suitable pressed
back contact structure carried upon the arm I30
if desired. When the contacts I3! and I32 are
conducting plate- 35.. The spring I 3.5 biasesthe
bimetal Ellv as. a whole ina. clockwise direction
towards the left so that. this action will take place >
first... Thereafter, upon further cooling. of the
“ thermostatic strip. 5a the lower rightehand end
thereot willmovetoward the right. The mov
able contact 6i will ?rst engage its stationary
contact. 63. 'At. this. time however,.,no circuit is
completed for the relay winding I4 becausev the
movable contact arm I5 of the relay I2 will be
out of engagement with its stationary contact
I8 and, there will be no circuit to the relay coil
I4. Upon further cooling of the thermostatic
strip 58;. the contact 6!] will engage the station
ary contact 65. At this time, a circuit for the
relay winding IA of the relay l2 may be traced from
the transformersecondary 52 as follows: from
wire I45‘ through wire I45‘, contact bracket 64,
bridged the circuit for the cooling cycle is placed
stationary contact as, movable contact 6|, flex
in condition for control by the thermostat as'will 60 ible strip 52‘, contact iii], stationary contact 65,
be hereinafter more fully described. When the
conducting bracket
wire I41, relay winding
cam follower Ill rides up onto the high surface
III. wire I43 and wire I49 back to the other side
of the cam II 6, the spring arm I30 is moved
of the transformer’ secondary 52. Energization
toward the left. Movement of the arm I30 to
of the relay winding I4‘ causes the movable con
ward the left will move the insulating panel ‘I5 65 tacts I5,- If' and» I-‘I' to be moved towards the
toward the left. The amount of movement of
right and results‘ in engagement of the contacts
the panel 15 will be determined now by the ad
I8’ and I9 by their respective movable contact
justment of the night setting cam III}. When
arms I5 and I6. Engagement of contacts IEYand
the arm I90 is rotated: toward the left the ad
I9 will cause energization of the heatingv means
justment’ ringer‘ I!!2 thereof will move into. en 70 through the circuit previously traced.
gagement with the adjustmentv cam III]. The
Operation ofv the. heating means It will re
spring arm. $3.0 isstrong enough to overcome the
sult in an increase in- temperature in the space
spring I23. connected to the arm I92: so the ad
in which the thermostat 55 is located. After the
justment ?nger I02. will move into engagement
temperatureeof the space rises. slightly the mov
with the cam. I II). which will determine the night 75 able. contact. 6%. will. move out of engagement
2,403,798.
7
with its stationary contact 65 but the contact 6|
will remain in engagement with its contact 63
because of .the pressback due to its mounting
8
Changeover operation
On the resilient blade 62.
At the time contacts 60 and I55 separate, a
If the thermostatic strip 58 is heated up indi
cating that the ambient temperature is rising
due to external conditions, for example the out
door temperature, the lower right-hand end of
holding circuit for the relay winding I4 of the
the bimetallic strip 58 will move toward the left.
relay I2 may be traced as follows: from the trans
After moving through a predetermined range of
movement, for example 3° temperature change
former secondary 52 through wires I45, I45,
bracket 64, contacts 63 and BI, ?exible blade 62, 10 after the contact 6| moves out of engagement
with the stationary contact 63, the bridge piece '
bimetal strip 53, mounting bracket 59, wire I50,
94 will engage the abuttable contacts SI] and 9|.
wire I5I, abuttable contact BI, bridge 85, con
At this time a circuit for the heater I40 may be
tact 80, wire I52, heater I45, wire I53, contact
traced as follows: from the transformer second
I8, contact blade I5, wire I54, relay winding I4,
ary 52 through wire I45, wire I58, relay arm I1,
.wire I48 and wire I49 back to the other side
“out” contact 20 of relay I2 which is deenergized
of the transformer secondary 52. It will be noted
at this time, wire I6I, a variable resistance I62,
that this circuit includes the heater I40 adja
wire I63, “out” contact 40 of the cooling means
cent the bimetal strip 58. Although this circuit
control relay It, contact arm 34, wire I64, heater
including this heater is closed immediately when
Mil, wire N55, abuttable contact 9|, bridge piece
the relay I2 pulls in, the resistance I40 will be
shunted out by the contacts 60 and 55 so that 20 54, contact 99, and wire I65 back to the other
side of the transformer secondary 52. On trac
this heater will not be brought into operation
ing the above circuit, it is seen that the heater
until after contacts 60 and 65 are opened.
549 is energized and as previously discussed, is
The heater I40 may be so selected so as to give
adapted to supply substantially 23° of heat to the
substantially three degrees of heat to the bime
bimetal strip 58, Additional heat being applied
tallic strip 58. Hence, after the contacts 60 and
to the strip 58 will result in the movable contacts
65 open and the circuit previously traced includ
‘ill and ‘II carried at the lower left hand end
ing the heater is in control of the relay l2 a
thereof moving into engagement with their re
certain amount of heat will be given off to the
bimetal.
This will result in a speed up in oper
ation of the bimetallic strip 58 in a heating di
rection which will tend to open the Contacts 6|
and 63 to deenergize the heating relay I2. De
energization of the heating relay I2 will result
in shutting off of the heating means. From the
foregoing it is seen that I have provided a de- :
layed heat anticipation action on the heating
cycle.
For night shut down while operating on the
heating side of the system, the clock mechanism
II5 is adjusted at some desired time at night to
pick up again at a predetermined time in the
morning. To adjust the device, the knob I I9 is
rotated in a clockwise direction to move the cam
- follower II‘! and the spring blade I30 connected
thereto toward the left. This will result in shift
ing the insulating panel ‘I5 carried upon the ad
justment arm I I30 toward the left. It will also
result in opening the contacts I3I and I32 to the
cooling system so that the cooling means will not I
be started during this time. Moving of the panel
15 toward the left will make it necessary for the
thermostatic strip 58 to expand more or in other
words to cool further before closing contacts
GIL-65 to start the heating operation. Hence, it
is seen that the thermostatic strip 58 will now
control at a low temperature which is determined
by the adjustment of the night shut-down cam
III.
Otherwise, the operation of the heating
spective stationary contacts. By such operation,
it is seen that I have provided a switch change
over device which is substantially capable of con
trolling either heating or cooling at approxi
mately the same temperature.
On changeover in the opposite direction heat
is removed from the bimetal 58 when the bridge
plate 94 separates from contacts 90 and GI to
thereby speed up cooling action of the bimetal.
Cooling operation
When the movable ‘contact ‘II carried upon the
?exible contact mounting strip 12 at the lower
left hand end of the bimetallic strip 58 moves
into engagement with its stationary contact ‘it,
no circuit will be established for the relay It be
cause the holding contacts 36 and BI of the relay
l3 will not at this time be in engagement. How
ever, when the movable contact 76 engages the
stationary contact ‘l5 an energizing circuit for
the relay winding 30 of the relay i3 may be
traced as follows: from transformer secondary
52 through wire I45, wire I‘Ill, contact I32, spring
I39, contact I3I, wire I'll, conducting bracket
‘III, contact ‘13, contact ‘II, resilient arm 72, con
tact 1E3, stationary contact ‘I6, conducting bracket
11, wire I12, relay winding 30, wire H3, relay
arm 33, “out” contact 38, wire I14, and wire 149
back to the other side of the transformer second
ary 52. The above traced circuit will cause pull
ing in of the relay I3 and engagement of the relay
relay I2 is identical to that discussed hereinbe
,arm 35 with its stationary contact 4| as well as
fore. In other words, ‘the last to make contacts
all of the other left-hand stationary contacts of
the relay. Engagement of contacts 35 and III will
result in energization of the cooling means II
through the circuit hereinbefore traced for said
60 and 65 must close before the relay winding
I4 is energized and the last to open contacts BI
and 63 which are in circuit with the heater I40
control the holding circuit to the relay I2. There
fore, it is seen that the present device gives de
layed heat anticipation on both day and night
means.
It will be noted that the heater I40 is energized
upon the bridging of the contacts 80 and 9| by
the plate 94 prior to the energization of the cool
ing means I I. Moreover it will be seen that when
When the winding I4 of the heating relay I2
is energized, the movable contact I'I moves out 70 relay coil 30 is energized and the cooling means
thereby placed in operation the heater I48 re
of engagement with an “out” contact 20. The
mains energized through a new circuit as fol
reason for this is to prevent a holding circuit
lows: from the transformer secondary 52 through
from being set up for the heat control relay
wires I45 and III], contact I32, spring I30, con
winding I4 which would be independent of the
tact I3I, wire I'II, contact bracket ‘i4, contacts
movable heating thermostatic contacts 50 and 6 I.
operation.
2,403,798
9
~10
Hand ‘II, contact carrying blade ‘I2, contacts
‘I0 and ‘I6, contact bracket 11, wire I12, relay
arms. As illustrated in the drawings, the relay
arm 34 may be ?exible and engage the stationary
winding 30, wire I13, relay arm 32, contact 31,
contact 39 prior to opening of the contact 38.
wire I15, contact 39, relay arm 34, wire I64, heater
Likewise, the contact 38 is adapted to remain
I40, wire I65, contact 9|, bridge piece 94, contact
closed until the stationary contact 31 is engaged
90, and wire I66 back to the other side. of the
by the arm 32. Thus it is seen that sufficient
transformer secondary 52, The original relay
overlap is provided so that the relay will be posi
circuit was broken at 33——38 and the previously
tively energized and remain energized until sep
traced original circuit for heater I40 was broken
aration of the holding contacts ‘II and '73.
.at 34-40 upon initial energization ofgrelay coil 10 It has ‘been found in practicing the condition
ing art that it is sometimes desirable to modify
.From tracing the foregoing circuits it will be
the operation of the system down at night. My
seen that the variable resistance I62 which was
novel device not only provides for lowering the
in series with the heater Mt when the relay I3
temperature at night on the heating cycle in the
was deenergized is now not in the circuit. The 15 manner hereinbefore described, but also deener
30.
‘
'
I
variable resistance I52 is so selected that its im
pedance will be approximately the same as either
of the relay windings 30 or I4. The reason for
gizes the cooling means at vnight so as to com
pletely shutoff the coolingoperation during the
night. To accomplish this, it is simply necessary
this is so that the resistance I40 will give approx
for an operator to rotate the adjustmentarm I I9
imately the same heating, for example 3", whether 20 to the desired setting, which operation will cause
the relay winding I4 is in series therewith or the
separate breaking of the circuit {through the con
relay winding 38, or the variable resistance I52.
tacts I3I and I32 which’ in normal day operation
By this structure it is seen that an exact tem
are bridged by the spring member I30. The cam
perature can be supplied tothe bimetal underdif
follower III is shown in Figure 1 in the position
ferent conditions and under diiferent controlling
which it normally takes for day operation for
operations in heating and cooling. With the
the device. Hence, in setting the clock mech
cooling means in operation, bimetal element 53
anism, I I5 in the above described manner the cir
will cool and ?rst open contacts l0—-l"6. '
cuit to the cooling relay I3 will be broken, for a
When the contact 70 leaves its stationary con
time predetermined by the setting of the clock
tact 16 it is desirable to have less heat generated ‘, work mechanism “.5. Such setting will in no‘
by the heater I40 aifect the bimetallic strip 50
way affect the heating contacts inasmuch as they
to accelerate cooling of the strip. For this reason,
I have devised a circuit which places a larger
resistance in the holding circuit after the contact
in separates from the stationary contact ‘it. This
circuit may be traced as follows: from trans
will be moved still further away from the station
ary contacts 63' and 65. ‘Hence it is seen that ‘I
have provided a device for automatic ‘change
over from .heating to cooling control wherein the
changeover degree of differential is kept at a
minimum and wherein night shut-down may be
provided whether operating upon the heating or
former secondary 52 through wires I45 and I10,
contact 5.3.2, spring 530, contact I3I, wire Ili, con
tact bracket 143, contacts 13 and ‘I I, contact blade
cooling cycleof the system.
12, bimetallic strip ~58, thermostat mounting
bracket =59, wire 15c, wire I80, a relatively large
resistance ISI, wire I82, holding contact36, relay
arm 3!, wire I83, relay winding 30, wire I13, re
lay arm 32, contact 3?, wire I'i?, contact .39, relay
arm 34, wire I64, heater I40, wire I05, contact 9|,
bridge Eli, contact 90, and wire I156 back to the
The modi?cation shown in Fig. 2
Referring now to Figure 2, a heating means
200 and a cooling means 20I are controlled ,re
spectively by a heating relay 202 and a cooling
relay 203. The heating relay 202 comprises ;a
relay .winding 202a which when energized moves
other side of the transformer‘secondary'52. It
will be noted that in the above circuit the large
resistance element I8I is in series ‘with the heater
a pair of ‘movable contactblades 206 and 20'! ,into
i'lir‘i. The resistance I8I .may be so selected that 50
the current ?ow through the above traced cir
cuits wiil be just su?icient to keep the relay wind
ing. 35 energized.
Hence, the potential drop
through the big resistance WI and the relay wind
ing 30 will be so large that very little heat will
emanate from the heater I40. This will remove
most of the 3° of heat theretofore furnished the
bimetal E8, causing it to cool, ' This cooling will
result in the ends of the bimetal moving in cooling
direction to accelerate the opening action between
the contacts ‘H and 73. Hence, this action might
be termed delayed cooling anticipation.
Sepa
ration of contacts ‘H and "I3 will of course result
.
engagement with stationary contacts ‘208 and 209,
respectively. Suitable biasing means are ;pro
vided whereby the said movable contact blades
are returned to the position shown in Figure 2
upon the'winding 202a being deenergized. En
gagement of contact arm 206 with station-ary
contact 20-8 will result/in energization of the _-hea-t-'
" ing means throughthe vfollowing circuit: from
line 'wire 2I0'through Wire 2I I, contact arm 2.06,
contact 208, wire 2I2, heating means 200 and
wire 2I3'back to the other'line wire 52M.
The cooling relay 203 includes a relay winding
:203a which when energized movesrelayarms '2 I5,
2I6, 2I1, 2H8, and 2H! into engagement with sta
tionary contacts 220, 22I, 222, 22.3, 224,.and 225.
. ‘Suitable biasing means are provided whereby the
in breaking the holding'circuit previously traced
saidrelay arms are returned to the position shown
to deenergize the relay and to cause the cooling 65 in Figure 2xupon the winding 203a being deener
means to be deenergized.
gized. Engagement of the contact arm :2l9 with
It will be noted upon referring again to the
the stationary contact 225 will result in ener
energizing circuit for-the cooling relay I3 that
gization of the cooling means 20I through the
the coil '30 is energized throughan “out” contact
following circuit: from line wire 2I0 through wire
38 engaged by an “out” contact arm 33. It will
226, contact arm '2I9, contact 225, wire 221, cool
also be noted that the energized position of the
ing means 20I and wire 228 back to the other line
relay depends upon the engagement of’ relay con
wire 2“.
,
tact 31 with relay arm 32 and relay contact '39
The heating and cooling relays 202 and 203
with arm 34. It is necessary ‘to have certain over
,receive electrical energyfrom a transformer gen
lapping in the operation of these relay contact 75 erally indicated by the reference character 230
glosses
11
end of the bimetallic strip‘ 240 will be in engage
ment with the adjustable stop 258. The lower
right-hand end of the bimetal 240 will move to
ward the stationary contacts 244 and 246. The
203 are under the control of , a thermostatic de
vice generally indicated by the reference char
acter 235.
?rst contacts to engage will be the movable con
tact 242 and the stationary contact 244. At this
time however, no circuit for the relay coil 202a
The controller 235 comprises a base 235 which
may be of insulating material and upon which
a pivot post 231 is secured. Freely pivoted upon
the post 231 by means of a bracket 238 is a bi
metallic strip thermostat 240. At the lower
will be established because of the fact that the
contact 200 will not be engaged by the relay arm
right-hand end of the bimetal strip 240 is car
ried a pair of movable heating control contacts
24! and 242. The contact v242 is mounted upon a
resilient strip 243 so that it may be pressed back
after engaging its stationary contact. The con
tact 242 cooperates with a stationary contact 244
which is carried upon a conducting bracket 245
which may extend to the rear of the base 236.
The contact 24! cooperates with a stationary
contact 245 which is secured to a conducting
bracket 241 which likewise may extend to the
rear of the base 236.
At the lower left-hand end of the bimetallic
strip 245 are a pair of cooling control contacts
250 and 25!. The contact 25! is carried upon a .
resilient strip 252 so that it may be pressed back
~ when engaging its stationary contact. The mov
able contact 25! cooperates with a stationary con
tact 253 carried upon a conducting bracket 254
which is secured to a movable insulating plate .
255. The contact 250 cooperates with a station
ary-contact 256 which is secured to a conducting
bracket 251 which likewise may be mounted upon
the plate 255.
12
is operating upon heating, the lower left-hand
which comprises a high voltage primary 23l and
a low voltage secondary 232. The relays 202 and
201. However, when the movable contact 24I en
gages its stationary contact 240, a circuit to the
relay winding 202a may be traced as follows:
from the secondary 232 of the transformer
through wire 215, wire 21$, bracket 245, contact
244, contact 242, contact strip 243, contact 24l,
contact 246, bracket 241, wire 211, relay coil 202a,
wire 218, and wire 219 back to the other side of
the transformer secondary. This circuit will
cause the relay to pull in and the relay arms to
engage stationary contacts. Engagement of the
relay arm 205 with the contact 208 will cause
energization of the heating means through the
circuit hereinbefore traced.
When the heating means has operated for a
suitable length of time, a slight rise in space tem
perature will occur. Upon a rise in space tem
perature the contact 241 will separate from the
stationary contact 246. However, at this time
the contacts 242 and 244 will not be separated
inasmuch as they engage slightly before en
gagement of contacts 2!“ and 246. Hence, a cir
cuit for maintaining the relay energized until the
contacts 242 and 244 separate may be traced as
follows: from the secondary 232 of the trans
'
.An adjustable stop 258 is mounted upon the
former through wires 215, 216, contact bracket
245, contacts 244 and 242, contact strip 243, bi
metallic strip 240, wire 280, heater 212, wires 28I
and 282, contact 229, relay arm 201, wire 283,
movable plate 255 and is adapted to cooperate
with the lower left-hand end of the bimetal and
serve as a bearing against which the bimetal may
abut and rotate about its pivot 231' so as to op
erate the heating contacts upon a decrease in 40 relay winding 202a, wires 218 and 219 back to
the other side of the transformer secondary 232.
It is noted that in this circuit the heater 212
will be energized and therefore will give heat to
temperature‘ as indicated by the legends on the
drawing. The stop 258 is made adjustable to
- vary the effective spacing of the contacts, and.
» A ?xed stop 255 cooperates with the lower right- -
the bimetallic strip 245 to speed up its operation
in separating contacts 242 and 244.. Hence, it is
hand end of the bimetallic strip 240 and the strip
is adapted to bear thereupon and rotate around
pation action in this circuit. During the period
--hence the changeover temperature differential.
- its pivot 231 to cause the movable cooling con
trol contacts 250 and 2.51 to engage the stationary
> contacts 256 and 253.
,
.
' 'An adjustment arm 250 is also pivoted upon
-
the post 231 and is biased for clockwise rotation
by a spring 25! which is secured at one of its
ends to an ear 232 on the base 236 and secured
at. its other end to the upper extending portion
seen that I have provided a delayed heat antici
of time that the contacts MI and 246 for pulling
the relay in remain in engagement, the heater 212
will be shunted out and therefore this heater will
not affect the operation of the bimetal until after
these contacts are separated.
Operation on cooling
In order to give a delayed cooling anticipation
I have provided means to supply heat to the
bimetal at all times except during a certain por
cooperates with an adjustment earn 263 which
tion of operation of the cooling means. A cir
may be rotated by an adjustment dial 264 hav
cuit for heater 21! which is on at all times except
ing indicia 255 thereupon which cooperate with
a pointer 266 to indicate the setting of the device. 60 for this period of time may be traced as follows:
from the transformer secondary 232 through con
A light spring 210 is secured at one of its ends
ductor 215, conductor 285, variable resistance 285,
to the bimetallic strip 240 and at its other end to
conductor 281, “out” contact 224 of the relay 203,
- the adjustment arm 250. The spring 210 urges
contact arm 2l8, conductor 288, the heater 21!,
the bimetallic member 240 as a whole in a clock
conductor 289, and conductors 290 and 219 back to
wise direction to the left so that one or the other
the other side of the transformer secondary 232.
of the ends will engage either of the stops 258 or
From this circuit it is seen that when the cool
259. A pair of heaters 21! and 212 are arranged
ing means are not in operation that a given de
in proximity to the bimetallic strip 240. I These
gree of heat,‘ for example for 3”, may be supplied
heaters are selected to give a predetermined de
gree of heat to the bimetal under certain oper- e to the bimetal at all times. It will also be noted
that‘ this heater is normally in operation, even
ating conditions to be described more fully here
. of- the arm 260. l The upper part of the arm 260
inafter.
‘
'
Operation on heating
when the thermostat is operating the heating
means.
Upon an increase in space temperature, the
decreasing temperature and the device as a whole 75 lower right-hand leg of the bimetallic strip 240
When the bimetallic strip 240 is subjected tea
2,403,798
'13
14
,
will move into engagement with the stop 259.
Thereafter the lower left-handend of the bi
tact .25! away from the-stationary contact 253.
metallic strip 240 will move away from its stop '
videda novel cooling anticipation type of struc
258 and into engagement with the stationary
contacts. The'?rst contacts to make as this tem
ture.
'It will be noted upon tracing the circuit for
perature rise takes place are the movable contact
25! and the-stationary contact 253. However, at
heating the bimetal when the cooling-relay is de
energized, that this circuit includes the variable
this time no effect will be had upon the relay.
Upon a further increase inyspace temperature
the movable contact 1259 will engage the sta
tionary contact 258. When these last to engage
contacts make, an energizing circuit for the re
lay winding 203a may be traced as follows: from
the secondary 232 of the transformer through
conductors 215, 216, 29!, bracket 254, contacts 253
By ~such structure it is seen that I have pro
resistance .286. The resistance 285 is so con
structed that its impedance in thiscircuit will be
substantially the same as the impedance of relay
winding 29311. The reason for this is that by-such
structure the heating to the bimetal 230 when the
relay is off will be substantially the same as when
the contacts 259 and 256 engage because the im
15 pedance in the circuit will be substantially the
and 25!, contact carrier-arm'252, contacts 258 and
same.
256, contact bracket 251, wire'232, relay coil 293a,
wire 4293, relay arm 2 l1, relay ‘\‘out” contact 222,
The modi?cation shown in Fig. '3
wire 294, and wires 290-and 219 back to the other
The device disclosed in Figure 3 will now bede
side of the transformer secondary.
20 scribed. In Figure 3, I have illustrated a heat
Once the'cooling relay 293 has been energized,
ing means 330 and a cooling means 32!. The
heating means is controlled by va snap action
"a new relay circuit including the heater 21! may
be traced as follows: from transformer secondary
232, wires (215i, 216 and 29!, contact bracket 254,
contacts 253, 25!, contact carrier 252, contacts G_
259 and 253, contact bracket 251, wire 292, relay
winding 293a, wire 293', relay arm 2! 5, contact
22!, wire 295, contact 223, relay arm 2E3, ‘Wire
e288, heater 21!, wire 289, and wires 29!: and 219
back to the other side of the transformer sec
ondary 232. The original circuit ‘for heater 21!
was broken at 2*!8-224, as was the original cir
cuit ‘for relay coil 203m at 2!1—222, upon the in
itial energization of relay coil 203a. How
ever, the relay arm 2!8 upon the initial en-
ergization of the winding 203a is adapted to
engage contact 223 prior to the opening of
the contact 222 by arm 2 I 1. Likewise the contact
222 is adapted to remain closed until the sta
tionary contact 22! is engaged by the arm 2l6.
Hence, it is seen that the heater 21!, which is
energized when the heating relay- 233 is deener
gized, is also energized when the relay is ener
l
switch generally indicated by the reference char
acter 392 and the cooling means is control-led by
a snap ‘action switch generally indicated by the
reference 393. When the contacts in the switch
332 are closed, a circuit is completed for operat
ing a heating means ‘from line wires 33:3 and 305.
When the contacts of the snap switch 333 are
closed a circuit for the cooling means is closed
from the line wires 396 and 301.
A control device for operating the snap switches
332 and 333 is generally indicated by the refer
ence character 3“). The'control device 3!:6 com
~
prises a base 311 upon which a bimetallic strip
312 is mounted upon a post 3E3 by means'of
a bracket 3M. [An adjustment ‘means, which is
similar in all respects to the adjustment means
described in connection with Figure 2, is gener
40 ally indicated at 3l5. An adjustment arm 3H3
carries a plate 311 which mounts a stop 3L8 for
the lower left-hand end of the bimetal and the
snap switch .303. A spring 329 biases the bi
gized so long as the movable contact 253 remains
metallic strip 312 towards the stop m as well as
in engagement with its stationary contact 253.
toward a stop 3!9. The stop 3!9 is adapted to
When contacts 253 and 253 separate indicating
cooperate with the bimetallic strip 3 ! 2 and serves
that there has been some cooling. in the space
as an abutment whereupon the strip may bear
which results in a slight movement of contact 25%]
to actuate the cooling snap switch 303. The ad
away from contact 252, it is desirable then to re
justable stop 3!8 may be rotated to vary the
move the heat from the bimetal to give delayed 50 differential of change-over of the switch and
cooling anticipation. Hence, I have provided a
cooperates with the bimetal in operation of the
further holding circuit having a high resistance
so that the effect of the heaters 21! and 212 will
be very slight. This circuit may be traced as
follows: from the transformer secoindary 232
heating switch 302.
Inasmuchas the snap switches 3.32 and 303 are
identical, only one of, them will be described.
When operating the cooling means, the bimetal
3! 2 will be heated and the ends will move toward
each other. The lower right-hand end of the
bimetal will, bear upon the abutment M9 and
through wires 215, 216, and ‘29!, contact bracket
254, contact 253, and 25!, contact arm 252, bi
metal strip 259, the mountingbracket 238, wire
28!], heater 212, wire 28 I, wire 2 96, large resistance
the lower left-hand end will force a plunger 33%]
291, wire 299, contact 220, relay arm 2l5, wire 299, 60 inwardly. This plunger 33!] builds up a force
relay winding 293a, wire 293, contact arm 2H5,
in a spring 33! which bears at its‘ innermost end
contact 22!, wire 295, contact 223, relay arm 2N3,
upon a vmovable cup 332, the cup in turn bears
wire 288, the heater 21!, wires 2B9, 29!], and 219
' against a switch arm 333, which is pivoted at its
back to the other sidev of the transformer sec
ondary 232. It is seen upontracing the above
circuit that the resistance of both heaters 21!
and 212 adjacent to the bimetal 249 are in series
with a considerably larger resistance 291. By
such an arrangement, the impedance on the cir
cuit is such that the effect of the heaters 21!
and 212 upon the bimetal is negligible, for ex
ample in the order of one-fourth to one-half of
one degree. Hence, the bimetallic member 229
will sense this effective cooling which will re
sult in accelerated movement of the movable con
lower end at 334 and at its upper end carries a
movable contact 335. The movable contact is
adapted to cooperate with a stationary contact
336 to make and break the circuit to the cooling
means 39!. A spring 331 biases the switch blade
333 in a counter-clockwise direction with a force
which ‘is, predetermined by the angle of force
application between it and the switch arm 333.
Hence, when su?icient force has been built up in
the spring 332 by a movement of the plunger 33!)
toward the right, the switch arm .333 will begin
to move in .a clockwise direction.
Thesprings
2,403,798
15
to movement of the switch arm 333 by the spring
331 falls off at a rate more rapid than the de
crease in force due to the action of spring 332.
Hence, what is known as a spring rate compen
sation or over compensation snap action is ob
tained. It will be understood that other snap ac
tion structure could also be utilized, for exam
ple magnets or overcenter snap switches.
After the contacts 335 and 335 have been made
for a suf?cient length of time the air affecting
the thermostat 3l2 will become cool and cause
the lower ends of the bimetallic strip 312 to sep
adjacent said ends, and a pair of snap action
switches adjacent said ends, one of said switches
being actuated by said strip upon cooling to op
erate said heating means and the other of said
switches being actuated thereby upon heating to
operate said cooling means, said strip acting upon
O the ‘?rst of said abutment means and rotating
arate. This separation will relieve the force in
the spring 332 and the force of the spring 33'!
acting upon the contact arm 333 will cause the
arm to snap away and separate the contact 335
from the contact 336, thus shutting off the cool
ing means.
The heating means switch 302 operates in an "
identical manner to the operation of the cool
ing means switch except for the fact that upon
cooling the switch 302 is made to energize the
heating means and upon heating the switch is
opened so that the heating means will be de
energized.
From the foregoing, it will be seen that I have
disclosed several modi?cations of my invention
for obtaining both heating and cooling control
having an automatic change over and control .
mechanism for preventing overshooting of the
delayed anticipation type.
16
therefor, and control means in said circuit com
prising a bimetal strip pivoted at a point be
tween its ends, ?rst and second abutment means
332 and 331 are so selected that the resistance
My present inven
tion embodies features which may be found ap—
plicable in other control ‘applications, for example
limit control or the like. It will be understood,
however, while only several embodiments of the
about its pivot point to actuate one of said
switches, and acting upon the second of said
abutment means and rotating about its pivot
point to actuate the other switch.
4. In a heating and cooling system, in combi
nation, heating means, cooling means, a circuit
therefor, and control means in said circuit com
prising a bimetal strip pivoted at a point between
its ends, a pair of switches adjacent said ends,
one of said switches controlling said heating
means and the other of said switches controlling
said coo-ling means, and means for causing auto
matic changeover from control by one to the
other of said switches consisting of abutment
means, said abutment means being ‘adjustable
for varying the changeover temperature di?er
ential.
‘
5. A heating and cooling system of the class
described, comprising, in combination, electrical
1y operated heating means, electrically operated
cooling means, thermostatic means, switching
means operated by the thermostatic means, local
electrical heating means for said thermostatic
means, means including electrical connections
between said switching means, electrically oper
ated heating means and said local heating means
operable to energize said electrically operated
invention have been described and illustrated in
heating means when the temperature falls to a
the drawings, that the invention is not limited
predetermined value, to additionally energize said
thereto, but is capable of a variety of mechani
local heating means while maintaining said elec
40
cal forms and that changes may be made in the
trically operated heating means energized upon a
form, details of construction and arrangement
?rst rise in temperature from said predetermined
of the parts without departing from the spirit of
value, and to deenergize both said local heating
the invention. Reference should therefore be had
means and said electrically operated heating
to the appended claims for de?nition of the limits
means upon a still further rise in temperature,
of the present invention.
I claim:
1. A heating and cooling system comprising, in
combination, heating means, cooling means, ?rst
control means fOr said heating means, second
control means for said cooling means, a mov- '
able condition responsive means, and a plurality
of abutment means for said condition responsive
means, said condition responsive means acting
upon a ?rst and second of said abutment means
second switching means operated by said thermo
static means upon further temperature rise,
means including electrical connections between
said second switching means and said local heat
ing means to energize the local heating means
upon such further rise in temperature, third
switching means operated by said thermostatic
means upon still further temperature rise, and
means including electrical connections between
said third switching means, electrically operated
cooling means and local heating means to main
to operate said ?rst control means, and upon said
tain said local heating means energized and to
sec-0nd and a third of said abutment means to
energize said electrically operated cooling means
operate said second control means.
2. In a heating and cooling system, in com
upon such further temperature rise so as to re
duce such temperature, to energize said local
bination, heating means, cooling means, a circuit
therefor, and control means in said circuit com (ii) heating means to a lesser degree while maintain
ing said electrically operated cooling means ener
prising a bimetal strip pivoted at a point be
gized upon a ?rst temperature fall, and to de
tween its ends, ?rst and second abutment means
energize said electrically operated cooling means
adjacent said ends, and a pair of switches adja
and reenergize said local heating means to the
cent said ends, one of said switches being actu
ated by said strip upon cooling to operate said '
heating means and the other of said switches
griiginal extent upon still further temperature
being actuated thereby upon heating to operate
6. In a combined heating and cooling system,
in combination, a pair of temperature changing
means comprising heating means and cooling
means, temperature responsive means in control
said cooling means, said strip acting upon the
?rst of said abutment means and rotating about
its pivot point to actuate one of said switches,
and acting upon the second of said abutment
means and rotating about its pivot point to ac
tuate the other switch.
3. In a heating and cooling system, in combi
nation, heating means, cooling means, a circuit -
al.
of said heating means and cooling means to op
erate said heating means at a predetermined low
temperature and to operate said cooling means
at a predetermined high temperature, means for
adjusting said temperature responsive means to
2,403,798
17
18
change the temperature at ‘which one of-said tem-"
ingr'of vthe ‘temperature,’ and to thereupon stop
per'ature changing means is operated, means to
prevent the operationof the other of said tem
said‘el’e'ctrically operated cooling means ‘and re
energize said local ‘heating means said prede
per'ature changing means, and a, single means for
operating ‘both said adjusting means and said
~ 11. In a cooling "system; electri'cal'means to
preventing
means.
'
>
'
,
termined amount.
I‘
'
provide a cooling action when energized, a tem
V
7. In a combined heating and cooling system,
perature responsive element, switching means
having three" switch closing positions operated
thereby, said, positions comprising 1a cold posi
in combination, a pair of temperature changing
means comprising heating means, and cooling
' means, temperature responsive means in control
"
10 tion','an .' intermediate position and a vhot posi
of said heating means and cooling means to op
erate said heating means at a predetermined low
temperature and to operate said cooling means
at a predetermined high temperature, means for
tion, a local electrical heating means for said
temperature responsive element, relay means in
cluding switches operated thereby, and circuit
connections
between
said
electrical
means,
adjusting said temperature responsive means to 15 switching means, local electrical heating means
change the temperature at which one of said tem
and relay means arranged to energize said local
perature changing means is operated, means to
electrical'heating means a predetermined amount
prevent the operation of the other of said tem
when the switching means is in said cold posi
perature changing means, and a single manually
tion, said circuit connections, switching means
settable timing means in control of said adjusting 20 and relay operated switches being arranged to
means and said preventing means.
maintain said energization of said local heating
8. In combination, a pair of temperature
changers comprising a heating means and a cool
means ‘substantially constant as said switching
means are moved through said intermediate po
ing means, temperature responsive switching
means in control of said heating means and cool
ing means, means to adjust the temperature at
sition to said hot position by rising temperature
25 and'to energize said electrical means to cause'
cooling when the switching means moves to said
which one of said temperature changers is oper
hot position, said circuit connections coacting
ated by said temperature responsive switching
with said switching means and switches to con
tinue the operation of said electrical means caus
means, and switching means operated by said ad
justing means to prevent operation of the other
ing cooling and to diminish the energization of
said local heating means upon moving of the
1 switching means out of said hot position due to
lowered temperature, the venergization of said
local heating’ means remaining substantially
diminished until movement of said switching
means through said intermediate position upon
lowering of the temperature, and to thereupon
of said temperature changers by said tempera:
ture responsive means.
.
~
9. In combination, 'a pair of ‘ temperature
changers comprising a heating means and a cool
ing means, temperature responsive switching
means in control of said heating means and. cool
ing means, means to adjust the temperature at
which one of said temperature changers is oper
stop said electrically operated cooling'means and
ated, by said temperature responsive switching
' means, switching means operated by said adjust
ing means to prevent operation of the other of
said temperature changers by said temperature
reenergize said localheating means said prede
40
responsive means, and manually settable timing
means in control of said adjusting means.
10. In a cooling system, electrical means to
provide a cooling action when energized, a tem
perature responsive element, switching means
having three switch closing positions operated
thereby, said positions comprising a cold posi
tion, an intermediate position and a hot posi
tion, local electrical heating means for said tem
perature responsive element, and means includ
ing circuit connections between said electrical
means, switching means and local electrical heat’
‘ing means arranged to energize said local elec 55
trical heating means a predetermined amount
, when the switching means is in said cold posi
tion, said means including circuit connections ~
termined amount.
.
12. In a cooling system for a medium, in com
bination, an electrically controlled cooling means;
means responsive to the medium temperature; a
plurality of switch means arranged to be se
quentially operated by said temperature respon
sive means; local electric heating means for said
temperature responsive‘means; relay means for
controlling said cooling means and having a
winding; a ?rst resistor having substantially the
same electrical impedance as said winding; a
second resistor; and electrical circuits controlled
by said sequentially operated switch means so
that, at one sequential position due to a rela
tively low medium temperature, the local heater
is energized in series with said ?rst resistor, at
another sequential position due to a higher me
dium temperature the ?rst resistor is deenergized
and the winding is energized in series with the
and switching means being arranged to main
tain said energization of said local heating means 60 heater, energizing the relay winding causing oper
ation of the cooling means, and at a further
substantially constant as said switching means
sequential position corresponding to said one po
are operated through ‘said intermediate position
sition and caused by the operation of said cool
to said hot position by rising temperature and
ing means loweringthe medium temperature, the
to energize said electrical means to cause cooling
when the switching means moves‘ to said hot 65 second resistor is energized in series with said
winding and said heater.
position, said means including circuit connections
13. In a system for controlling the temper
coacting with said switching means to continue
ature of a medium, in combination, an electri
the operation of said electrical means causing
cally controlled temperature changing means,
cooling and to diminish the energization of said
local heating means upon moving of the switch 70 means responsive to the medium temperature, a
plurality ofswitch means sequentially operable
ing means out of said hot position due to low
by said temperature responsive means, local elec
tric heating means for said temperature respon
sive means, relay means for controlling said tem
ished until movement of said switching means
perature changing means and having a winding,
through said intermediate position upon lower 75 means including an electric circuit controlled
ered temperature, the energization of said‘local
heating means remaining substantially dimin
2,4;(13388
119
20
byvsaid; switch. means when. in. a. sequential posi
tion- due,v to. a predetermined temperature for
mined. value; and, means. including another, elec
tric circuit controlled by said’ switch means when
energizing; said- heater by- an‘ electric current. of
predetermined value, means including a different
electric circuit controlled by saidv switch means
when at. a, different sequential‘ position due’ to
a temperature other than said »predetermined
temperature for» energizing said‘ winding in_ series
at a third sequential position, due to, a temper
changing means for energizing said winding and
for changing the current flow in- said local heater
with said heater and maintaining the current
flow through said local heater at said predeter- 10
ture changing means.
ature caused by operation of said temperature
in a manner‘ to anticipate a further change in
temperature due to operation of said tempera
-
GI'FFORD I. HOLMES‘.
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